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Endoscopic surgery

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.


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Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
H Inoue, RA Ciurezu, M Pizzicannella, F Habersetzer
Surgical intervention
29 days ago
151 views
0 likes
0 comments
25:51
Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: live procedure
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system mounted on a dual-channel Olympus® scope allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to reduce the volume and the size of the stomach. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. Once the Overtube™ was placed, the scope equipped with the OverStitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery®, Austin, Tex) suturing device was inserted through the stomach, and the suturing was initiated at the level of the incisura. The tissue-retracting helix device was used to grab the stomach wall, allowing for full-thickness bites. Each suture consisted of multiple sequential U-shaped bites along the anterior wall, the greater curvature, the posterior wall, and then in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device. Three sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization, and to spare the fundus.
S Perretta, M Pizzicannella, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
29 days ago
245 views
0 likes
0 comments
18:32
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: live procedure
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system mounted on a dual-channel Olympus® scope allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to reduce the volume and the size of the stomach. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. Once the Overtube™ was placed, the scope equipped with the OverStitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery®, Austin, Tex) suturing device was inserted through the stomach, and the suturing was initiated at the level of the incisura. The tissue-retracting helix device was used to grab the stomach wall, allowing for full-thickness bites. Each suture consisted of multiple sequential U-shaped bites along the anterior wall, the greater curvature, the posterior wall, and then in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device. Three sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization, and to spare the fundus.
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of multiple hyperplastic polyps of the stomach
A 69 year-old man with a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and renal insufficiency underwent a gastroscopy for chronic anemia. During this procedure, a 3cm hyperplastic gastric polyp was discovered. The patient was scheduled for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The procedure started with a gastroscopy, which showed a normal duodenum and many gastric hyperplastic polyps. The largest one was a pedunculated polyp of about 3cm in size at the level of the greater curvature. The operator opted for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the multiple polyps. After submucosal injection, polyps were resected using a snare (ENDO CUT® Q mode). All resected polyps were retrieved with a Roth Net® for histological evaluation.
A Lemmers, M Pizzicannella, F Habersetzer
Surgical intervention
29 days ago
96 views
0 likes
0 comments
08:46
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of multiple hyperplastic polyps of the stomach
A 69 year-old man with a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and renal insufficiency underwent a gastroscopy for chronic anemia. During this procedure, a 3cm hyperplastic gastric polyp was discovered. The patient was scheduled for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The procedure started with a gastroscopy, which showed a normal duodenum and many gastric hyperplastic polyps. The largest one was a pedunculated polyp of about 3cm in size at the level of the greater curvature. The operator opted for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the multiple polyps. After submucosal injection, polyps were resected using a snare (ENDO CUT® Q mode). All resected polyps were retrieved with a Roth Net® for histological evaluation.
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Gf Donatelli, S Perretta, M Ignat, M Pizzicannella, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
598 views
2 likes
0 comments
14:45
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
A D'Urso, Gf Donatelli, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
80 views
0 likes
0 comments
12:02
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading tumor in rectum and resolution of late bleeding
The objectives of this video are manifold, namely to present the totally endoscopic treatment of a laterally spreading tumor in the upper rectum with a piecemeal technique, and how to act against one of its most frequent complications, post-polypectomy bleeding.
Methods: The procedure was performed in an advanced flexible endoscopy unit, with the patient lying supine, with anesthesia (Propofol), and insufflation of carbon dioxide. A videocolonoscope was used, the lesion was identified and elevated with hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven). It was dried with a hot snare in parts ("piecemeal" technique), thereby achieving complete resection. The defect was closed with metal clips. The specimen was recovered for histopathological study.
Results: During screening colonoscopy, a 56-year-old patient was found with a 30mm granular laterally spreading tumor of the rectum (LST-G or nodular mixed type), located 15cm from the anal verge. Complete endoscopic resection of the lesion with a curative intent was performed. On postoperative day 5, proctorrhagia presented without hemodynamic alteration. Emergency endoscopy was decided upon. Upon entering with the colonoscope, we identified a clot attached to the surgical site. Once the bleeding had been confirmed, a saline solution with 1/20,000 adrenaline was injected. And then, with a hot snare, electrocoagulation was performed in the same area, combining an injection method with a thermal one and achieving a satisfying hemostasis. The patient was discharged on the same day without any other complications. The pathology report showed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, including patches of high-grade dysplasia, and injury-free resection margins.
Conclusions: EMR of laterally spreading tumors is safe, although it is not devoid of complications such as bleeding, which is present in up to 9.8 of every 100,000 polypectomies in some series (Reumkens et al., AJG 2016). It is essential to suspect and know how to solve it efficiently with the tools available at that time of emergency.
J Isaguirre, A Insausti
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
373 views
0 likes
0 comments
05:38
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading tumor in rectum and resolution of late bleeding
The objectives of this video are manifold, namely to present the totally endoscopic treatment of a laterally spreading tumor in the upper rectum with a piecemeal technique, and how to act against one of its most frequent complications, post-polypectomy bleeding.
Methods: The procedure was performed in an advanced flexible endoscopy unit, with the patient lying supine, with anesthesia (Propofol), and insufflation of carbon dioxide. A videocolonoscope was used, the lesion was identified and elevated with hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven). It was dried with a hot snare in parts ("piecemeal" technique), thereby achieving complete resection. The defect was closed with metal clips. The specimen was recovered for histopathological study.
Results: During screening colonoscopy, a 56-year-old patient was found with a 30mm granular laterally spreading tumor of the rectum (LST-G or nodular mixed type), located 15cm from the anal verge. Complete endoscopic resection of the lesion with a curative intent was performed. On postoperative day 5, proctorrhagia presented without hemodynamic alteration. Emergency endoscopy was decided upon. Upon entering with the colonoscope, we identified a clot attached to the surgical site. Once the bleeding had been confirmed, a saline solution with 1/20,000 adrenaline was injected. And then, with a hot snare, electrocoagulation was performed in the same area, combining an injection method with a thermal one and achieving a satisfying hemostasis. The patient was discharged on the same day without any other complications. The pathology report showed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, including patches of high-grade dysplasia, and injury-free resection margins.
Conclusions: EMR of laterally spreading tumors is safe, although it is not devoid of complications such as bleeding, which is present in up to 9.8 of every 100,000 polypectomies in some series (Reumkens et al., AJG 2016). It is essential to suspect and know how to solve it efficiently with the tools available at that time of emergency.
Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent
This video demonstrates a case of EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy, emblematic of the latest cutting-edge technology.
A 86-year-old woman with recent abdominal pain and jaundice underwent a CT-scan, which showed an enlarged tumor of the second portion of the duodenum with biliary tree dilatation. Gastroscopy with biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of duodenal adenocarcinoma of the 2nd duodenum.
First, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) failed to achieve biliary drainage because of an inability to cannulate the papilla due to tumor infiltration. EUS-guided hepatogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) was not attempted because the left intra-hepatic bile ducts were minimally dilated (3mm). However, the common bile duct (CBD) was largely dilated (20 mm). A Hot AXIOS™ Stent and Electrocautery Enhanced Delivery System (stent of 8 by 6mm) was advanced through the bulb. Pure cut electrocautery current was then applied, allowing the device to reach the CBD. Next, the distal flange was opened and retracted towards the EUS transducer, and once a biliary and bulbar tissue apposition had been noted, the proximal flange was released. Good drainage of purulent bile was observed and no complications occurred during the procedure and one month afterwards.
A Sportes, G Airinei, R Kamel, R Benamouzig
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
257 views
6 likes
0 comments
03:09
Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent
This video demonstrates a case of EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy, emblematic of the latest cutting-edge technology.
A 86-year-old woman with recent abdominal pain and jaundice underwent a CT-scan, which showed an enlarged tumor of the second portion of the duodenum with biliary tree dilatation. Gastroscopy with biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of duodenal adenocarcinoma of the 2nd duodenum.
First, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) failed to achieve biliary drainage because of an inability to cannulate the papilla due to tumor infiltration. EUS-guided hepatogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) was not attempted because the left intra-hepatic bile ducts were minimally dilated (3mm). However, the common bile duct (CBD) was largely dilated (20 mm). A Hot AXIOS™ Stent and Electrocautery Enhanced Delivery System (stent of 8 by 6mm) was advanced through the bulb. Pure cut electrocautery current was then applied, allowing the device to reach the CBD. Next, the distal flange was opened and retracted towards the EUS transducer, and once a biliary and bulbar tissue apposition had been noted, the proximal flange was released. Good drainage of purulent bile was observed and no complications occurred during the procedure and one month afterwards.
Anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation
Biliary stricture is the most frequent complication after liver transplantation, and ranges from 5 to 32%. Biliary strictures in transplanted patients can be anastomotic and non-anastomotic. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first-line treatment modality for anastomotic biliary strictures and in selected cases of non-anastomotic biliary strictures. Anastomotic biliary strictures arise at the site of the choledocho-choledochostomy. ERCP with multiple plastic stent placements is the first-line treatment of anastomotic biliary strictures, with long-term success rates ranging from 90 to 100%. Also covered self-expandable metal stents can be used for dilation of these strictures, but not routinely.
I Boškoski, RA Ciurezu, I Crisan, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1433 views
67 likes
0 comments
09:31
Anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation
Biliary stricture is the most frequent complication after liver transplantation, and ranges from 5 to 32%. Biliary strictures in transplanted patients can be anastomotic and non-anastomotic. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first-line treatment modality for anastomotic biliary strictures and in selected cases of non-anastomotic biliary strictures. Anastomotic biliary strictures arise at the site of the choledocho-choledochostomy. ERCP with multiple plastic stent placements is the first-line treatment of anastomotic biliary strictures, with long-term success rates ranging from 90 to 100%. Also covered self-expandable metal stents can be used for dilation of these strictures, but not routinely.
Postoperative CBD stenosis
Benign biliary strictures are often a consequence of iatrogenic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy or they may arise after liver transplantation or hepatic resection with duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis. Other etiologies of benign biliary strictures are primary sclerosing cholangitis, chronic pancreatitis, and autoimmune cholangitis. In the past, surgical repair was the treatment of choice. Today, ERCP has a pivotal role in the treatment of the vast majority of these lesions. Up to 80% of postoperative benign biliary strictures develop within 6 to 12 months after surgery with symptoms as pruritus, jaundice, abdominal pain, alterations of liver function tests and recurrent cholangitis. Prompt identification of these lesions is essential because long-standing cholestasis can lead to secondary biliary cirrhosis. MRCP with cholangiographic sequences is the preferred non-invasive method for diagnostic cholangiography. In particular, this imaging method can be useful in hilar strictures and in patients with suspected anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation.
I Boškoski, RA Ciurezu, M Morar, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
993 views
66 likes
0 comments
11:04
Postoperative CBD stenosis
Benign biliary strictures are often a consequence of iatrogenic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy or they may arise after liver transplantation or hepatic resection with duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis. Other etiologies of benign biliary strictures are primary sclerosing cholangitis, chronic pancreatitis, and autoimmune cholangitis. In the past, surgical repair was the treatment of choice. Today, ERCP has a pivotal role in the treatment of the vast majority of these lesions. Up to 80% of postoperative benign biliary strictures develop within 6 to 12 months after surgery with symptoms as pruritus, jaundice, abdominal pain, alterations of liver function tests and recurrent cholangitis. Prompt identification of these lesions is essential because long-standing cholestasis can lead to secondary biliary cirrhosis. MRCP with cholangiographic sequences is the preferred non-invasive method for diagnostic cholangiography. In particular, this imaging method can be useful in hilar strictures and in patients with suspected anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation.
Common bile duct stricture due to an inoperable pancreatic head cancer: metal stent placement
There are several major indications for the endoscopic drainage of malignant common bile duct obstruction. There are several types of drainage: a preoperative biliary drainage, which is performed in selected cases (delayed surgery, high bilirubin levels, itching, cholangitis), a biliary drainage before neo-adjuvant therapies, and a biliary drainage for palliation. According to the ESGE guidelines, palliative biliary drainage should be performed according to life expectancy. If less than 4 months, plastic stent placement is recommended; if longer than 4 months, a self-expandable metal stent should be placed. In any case, every single patient should be evaluated for the best treatment. In particular, since uncovered self-expandable metal stents are impossible to remove, malignancy must be evidenced before placement of these stents.
I Boškoski, M Morar, I Crisan, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
834 views
83 likes
0 comments
18:14
Common bile duct stricture due to an inoperable pancreatic head cancer: metal stent placement
There are several major indications for the endoscopic drainage of malignant common bile duct obstruction. There are several types of drainage: a preoperative biliary drainage, which is performed in selected cases (delayed surgery, high bilirubin levels, itching, cholangitis), a biliary drainage before neo-adjuvant therapies, and a biliary drainage for palliation. According to the ESGE guidelines, palliative biliary drainage should be performed according to life expectancy. If less than 4 months, plastic stent placement is recommended; if longer than 4 months, a self-expandable metal stent should be placed. In any case, every single patient should be evaluated for the best treatment. In particular, since uncovered self-expandable metal stents are impossible to remove, malignancy must be evidenced before placement of these stents.
ERCP: acute cholangitis in a patient with antiplatelet (clopidogrel) therapy
Acute cholangitis is a clinical emergency. Urgent biliary drainage and bile ducts disobstruction represent the only effective therapy. Acute cholangitis is a result of bile flow obstruction and bile infection. Both ERCP and percutaneous biliary drainage are valid therapeutic options associated with antibiotics. ERCP with biliary sphincterotomy and stones clearance is less invasive and generates less discomfort as compared to percutaneous biliary drainage. Percutaneous biliary drainage is reserved for patients in poor or bad clinical conditions and co-morbidities, unavailability of ERCP or surgically altered anatomy unsuitable for ERCP. We present a case of an 81-year-old female patient with antiplatelet therapy (Plavix®/clopidogrel) and cholangitis. During ERCP, there was evidence of previously unreported small biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, biliary balloon dilation followed by stones extraction were performed. A nasobiliary drainage was also placed to flush the bile ducts with saline over 24 hours.
I Boškoski, I Crisan, RA Ciurezu, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
495 views
92 likes
0 comments
09:17
ERCP: acute cholangitis in a patient with antiplatelet (clopidogrel) therapy
Acute cholangitis is a clinical emergency. Urgent biliary drainage and bile ducts disobstruction represent the only effective therapy. Acute cholangitis is a result of bile flow obstruction and bile infection. Both ERCP and percutaneous biliary drainage are valid therapeutic options associated with antibiotics. ERCP with biliary sphincterotomy and stones clearance is less invasive and generates less discomfort as compared to percutaneous biliary drainage. Percutaneous biliary drainage is reserved for patients in poor or bad clinical conditions and co-morbidities, unavailability of ERCP or surgically altered anatomy unsuitable for ERCP. We present a case of an 81-year-old female patient with antiplatelet therapy (Plavix®/clopidogrel) and cholangitis. During ERCP, there was evidence of previously unreported small biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, biliary balloon dilation followed by stones extraction were performed. A nasobiliary drainage was also placed to flush the bile ducts with saline over 24 hours.
Removal of large biliary stones
Biliary stones can be easy or difficult to remove, depending on their dimensions. Understanding bile ducts anatomy, choosing the appropriate devices/extraction technique, developing confidence with biliary lithotripsy, choosing the appropriate size of the sphincterotomy, performing large balloon biliary dilation in appropriate cases and management of failed stones extraction are the basic key issues in the management of biliary stones. Here, we present the case of a 96-year-old female patient who had an episode of cholangitis one week ago and ERCP was performed with a biliary precut to access the bile duct. Since the biliary stones were large, a biliary plastic stent was placed and after unintentional pancreatic duct cannulation, a pancreatic stent was also placed to prevent pancreatitis. ERCP was repeated. The biliary stent was removed since the stones were approximately 12mm in diameter. A biliary balloon dilation was carried out to facilitate the removal. At the end, the pancreatic stent was also removed.
I Boškoski, M Morar, RA Ciurezu, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
992 views
84 likes
0 comments
12:52
Removal of large biliary stones
Biliary stones can be easy or difficult to remove, depending on their dimensions. Understanding bile ducts anatomy, choosing the appropriate devices/extraction technique, developing confidence with biliary lithotripsy, choosing the appropriate size of the sphincterotomy, performing large balloon biliary dilation in appropriate cases and management of failed stones extraction are the basic key issues in the management of biliary stones. Here, we present the case of a 96-year-old female patient who had an episode of cholangitis one week ago and ERCP was performed with a biliary precut to access the bile duct. Since the biliary stones were large, a biliary plastic stent was placed and after unintentional pancreatic duct cannulation, a pancreatic stent was also placed to prevent pancreatitis. ERCP was repeated. The biliary stent was removed since the stones were approximately 12mm in diameter. A biliary balloon dilation was carried out to facilitate the removal. At the end, the pancreatic stent was also removed.
Double wire biliary cannulation, biliary stone removal and pancreatic stent placement
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the most technically challenging procedure in digestive endoscopy. Cannulation in ERCP requires optimal training, understanding of papillary anatomy, and especially understanding cholangiography and pancreatography imaging. The choice of cannulation technique (contrast vs. wire) depends on the expertise of local teams, even if the injection of a small amount of contrast can better show the way and direction of the ducts. It is essential to choose the appropriate accessories according to the case that's being dealt with. Here, we present the case of a hemophilic 71-year-old male patient with elevated liver enzymes, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) was performed to detect common bile duct stones. The patient has also a left lobe liver hematoma which originated from mild trauma. Endoscopically, the papilla of this patient presented with an ectropion and long infundibulum. Biliary cannulation was performed with the double wire technique, first cannulating Wirsung’s duct which straightened the siphon. After a large biliary sphincterotomy, the stone was removed with a Dormia basket. A small pancreatic stent was placed to prevent pancreatitis.
I Boškoski, I Crisan, M Morar, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
639 views
54 likes
0 comments
18:35
Double wire biliary cannulation, biliary stone removal and pancreatic stent placement
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the most technically challenging procedure in digestive endoscopy. Cannulation in ERCP requires optimal training, understanding of papillary anatomy, and especially understanding cholangiography and pancreatography imaging. The choice of cannulation technique (contrast vs. wire) depends on the expertise of local teams, even if the injection of a small amount of contrast can better show the way and direction of the ducts. It is essential to choose the appropriate accessories according to the case that's being dealt with. Here, we present the case of a hemophilic 71-year-old male patient with elevated liver enzymes, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) was performed to detect common bile duct stones. The patient has also a left lobe liver hematoma which originated from mild trauma. Endoscopically, the papilla of this patient presented with an ectropion and long infundibulum. Biliary cannulation was performed with the double wire technique, first cannulating Wirsung’s duct which straightened the siphon. After a large biliary sphincterotomy, the stone was removed with a Dormia basket. A small pancreatic stent was placed to prevent pancreatitis.
Large intradiverticulum endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy
Periampullary duodenal diverticula are observed in 10-20% of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and could well increase ampulla cannulation failure risk, as well as potential complications related to endoscopic sphincterotomy.
Here we report two successful cases of large intradiverticular endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy in the treatment of two different kinds of benign biliary pathologies. The first case was that of a woman with multiple large stones in the common bile duct (CBD). The second case was one of a male patient with cholestasis due to a compression of the distal common bile duct caused by a diverticulum – this condition being known as Lemmel’s syndrome.
Gf Donatelli, L Marx, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1346 views
77 likes
0 comments
05:09
Large intradiverticulum endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy
Periampullary duodenal diverticula are observed in 10-20% of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and could well increase ampulla cannulation failure risk, as well as potential complications related to endoscopic sphincterotomy.
Here we report two successful cases of large intradiverticular endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy in the treatment of two different kinds of benign biliary pathologies. The first case was that of a woman with multiple large stones in the common bile duct (CBD). The second case was one of a male patient with cholestasis due to a compression of the distal common bile duct caused by a diverticulum – this condition being known as Lemmel’s syndrome.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: POEM for type 2 achalasia and incidental esophageal leiomyoma
POEM (peroral endoscopic myotomy) is an emerging procedure, which has evolved from the era of NOTES. The most cardinal indication for POEM is achalasia of the cardia. Other indications include diffuse esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus, and surgically failed cases.
The steps of POEM include the following: mucosotomy, submucous tunnelling, myotomy, closure of mucosotomy.
The myotomy is started 2 to 3cm distal to the mucosotomy and is continued to the end of the tunnel at 2 to 3cm distally to the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). A partial myotomy is most commonly performed by means of careful dissection of circular fibers, hence avoiding longitudinal fibers to prevent entry into the mediastinum. The mucosotomy is then closed to prevent any leakage with the use of endoscopic clips or of an endoscopic suturing device. About the EndoFLIP™ (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) Imaging System: this is a functional endoluminal imaging probe, which helps in the assessment of gastroesophageal junction distensibility and compliance after the procedure.
Complications of POEM:
Inadvertent mucosotomy is the most common complication.
Complications due to insufflation (pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum) can be controlled by using carbon dioxide for insufflation. Esophageal leak is the most dreaded complication with rates ranging from 0 to 5.6%.
H Inoue, S Perretta
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
988 views
32 likes
0 comments
31:42
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: POEM for type 2 achalasia and incidental esophageal leiomyoma
POEM (peroral endoscopic myotomy) is an emerging procedure, which has evolved from the era of NOTES. The most cardinal indication for POEM is achalasia of the cardia. Other indications include diffuse esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus, and surgically failed cases.
The steps of POEM include the following: mucosotomy, submucous tunnelling, myotomy, closure of mucosotomy.
The myotomy is started 2 to 3cm distal to the mucosotomy and is continued to the end of the tunnel at 2 to 3cm distally to the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). A partial myotomy is most commonly performed by means of careful dissection of circular fibers, hence avoiding longitudinal fibers to prevent entry into the mediastinum. The mucosotomy is then closed to prevent any leakage with the use of endoscopic clips or of an endoscopic suturing device. About the EndoFLIP™ (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) Imaging System: this is a functional endoluminal imaging probe, which helps in the assessment of gastroesophageal junction distensibility and compliance after the procedure.
Complications of POEM:
Inadvertent mucosotomy is the most common complication.
Complications due to insufflation (pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum) can be controlled by using carbon dioxide for insufflation. Esophageal leak is the most dreaded complication with rates ranging from 0 to 5.6%.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), chromoendoscopy, and BARRX treatment of remaining Barrett's mucosa
Chromoendoscopy is a procedure where dyes are instilled in the gastrointestinal tract at the time of visualization with endoscopy. It enhances the characterization of the tissues. The most common applications are as follows:
- Identification of squamous cell carcinoma or dysplasia;
- Identification of Barrett’s esophagus;
- Detection of early gastric cancer;
- Characterization of colonic polyps;
- Screening.
BARRX™ is a radiofrequency ablation of the metaplastic esophageal mucosa. The concept is to resect the epithelium and the muscularis mucosa without damaging the submucosa. It reduces the risk of developing carcinoma.
E Coron, G Rahmi
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
432 views
20 likes
0 comments
09:12
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), chromoendoscopy, and BARRX treatment of remaining Barrett's mucosa
Chromoendoscopy is a procedure where dyes are instilled in the gastrointestinal tract at the time of visualization with endoscopy. It enhances the characterization of the tissues. The most common applications are as follows:
- Identification of squamous cell carcinoma or dysplasia;
- Identification of Barrett’s esophagus;
- Detection of early gastric cancer;
- Characterization of colonic polyps;
- Screening.
BARRX™ is a radiofrequency ablation of the metaplastic esophageal mucosa. The concept is to resect the epithelium and the muscularis mucosa without damaging the submucosa. It reduces the risk of developing carcinoma.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Barrett's esophagus treatment using BARRX™ radiofrequency ablation (RFA) system
Barrett’s esophagus is a metaplastic change in the lining mucosa of the esophagus in response to chronic GERD. The hallmark of specialized Barrett’s epithelium is mucus-secreting goblet cells (intestinal metaplasia). There is an increased risk of adenocarcinoma with intestinal metaplasia. BARRX™ is a new treatment option for Barrett’s esophagus which uses Radio frequency energy and minimizes the risk of developing cancer.
Radio frequency energy is delivered via a catheter to the esophagus, lasts less than a second and creates superficial injury to the mucosa.
Principle: To deliver high power (approx. 300 Watts) in a short period of time. This will allow the depth of penetration to ablate the epithelium and the muscularis mucosa without injuring the submucosa. Overall results are excellent with elimination of dysplasia in 80% of patients and stricture rate to less than 6%.
Side effects: chest pain following the procedure, which can be treated with analgesics.
Bleeding, infection, and perforation requiring surgery are some of the rare complications.
Follow-up: endoscopy at 3 months and ablation repeated if required.
LL Swanström, V Wong
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
376 views
14 likes
0 comments
11:15
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Barrett's esophagus treatment using BARRX™ radiofrequency ablation (RFA) system
Barrett’s esophagus is a metaplastic change in the lining mucosa of the esophagus in response to chronic GERD. The hallmark of specialized Barrett’s epithelium is mucus-secreting goblet cells (intestinal metaplasia). There is an increased risk of adenocarcinoma with intestinal metaplasia. BARRX™ is a new treatment option for Barrett’s esophagus which uses Radio frequency energy and minimizes the risk of developing cancer.
Radio frequency energy is delivered via a catheter to the esophagus, lasts less than a second and creates superficial injury to the mucosa.
Principle: To deliver high power (approx. 300 Watts) in a short period of time. This will allow the depth of penetration to ablate the epithelium and the muscularis mucosa without injuring the submucosa. Overall results are excellent with elimination of dysplasia in 80% of patients and stricture rate to less than 6%.
Side effects: chest pain following the procedure, which can be treated with analgesics.
Bleeding, infection, and perforation requiring surgery are some of the rare complications.
Follow-up: endoscopy at 3 months and ablation repeated if required.
Endoscopic biliary stones extraction using a forward viewing standard gastroscope in a patient with altered anatomy (partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction)
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in case of altered anatomy such as partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction has a success rate of 85% due to different factors such as failure to cross the anastomosis and the presence of an important length of afferent loop with a high risk of jejunal perforation at (or near) the anastomotic site while advancing the duodenoscope. The use of a front-view scope is the safest and could be used theoretically. However, the lack of elevator, the inability to see the papilla in a direct view, and the limited number of catheters available for cannulation and therapeutic procedures in the standard gastroscope with the 2.8mm working channel, can make this kind of procedure quite challenging. In this video, we present a case of successful biliary stone extraction in a patient with Billroth II reconstruction using a standard 2.8mm working channel front-viewing scope.
Gf Donatelli, BM Vergeau, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
865 views
14 likes
0 comments
04:47
Endoscopic biliary stones extraction using a forward viewing standard gastroscope in a patient with altered anatomy (partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction)
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in case of altered anatomy such as partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction has a success rate of 85% due to different factors such as failure to cross the anastomosis and the presence of an important length of afferent loop with a high risk of jejunal perforation at (or near) the anastomotic site while advancing the duodenoscope. The use of a front-view scope is the safest and could be used theoretically. However, the lack of elevator, the inability to see the papilla in a direct view, and the limited number of catheters available for cannulation and therapeutic procedures in the standard gastroscope with the 2.8mm working channel, can make this kind of procedure quite challenging. In this video, we present a case of successful biliary stone extraction in a patient with Billroth II reconstruction using a standard 2.8mm working channel front-viewing scope.
Single stage diagnosis and treatment by EUS and ERCP of a pancreatic stone causing an acute pancreatitis
Biliopancreatic stones are the ‘primum movens’ of acute pancreatitis. Pure pancreatic stones are rare. However, when present, they are the main cause of acute obstruction of the main pancreatic duct. Conversely, when present in chronic pancreatitis, they are mostly responsible for pancreatic glandular insufficiency. Medical treatment, radiologic evaluation (by MRI or CT-scan), and therapeutic endoscopy constitute the standard of care (SOC).
Here, we report the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for upper middle abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia, without anomalies in liver function tests, and who underwent biliopancreatic EUS. A pancreatic stone was diagnosed and immediately treated by endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy and extraction.
Gf Donatelli, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1153 views
41 likes
0 comments
05:10
Single stage diagnosis and treatment by EUS and ERCP of a pancreatic stone causing an acute pancreatitis
Biliopancreatic stones are the ‘primum movens’ of acute pancreatitis. Pure pancreatic stones are rare. However, when present, they are the main cause of acute obstruction of the main pancreatic duct. Conversely, when present in chronic pancreatitis, they are mostly responsible for pancreatic glandular insufficiency. Medical treatment, radiologic evaluation (by MRI or CT-scan), and therapeutic endoscopy constitute the standard of care (SOC).
Here, we report the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for upper middle abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia, without anomalies in liver function tests, and who underwent biliopancreatic EUS. A pancreatic stone was diagnosed and immediately treated by endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy and extraction.
Endoscopic internal drainage (EID) for leaks following sleeve gastrectomy
Leaks following sleeve gastrectomy represent a serious problem for surgeons, since a standardized approach has not yet been established.
Usually laparoscopic exploration is necessary in order to achieve a diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and a surgical drain is left in place proximally to the suture line, at the level of the dehiscence (if visualized), jejunostomy is also frequently performed to ensure enteral alimentation. This treatment however, needs to be combined with an endoscopic treatment, in order to facilitate rapid closure of gastric staple line defects.
In this video we report our Endoscopic Internal Drainage (EID) technique by insertion of double pigtail stents combined for the firsts weeks with enteral nutrition, with the aim to create an internal fistula allowing to quickly remove the surgical drain, and promote the formation of granulation tissue at the level of the dehiscence.
Reference:
Endoscopic internal drainage with enteral nutrition (EDEN) for treatment of leaks following sleeve gastrectomy. Donatelli G, Ferretti S, Vergeau BM, Dhumane P, Dumont JL, Derhy S, Tuszynski T, Dritsas S, Carloni A, Catheline JM, Pourcher G, Dagher I, Meduri B. Obes Surg 2014;24:1400-7.
Gf Donatelli
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
922 views
22 likes
0 comments
06:33
Endoscopic internal drainage (EID) for leaks following sleeve gastrectomy
Leaks following sleeve gastrectomy represent a serious problem for surgeons, since a standardized approach has not yet been established.
Usually laparoscopic exploration is necessary in order to achieve a diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and a surgical drain is left in place proximally to the suture line, at the level of the dehiscence (if visualized), jejunostomy is also frequently performed to ensure enteral alimentation. This treatment however, needs to be combined with an endoscopic treatment, in order to facilitate rapid closure of gastric staple line defects.
In this video we report our Endoscopic Internal Drainage (EID) technique by insertion of double pigtail stents combined for the firsts weeks with enteral nutrition, with the aim to create an internal fistula allowing to quickly remove the surgical drain, and promote the formation of granulation tissue at the level of the dehiscence.
Reference:
Endoscopic internal drainage with enteral nutrition (EDEN) for treatment of leaks following sleeve gastrectomy. Donatelli G, Ferretti S, Vergeau BM, Dhumane P, Dumont JL, Derhy S, Tuszynski T, Dritsas S, Carloni A, Catheline JM, Pourcher G, Dagher I, Meduri B. Obes Surg 2014;24:1400-7.
Endoscopic extraction of a giant cystic duct stone to treat type I Mirizzi syndrome
Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is characterized by common hepatic duct obstruction due to mechanical compression and surrounding inflammation by a gallstone impacted in the cystic duct (type I) or at the gallbladder neck (type II). Preoperative diagnosis of the syndrome is mandatory and associated with a decrease of complication rate of surgical management. Endoscopic therapies like ERCP with lithotripsy or endoscopic extraction of cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been described. Here we report successful endoscopic stone-clearance using double-cannulation and large balloon dilatation of the papilla for giant biliary stone impacted in the cystic duct inserted low in the common hepatic duct causing type I MS.
Bibliographic reference:
Double-cannulation and large papillary balloon dilation: key to successful endoscopic treatment of mirizzi syndrome in low insertion of cystic duct. Donatelli G, Dhumane P, Dallemagne B, Marx L, Delvaux M, Gay G, Marescaux J. Dig Endosc 2012;24:466-9.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, S Perretta, BM Vergeau, JL Dumont, T Tuszynski, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
880 views
13 likes
0 comments
04:09
Endoscopic extraction of a giant cystic duct stone to treat type I Mirizzi syndrome
Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is characterized by common hepatic duct obstruction due to mechanical compression and surrounding inflammation by a gallstone impacted in the cystic duct (type I) or at the gallbladder neck (type II). Preoperative diagnosis of the syndrome is mandatory and associated with a decrease of complication rate of surgical management. Endoscopic therapies like ERCP with lithotripsy or endoscopic extraction of cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been described. Here we report successful endoscopic stone-clearance using double-cannulation and large balloon dilatation of the papilla for giant biliary stone impacted in the cystic duct inserted low in the common hepatic duct causing type I MS.
Bibliographic reference:
Double-cannulation and large papillary balloon dilation: key to successful endoscopic treatment of mirizzi syndrome in low insertion of cystic duct. Donatelli G, Dhumane P, Dallemagne B, Marx L, Delvaux M, Gay G, Marescaux J. Dig Endosc 2012;24:466-9.
Endoscopic subcutaneous approach for component separation
This video describes the endoscopic subcutaneous approach for component separation. The patient is a 64-year-old woman with a history of progressive bulging of the abdominal wall and moderate pain. Physical examination revealed two central ventral hernias, measuring approximately 6 and 7cm in diameter. She had previously undergone laparotomy via a midline incision. The video shows in detail the steps of how to perform the endoscopic subcutaneous approach for component separation. We describe preoperative skin marking of the semilunar line under ultrasonic guidance, creation of the subcutaneous space, placement of the working port, division of the external oblique aponeurosis lateral to the semilunar line extending from the inguinal ligament to 4cm above the costal margin, mobilization of the external oblique from the internal oblique muscle, and finally measurement of the extension of the component separation.
J Daes
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1117 views
34 likes
0 comments
07:15
Endoscopic subcutaneous approach for component separation
This video describes the endoscopic subcutaneous approach for component separation. The patient is a 64-year-old woman with a history of progressive bulging of the abdominal wall and moderate pain. Physical examination revealed two central ventral hernias, measuring approximately 6 and 7cm in diameter. She had previously undergone laparotomy via a midline incision. The video shows in detail the steps of how to perform the endoscopic subcutaneous approach for component separation. We describe preoperative skin marking of the semilunar line under ultrasonic guidance, creation of the subcutaneous space, placement of the working port, division of the external oblique aponeurosis lateral to the semilunar line extending from the inguinal ligament to 4cm above the costal margin, mobilization of the external oblique from the internal oblique muscle, and finally measurement of the extension of the component separation.
POEM endoscopic treatment of achalasia using the EndoFLIP® (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) imaging system
This is the case of a 75-year-old lady who presented with recurrent symptoms of dysphagia and regurgitation associated with a significant weight loss due to recurrent achalasia. She developed progressive recurrence after a first surgical treatment by an open Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication back in 1974. This first operation was complicated by an esophageal perforation which required a thoracotomy to be controlled. Several dilatations were attempted with no significant symptoms improvement. One of the most important aspects of POEM is to ensure that the submucosal tunnel adequately extends into the gastric cardia in order to perform a complete and adequate myotomy. To this aim, proper orientation is key but may be difficult even to the experienced eye of the interventional endoscopist familiar with ESD techniques and dissection planes. Six endoscopic cues that assist with this determination have been identified so far. The most useful cue was deemed to be the characteristic appearance of the submucosal space of the cardia of a slightly different color with a somewhat yellowish hue, more capacious than the esophageal submucosal space with more and larger vessels. Identification of the thick, cord-like circular muscle fibers of the lower esophageal sphincter was deemed as the second most useful cue, and noting a bluish coloration of the cardial mucosa from the colored submucosal injection via a retroflexed luminal view was the third most useful cue. Endoscope insertion length within the submucosal tunnel and the palisading mucosal vessels marking the gastroesophageal junction and visible also from inside the submucosal tunnel were deemed helpful but to a lesser degree. Nevertheless, identification of these endoscopic landmarks is not easy nor always reproducible. Creation of the submucosal tunnel is very sensitive to case difficulty and accounts for the large fluctuations in procedure time. Another area of technique variability involves the orientation of the myotomy. In order to improve the recognition of the essential landmarks, we developed a myotomy technique guided by the EndoFLIP® catheter. EndoFLIP® is a unique physiology test that uses both volumetric assessment and pressure readings to calculate compliance and high pressure zones as well as distensibility changes at the gastroesophageal junction. It allows intraoperative assessment of myotomy completion. The use of this device provides a direct immediate feedback with regards to the efficacy of the myotomy. The EndoFLIP® catheter used in this case (EF-325L) has been specifically modified for the POEM procedure. It differs from the standard EndoFLIP® catheter in that it contains an integrated illuminating LED adjacent to the centre measurement electrode. When the catheter is positioned intraluminally at the gastroesophageal junction and secured to this position taping the distal end to the endothracheal tube, it allows to direct dissection towards the cardia.
S Perretta, LL Swanström, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2771 views
39 likes
0 comments
07:08
POEM endoscopic treatment of achalasia using the EndoFLIP® (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) imaging system
This is the case of a 75-year-old lady who presented with recurrent symptoms of dysphagia and regurgitation associated with a significant weight loss due to recurrent achalasia. She developed progressive recurrence after a first surgical treatment by an open Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication back in 1974. This first operation was complicated by an esophageal perforation which required a thoracotomy to be controlled. Several dilatations were attempted with no significant symptoms improvement. One of the most important aspects of POEM is to ensure that the submucosal tunnel adequately extends into the gastric cardia in order to perform a complete and adequate myotomy. To this aim, proper orientation is key but may be difficult even to the experienced eye of the interventional endoscopist familiar with ESD techniques and dissection planes. Six endoscopic cues that assist with this determination have been identified so far. The most useful cue was deemed to be the characteristic appearance of the submucosal space of the cardia of a slightly different color with a somewhat yellowish hue, more capacious than the esophageal submucosal space with more and larger vessels. Identification of the thick, cord-like circular muscle fibers of the lower esophageal sphincter was deemed as the second most useful cue, and noting a bluish coloration of the cardial mucosa from the colored submucosal injection via a retroflexed luminal view was the third most useful cue. Endoscope insertion length within the submucosal tunnel and the palisading mucosal vessels marking the gastroesophageal junction and visible also from inside the submucosal tunnel were deemed helpful but to a lesser degree. Nevertheless, identification of these endoscopic landmarks is not easy nor always reproducible. Creation of the submucosal tunnel is very sensitive to case difficulty and accounts for the large fluctuations in procedure time. Another area of technique variability involves the orientation of the myotomy. In order to improve the recognition of the essential landmarks, we developed a myotomy technique guided by the EndoFLIP® catheter. EndoFLIP® is a unique physiology test that uses both volumetric assessment and pressure readings to calculate compliance and high pressure zones as well as distensibility changes at the gastroesophageal junction. It allows intraoperative assessment of myotomy completion. The use of this device provides a direct immediate feedback with regards to the efficacy of the myotomy. The EndoFLIP® catheter used in this case (EF-325L) has been specifically modified for the POEM procedure. It differs from the standard EndoFLIP® catheter in that it contains an integrated illuminating LED adjacent to the centre measurement electrode. When the catheter is positioned intraluminally at the gastroesophageal junction and secured to this position taping the distal end to the endothracheal tube, it allows to direct dissection towards the cardia.
Endoscopic subcutaneous approach to components separation for suture closure and underlay mesh reinforcement of central ventral hernias
This video describes the technique for repair of central ventral defects by endoscopic subcutaneous component separation, suture closure of the central ventral defects using V-Loc™ suture and reinforcement of the reconstruction with an underlay composite mesh. Advantages of this approach are the preservation of abdominal wall dynamics with a low recurrence rate and fewer complications usually observed in other complex abdominal reconstructions such as seromas, hematomas, infection, pain, delayed recovery, and undesirable cosmetic results. The video shows the endoscopic subcutaneous component separation technique in detail as well as the identification and closure of the central ventral defect and the underlay placement of a composite mesh. CT-scan images of abdominal wall reconstruction at three months postoperatively are presented. In our first 6 cases, early clinical and CT-scan results were encouraging.
J Daes
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1646 views
25 likes
0 comments
09:01
Endoscopic subcutaneous approach to components separation for suture closure and underlay mesh reinforcement of central ventral hernias
This video describes the technique for repair of central ventral defects by endoscopic subcutaneous component separation, suture closure of the central ventral defects using V-Loc™ suture and reinforcement of the reconstruction with an underlay composite mesh. Advantages of this approach are the preservation of abdominal wall dynamics with a low recurrence rate and fewer complications usually observed in other complex abdominal reconstructions such as seromas, hematomas, infection, pain, delayed recovery, and undesirable cosmetic results. The video shows the endoscopic subcutaneous component separation technique in detail as well as the identification and closure of the central ventral defect and the underlay placement of a composite mesh. CT-scan images of abdominal wall reconstruction at three months postoperatively are presented. In our first 6 cases, early clinical and CT-scan results were encouraging.
Endoscopic repair of a large inguino-scrotal hernia with the e-TEP (enhanced view) technique
In this video, we describe the e-TEP (extended view) repair of a left, large, chronic inguinoscrotal hernia in a 35-year-old man.
There are two main difficulties in dealing with large inguinoscrotal hernias: the limited surgical field and the management of the distal sac to avoid seroma formation.
The e-TEP technique has three principles: a high camera trocar placement, a flexible distribution of trocars, and often the division of the posterior aponeurosis at the level of the line of Douglas. The reasons for this approach are that it facilitates the creation of the surgical space and provides a larger surgical field. This technique has allowed us to expand the indications for extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernia to large inguinoscrotal hernias, incarcerated hernias and sliding hernias. The description and the results of the e-TEP technique have been published in Surgical Endoscopy (2012).
This video shows in detail the dissection of the large indirect sac free from the structures of the spermatic cord and the management of the distal sac to avoid seromas or pseudo-hydroceles by reducing the distal sac and fixing it high and lateral to the posterior inguinal wall. This approach has been recently published in Hernia.
J Daes
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2777 views
31 likes
0 comments
09:29
Endoscopic repair of a large inguino-scrotal hernia with the e-TEP (enhanced view) technique
In this video, we describe the e-TEP (extended view) repair of a left, large, chronic inguinoscrotal hernia in a 35-year-old man.
There are two main difficulties in dealing with large inguinoscrotal hernias: the limited surgical field and the management of the distal sac to avoid seroma formation.
The e-TEP technique has three principles: a high camera trocar placement, a flexible distribution of trocars, and often the division of the posterior aponeurosis at the level of the line of Douglas. The reasons for this approach are that it facilitates the creation of the surgical space and provides a larger surgical field. This technique has allowed us to expand the indications for extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernia to large inguinoscrotal hernias, incarcerated hernias and sliding hernias. The description and the results of the e-TEP technique have been published in Surgical Endoscopy (2012).
This video shows in detail the dissection of the large indirect sac free from the structures of the spermatic cord and the management of the distal sac to avoid seromas or pseudo-hydroceles by reducing the distal sac and fixing it high and lateral to the posterior inguinal wall. This approach has been recently published in Hernia.
Gastric mucosal laceration managed with endoscopic clipping during ESD in a patient with Child Class A liver cirrhosis
Patients with liver cirrhosis present with portal hypertension (PHT), which causes various pathological changes in the entire gastrointestinal tract (from esophagus to anus). In this video, the Mallory Weiss tear (MWT) occurred accidentally during ESD of a gastric antral adenoma in a cirrhotic patient. It was successfully managed by means of endoscopic clipping. The patient had two episodes of retching during endoscopy, which might have contributed to gastric over-distension. With esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) being so commonly performed in cirrhotic patients and ESD being more and more commonly used for treatment of gastric mucosal lesions, this case report should serve as a precautionary reminder in such case scenarios.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, L Marx, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
767 views
11 likes
0 comments
02:57
Gastric mucosal laceration managed with endoscopic clipping during ESD in a patient with Child Class A liver cirrhosis
Patients with liver cirrhosis present with portal hypertension (PHT), which causes various pathological changes in the entire gastrointestinal tract (from esophagus to anus). In this video, the Mallory Weiss tear (MWT) occurred accidentally during ESD of a gastric antral adenoma in a cirrhotic patient. It was successfully managed by means of endoscopic clipping. The patient had two episodes of retching during endoscopy, which might have contributed to gastric over-distension. With esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) being so commonly performed in cirrhotic patients and ESD being more and more commonly used for treatment of gastric mucosal lesions, this case report should serve as a precautionary reminder in such case scenarios.
Emergency endoscopic esophageal variceal band ligation for active bleeding
Upper digestive bleeding is a frequent complication in cirrhotic patients. In some cases, it can be disastrous with collapse, especially considering coagulopathies in these patients. The management must be multidisciplinary involving an anesthesiologist, an endoscopist, and sometimes an interventional radiologist.
Emergency variceal band ligation is the first step to achieve hemostasis once the patient has been medically stabilized.
This video presents the case of a 91-year-old cirrhotic man, presenting with hepatitis C virus (HCV). He was admitted to the emergency department for massive hematemesis. Blood tests showed hemoglobin levels at 8 g/dL and the patient was hemodynamically stable. Sandostatin® injection, proton pump inhibitors (PPI), antibiotics, vitamin K were started immediately to a full dose regimen. Once fresh frozen plasma and blood transfusion have been carried out, an endoscopy was scheduled within the first 12 hours.
Gf Donatelli, L Marx, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1602 views
26 likes
0 comments
02:05
Emergency endoscopic esophageal variceal band ligation for active bleeding
Upper digestive bleeding is a frequent complication in cirrhotic patients. In some cases, it can be disastrous with collapse, especially considering coagulopathies in these patients. The management must be multidisciplinary involving an anesthesiologist, an endoscopist, and sometimes an interventional radiologist.
Emergency variceal band ligation is the first step to achieve hemostasis once the patient has been medically stabilized.
This video presents the case of a 91-year-old cirrhotic man, presenting with hepatitis C virus (HCV). He was admitted to the emergency department for massive hematemesis. Blood tests showed hemoglobin levels at 8 g/dL and the patient was hemodynamically stable. Sandostatin® injection, proton pump inhibitors (PPI), antibiotics, vitamin K were started immediately to a full dose regimen. Once fresh frozen plasma and blood transfusion have been carried out, an endoscopy was scheduled within the first 12 hours.
Single stage laparo-endoscopic management of acute cholecystitis and common bile duct stones
This video demonstrates the case of a 27-year-old woman, admitted to the emergency department for acute right hypochondrium pain.
Clinical examination found a positive Murphy’s sign. Biological findings showed a cholestasis (Gamma Glutamyl Transferase at 576 l/U, Alkaline Phosphatase at 346 l/U), and cytolysis (AST at 460 I/U, ALT at 635 I/U) without jaundice.
Abdominal ultrasonography confirmed the presence of acute cholecystitis with thickening of the gallbladder wall associated with a moderate 8mm dilatation of the common bile duct without any lithiasis.
Antibiotic therapy was started and cholecystectomy with intraoperative cholangiography was decided upon because of the clinical presentation and biological disturbance.
Gf Donatelli, L Marx, C Callari, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2005 views
9 likes
0 comments
04:38
Single stage laparo-endoscopic management of acute cholecystitis and common bile duct stones
This video demonstrates the case of a 27-year-old woman, admitted to the emergency department for acute right hypochondrium pain.
Clinical examination found a positive Murphy’s sign. Biological findings showed a cholestasis (Gamma Glutamyl Transferase at 576 l/U, Alkaline Phosphatase at 346 l/U), and cytolysis (AST at 460 I/U, ALT at 635 I/U) without jaundice.
Abdominal ultrasonography confirmed the presence of acute cholecystitis with thickening of the gallbladder wall associated with a moderate 8mm dilatation of the common bile duct without any lithiasis.
Antibiotic therapy was started and cholecystectomy with intraoperative cholangiography was decided upon because of the clinical presentation and biological disturbance.
Endoscopic staple-assisted diverticulostomy in the treatment of Zenker’s diverticulum
Zenker’s diverticulum (ZD) is an acquired pulsion pouch that was first described by Ludlow in 1769. It develops within a natural anatomic dehiscence zone (Killian’s triangle), which is located between the cricopharyngeal and the inferior constrictor muscles, and is due to failure of the cricopharyngeus to relax with swallowing.
The principles of treatment include division of the obstructing cricopharyngeal muscle and adequate drainage of the pouch. This can be achieved successfully with an endoscopic per-oral technique using an endoscopic stapler, as described by Collard in 1993.
Adequate cervical extension and opening of the mouth are a prerequisite for the procedure, which is otherwise indicated for all patients having a symptomatic ZD larger than 2.0cm. Very small diverticula (< 1.0cm), make it difficult to achieve adequate exposure and a complete myotomy; in contrast, very large diverticula leave behind a residual pouch which may be responsible for postoperative dysphagia.
ESD provides short inpatient and operating times, along with a short anesthesia time (mean of 10 to 30 minutes duration). Also, it only causes a mild postoperative discomfort and the patient is able to resume a diet on the same day. It is therefore cost-effective. The most common encountered complications are chipped teeth, postoperative fever and aspiration pneumonia.
Overall, results of this technique in appropriately selected patients are excellent, with a success rate well above 90%.
Needed equipment for this procedure includes:
- Weerda’s diverticuloscope
- Endopath™ articulating endoscopic stapler ATB 45
- Standard cartridges 45mm/3.5mm
- Endo Stitch™ with 2/0 silk sutures
- Closed-end esophageal suction
- 4mm, 0-degree rigid endoscope, 30cm long
References
Ludlow A. A case of obstructed deglutition from a preternatural dilation of and bag formed in the pharynx. Medical Observations Inquiries 1769;3:85-101.
Chang CY, Payyapilli RJ, Scher RL.Endoscopic staple diverticulostomy for Zenker's diverticulum: review of literature and experience in 159 consecutive cases. Laryngoscope. 2003 Jun;113(6):957-65.
Leporrier J, Salamé E, Gignoux M, Ségol P. Zenker's diverticulum: diverticulopexy versus diverticulectomy. Ann Chir. 2001 Feb;126(1):42-5.
Wasserzug O, Zikk D, Raziel A, Cavel O, Fleece D, Szold A. Endoscopically stapled diverticulostomy for Zenker's diverticulum: results of a multidisciplinary team approach. SurgEndosc. 2010 Mar;24(3):637-41. Epub 2009 Aug 18.
Feeley MA, Righi PD, Weisberger EC, Hamaker RC, Spahn TJ, Radpour S, Wynne MK.
Zenker's diverticulum: analysis of surgical complications from diverticulectomy and cricopharyngealmyotomy. Laryngoscope. 1999 Jun;109(6):858-61.
Cook RD, Huang PC, Richstmeier WJ, Scher RL.Endoscopic staple-assisted esophagodiverticulostomy: an excellent treatment of choice for Zenker's diverticulum. Laryngoscope. 2000 Dec;110(12):2020-5.
Cummings CW, Haughey BH, Thomas JR, Harker LA, Flint PW. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. Chapter 74.
S Bouhabel, J Bolduc-Bégin, G Rakovich, A Rahal
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1206 views
5 likes
0 comments
03:34
Endoscopic staple-assisted diverticulostomy in the treatment of Zenker’s diverticulum
Zenker’s diverticulum (ZD) is an acquired pulsion pouch that was first described by Ludlow in 1769. It develops within a natural anatomic dehiscence zone (Killian’s triangle), which is located between the cricopharyngeal and the inferior constrictor muscles, and is due to failure of the cricopharyngeus to relax with swallowing.
The principles of treatment include division of the obstructing cricopharyngeal muscle and adequate drainage of the pouch. This can be achieved successfully with an endoscopic per-oral technique using an endoscopic stapler, as described by Collard in 1993.
Adequate cervical extension and opening of the mouth are a prerequisite for the procedure, which is otherwise indicated for all patients having a symptomatic ZD larger than 2.0cm. Very small diverticula (< 1.0cm), make it difficult to achieve adequate exposure and a complete myotomy; in contrast, very large diverticula leave behind a residual pouch which may be responsible for postoperative dysphagia.
ESD provides short inpatient and operating times, along with a short anesthesia time (mean of 10 to 30 minutes duration). Also, it only causes a mild postoperative discomfort and the patient is able to resume a diet on the same day. It is therefore cost-effective. The most common encountered complications are chipped teeth, postoperative fever and aspiration pneumonia.
Overall, results of this technique in appropriately selected patients are excellent, with a success rate well above 90%.
Needed equipment for this procedure includes:
- Weerda’s diverticuloscope
- Endopath™ articulating endoscopic stapler ATB 45
- Standard cartridges 45mm/3.5mm
- Endo Stitch™ with 2/0 silk sutures
- Closed-end esophageal suction
- 4mm, 0-degree rigid endoscope, 30cm long
References
Ludlow A. A case of obstructed deglutition from a preternatural dilation of and bag formed in the pharynx. Medical Observations Inquiries 1769;3:85-101.
Chang CY, Payyapilli RJ, Scher RL.Endoscopic staple diverticulostomy for Zenker's diverticulum: review of literature and experience in 159 consecutive cases. Laryngoscope. 2003 Jun;113(6):957-65.
Leporrier J, Salamé E, Gignoux M, Ségol P. Zenker's diverticulum: diverticulopexy versus diverticulectomy. Ann Chir. 2001 Feb;126(1):42-5.
Wasserzug O, Zikk D, Raziel A, Cavel O, Fleece D, Szold A. Endoscopically stapled diverticulostomy for Zenker's diverticulum: results of a multidisciplinary team approach. SurgEndosc. 2010 Mar;24(3):637-41. Epub 2009 Aug 18.
Feeley MA, Righi PD, Weisberger EC, Hamaker RC, Spahn TJ, Radpour S, Wynne MK.
Zenker's diverticulum: analysis of surgical complications from diverticulectomy and cricopharyngealmyotomy. Laryngoscope. 1999 Jun;109(6):858-61.
Cook RD, Huang PC, Richstmeier WJ, Scher RL.Endoscopic staple-assisted esophagodiverticulostomy: an excellent treatment of choice for Zenker's diverticulum. Laryngoscope. 2000 Dec;110(12):2020-5.
Cummings CW, Haughey BH, Thomas JR, Harker LA, Flint PW. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. Chapter 74.
Loop-and-let-go technique for symptomatic descending colonic lipoma
Large symptomatic colonic lipomas require treatment, but resection of lipomas by means of endoscopic cautery snare carries some risk of colonic perforation. The loop-and-let-go technique described here is technically simple; anyone who is well acquainted with the snare cautery technique can do it. It looks safer than the conventionally employed snare cautery technique, as no current is used with the loop-and-let-go technique. It causes selective occlusive ischemia of mucosa and submucosa without causing any transmural damage. The total duration needed for the lipoma to slough off depends on the quality of endoloop occlusion and the type of lipoma (narrow-based vs wide-based).
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, L Marx, J D'Agostino, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
891 views
3 likes
0 comments
02:16
Loop-and-let-go technique for symptomatic descending colonic lipoma
Large symptomatic colonic lipomas require treatment, but resection of lipomas by means of endoscopic cautery snare carries some risk of colonic perforation. The loop-and-let-go technique described here is technically simple; anyone who is well acquainted with the snare cautery technique can do it. It looks safer than the conventionally employed snare cautery technique, as no current is used with the loop-and-let-go technique. It causes selective occlusive ischemia of mucosa and submucosa without causing any transmural damage. The total duration needed for the lipoma to slough off depends on the quality of endoloop occlusion and the type of lipoma (narrow-based vs wide-based).
Endoscopic management of cystic duct leakage after cholecystectomy
Biliary leaks still represent a significant problem following open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The incidence of bile duct leaks after such operations was reported to range between 0.3 and 1%. This video presents the case of a 75-year-old man who was referred to our department for fever, jaundice, and abdominal pain 12 days after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A cholangio-MRI was carried out. It demonstrated an intra-abdominal biliary collection at the level of the gallbladder bed. A leak from the cystic duct was suspected. A radiological drainage of the collection was performed, and an endoscopic sphincterotomy with plastic stenting of the common bile duct was achieved. The patient went clinically well and at 2 months, the stent was removed. Two months after stent removal, he is totally symptom-free.
Gf Donatelli, L Marx, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1877 views
4 likes
1 comment
02:55
Endoscopic management of cystic duct leakage after cholecystectomy
Biliary leaks still represent a significant problem following open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The incidence of bile duct leaks after such operations was reported to range between 0.3 and 1%. This video presents the case of a 75-year-old man who was referred to our department for fever, jaundice, and abdominal pain 12 days after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A cholangio-MRI was carried out. It demonstrated an intra-abdominal biliary collection at the level of the gallbladder bed. A leak from the cystic duct was suspected. A radiological drainage of the collection was performed, and an endoscopic sphincterotomy with plastic stenting of the common bile duct was achieved. The patient went clinically well and at 2 months, the stent was removed. Two months after stent removal, he is totally symptom-free.
Endoscopic intragastric balloon as a bridge to bariatric surgery for the management of a superobese patient
The use of an air-filled intragastric balloon is effective in achieving a relevant loss of body weight. It is used as a bridge to definitive surgery in superobese patients for whom surgery is often associated with high risks. The balloon helps reduce the volume of the stomach and leads to a premature feeling of satiety. These endoscopic bariatric bridging procedures can reduce the overall risk related to the surgical intervention, as measured by the use of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification System, and promote cardiopulmonary and metabolic improvement. By reducing truncal/visceral obesity, these endoscopic bariatric procedures can ease off technical difficulties related to subsequent surgical interventions.
In this video, we show the case of a 44-year-old superobese man with a BMI of 63, presenting with diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea, in which a Heliosphere® BAG Pre OP balloon was positioned with the objective of weight reduction.
The procedure is performed under general anesthesia with orotracheal intubation, and with the patient in supine position. Upper endoscopy did not show any lesions or any contraindications to the gastric balloon implantation.
All the procedure is carried out under endoscopic control. In retroversion, good positioning of the inflated balloon is controlled at the level of the fundus floating freely.
PPI drugs are administered throughout the procedure.
The patient is discharged on postoperative day one after starting a liquid diet, and on the following day, he is on a normal hypocaloric diet.
The patient is scheduled to have the Heliosphere® BAG Pre OP removed within six months.
Gf Donatelli, L Marx, C Callari
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1291 views
9 likes
0 comments
02:14
Endoscopic intragastric balloon as a bridge to bariatric surgery for the management of a superobese patient
The use of an air-filled intragastric balloon is effective in achieving a relevant loss of body weight. It is used as a bridge to definitive surgery in superobese patients for whom surgery is often associated with high risks. The balloon helps reduce the volume of the stomach and leads to a premature feeling of satiety. These endoscopic bariatric bridging procedures can reduce the overall risk related to the surgical intervention, as measured by the use of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification System, and promote cardiopulmonary and metabolic improvement. By reducing truncal/visceral obesity, these endoscopic bariatric procedures can ease off technical difficulties related to subsequent surgical interventions.
In this video, we show the case of a 44-year-old superobese man with a BMI of 63, presenting with diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea, in which a Heliosphere® BAG Pre OP balloon was positioned with the objective of weight reduction.
The procedure is performed under general anesthesia with orotracheal intubation, and with the patient in supine position. Upper endoscopy did not show any lesions or any contraindications to the gastric balloon implantation.
All the procedure is carried out under endoscopic control. In retroversion, good positioning of the inflated balloon is controlled at the level of the fundus floating freely.
PPI drugs are administered throughout the procedure.
The patient is discharged on postoperative day one after starting a liquid diet, and on the following day, he is on a normal hypocaloric diet.
The patient is scheduled to have the Heliosphere® BAG Pre OP removed within six months.
Right colon Dieulafoy's lesion: endoscopic treatment
A 78-year-old man presenting with chronic renal failure was admitted to the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding per rectum.
The hemoglobin level was 10.5 g/dL on admission. Given that the patient was hemodynamically stable, decision was made to perform an upper GI endoscopy and a total colonoscopy the following day after standard bowel preparation. Bleeding recurred during the night with a hemoglobin drop to 6.3g/dL, requiring transfusions of 3 Units of blood.
With no further delay, endoscopy was performed. The gastroscopy was normal but at colonoscopy old blood was visualized in the rectum, the sigmoid, and the left and transverse colon. Additional bright red blood was observed at the level of the right colon.
Gf Donatelli, S Perretta, B Dallemagne
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1589 views
16 likes
1 comment
02:32
Right colon Dieulafoy's lesion: endoscopic treatment
A 78-year-old man presenting with chronic renal failure was admitted to the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding per rectum.
The hemoglobin level was 10.5 g/dL on admission. Given that the patient was hemodynamically stable, decision was made to perform an upper GI endoscopy and a total colonoscopy the following day after standard bowel preparation. Bleeding recurred during the night with a hemoglobin drop to 6.3g/dL, requiring transfusions of 3 Units of blood.
With no further delay, endoscopy was performed. The gastroscopy was normal but at colonoscopy old blood was visualized in the rectum, the sigmoid, and the left and transverse colon. Additional bright red blood was observed at the level of the right colon.
Endoscopic removal of accidentally swallowed dentures
Foreign body ingestion occurs more commonly in children with a peak incidence in the age group of 6 months to 3 years. In adults, it occurs mostly in edentulous patients, prisoners and psychiatric patients.
80-90% of the foreign bodies that reach the gastrointestinal tract will pass spontaneously; 10-20 % will have to be removed endoscopically and unfortunately, 1% requires surgery.
The decision and timing of endoscopic intervention depends on the patient’s age, clinical condition, size, shape and classification of ingested material, anatomical location, risk of aspiration and/or perforation and technical abilities of the endoscopist.
Accidentally swallowed dentures can lead to severe complications in the gastrointestinal tract, such as perforation that needs surgical intervention.
In this video, we present the endoscopic removal of a fixed four-dental prosthesis accidentally swallowed and blocked in the prepyloric zone.

Reference:
Management of foreign bodies of the upper gastrointestinal tract: update. William A. Webb Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol 41, No.1, 1995.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, C Callari, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
1591 views
4 likes
0 comments
02:39
Endoscopic removal of accidentally swallowed dentures
Foreign body ingestion occurs more commonly in children with a peak incidence in the age group of 6 months to 3 years. In adults, it occurs mostly in edentulous patients, prisoners and psychiatric patients.
80-90% of the foreign bodies that reach the gastrointestinal tract will pass spontaneously; 10-20 % will have to be removed endoscopically and unfortunately, 1% requires surgery.
The decision and timing of endoscopic intervention depends on the patient’s age, clinical condition, size, shape and classification of ingested material, anatomical location, risk of aspiration and/or perforation and technical abilities of the endoscopist.
Accidentally swallowed dentures can lead to severe complications in the gastrointestinal tract, such as perforation that needs surgical intervention.
In this video, we present the endoscopic removal of a fixed four-dental prosthesis accidentally swallowed and blocked in the prepyloric zone.

Reference:
Management of foreign bodies of the upper gastrointestinal tract: update. William A. Webb Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol 41, No.1, 1995.
Endoscopic extraction of a giant common bile duct stone
The Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) has become the gold standard for the treatment of cholelithiasis with a success rate of 95%.
The dimensions of a giant biliary calculus are equal to or bigger than 2cm.
Various endoscopic tools such as the mechanical lithotripsy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) have been described to treat this pathology. Surgery is offered to cases unresolved by endoscopic therapy.
Recently, the sphincteroplasty with a large-size balloon dilatation of the papilla has been described as an option for the endoscopic management of the giant biliary stone.
This is a case of extraction of giant common bile duct calculus using the combination of sphincterotomy and large-size balloon sphincteroplasty.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
2756 views
17 likes
0 comments
03:56
Endoscopic extraction of a giant common bile duct stone
The Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) has become the gold standard for the treatment of cholelithiasis with a success rate of 95%.
The dimensions of a giant biliary calculus are equal to or bigger than 2cm.
Various endoscopic tools such as the mechanical lithotripsy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) have been described to treat this pathology. Surgery is offered to cases unresolved by endoscopic therapy.
Recently, the sphincteroplasty with a large-size balloon dilatation of the papilla has been described as an option for the endoscopic management of the giant biliary stone.
This is a case of extraction of giant common bile duct calculus using the combination of sphincterotomy and large-size balloon sphincteroplasty.
Tips 'n tricks: successful ERCP in the presence of periampullary diverticula
Duodenal diverticula are found in approximately 10-20% of patients undergoing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP).
Usually, these diverticula lie within 2cm of the major duodenal papilla and are called juxtapapillary diverticula. They are mostly acquired and their incidence increases with age.
Juxtapapillary diverticula have often been associated with mechanical compression and they are also involved in Oddi’s sphincter dysfunction. The presence of juxtapapillary diverticula is known to influence the outcome of ERCP procedure by making it more difficult and causing some complications like bleeding. Various techniques have been advised for a more successful ERCP outcome
In this video, four cases of duodenal diverticula are presented to provide tips and tricks for the successful cannulation of the CBD and management of periampullary bleeding in case they occur.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
2064 views
10 likes
0 comments
09:19
Tips 'n tricks: successful ERCP in the presence of periampullary diverticula
Duodenal diverticula are found in approximately 10-20% of patients undergoing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP).
Usually, these diverticula lie within 2cm of the major duodenal papilla and are called juxtapapillary diverticula. They are mostly acquired and their incidence increases with age.
Juxtapapillary diverticula have often been associated with mechanical compression and they are also involved in Oddi’s sphincter dysfunction. The presence of juxtapapillary diverticula is known to influence the outcome of ERCP procedure by making it more difficult and causing some complications like bleeding. Various techniques have been advised for a more successful ERCP outcome
In this video, four cases of duodenal diverticula are presented to provide tips and tricks for the successful cannulation of the CBD and management of periampullary bleeding in case they occur.
Small sphincterotomy and balloon sphincteroplasty for extraction of a common bile duct stone in a patient with juxtapapillary diverticulum
Duodenal diverticula have a prevalence of 9 to 32%. Usually, they are within 2cm of the major duodenal papilla and for that are called juxtapapillary diverticula. They are acquired and their incidence increases with age. Biliary and pancreatic disease is often associated with juxtapapillary diverticula, in particular common bile duct stones. They are directly associated with the outcome of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (due to the complexity of cannulation) and with an increased rate of complications, in particular bleeding. Various techniques are described to increase the success rate, such as clip-assisted biliary cannulation, endoscopic ultrasound-guided bile duct access, main pancreatic duct stent placement followed by pre-cut biliary sphincterotomy. The success rate, independently of these techniques, varies from 61% to 95%.
In this video, we show a case of a patient with angiocholitis secondary to choledocholithiasis, and several cardiovascular co-morbidities, having the papilla of Vater on the edge of a diverticulum. A small sphincterotomy was performed as shown and then bleeding risk was evaluated (the patient being on anticoagulants) and because of the important size of the impacted stone, a sphincteroplasty with dilatation of the papilla with a balloon expanded to 15mm was performed, along with stone extraction using a Dormia basket.
The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2 with normal liver function tests and no inflammation.
Gf Donatelli, C Callari, S Perretta, B Dallemagne
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
1322 views
19 likes
0 comments
05:08
Small sphincterotomy and balloon sphincteroplasty for extraction of a common bile duct stone in a patient with juxtapapillary diverticulum
Duodenal diverticula have a prevalence of 9 to 32%. Usually, they are within 2cm of the major duodenal papilla and for that are called juxtapapillary diverticula. They are acquired and their incidence increases with age. Biliary and pancreatic disease is often associated with juxtapapillary diverticula, in particular common bile duct stones. They are directly associated with the outcome of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (due to the complexity of cannulation) and with an increased rate of complications, in particular bleeding. Various techniques are described to increase the success rate, such as clip-assisted biliary cannulation, endoscopic ultrasound-guided bile duct access, main pancreatic duct stent placement followed by pre-cut biliary sphincterotomy. The success rate, independently of these techniques, varies from 61% to 95%.
In this video, we show a case of a patient with angiocholitis secondary to choledocholithiasis, and several cardiovascular co-morbidities, having the papilla of Vater on the edge of a diverticulum. A small sphincterotomy was performed as shown and then bleeding risk was evaluated (the patient being on anticoagulants) and because of the important size of the impacted stone, a sphincteroplasty with dilatation of the papilla with a balloon expanded to 15mm was performed, along with stone extraction using a Dormia basket.
The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2 with normal liver function tests and no inflammation.
Emergency endoscopic removal of intragastric balloon for hematemesis and melena
The BioEnterics® Intragastric Balloon (BIB®) System has been developed as a temporary aid to achieve weight loss in obese people that are 40% or more above their optimal weight, in patients who have had unsatisfactory results in their treatment of morbid obesity despite being cared for by a multidisciplinary team, and in superobese patients for whom surgery is often associated with high risks. The BIB® reduces the volume of the stomach and leads to a premature feeling of satiety. The placement and removal of the BIB® is an interventional endoscopic procedure and the balloon is designed to float freely inside the stomach; its size can be changed during the placement.
The technique has absolute contraindications such as voluminous hiatus hernia, abnormalities of the pharynx and esophagus, esophageal varicose veins, use of anti-inflammatory or anti-coagulant drugs, pregnancy and psychiatric disorders. Relative contraindications are esophagitis, ulceration and acute lesions of the gastric mucous membrane. The complications of the BIB® are related to the endoscopic method itself, to sedation and perforation, to its prolonged contact with the mucous membrane and its migration, which may result in esophageal or intestinal obstruction (1). The patients must be clinically supervised during the BIB® placement. Complications and symptoms, such as esophageal injury and vomiting due to BIB® slippage must be described to the patient, along with the possibility that the BIB® may require early endoscopic removal. Since the BIB® works as an artificial bezoar, the patients usually show a maximal reduction in ingestion around the fourth week, and return to normal after 12 weeks.

(1) Mathus-Vliegen EMH. Efficacy of bioenterics intragastric balloon treatment in a prospective 2 years follow-up study. Presented at the Eighth European Congress on Obesity; 1997 Aug. Dublin, Ireland: European Congress on Obesity, 1997.
Gf Donatelli, C Callari, S Perretta, B Dallemagne
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
2644 views
14 likes
0 comments
03:36
Emergency endoscopic removal of intragastric balloon for hematemesis and melena
The BioEnterics® Intragastric Balloon (BIB®) System has been developed as a temporary aid to achieve weight loss in obese people that are 40% or more above their optimal weight, in patients who have had unsatisfactory results in their treatment of morbid obesity despite being cared for by a multidisciplinary team, and in superobese patients for whom surgery is often associated with high risks. The BIB® reduces the volume of the stomach and leads to a premature feeling of satiety. The placement and removal of the BIB® is an interventional endoscopic procedure and the balloon is designed to float freely inside the stomach; its size can be changed during the placement.
The technique has absolute contraindications such as voluminous hiatus hernia, abnormalities of the pharynx and esophagus, esophageal varicose veins, use of anti-inflammatory or anti-coagulant drugs, pregnancy and psychiatric disorders. Relative contraindications are esophagitis, ulceration and acute lesions of the gastric mucous membrane. The complications of the BIB® are related to the endoscopic method itself, to sedation and perforation, to its prolonged contact with the mucous membrane and its migration, which may result in esophageal or intestinal obstruction (1). The patients must be clinically supervised during the BIB® placement. Complications and symptoms, such as esophageal injury and vomiting due to BIB® slippage must be described to the patient, along with the possibility that the BIB® may require early endoscopic removal. Since the BIB® works as an artificial bezoar, the patients usually show a maximal reduction in ingestion around the fourth week, and return to normal after 12 weeks.

(1) Mathus-Vliegen EMH. Efficacy of bioenterics intragastric balloon treatment in a prospective 2 years follow-up study. Presented at the Eighth European Congress on Obesity; 1997 Aug. Dublin, Ireland: European Congress on Obesity, 1997.
Endoscopic palliative therapy of an obstructing rectal cancer
Fifteen per cent of rectal cancers are unresectable because of local extension or metastasis.
Endoscopic palliative treatments have been described to avoid surgical palliative procedures (ileostomy, colostomy), which inevitably affect the patient's quality of life.
Endoscopic electrocoagulation, laser therapy and cryotherapy have been used for this purpose, but they need multiple therapeutic sessions: these have a high cost and cause patient discomfort.
Permanent stenting with Self Expanding Metal Stents (SEMS) has been increasingly used for the palliative treatment of obstructing gastrointestinal tumors.
This is the case of a 74-year-old man with an adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T4 N+ M+, that was admitted to our surgical department with sub-occlusion and rectal bleeding.
Under endoscopic-fluoroscopic control, a SEMS was delivered with no complications and the patient was discharged the day after. He was scheduled for a palliative chemotherapy.
Endoscopic stent introduction is a safe palliative procedure performed to improve the quality of life of patients with inoperable tumors of the rectum.
Gf Donatelli, P Ruiz Rodriguez, D Coumaros
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
2406 views
12 likes
0 comments
02:30
Endoscopic palliative therapy of an obstructing rectal cancer
Fifteen per cent of rectal cancers are unresectable because of local extension or metastasis.
Endoscopic palliative treatments have been described to avoid surgical palliative procedures (ileostomy, colostomy), which inevitably affect the patient's quality of life.
Endoscopic electrocoagulation, laser therapy and cryotherapy have been used for this purpose, but they need multiple therapeutic sessions: these have a high cost and cause patient discomfort.
Permanent stenting with Self Expanding Metal Stents (SEMS) has been increasingly used for the palliative treatment of obstructing gastrointestinal tumors.
This is the case of a 74-year-old man with an adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T4 N+ M+, that was admitted to our surgical department with sub-occlusion and rectal bleeding.
Under endoscopic-fluoroscopic control, a SEMS was delivered with no complications and the patient was discharged the day after. He was scheduled for a palliative chemotherapy.
Endoscopic stent introduction is a safe palliative procedure performed to improve the quality of life of patients with inoperable tumors of the rectum.
Endoscopic metal stenting of common bile duct for unresectable pancreatic cancer
Obstructive jaundice occurs in many patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.
Endoscopic therapy is the best palliative option for inoperable pancreatic cancers, either for the treatment of a potential duodenal stenosis or, in the majority of cases, for the treatment of the associated jaundice.
Metal stents are preferable to plastic stents in patients who have a life expectancy of more than 3 months. The obstruction of the common bile duct is due to cancer of the head of the pancreas that compresses the biliary tree. However, in a few cases, the mucosa of the ampulla is also involved with malignancy from the adjacent pancreas.
We present the case of two patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, obstructive jaundice and pruritus, in which the drainage of the common bile duct was achieved with an Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) with insertion of an uncovered metal stent (Wallflex® type) with subsequent relief of the jaundice.
Endoscopic drainage of the common bile duct for obstructive jaundice for unresectable pancreatic cancer is the preferred palliative approach in this type of patient.
Gf Donatelli, M Gualtierotti, D Coumaros
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
2370 views
7 likes
0 comments
04:28
Endoscopic metal stenting of common bile duct for unresectable pancreatic cancer
Obstructive jaundice occurs in many patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.
Endoscopic therapy is the best palliative option for inoperable pancreatic cancers, either for the treatment of a potential duodenal stenosis or, in the majority of cases, for the treatment of the associated jaundice.
Metal stents are preferable to plastic stents in patients who have a life expectancy of more than 3 months. The obstruction of the common bile duct is due to cancer of the head of the pancreas that compresses the biliary tree. However, in a few cases, the mucosa of the ampulla is also involved with malignancy from the adjacent pancreas.
We present the case of two patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, obstructive jaundice and pruritus, in which the drainage of the common bile duct was achieved with an Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) with insertion of an uncovered metal stent (Wallflex® type) with subsequent relief of the jaundice.
Endoscopic drainage of the common bile duct for obstructive jaundice for unresectable pancreatic cancer is the preferred palliative approach in this type of patient.
Endoscopic treatment of esophagojejunostomy dehiscence after total gastrectomy with a fully covered self-expandable metallic stent
The most frequent complications after upper GI surgery are leaks and stenosis. These complications are associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates.
Conservative treatments such as Self-Expanding Metal Stents (SEMS) and balloon dilatation have been described for the treatment of these complications, but stay controversial yet.
We report a case of a 66-year-old woman who underwent a total gastrectomy for a neuro-endocrine tumor that developed an anastomotic dehiscence six days after surgery, successfully treated with a covered SEMS. The stent was well-tolerated and left in place for two weeks. Its ablation confirmed through endoscopic and enhanced X-ray upper series the development of a granulation tissue, along with epithelial proliferation, enough to produce a perfectly closed and healing anastomotic defect. No further surgery was required; oral feeding was started and has been well-tolerated and the patient was soon discharged.
In this case where the use of surgery seemed inevitable and not risk-free, the placement of a removable SEMS was demonstrated to be a safe and efficient technique.
Gf Donatelli, M Gualtierotti, D Coumaros, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
1548 views
29 likes
0 comments
04:57
Endoscopic treatment of esophagojejunostomy dehiscence after total gastrectomy with a fully covered self-expandable metallic stent
The most frequent complications after upper GI surgery are leaks and stenosis. These complications are associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates.
Conservative treatments such as Self-Expanding Metal Stents (SEMS) and balloon dilatation have been described for the treatment of these complications, but stay controversial yet.
We report a case of a 66-year-old woman who underwent a total gastrectomy for a neuro-endocrine tumor that developed an anastomotic dehiscence six days after surgery, successfully treated with a covered SEMS. The stent was well-tolerated and left in place for two weeks. Its ablation confirmed through endoscopic and enhanced X-ray upper series the development of a granulation tissue, along with epithelial proliferation, enough to produce a perfectly closed and healing anastomotic defect. No further surgery was required; oral feeding was started and has been well-tolerated and the patient was soon discharged.
In this case where the use of surgery seemed inevitable and not risk-free, the placement of a removable SEMS was demonstrated to be a safe and efficient technique.