We use cookies to offer you an optimal experience on our website. By browsing our website, you accept the use of cookies.

General and digestive surgery

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
P Agami, A Andrianov, V Shchadrova, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
5 hours ago
144 views
1 like
1 comment
12:28
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
Single stage diagnosis and treatment by EUS and ERCP of a pancreatic stone causing an acute pancreatitis
Biliopancreatic stones are the ‘primum movens’ of acute pancreatitis. Pure pancreatic stones are rare. However, when present, they are the main cause of acute obstruction of the main pancreatic duct. Conversely, when present in chronic pancreatitis, they are mostly responsible for pancreatic glandular insufficiency. Medical treatment, radiologic evaluation (by MRI or CT-scan), and therapeutic endoscopy constitute the standard of care (SOC).
Here, we report the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for upper middle abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia, without anomalies in liver function tests, and who underwent biliopancreatic EUS. A pancreatic stone was diagnosed and immediately treated by endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy and extraction.
Gf Donatelli, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1142 views
41 likes
0 comments
05:10
Single stage diagnosis and treatment by EUS and ERCP of a pancreatic stone causing an acute pancreatitis
Biliopancreatic stones are the ‘primum movens’ of acute pancreatitis. Pure pancreatic stones are rare. However, when present, they are the main cause of acute obstruction of the main pancreatic duct. Conversely, when present in chronic pancreatitis, they are mostly responsible for pancreatic glandular insufficiency. Medical treatment, radiologic evaluation (by MRI or CT-scan), and therapeutic endoscopy constitute the standard of care (SOC).
Here, we report the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for upper middle abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia, without anomalies in liver function tests, and who underwent biliopancreatic EUS. A pancreatic stone was diagnosed and immediately treated by endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy and extraction.
Tips 'n tricks: cholecystectomy: antegrade approach for difficult dissection
Today, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a routinely performed surgical intervention. In certain cases, the identification of Calot’s triangle may be difficult due to adhesions or inflammatory infiltrations of adjacent structures. Hydrodissection can allow for an atraumatic dissection but in more complex cases, an antegrade freeing of the gallbladder should be envisaged.
Here we present the case of a man benefiting from a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy for a pancreatitis with common bile duct stone migration. The flag technique, with an antegrade freeing, must be applied in order to complete the procedure laparoscopically.
L Marx, C Hild, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
4721 views
75 likes
8 comments
06:50
Tips 'n tricks: cholecystectomy: antegrade approach for difficult dissection
Today, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a routinely performed surgical intervention. In certain cases, the identification of Calot’s triangle may be difficult due to adhesions or inflammatory infiltrations of adjacent structures. Hydrodissection can allow for an atraumatic dissection but in more complex cases, an antegrade freeing of the gallbladder should be envisaged.
Here we present the case of a man benefiting from a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy for a pancreatitis with common bile duct stone migration. The flag technique, with an antegrade freeing, must be applied in order to complete the procedure laparoscopically.