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Gynecology

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.
Sentinel node technique in uterine cancers (update of April 2012 lecture)
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. In the majority of patients, the disease will present at an early stage, without metastasis, and with an excellent prognosis.
Total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without a lymph node dissection is the standard method in the management of endometrial cancer. Although the rate of metastasis in patients with early stage endometrial cancer is low, the standard of treatment still includes a complete or selective pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy for staging, resulting in detrimental side-effects, including lower extremity lymphedema. SLN mapping is based on the concept that lymph node metastasis is the result of an orderly process, that is, the lymph drains in a specific pattern away from the tumor, and therefore if the SLN, or first node, is negative for metastasis, then the nodes after the SLN should also be negative. Among gynecological cancers, a variety of methods have been described to detect a sentinel node in situ including colored dyes and radioisotopes, the latter requiring a specialized gamma detection probe. In this key presentation, Dr. Querleu will talk about the SNL technique in uterine cancers.
D Querleu
Lecture
2 years ago
1426 views
131 likes
0 comments
34:36
Sentinel node technique in uterine cancers (update of April 2012 lecture)
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. In the majority of patients, the disease will present at an early stage, without metastasis, and with an excellent prognosis.
Total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without a lymph node dissection is the standard method in the management of endometrial cancer. Although the rate of metastasis in patients with early stage endometrial cancer is low, the standard of treatment still includes a complete or selective pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy for staging, resulting in detrimental side-effects, including lower extremity lymphedema. SLN mapping is based on the concept that lymph node metastasis is the result of an orderly process, that is, the lymph drains in a specific pattern away from the tumor, and therefore if the SLN, or first node, is negative for metastasis, then the nodes after the SLN should also be negative. Among gynecological cancers, a variety of methods have been described to detect a sentinel node in situ including colored dyes and radioisotopes, the latter requiring a specialized gamma detection probe. In this key presentation, Dr. Querleu will talk about the SNL technique in uterine cancers.
Role of para-aortic staging lymphadenectomy in advanced cervical cancer (update of September 2014 lecture)
Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation is a major component of the surgical staging procedure for several gynecologic malignancies. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, but assessment of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes is performed with lymphadenectomy and/or imaging. The surgical and oncologic goals of lymph node dissection are to define the extent of disease, and thereby, to guide further treatment. Lymphadenectomy may also have a therapeutic goal in conditions in which removing nodes harboring metastatic disease improves survival. The role of para-aortic lymph node dissection for women diagnosed with LACC had been described in these slides.
F Kridelka
Lecture
2 years ago
1392 views
123 likes
1 comment
27:54
Role of para-aortic staging lymphadenectomy in advanced cervical cancer (update of September 2014 lecture)
Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation is a major component of the surgical staging procedure for several gynecologic malignancies. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, but assessment of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes is performed with lymphadenectomy and/or imaging. The surgical and oncologic goals of lymph node dissection are to define the extent of disease, and thereby, to guide further treatment. Lymphadenectomy may also have a therapeutic goal in conditions in which removing nodes harboring metastatic disease improves survival. The role of para-aortic lymph node dissection for women diagnosed with LACC had been described in these slides.
Vascular anomalies found by retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The retroperitoneum is an area of great interest in gynecologic oncology. The knowledge of the anatomy and potential vascular anomalies, which can be found, can help prevent complications.
The retroperitoneal vascular anomalies are often asymptomatic. Their prevalence ranges between 2.4 and 30% according to the published literature.
Its diagnosis includes imaging techniques or it can be made during surgery.
Although the presence of these variations may go unnoticed, different potential complications can be devastating (e.g., hemorrhage, loss of organs or even death).
In this video, the authors demonstrate some variations of retroperitoneal vessels diagnosed during the practice of retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy performed in gynecologic cancer patients (advanced cervical cancer, endometrial carcinoma, and ovarian cancer in early stages).
In our case series of 60 procedures performed during 2011, 2012, and 2013, vascular anatomical anomalies are 33.33% (20 cases) and all of them were diagnosed during surgery.
First, the anomaly of the renal vascular territory (arterial or venous) was the most frequent, followed by anomalies which affect gonadal vessels, and finally by great vessel anomalies.
H Di Fiore, MC González Álvarez, R Sanz Baro, C Redondo Guisasola, JE García Villayzan
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2035 views
60 likes
0 comments
13:28
Vascular anomalies found by retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The retroperitoneum is an area of great interest in gynecologic oncology. The knowledge of the anatomy and potential vascular anomalies, which can be found, can help prevent complications.
The retroperitoneal vascular anomalies are often asymptomatic. Their prevalence ranges between 2.4 and 30% according to the published literature.
Its diagnosis includes imaging techniques or it can be made during surgery.
Although the presence of these variations may go unnoticed, different potential complications can be devastating (e.g., hemorrhage, loss of organs or even death).
In this video, the authors demonstrate some variations of retroperitoneal vessels diagnosed during the practice of retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy performed in gynecologic cancer patients (advanced cervical cancer, endometrial carcinoma, and ovarian cancer in early stages).
In our case series of 60 procedures performed during 2011, 2012, and 2013, vascular anatomical anomalies are 33.33% (20 cases) and all of them were diagnosed during surgery.
First, the anomaly of the renal vascular territory (arterial or venous) was the most frequent, followed by anomalies which affect gonadal vessels, and finally by great vessel anomalies.
Laparoscopic type C radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer
This video shows a standardized and reproducible approach to radical hysterectomy. The procedure begins with the dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the paracervix. After coagulation and division of the round ligament, the surgeon performs a T-shape incision until the psoas muscles to expose the field for the ilio-obturator lymphadenectomy. The paravesical fossa is then dissected in its medial and lateral aspect using the umbilical artery as a landmark. Following the umbilical artery in a ventral to dorsal direction, the surgeon identifies the uterine artery and the paracervix. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the paracervix, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the Latzko and Okabayashi spaces in order to isolate the paracervix. Once the spaces have been developed, the lymphadenectomy is performed separating the external iliac vessels from the psoas muscle to reach the obturator fossa. During this step, the obturator nerve is identified to avoid injuries and to mark the caudal limit of the lymphadenectomy.
The procedure is carried on with the isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the paracervix and the bladder. To do so, the bladder pillar is identified and the dissection is pursued between its medial and lateral aspect developing the so-called space of Yabuki. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The paracervix is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel and the ureter is unroofed.
The vagina is cut with monopolar energy using a vaginal valve as a guide and the specimen is extracted vaginally.
The vagina is closed with three stitches using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
G Centini, K Afors, J Castellano, C Meza Paul, R Murtada, A Wattiez
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
10517 views
345 likes
1 comment
07:20
Laparoscopic type C radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer
This video shows a standardized and reproducible approach to radical hysterectomy. The procedure begins with the dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the paracervix. After coagulation and division of the round ligament, the surgeon performs a T-shape incision until the psoas muscles to expose the field for the ilio-obturator lymphadenectomy. The paravesical fossa is then dissected in its medial and lateral aspect using the umbilical artery as a landmark. Following the umbilical artery in a ventral to dorsal direction, the surgeon identifies the uterine artery and the paracervix. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the paracervix, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the Latzko and Okabayashi spaces in order to isolate the paracervix. Once the spaces have been developed, the lymphadenectomy is performed separating the external iliac vessels from the psoas muscle to reach the obturator fossa. During this step, the obturator nerve is identified to avoid injuries and to mark the caudal limit of the lymphadenectomy.
The procedure is carried on with the isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the paracervix and the bladder. To do so, the bladder pillar is identified and the dissection is pursued between its medial and lateral aspect developing the so-called space of Yabuki. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The paracervix is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel and the ureter is unroofed.
The vagina is cut with monopolar energy using a vaginal valve as a guide and the specimen is extracted vaginally.
The vagina is closed with three stitches using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
Stepwise radical vaginal trachelectomy: Dargent’s operation
Up to 40% of early cervical cancers are diagnosed in young women who might desire fertility preservation. More than 1,000 cases of Radical Vaginal Trachelectomy (RVT) have been published so far, with over 450 pregnancies achieved. Oncological outcomes of this treatment are totally comparable with the ones obtained with radical hysterectomies for similar size lesions. Additionally, these results are similar or superior when compared to the other routes of trachelectomy.
The procedure is always combined with a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy to rule out the possibility of lymph node metastases.
This video demonstrates the technique of RVT. Interesting parts of the vaginal steps are shown along with their contemporary laparoscopic views for didactic purposes.
E Leblanc, F Narducci, L Bresson, M Puga
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2958 views
86 likes
0 comments
09:21
Stepwise radical vaginal trachelectomy: Dargent’s operation
Up to 40% of early cervical cancers are diagnosed in young women who might desire fertility preservation. More than 1,000 cases of Radical Vaginal Trachelectomy (RVT) have been published so far, with over 450 pregnancies achieved. Oncological outcomes of this treatment are totally comparable with the ones obtained with radical hysterectomies for similar size lesions. Additionally, these results are similar or superior when compared to the other routes of trachelectomy.
The procedure is always combined with a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy to rule out the possibility of lymph node metastases.
This video demonstrates the technique of RVT. Interesting parts of the vaginal steps are shown along with their contemporary laparoscopic views for didactic purposes.
Single port laparoscopy and extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy
Background: To report the feasibility and reproducibility of single port extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy in locally advanced cervical cancer before chemoradiotherapy. This procedure is used in our institution in patients with negative PET-CT imaging in the para-aortic area to define radiation field limits more accurately.
Methods: Prospective study of patients with stage IB1N+-IVA cervical cancer treated at the Institute Gustave Roussy from January 2011 to January 2013.
Results: There was no conversion to laparotomy or to conventional multiport laparoscopy among our 50 cases. Only one failure occurred after removal of 2 nodes. In this case, we chose to stop the procedure because of the risk of a vascular complication due to the vascular anatomic variation. The median and mean number of lymph nodes removed were 18 [2-47] and 19 respectively. Six (12%) patients had metastatic para-aortic nodes. Radiotherapy fields were extended when para-aortic nodes were involved.
Conclusion: Extraperitoneal staging via a single port left iliac approach is feasible with conventional tools; it is reproducible and safe, and offers a high degree of cosmetic satisfaction.
S Gouy, C Uzan, A Leary, P Morice
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2436 views
42 likes
0 comments
09:54
Single port laparoscopy and extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy
Background: To report the feasibility and reproducibility of single port extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy in locally advanced cervical cancer before chemoradiotherapy. This procedure is used in our institution in patients with negative PET-CT imaging in the para-aortic area to define radiation field limits more accurately.
Methods: Prospective study of patients with stage IB1N+-IVA cervical cancer treated at the Institute Gustave Roussy from January 2011 to January 2013.
Results: There was no conversion to laparotomy or to conventional multiport laparoscopy among our 50 cases. Only one failure occurred after removal of 2 nodes. In this case, we chose to stop the procedure because of the risk of a vascular complication due to the vascular anatomic variation. The median and mean number of lymph nodes removed were 18 [2-47] and 19 respectively. Six (12%) patients had metastatic para-aortic nodes. Radiotherapy fields were extended when para-aortic nodes were involved.
Conclusion: Extraperitoneal staging via a single port left iliac approach is feasible with conventional tools; it is reproducible and safe, and offers a high degree of cosmetic satisfaction.
Lumbo-aortic lymphadenectomy: improving exposure with the T’lift™ device
Lymph node dissection in the lumbo-aortic area is a challenging procedure. The main concerns during surgery include the risk of major vascular injury and the potential lesion of other structures such as the ureter or the duodenum. A thorough surgical strategy and adequate exposure are mandatory to reduce the possibility of complications.
During this surgical demonstration, the most important aspects of the strategy are discussed. Special emphasis is put on exposure and the use of the T’lift™ device is shown. This simple technique allows for a fast and safe suspension of the peritoneum, improving the visualization of the operative field.
A Wattiez, M Puga, CY Akladios, C Redondo Guisasola, Al Ussia
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
4265 views
59 likes
0 comments
15:01
Lumbo-aortic lymphadenectomy: improving exposure with the T’lift™ device
Lymph node dissection in the lumbo-aortic area is a challenging procedure. The main concerns during surgery include the risk of major vascular injury and the potential lesion of other structures such as the ureter or the duodenum. A thorough surgical strategy and adequate exposure are mandatory to reduce the possibility of complications.
During this surgical demonstration, the most important aspects of the strategy are discussed. Special emphasis is put on exposure and the use of the T’lift™ device is shown. This simple technique allows for a fast and safe suspension of the peritoneum, improving the visualization of the operative field.
Radical nerve-sparing hysterectomy (type C1)
This video demonstrates a nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy (type C1).
During type C Radical Hysterectomy (RH), the uterus is removed en bloc with its ligaments along with a vaginal margin of 15 to 20mm. The uterosacral ligaments are transected from the level of the rectum and the vesicouterine ligament at the level of the bladder. The ureter is dissected until it enters the bladder. It is mobilized completely to resect the lateral parametrium from the lateral wall.

Radical hysterectomy type C1 implies the preservation of the hypogastric inferior nerve and the bladder branch of the hypogastric plexus during the resection of the parametrium.
During the surgery, the components of the hypogastric plexus are identified: the inferior hypogastric nerve running from the lateral wall of the rectum and the splanchnic nerves from S2-S4. The deep uterine vein is an essential landmark because we can find the first splanchnic nerve underneath it. Consequently, during the resection of the posterior parametrium, the uterosacral ligament can be completely resected while conserving the inferior hypogastric nerve. Division of the lateral parametrium is pursued without including the splanchnic nerves. During the transection of the caudal part of the paracervix and the paracolpium, attention must be paid not to include the vesical branch of the inferior hypogastric plexus that runs parallel to paravaginal vessels.
M Malzoni, A Ruggiero, M Puga
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
8292 views
152 likes
1 comment
20:14
Radical nerve-sparing hysterectomy (type C1)
This video demonstrates a nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy (type C1).
During type C Radical Hysterectomy (RH), the uterus is removed en bloc with its ligaments along with a vaginal margin of 15 to 20mm. The uterosacral ligaments are transected from the level of the rectum and the vesicouterine ligament at the level of the bladder. The ureter is dissected until it enters the bladder. It is mobilized completely to resect the lateral parametrium from the lateral wall.

Radical hysterectomy type C1 implies the preservation of the hypogastric inferior nerve and the bladder branch of the hypogastric plexus during the resection of the parametrium.
During the surgery, the components of the hypogastric plexus are identified: the inferior hypogastric nerve running from the lateral wall of the rectum and the splanchnic nerves from S2-S4. The deep uterine vein is an essential landmark because we can find the first splanchnic nerve underneath it. Consequently, during the resection of the posterior parametrium, the uterosacral ligament can be completely resected while conserving the inferior hypogastric nerve. Division of the lateral parametrium is pursued without including the splanchnic nerves. During the transection of the caudal part of the paracervix and the paracolpium, attention must be paid not to include the vesical branch of the inferior hypogastric plexus that runs parallel to paravaginal vessels.
Sentinel node technique in uterine cancers
Standard full pelvic lymph node dissection is a simple operation but with potential complications, such as lymphedema, which can be very disturbing for the patient. Additionally, even full pelvic dissection may miss the so-called “ectopic nodes”. Moreover, if a large number of nodes are sent for pathological exam, the pathologist is unable to perform serial sections and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to all nodes. For that reason, the pathologist could well miss positive nodes.
On the other hand, the sentinel node technique is able to detect the nodes that are not included in standard pelvic node dissection. It is also able to diagnose micro-metastasis on serial sections.
This technique, which is performed laparoscopically, uses blue dye combined with radio-isotopic identification and mapping, potentially associated with planar lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT-CT. In this way, it is possible to also detect “hot” nodes that are not colored by blue dye. The injection is performed in each quadrant of the cervix, approximately 2mm deep in the stroma.
In the near future, the sentinel node will probably have become the only one to be removed in early cervical cancer as well as in low and intermediate risk endometrial cancer.
D Querleu
Lecture
7 years ago
1634 views
19 likes
0 comments
28:53
Sentinel node technique in uterine cancers
Standard full pelvic lymph node dissection is a simple operation but with potential complications, such as lymphedema, which can be very disturbing for the patient. Additionally, even full pelvic dissection may miss the so-called “ectopic nodes”. Moreover, if a large number of nodes are sent for pathological exam, the pathologist is unable to perform serial sections and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to all nodes. For that reason, the pathologist could well miss positive nodes.
On the other hand, the sentinel node technique is able to detect the nodes that are not included in standard pelvic node dissection. It is also able to diagnose micro-metastasis on serial sections.
This technique, which is performed laparoscopically, uses blue dye combined with radio-isotopic identification and mapping, potentially associated with planar lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT-CT. In this way, it is possible to also detect “hot” nodes that are not colored by blue dye. The injection is performed in each quadrant of the cervix, approximately 2mm deep in the stroma.
In the near future, the sentinel node will probably have become the only one to be removed in early cervical cancer as well as in low and intermediate risk endometrial cancer.
Retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy: stage IIB cervical carcinoma
This video demonstrates a retroperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy for stage IIB epidermoid cervical carcinoma. This procedure allows to identify patients who should undergo extended field radiotherapy. The intervention is pursued with the dissection of the lympho-adipose tissue situated in the following anatomical boundaries: ureters and psoas muscles laterally, the iliac artery bifurcation —lower limit— and the left renal vein —superior limit. A diagnostic laparoscopy is first performed to rule out metastasis. A 10mm, 0-degree scope is used. An umbilical Hasson trocar is placed to explore the abdominal cavity. A left McBurney’s incision is then made, and the retroperitoneal space is created digitally. The Hasson trocar is placed with a 10mm balloon through the anterior incision. Two additional ports are placed in the anterior axillary line, a 12mm one and a 5mm one. The 5mm Ligasure™ V device and a grasping forceps are used throughout the whole intervention. At the end of the procedure, the lympho-adipose tissue is extracted using an Endobag through an enlarged peritoneal opening.
H Di Fiore, O Martínez, I Pérez, I Borrego, A Cristóbal
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
889 views
51 likes
0 comments
14:47
Retroperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy: stage IIB cervical carcinoma
This video demonstrates a retroperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy for stage IIB epidermoid cervical carcinoma. This procedure allows to identify patients who should undergo extended field radiotherapy. The intervention is pursued with the dissection of the lympho-adipose tissue situated in the following anatomical boundaries: ureters and psoas muscles laterally, the iliac artery bifurcation —lower limit— and the left renal vein —superior limit. A diagnostic laparoscopy is first performed to rule out metastasis. A 10mm, 0-degree scope is used. An umbilical Hasson trocar is placed to explore the abdominal cavity. A left McBurney’s incision is then made, and the retroperitoneal space is created digitally. The Hasson trocar is placed with a 10mm balloon through the anterior incision. Two additional ports are placed in the anterior axillary line, a 12mm one and a 5mm one. The 5mm Ligasure™ V device and a grasping forceps are used throughout the whole intervention. At the end of the procedure, the lympho-adipose tissue is extracted using an Endobag through an enlarged peritoneal opening.
Laparoscopic hysterectomy: removal of a large (1300g) uterus
Some believe that laparoscopy is almost impossible to perform in cases of very big uterus or large adnexal masses that obstruct our view to the pelvis. However, if the same surgical steps are always followed and a specific strategy is determined, it is feasible and safe to choose laparoscopy even in the case of large organs. In this video, we present the case of a 45-year-old patient with a large fibromatous uterus, suffering from abdominal discomfort and bleeding. The patient was anemic and decision was made to perform a laparoscopic total hysterectomy. With the appropriate surgical steps and some safety tips, the operation took place quickly and with success. The weight of the specimen was 1300g.
A Wattiez, P Trompoukis, J Nassif, B Gabriel
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
5296 views
53 likes
0 comments
10:21
Laparoscopic hysterectomy: removal of a large (1300g) uterus
Some believe that laparoscopy is almost impossible to perform in cases of very big uterus or large adnexal masses that obstruct our view to the pelvis. However, if the same surgical steps are always followed and a specific strategy is determined, it is feasible and safe to choose laparoscopy even in the case of large organs. In this video, we present the case of a 45-year-old patient with a large fibromatous uterus, suffering from abdominal discomfort and bleeding. The patient was anemic and decision was made to perform a laparoscopic total hysterectomy. With the appropriate surgical steps and some safety tips, the operation took place quickly and with success. The weight of the specimen was 1300g.
Surgical strategies and techniques for difficult hysterectomy
In gynecologic surgery, hysterectomy is the most important procedure. Sometimes, however, hysterectomy can be a very difficult and challenging operation, and even more so if performed laparoscopically. Situations that distort the pelvic anatomy such as large fibroids, severe endometriosis, postoperative adhesions and morbid obesity make surgery much more difficult. Dr Lee analyses in a very didactic way all these situations, gives valuable directions and surgical strategies in order to overcome difficulties, and uses specific rules to obtain the best result as much safely as possible. Very useful are the different approaches, namely anterior, posterior and lateral, for patients with big fibroids, for adhesions and for fibrosis originating from severe endometriosis respectively.
T Lee
Lecture
8 years ago
3050 views
51 likes
2 comments
25:34
Surgical strategies and techniques for difficult hysterectomy
In gynecologic surgery, hysterectomy is the most important procedure. Sometimes, however, hysterectomy can be a very difficult and challenging operation, and even more so if performed laparoscopically. Situations that distort the pelvic anatomy such as large fibroids, severe endometriosis, postoperative adhesions and morbid obesity make surgery much more difficult. Dr Lee analyses in a very didactic way all these situations, gives valuable directions and surgical strategies in order to overcome difficulties, and uses specific rules to obtain the best result as much safely as possible. Very useful are the different approaches, namely anterior, posterior and lateral, for patients with big fibroids, for adhesions and for fibrosis originating from severe endometriosis respectively.
Laparoscopic hysterectomy with adnexectomy
This video demonstrates the technique of a total laparoscopic hysterectomy with adnexectomy. Our patient is a 44-year-old lady with Tamoxifen-induced endometrial hyperplasia, which failed to respond to medical treatment.
Umbilical incision is made on the left internal border to give a more aesthetic scar.
Direct entry is performed. The assistant helps to lift the abdomen while the surgeon directs the trocar perpendicularly towards the rectus sheath first, then directs it towards the pelvis. The midline port is inserted: this should be at a slightly higher level than the lateral ports for better ergonomics. The uterine manipulator has a rotating ceramic valve for opening the vagina and a set of rings to maintain the pneumoperitoneum. The procedure is started by coagulating and cutting the round ligament on the left and opening the broad ligament. The broad ligament is opened parallel to the infundibulopelvic ligament for adnexectomy and a window is made over the grey area. The posterior leaf of the broad ligament is opened towards the left uterosacral ligament. The anterior leaf of the broad ligament is opened towards the vagina by dissecting the space and coagulating and cutting the tissues in between. The dissection is continued until the uterine artery is reached. The left infundibulopelvic ligament is coagulated and cut. The same procedure is done on the other side. Bladder dissection is performed with the help of the assistant holding up the bladder and entering the vesicovaginal space. The bladder is dissected away, beyond the valve of the manipulator. The left uterine artery is coagulated and cut. The left uterosacral ligament is coagulated and cut. The right uterine vessels are coagulated and cut followed by the uterosacral ligament. The vagina is now cut against the valve of the manipulator using a monopolar hook. Bleeding points are coagulated with a bipolar forceps. The vagina is sutured in two layers using extracorporeal knots. The procedure is now complete and hemostasis is confirmed. This patient had a favourable postoperative outcome and was discharged on postoperative day 1.
A Wattiez, E Kovoor, J Nassif, I Miranda-Mendoza
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
9891 views
93 likes
0 comments
23:00
Laparoscopic hysterectomy with adnexectomy
This video demonstrates the technique of a total laparoscopic hysterectomy with adnexectomy. Our patient is a 44-year-old lady with Tamoxifen-induced endometrial hyperplasia, which failed to respond to medical treatment.
Umbilical incision is made on the left internal border to give a more aesthetic scar.
Direct entry is performed. The assistant helps to lift the abdomen while the surgeon directs the trocar perpendicularly towards the rectus sheath first, then directs it towards the pelvis. The midline port is inserted: this should be at a slightly higher level than the lateral ports for better ergonomics. The uterine manipulator has a rotating ceramic valve for opening the vagina and a set of rings to maintain the pneumoperitoneum. The procedure is started by coagulating and cutting the round ligament on the left and opening the broad ligament. The broad ligament is opened parallel to the infundibulopelvic ligament for adnexectomy and a window is made over the grey area. The posterior leaf of the broad ligament is opened towards the left uterosacral ligament. The anterior leaf of the broad ligament is opened towards the vagina by dissecting the space and coagulating and cutting the tissues in between. The dissection is continued until the uterine artery is reached. The left infundibulopelvic ligament is coagulated and cut. The same procedure is done on the other side. Bladder dissection is performed with the help of the assistant holding up the bladder and entering the vesicovaginal space. The bladder is dissected away, beyond the valve of the manipulator. The left uterine artery is coagulated and cut. The left uterosacral ligament is coagulated and cut. The right uterine vessels are coagulated and cut followed by the uterosacral ligament. The vagina is now cut against the valve of the manipulator using a monopolar hook. Bleeding points are coagulated with a bipolar forceps. The vagina is sutured in two layers using extracorporeal knots. The procedure is now complete and hemostasis is confirmed. This patient had a favourable postoperative outcome and was discharged on postoperative day 1.