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General and digestive surgery

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
X Untereiner, M Pizzicannella, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
1455 views
9 likes
3 comments
06:55
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
J Magalhães, C Osorio, L Frutuoso, AM Pereira, A Trovão, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1700 views
9 likes
3 comments
09:44
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres, J López Gutiérrez
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
857 views
5 likes
1 comment
13:16
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
J Magalhães, AM Pereira, T Fonseca, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1081 views
3 likes
1 comment
09:34
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, L Arru, F Gheza, M Diana
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2496 views
9 likes
1 comment
12:41
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
C Viana, M Lozano, D Poletto, T Moreno, C Varela, A Toscano
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
2662 views
7 likes
0 comments
15:27
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
Laparoscopic total D2 gastrectomy for cancer
Laparoscopic gastrectomy is accepted as a treatment of choice for gastric cancer due to low postoperative pain, faster recovery, shorter hospital stay, and a better cosmetic outcome as compared to open gastrectomy. Radical gastrectomy, with lymph node dissection, is essential to cure this type of cancer. This technique can be reproduced also in third world countries.
This is the case of a 74-year-old woman who was evaluated for dyspepsia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy found a tumor near the cardia on the lesser curvature. The biopsy study confirmed the presence of an adenocarcinoma. CT-scan showed no metastasis or lymph nodes affected. Surgical treatment was decided upon along with a laparoscopic total D2 gastrectomy.
F Signorini, S Reimondez, M España, L Obeide, F Moser
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
7463 views
418 likes
6 comments
06:41
Laparoscopic total D2 gastrectomy for cancer
Laparoscopic gastrectomy is accepted as a treatment of choice for gastric cancer due to low postoperative pain, faster recovery, shorter hospital stay, and a better cosmetic outcome as compared to open gastrectomy. Radical gastrectomy, with lymph node dissection, is essential to cure this type of cancer. This technique can be reproduced also in third world countries.
This is the case of a 74-year-old woman who was evaluated for dyspepsia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy found a tumor near the cardia on the lesser curvature. The biopsy study confirmed the presence of an adenocarcinoma. CT-scan showed no metastasis or lymph nodes affected. Surgical treatment was decided upon along with a laparoscopic total D2 gastrectomy.
Advanced bariatric surgery: reduced port simplified gastric bypass, a reproducible 3-port technique
Minimally invasive surgery is a field of continuous evolution and the advantages of this approach is no longer a matter of debate. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has shown to be the cornerstone in the treatment of morbid obesity and so far all the efforts in this technique have been conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Nowadays, reduced port surgery is regaining momentum as the evolution of minimally invasive surgery.
The purpose is to describe our technique of LRYGB, which mimics all the fundamental aspects of the “simplified gastric bypass” described by A. Cardoso Ramos et al. in a conventional laparoscopic surgical approach (5 ports) while incorporating some innovative technical features to reduce the quantity of ports. Despite the use of only three trocars, there is no problem with exposure or ergonomics, which represent major drawbacks when performing reduced port surgery.

Our technique can be a useful and feasible tool in selected patients in order to minimize parietal trauma and its possible complications, to improve cosmetic results, and to indirectly avoid the need for a second assistant, thereby improving the logistics, team dynamics, and economic aspects of the procedure.

In our experience, this technique is indicated as primary surgery in patients without previous surgery and with a BMI ranging from 35 to 50. Major contraindications are liver steatosis, superobese patients, and potentially revisional surgery. Although based on the experience of the team, we had also to perform revisional surgery mostly from ring vertical gastroplasty.

From January 2015 to June 2017, we analyzed 72 consecutive cases in our institution with a mean initial BMI of 43.12 (range: 30.1-58.7) using this approach, and the mean operative time was 64.77 minutes (range: 30-155, n=72) and excluding revisional cases or cases associated with cholecystectomy (58.72 min, range: 30-104, n=62).

This approach should be performed by highly skilled surgeons experienced with conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and with one of the patients feeling particularly comfortable. We strongly suggest using additional trocars if patient safety is jeopardized.
D Lipski, D Garcilazo Arismendi, S Targa
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2699 views
424 likes
1 comment
07:37
Advanced bariatric surgery: reduced port simplified gastric bypass, a reproducible 3-port technique
Minimally invasive surgery is a field of continuous evolution and the advantages of this approach is no longer a matter of debate. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has shown to be the cornerstone in the treatment of morbid obesity and so far all the efforts in this technique have been conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Nowadays, reduced port surgery is regaining momentum as the evolution of minimally invasive surgery.
The purpose is to describe our technique of LRYGB, which mimics all the fundamental aspects of the “simplified gastric bypass” described by A. Cardoso Ramos et al. in a conventional laparoscopic surgical approach (5 ports) while incorporating some innovative technical features to reduce the quantity of ports. Despite the use of only three trocars, there is no problem with exposure or ergonomics, which represent major drawbacks when performing reduced port surgery.

Our technique can be a useful and feasible tool in selected patients in order to minimize parietal trauma and its possible complications, to improve cosmetic results, and to indirectly avoid the need for a second assistant, thereby improving the logistics, team dynamics, and economic aspects of the procedure.

In our experience, this technique is indicated as primary surgery in patients without previous surgery and with a BMI ranging from 35 to 50. Major contraindications are liver steatosis, superobese patients, and potentially revisional surgery. Although based on the experience of the team, we had also to perform revisional surgery mostly from ring vertical gastroplasty.

From January 2015 to June 2017, we analyzed 72 consecutive cases in our institution with a mean initial BMI of 43.12 (range: 30.1-58.7) using this approach, and the mean operative time was 64.77 minutes (range: 30-155, n=72) and excluding revisional cases or cases associated with cholecystectomy (58.72 min, range: 30-104, n=62).

This approach should be performed by highly skilled surgeons experienced with conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and with one of the patients feeling particularly comfortable. We strongly suggest using additional trocars if patient safety is jeopardized.
Fourth antireflux procedure in a patient with a BMI of 35: esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy
We present an esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy as the fourth antireflux procedure in an obese patient with recurrent severe GERD despite high-dose PPI therapy. After previous Nissen fundoplications and a redo procedure with a partial posterior fundoplication, the patient now presented with an intrathoracic migration of the posterior fundoplication. In these complex redo scenarios in conjunction with a high BMI, the strategy of esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y reconstruction similarly to obesity surgery is increasingly being used.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
951 views
351 likes
0 comments
21:18
Fourth antireflux procedure in a patient with a BMI of 35: esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy
We present an esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy as the fourth antireflux procedure in an obese patient with recurrent severe GERD despite high-dose PPI therapy. After previous Nissen fundoplications and a redo procedure with a partial posterior fundoplication, the patient now presented with an intrathoracic migration of the posterior fundoplication. In these complex redo scenarios in conjunction with a high BMI, the strategy of esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y reconstruction similarly to obesity surgery is increasingly being used.
Laparoscopic gastric bypass with unexpected intestinal malrotation
There are only a few descriptions of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in the setting of intestinal malrotation and these are limited to clinical case reports. Intestinal malrotations usually present in the first months of life with symptoms of bowel obstruction. However, in rare cases, it can persist undetected into adulthood when it could be incidentally identified. The anatomical abnormalities which should alert us to this possibility are an absent duodenojejunal angle, the small bowel on the right side of the abdomen, the caecum on the left, and the absence of a transverse colon crossing the abdomen. Identification and adjustment of the surgical technique at the time of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is crucial to prevent a very distal RYGB or avoid confusion between the Roux limb and the common channel. The construction of the laparoscopic Roux limb can be safely performed with adjustments to the standard technique.
We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a long history of morbid obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The patient had no complaints and presented a normal preoperative evaluation. After a multidisciplinary evaluation, she was elected to undergo a LRYGB. We report an intestinal malrotation discovered at the time of LRYGB, and detail the incidental findings and the technical aspects which require to be incorporated in order to complete the operation safely.
A Laranjeira, S Silva, M Amaro, M Carvalho, J Caravana
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1847 views
418 likes
0 comments
08:33
Laparoscopic gastric bypass with unexpected intestinal malrotation
There are only a few descriptions of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in the setting of intestinal malrotation and these are limited to clinical case reports. Intestinal malrotations usually present in the first months of life with symptoms of bowel obstruction. However, in rare cases, it can persist undetected into adulthood when it could be incidentally identified. The anatomical abnormalities which should alert us to this possibility are an absent duodenojejunal angle, the small bowel on the right side of the abdomen, the caecum on the left, and the absence of a transverse colon crossing the abdomen. Identification and adjustment of the surgical technique at the time of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is crucial to prevent a very distal RYGB or avoid confusion between the Roux limb and the common channel. The construction of the laparoscopic Roux limb can be safely performed with adjustments to the standard technique.
We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a long history of morbid obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The patient had no complaints and presented a normal preoperative evaluation. After a multidisciplinary evaluation, she was elected to undergo a LRYGB. We report an intestinal malrotation discovered at the time of LRYGB, and detail the incidental findings and the technical aspects which require to be incorporated in order to complete the operation safely.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: paraesophageal hernia repair: critical value of extrasaccular approach
Paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair is a challenging procedure. Repositioning of the herniated stomach and the reduction of the sac from the mediastinum is mandatory in order to decrease the risk of recurrence. The dissection and reduction of the sac must be performed following stepwise and precise dissection rules: it must be carried out outside of the sac, in an anatomical cleavage plane. Recurrence is also related to the type of crural repair performed, some authors advocating the systematic use of prosthetic or biological reinforcement. In this video, we present a PEH repair and cruroplasty protected with an absorbable mesh and contemporary Nissen fundoplication.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, M Diana, F Longo, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5174 views
438 likes
0 comments
54:47
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: paraesophageal hernia repair: critical value of extrasaccular approach
Paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair is a challenging procedure. Repositioning of the herniated stomach and the reduction of the sac from the mediastinum is mandatory in order to decrease the risk of recurrence. The dissection and reduction of the sac must be performed following stepwise and precise dissection rules: it must be carried out outside of the sac, in an anatomical cleavage plane. Recurrence is also related to the type of crural repair performed, some authors advocating the systematic use of prosthetic or biological reinforcement. In this video, we present a PEH repair and cruroplasty protected with an absorbable mesh and contemporary Nissen fundoplication.
Bariatric and metabolic surgery
In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Michel Vix highlighted the indications related to metabolic and morbid obesity surgery. He presented key anatomical landmarks and operating room (OR) set-up depending on every patient. He briefly described the main principles of port placement and pneumoperitoneum, and demonstrated maneuvers, indications, and main key steps of morbid obesity procedures including LAGB, SBPD-DS, Scopinaro, RYGB, Mini Gastric Bypass, and Sleeve Gastrectomy, along with their technical aspects, mortality, morbidity, effectiveness, and results using different studies and meta-analyses. He also demonstrated the main principles and key steps of new trends and approaches in bariatric and metabolic surgery with complications and technical therapeutic aspects.
M Vix
Lecture
1 year ago
1385 views
273 likes
0 comments
04:52
Bariatric and metabolic surgery
In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Michel Vix highlighted the indications related to metabolic and morbid obesity surgery. He presented key anatomical landmarks and operating room (OR) set-up depending on every patient. He briefly described the main principles of port placement and pneumoperitoneum, and demonstrated maneuvers, indications, and main key steps of morbid obesity procedures including LAGB, SBPD-DS, Scopinaro, RYGB, Mini Gastric Bypass, and Sleeve Gastrectomy, along with their technical aspects, mortality, morbidity, effectiveness, and results using different studies and meta-analyses. He also demonstrated the main principles and key steps of new trends and approaches in bariatric and metabolic surgery with complications and technical therapeutic aspects.
Concurrent laparoscopic RYGB with a paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair
This is the case of a 75-year old female patient with a medical history of bilateral mastectomy due to cancer, which occurred 30 and 15 years before referral. She was treated using adjuvant chemotherapy (tamoxifen) and radiotherapy, and had a liver-related kidney donation. The patient was found asymptomatic when she underwent a control abdominal ultrasound, which showed a 6cm hepatic mass in liver segments V and VI. A hepatic MRI was performed and showed a single liver lesion (68mm in diameter) located in the right liver lobe, and a PET-CT-scan demonstrated an increased hypermetabolic activity of the lesion without other systemic tumor dissemination. A laparoscopic right hepatectomy was scheduled. A laparoscopic surgery was performed. Laparoscopic exploration revealed multiple bilateral lesions, and an intraoperative ultrasound demonstrated a lesion in liver segment IV. An ALPPS approach was considered.
There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day.
A Duro, F Wright, PJ Castellaro, A Beskow, D Cavadas, J Montagné
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
994 views
179 likes
3 comments
06:23
Concurrent laparoscopic RYGB with a paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair
This is the case of a 75-year old female patient with a medical history of bilateral mastectomy due to cancer, which occurred 30 and 15 years before referral. She was treated using adjuvant chemotherapy (tamoxifen) and radiotherapy, and had a liver-related kidney donation. The patient was found asymptomatic when she underwent a control abdominal ultrasound, which showed a 6cm hepatic mass in liver segments V and VI. A hepatic MRI was performed and showed a single liver lesion (68mm in diameter) located in the right liver lobe, and a PET-CT-scan demonstrated an increased hypermetabolic activity of the lesion without other systemic tumor dissemination. A laparoscopic right hepatectomy was scheduled. A laparoscopic surgery was performed. Laparoscopic exploration revealed multiple bilateral lesions, and an intraoperative ultrasound demonstrated a lesion in liver segment IV. An ALPPS approach was considered.
There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day.
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
A Trovão, L Costa, M Costa, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
596 views
106 likes
0 comments
09:55
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) after failed Nissen
This is the case of a 62-year old female patient with a BMI of 35 and a history of high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and morbid obesity. She underwent a laparoscopic Nissen surgery 8 years earlier and presented with recurrent GERD symptoms.

A CT-scan, an endoscopy, and a barium swallow showed a hiatal hernia. It was decided to perform a paraesophageal hernia repair as well as a gastric bypass. A laparoscopic surgery was performed.

There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the second postoperative day. An esogastroduodenal contrast examination was performed 1 month after the procedure. It showed the absence of hiatal hernia. The patient was controlled 3 months after surgery and was found asymptomatic with an Excess Weight Loss (EWL) of 42%.
A Duro, V Cano Busnelli, A Beskow, D Cavadas, F Wright, P Saleg, PJ Castellaro
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1977 views
171 likes
1 comment
06:12
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) after failed Nissen
This is the case of a 62-year old female patient with a BMI of 35 and a history of high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and morbid obesity. She underwent a laparoscopic Nissen surgery 8 years earlier and presented with recurrent GERD symptoms.

A CT-scan, an endoscopy, and a barium swallow showed a hiatal hernia. It was decided to perform a paraesophageal hernia repair as well as a gastric bypass. A laparoscopic surgery was performed.

There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the second postoperative day. An esogastroduodenal contrast examination was performed 1 month after the procedure. It showed the absence of hiatal hernia. The patient was controlled 3 months after surgery and was found asymptomatic with an Excess Weight Loss (EWL) of 42%.
A stepwise personal technique of RYGB with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy
With more than 25 years of experience, we have created a unique laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass technique with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy and several additional steps which offer our patients a safe and reliable procedure.
We routinely use 5 bladeless 12mm trocars. The procedure begins with the creation of a 15-20mL gastric pouch with a tilted orientation for the first stapling (not horizontal), and staple lines are oversewn for both gastric pouch and gastric remnant. A blue dye test is always performed at this stage. The second stage of the procedure includes the creation of a 75cm biliopancreatic limb with division of the mesentery and creation of a mechanical jejunojejunostomy with a 100cm alimentary limb, and hand-sewn closure of the enterotomy. Anti-torsion stitches are mandatory at this point. Closure of mesenteric defects (intermesenteric space and Petersen's space) is accomplished with non-absorbable sutures performed in a routine manner. The third and final stage of the procedure involves the creation of the hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy with an interposed limb and 4 layers of absorbable sutures over a 28-30 French bougie.
Closure of all trocar defects is performed in every patient.
L Zorrilla-Nunez, P Zorrilla
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1312 views
219 likes
0 comments
10:05
A stepwise personal technique of RYGB with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy
With more than 25 years of experience, we have created a unique laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass technique with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy and several additional steps which offer our patients a safe and reliable procedure.
We routinely use 5 bladeless 12mm trocars. The procedure begins with the creation of a 15-20mL gastric pouch with a tilted orientation for the first stapling (not horizontal), and staple lines are oversewn for both gastric pouch and gastric remnant. A blue dye test is always performed at this stage. The second stage of the procedure includes the creation of a 75cm biliopancreatic limb with division of the mesentery and creation of a mechanical jejunojejunostomy with a 100cm alimentary limb, and hand-sewn closure of the enterotomy. Anti-torsion stitches are mandatory at this point. Closure of mesenteric defects (intermesenteric space and Petersen's space) is accomplished with non-absorbable sutures performed in a routine manner. The third and final stage of the procedure involves the creation of the hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy with an interposed limb and 4 layers of absorbable sutures over a 28-30 French bougie.
Closure of all trocar defects is performed in every patient.
Subtotal gastrectomy and D1+ lymphadenectomy for distal stage IB gastric cancer with preservation of an accessory left hepatic artery
This video shows a partial gastrectomy in a 63-year-old woman with a stage IB gastric cancer located at the distal third of the stomach. The lesion was located using intraoperatory endoscopy. We found an accessory left hepatic artery originating from the left gastric artery, which was preserved. The gastrojejunostomy was performed in a Roux-en-Y fashion. The alimentary limb was ascended through the transverse mesocolon. The jejunojejunostomy was performed in a latero-lateral fashion with closure of the ostium with simple Ethibond 2/0 stitches. The skin incision used for trocar placement in the upper left abdomen (right hand of the surgeon) was slightly enlarged to allow for specimen extraction.
P Vorwald, R Restrepo, G Salcedo, M Posada
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2429 views
228 likes
0 comments
11:41
Subtotal gastrectomy and D1+ lymphadenectomy for distal stage IB gastric cancer with preservation of an accessory left hepatic artery
This video shows a partial gastrectomy in a 63-year-old woman with a stage IB gastric cancer located at the distal third of the stomach. The lesion was located using intraoperatory endoscopy. We found an accessory left hepatic artery originating from the left gastric artery, which was preserved. The gastrojejunostomy was performed in a Roux-en-Y fashion. The alimentary limb was ascended through the transverse mesocolon. The jejunojejunostomy was performed in a latero-lateral fashion with closure of the ostium with simple Ethibond 2/0 stitches. The skin incision used for trocar placement in the upper left abdomen (right hand of the surgeon) was slightly enlarged to allow for specimen extraction.
Reduced port laparoscopic pyloroduodenectomy with handsewn Roux-en-Y reconstruction
Background: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) is an evolution of conventional laparoscopic surgery, allowing for enhanced cosmetic outcomes, in addition to a reduced abdominal wall trauma. Tips and tricks are required to complete a procedure using a RPLS.

Video: This video shows a 55-year-old lady who underwent a laparoscopic pyloro-duodenectomy for a duodenal bulb lesion increased in size at endoscopic follow-up. Three trocars were used (a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, a 5mm one in the left flank). The exposure of the operative field was enhanced thanks to a temporary percutaneous suture placed into the hepatic round ligament. Perioperative gastroscopy allowed for an adequate resection without too much distance from the margins, and preservation of the entire gastric antrum. The reconstruction was performed through a handsewn end-to-end gastrojejunostomy, with a 50cm alimentary limb, and a semi-mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy. Finally, a gastroscopy was used to test the gastrojejunostomy.

Results: Total operative time was 190 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7. Pathological findings demonstrated a Brunner’s gland hamartoma, with safe distance from the margins.

Conclusions: RPLS is a step forward of conventional laparoscopy. Perioperative gastroscopy is essential to perform safe upper GI resections. br>
G Dapri, NA Bascombe, S Targa
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
774 views
25 likes
0 comments
09:01
Reduced port laparoscopic pyloroduodenectomy with handsewn Roux-en-Y reconstruction
Background: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) is an evolution of conventional laparoscopic surgery, allowing for enhanced cosmetic outcomes, in addition to a reduced abdominal wall trauma. Tips and tricks are required to complete a procedure using a RPLS.

Video: This video shows a 55-year-old lady who underwent a laparoscopic pyloro-duodenectomy for a duodenal bulb lesion increased in size at endoscopic follow-up. Three trocars were used (a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, a 5mm one in the left flank). The exposure of the operative field was enhanced thanks to a temporary percutaneous suture placed into the hepatic round ligament. Perioperative gastroscopy allowed for an adequate resection without too much distance from the margins, and preservation of the entire gastric antrum. The reconstruction was performed through a handsewn end-to-end gastrojejunostomy, with a 50cm alimentary limb, and a semi-mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy. Finally, a gastroscopy was used to test the gastrojejunostomy.

Results: Total operative time was 190 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7. Pathological findings demonstrated a Brunner’s gland hamartoma, with safe distance from the margins.

Conclusions: RPLS is a step forward of conventional laparoscopy. Perioperative gastroscopy is essential to perform safe upper GI resections. br>
Laparoscopic excision of a celiac paraganglioma
A 72-year-old woman was addressed to the endocrinologist for arterial hypertension and US finding of a 5cm nodule in the aortocaval space of the celiac region. The diagnostic workup revealed raised urinary metanephrines. A CT-scan confirmed the US findings, and the nodule was also positive at PET CT-scan. A fine needle biopsy was performed, which was suggestive of a paraganglioma.
Medical treatment with Doxazosine 44mg qd was required for the adequate control of hypertension, and surgical excision was required.
A laparoscopic lateral transabdominal approach was chosen, to displace the hepatoduodenal ligament and allow for a wide access to the inferior vena cava. The operative time was 75 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Her symptoms recovered and she was found with normal metanephrines at follow-up.
M Lotti, M Giulii Capponi, L Ansaloni
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
853 views
57 likes
0 comments
08:21
Laparoscopic excision of a celiac paraganglioma
A 72-year-old woman was addressed to the endocrinologist for arterial hypertension and US finding of a 5cm nodule in the aortocaval space of the celiac region. The diagnostic workup revealed raised urinary metanephrines. A CT-scan confirmed the US findings, and the nodule was also positive at PET CT-scan. A fine needle biopsy was performed, which was suggestive of a paraganglioma.
Medical treatment with Doxazosine 44mg qd was required for the adequate control of hypertension, and surgical excision was required.
A laparoscopic lateral transabdominal approach was chosen, to displace the hepatoduodenal ligament and allow for a wide access to the inferior vena cava. The operative time was 75 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Her symptoms recovered and she was found with normal metanephrines at follow-up.
Laparoscopic extraction of gastric denture
A 49-year-old generally fit man presented with abdominal pain following accidental swallowing of his denture 2 weeks previously. He looked well and his abdomen was soft and non-tender. A CT-scan showed a denture in the pyloric antrum of the stomach.
Gastroenterologists thought that it would be too large to be removed endoscopically. Laparoscopy was performed and the denture could be easily felt with a laparoscopic forceps. The denture was extracted in an Albert bag via the umbilical port after longitudinal gastrotomy. The gastrotomy was closed with 2/0 Vicryl continuous suture in 2 layers intracorporeally as shown on the video.
The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2 and remains well at 6 weeks of follow-up. Laparoscopic extraction of the gastric foreign body has the advantage of quicker recovery and better cosmesis as compared to the open technique.
K Aryal
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1074 views
14 likes
0 comments
06:18
Laparoscopic extraction of gastric denture
A 49-year-old generally fit man presented with abdominal pain following accidental swallowing of his denture 2 weeks previously. He looked well and his abdomen was soft and non-tender. A CT-scan showed a denture in the pyloric antrum of the stomach.
Gastroenterologists thought that it would be too large to be removed endoscopically. Laparoscopy was performed and the denture could be easily felt with a laparoscopic forceps. The denture was extracted in an Albert bag via the umbilical port after longitudinal gastrotomy. The gastrotomy was closed with 2/0 Vicryl continuous suture in 2 layers intracorporeally as shown on the video.
The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2 and remains well at 6 weeks of follow-up. Laparoscopic extraction of the gastric foreign body has the advantage of quicker recovery and better cosmesis as compared to the open technique.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy guided by fluorescent lymphangiography using ICG injection around a tumor, followed by an intracorporeal double stapling esophagojejunostomy
Injecting indocyanine green (ICG) around the tumor enables the operators to identify the lymphatic channels and the lymph nodes in which the cancer cells can spread. It also allows them to decide on the extent of the dissection and validate the completeness of lymph node dissection. In this video, a laparoscopic near-infrared fluorescent camera was used, showing the fluorescent signal in diverse modes. A total gastrectomy with D1+ dissection is performed. The fluorescent signal shows the possible lymphatic pathways during the operation. An intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy was performed in a double stapling fashion; a round needle and a surgical thread are attached to the plastic part of the anvil of the circular stapler.
HK Yang, SH Kong
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1621 views
74 likes
0 comments
15:56
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy guided by fluorescent lymphangiography using ICG injection around a tumor, followed by an intracorporeal double stapling esophagojejunostomy
Injecting indocyanine green (ICG) around the tumor enables the operators to identify the lymphatic channels and the lymph nodes in which the cancer cells can spread. It also allows them to decide on the extent of the dissection and validate the completeness of lymph node dissection. In this video, a laparoscopic near-infrared fluorescent camera was used, showing the fluorescent signal in diverse modes. A total gastrectomy with D1+ dissection is performed. The fluorescent signal shows the possible lymphatic pathways during the operation. An intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy was performed in a double stapling fashion; a round needle and a surgical thread are attached to the plastic part of the anvil of the circular stapler.
Laparoscopic excision of a gastric duplication cyst
Duplication cysts are rare benign congenital anomalies, located predominantly at the proximal small intestine, emerging in the stomach in about 2 to 4% of all cases. Usually diagnosed in the pediatric age, they are commonly asymptomatic in adulthood and found incidentally on endoscopic or radiological exams. The therapeutic management of asymptomatic cysts is usually expectant. However, a surgical resection is recommended based on the potential risk of complications, such as malignant transformation.
Clinical case: This is the case of a 44-year-old woman, who had an incidental diagnosis of an intra-abdominal cyst on ultrasound examination. CT-scan and MRI revealed the presence of a 6x4cm cystic mass located between the posterior wall of the stomach and the anterior wall of the pancreas, assuming the differential diagnosis of enteric duplication cyst or pancreatic cystic lesion. A laparoscopic exploration is decided upon. She underwent a laparoscopic excision of cystic lesion of the gastric wall, without complications. The patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day. The pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of enteric duplication cyst. Histology showed a cystic lesion composed of smooth muscle tissue and partially covered by gastric antral-type mucosa.
C Branco, C Viana, H Cristino, S Vilaça, J Falcão
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
833 views
32 likes
0 comments
06:07
Laparoscopic excision of a gastric duplication cyst
Duplication cysts are rare benign congenital anomalies, located predominantly at the proximal small intestine, emerging in the stomach in about 2 to 4% of all cases. Usually diagnosed in the pediatric age, they are commonly asymptomatic in adulthood and found incidentally on endoscopic or radiological exams. The therapeutic management of asymptomatic cysts is usually expectant. However, a surgical resection is recommended based on the potential risk of complications, such as malignant transformation.
Clinical case: This is the case of a 44-year-old woman, who had an incidental diagnosis of an intra-abdominal cyst on ultrasound examination. CT-scan and MRI revealed the presence of a 6x4cm cystic mass located between the posterior wall of the stomach and the anterior wall of the pancreas, assuming the differential diagnosis of enteric duplication cyst or pancreatic cystic lesion. A laparoscopic exploration is decided upon. She underwent a laparoscopic excision of cystic lesion of the gastric wall, without complications. The patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day. The pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of enteric duplication cyst. Histology showed a cystic lesion composed of smooth muscle tissue and partially covered by gastric antral-type mucosa.
Robot-assisted ultrasound-guided transgastric cystogastrostomy
We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with a voluminous pseudocyst in the lesser sac after several episodes of acute pancreatitis of biliary origin managed by a robot-assisted transgastric cystogastrostomy. The patient is lying supine, legs apart. Five ports are positioned. The intervention is begun with an anterior gastrotomy, which allows to introduce a balloon-tipped trocar transgastrically. A second gastrotomy is performed in the prepyloric region. It allows to introduce a second transgastric trocar. Finally, a third gastrotomy is performed at the level of the fundus to introduce a third transgastric balloon-tipped trocar. After transgastric insufflation, the trocars are connected to the robot, which is positioned at the patient’s head. A transgastric ultrasonography is performed to visualize the pseudocyst, which has a heterogeneous content, with fibrotic debris. The gastrotomy is initiated with Ultracision™ at the posterior aspect of the stomach. The cyst is multilocular. The gastric wall is controlled by means of a Doppler ultrasound in order not to pass through the gastric varices, which had been identified on endoscopic ultrasound. A second cavity with some more heterogeneous content is subsequently opened. This cavity presents some pancreatic necrosis. The cystogastrostomy is enlarged at its most. Trocars are then removed to proceed intraperitoneally. The three anterior gastrotomy incisions are then sutured using the robot. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, O Perotto, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1126 views
52 likes
0 comments
06:04
Robot-assisted ultrasound-guided transgastric cystogastrostomy
We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with a voluminous pseudocyst in the lesser sac after several episodes of acute pancreatitis of biliary origin managed by a robot-assisted transgastric cystogastrostomy. The patient is lying supine, legs apart. Five ports are positioned. The intervention is begun with an anterior gastrotomy, which allows to introduce a balloon-tipped trocar transgastrically. A second gastrotomy is performed in the prepyloric region. It allows to introduce a second transgastric trocar. Finally, a third gastrotomy is performed at the level of the fundus to introduce a third transgastric balloon-tipped trocar. After transgastric insufflation, the trocars are connected to the robot, which is positioned at the patient’s head. A transgastric ultrasonography is performed to visualize the pseudocyst, which has a heterogeneous content, with fibrotic debris. The gastrotomy is initiated with Ultracision™ at the posterior aspect of the stomach. The cyst is multilocular. The gastric wall is controlled by means of a Doppler ultrasound in order not to pass through the gastric varices, which had been identified on endoscopic ultrasound. A second cavity with some more heterogeneous content is subsequently opened. This cavity presents some pancreatic necrosis. The cystogastrostomy is enlarged at its most. Trocars are then removed to proceed intraperitoneally. The three anterior gastrotomy incisions are then sutured using the robot. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
Laparoscopic gastric bypass after open vertical banded gastroplasty
This video shows a laparoscopic reintervention after an open vertical banded gastroplasty in a 51-year-old woman presenting with untreatable gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD originated from gastric remnant outlet obstruction. For that reason, we decided to perform a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. First, very intense adhesions of the greater omentum and the stomach to the parietal peritoneum and the left lobe of the liver are dissected. The gastric remnant is dissected in order to transect it proximally to the stenotic, banded segment. A Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with a 50cm alimentary limb using the OrVil™ orogastric tube and the DST Series™ EEA™ 25mm circular stapling device is performed.
P Vorwald, M Posada, G Salcedo, C Lévano Linares, ML Sánchez de Molina, R Restrepo, JR Torres
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1612 views
36 likes
0 comments
12:54
Laparoscopic gastric bypass after open vertical banded gastroplasty
This video shows a laparoscopic reintervention after an open vertical banded gastroplasty in a 51-year-old woman presenting with untreatable gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD originated from gastric remnant outlet obstruction. For that reason, we decided to perform a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. First, very intense adhesions of the greater omentum and the stomach to the parietal peritoneum and the left lobe of the liver are dissected. The gastric remnant is dissected in order to transect it proximally to the stenotic, banded segment. A Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with a 50cm alimentary limb using the OrVil™ orogastric tube and the DST Series™ EEA™ 25mm circular stapling device is performed.
Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with repair of a positive leak test
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for antral gastric cancer. The patient we present is a 40 year-old gentleman who presented with epigastric pain. Endoscopy revealed a neoplastic lesion at the gastric antrum. Biopsies confirmed the presence of an adenocarcinoma. This was staged as a T2 lesion and there was no distant metastasis. A total gastrectomy was planned using a total laparoscopic approach. For reconstruction, the authors used a Roux En Y esophagojejunal anastomosis using the transoral delivery of the OrVil® device (Covidien, Mansfield, MA, USA). We also demonstrate how to deal with a positive intraoperative leak test at the end of the procedure.
AE Salih, S Smolarek, SA Naqi, M Arumugasamy
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
6539 views
403 likes
1 comment
12:35
Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with repair of a positive leak test
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for antral gastric cancer. The patient we present is a 40 year-old gentleman who presented with epigastric pain. Endoscopy revealed a neoplastic lesion at the gastric antrum. Biopsies confirmed the presence of an adenocarcinoma. This was staged as a T2 lesion and there was no distant metastasis. A total gastrectomy was planned using a total laparoscopic approach. For reconstruction, the authors used a Roux En Y esophagojejunal anastomosis using the transoral delivery of the OrVil® device (Covidien, Mansfield, MA, USA). We also demonstrate how to deal with a positive intraoperative leak test at the end of the procedure.
Three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with intracorporeal manual esophagojejunostomy
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven to be oncologically feasible and safe. Over the last decade, a new philosophy of MIS reducing abdominal trauma and improving cosmetic results has been made popular. The authors report a three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy combined with a D2 lymphadenectomy for smaller curvature gastric adenocarcinoma.
Video: A 52-year-old woman presenting with a non-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma at the incisura angularis was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N+M0 tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, laparoscopy was scheduled. Three ports (5mm, 12mm, 5mm) were placed in the abdomen. Exposure of the operative field was improved with percutaneous sutures. En-bloc total gastrectomy and omentectomy were performed with a D2 lymphadenectomy, including the nodes of stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a, 8p, 9, 10, 11p, 11d, and 12a. A completely manual end-to-side esophagojejunostomy, and a linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, with closure of both mesenteric and mesocolic defects. The specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic access.
Results: Operative time was 4 hours and 45 minutes (anastomosis: 30) and perioperative bleeding amounted to 100cc. The pathological report confirmed the presence of a non-differentiated adenocarcinoma, mucinous, G3, interesting the gastric wall completely, with 63 (4 positive) nodes removed; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4aN2aM0; keratine AE1/AE3 negative, HER2/neu and HER2/CEP17 non-amplified. During the postoperative follow-up, no recurrence was demonstrated at 12 months.
Conclusions: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery provides the same quality of oncologic surgery as conventional multiport laparoscopy. However, a superior cosmesis and a reduced abdominal trauma are offered.
G Dapri, HK Yang
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2953 views
95 likes
2 comments
11:03
Three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with intracorporeal manual esophagojejunostomy
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven to be oncologically feasible and safe. Over the last decade, a new philosophy of MIS reducing abdominal trauma and improving cosmetic results has been made popular. The authors report a three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy combined with a D2 lymphadenectomy for smaller curvature gastric adenocarcinoma.
Video: A 52-year-old woman presenting with a non-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma at the incisura angularis was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N+M0 tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, laparoscopy was scheduled. Three ports (5mm, 12mm, 5mm) were placed in the abdomen. Exposure of the operative field was improved with percutaneous sutures. En-bloc total gastrectomy and omentectomy were performed with a D2 lymphadenectomy, including the nodes of stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a, 8p, 9, 10, 11p, 11d, and 12a. A completely manual end-to-side esophagojejunostomy, and a linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, with closure of both mesenteric and mesocolic defects. The specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic access.
Results: Operative time was 4 hours and 45 minutes (anastomosis: 30) and perioperative bleeding amounted to 100cc. The pathological report confirmed the presence of a non-differentiated adenocarcinoma, mucinous, G3, interesting the gastric wall completely, with 63 (4 positive) nodes removed; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4aN2aM0; keratine AE1/AE3 negative, HER2/neu and HER2/CEP17 non-amplified. During the postoperative follow-up, no recurrence was demonstrated at 12 months.
Conclusions: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery provides the same quality of oncologic surgery as conventional multiport laparoscopy. However, a superior cosmesis and a reduced abdominal trauma are offered.
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy plus 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps
Background: Transumbilical single access laparoscopy (TSAL) has gained interest over the last decade. However, in bariatric surgery, it still remains difficult due to the fact that the umbilicus is not a landmark, and it is frequently localized too far from the operative field. In selected patients, it can be considered and offered.
Video: A 29-year-old morbidly obese woman with a BMI of 40 underwent TSAL sleeve gastrectomy. Two reusable ports and curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were placed in the umbilicus. The chosen method to perform sleeve gastrectomy was a medial-to-lateral approach (gastric division followed by greater curvature mobilization), and the resection of the gastric antrum. Gastric division was performed under the control of a long, rigid, 30-degree scope (Karl Storz). To expose the hiatal region and the angle of His, a 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps according to DAPRI (Karl Storz) was inserted underneath the xiphoid process and placed against the diaphragm below the left liver lobe. Some absorbable sutures between the staple lines were finally placed, and no drain was left into the abdominal cavity. The specimen was removed transumbilically, after joining the three used windows together at the umbilical aponeurosis.
Results: Laparoscopy took 94 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 30cc. Umbilical scar length was 25mm. No postoperative complications were noted and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
Conclusions: TSAL sleeve gastrectomy can be offered to selected obese patients. The use of reusable material and curved tools make it possible not to increase the cost of the procedure due to TSAL, and to establish intracorporeal and extracorporeal working triangulation.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1738 views
63 likes
0 comments
08:13
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy plus 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps
Background: Transumbilical single access laparoscopy (TSAL) has gained interest over the last decade. However, in bariatric surgery, it still remains difficult due to the fact that the umbilicus is not a landmark, and it is frequently localized too far from the operative field. In selected patients, it can be considered and offered.
Video: A 29-year-old morbidly obese woman with a BMI of 40 underwent TSAL sleeve gastrectomy. Two reusable ports and curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were placed in the umbilicus. The chosen method to perform sleeve gastrectomy was a medial-to-lateral approach (gastric division followed by greater curvature mobilization), and the resection of the gastric antrum. Gastric division was performed under the control of a long, rigid, 30-degree scope (Karl Storz). To expose the hiatal region and the angle of His, a 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps according to DAPRI (Karl Storz) was inserted underneath the xiphoid process and placed against the diaphragm below the left liver lobe. Some absorbable sutures between the staple lines were finally placed, and no drain was left into the abdominal cavity. The specimen was removed transumbilically, after joining the three used windows together at the umbilical aponeurosis.
Results: Laparoscopy took 94 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 30cc. Umbilical scar length was 25mm. No postoperative complications were noted and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
Conclusions: TSAL sleeve gastrectomy can be offered to selected obese patients. The use of reusable material and curved tools make it possible not to increase the cost of the procedure due to TSAL, and to establish intracorporeal and extracorporeal working triangulation.
The VERSA LIFTER BAND™: a new option for liver retraction in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity
During laparoscopic bariatric procedures in morbidly obese patients, the surgeon's operative view is often obscured by the hypertrophic adipose left lobe of the liver.
To provide adequate operative views and working space, an appropriate retraction of the left liver lobe is required.
The use of a conventional liver retractor mandates an additional subxiphoid wound, resulting in patient discomfort for pain and scar formation, with the additional risk of iatrogenic liver injury during retraction maneuvers.
To overcome these limitations, we present the use of a simple, rapid, and safe technique for liver retraction using the VERSA LIFTER™ Band disposable liver suspension system or retractor.
A D'Urso, M Vix, B Dallemagne, HA Mercoli, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1669 views
37 likes
0 comments
03:48
The VERSA LIFTER BAND™: a new option for liver retraction in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity
During laparoscopic bariatric procedures in morbidly obese patients, the surgeon's operative view is often obscured by the hypertrophic adipose left lobe of the liver.
To provide adequate operative views and working space, an appropriate retraction of the left liver lobe is required.
The use of a conventional liver retractor mandates an additional subxiphoid wound, resulting in patient discomfort for pain and scar formation, with the additional risk of iatrogenic liver injury during retraction maneuvers.
To overcome these limitations, we present the use of a simple, rapid, and safe technique for liver retraction using the VERSA LIFTER™ Band disposable liver suspension system or retractor.
Relaxing incision for crural repair in type III paraesophageal hernia
This video shows the laparoscopic repair of a large type III paraesophageal hernia in a 55-year-old woman. After dissection of the hernia sac, partial resection is performed. Very high intramediastinal dissection of the esophagus is performed, taking special care not to injure the posterior and anterior vagal trunk. First, as the hiatal defect is very large, a right relaxing incision is performed. The crural repair is performed by interrupted Ethibond® 2/0 stitches buttressed with a polypropylene mesh. Finally, the diaphragmatic defect is covered with a non-reabsorbable mesh (Physiomesh™) and a 180-degree posterior fundoplication is performed.
P Vorwald, G Salcedo, M Posada, C Lévano Linares, ML Sánchez de Molina, R Restrepo, C Ferrero
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2052 views
79 likes
0 comments
09:13
Relaxing incision for crural repair in type III paraesophageal hernia
This video shows the laparoscopic repair of a large type III paraesophageal hernia in a 55-year-old woman. After dissection of the hernia sac, partial resection is performed. Very high intramediastinal dissection of the esophagus is performed, taking special care not to injure the posterior and anterior vagal trunk. First, as the hiatal defect is very large, a right relaxing incision is performed. The crural repair is performed by interrupted Ethibond® 2/0 stitches buttressed with a polypropylene mesh. Finally, the diaphragmatic defect is covered with a non-reabsorbable mesh (Physiomesh™) and a 180-degree posterior fundoplication is performed.
Laparoscopic repair of a giant type III paraesophageal hernia with mesenteric-axial gastric volvulus
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic repair of a giant type III paraesophageal hernia with an associated mesenteric-axial gastric volvulus in a 61-year-old woman. Dissection of the hernia sac was difficult because the esophageal hiatus was not very enlarged and the overlying peritoneum was very thickened because of chronic hernia incarceration. Once the stomach was replaced into the peritoneal cavity, mediastinal mobilization of the esophagus up to the pulmonary vein was performed. After crural repair, a standard posterior fundoplication was performed, as the intra-abdominal esophageal length was adequate.
P Vorwald, M Posada, G Salcedo, R Restrepo, JR Torres
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1647 views
53 likes
0 comments
13:44
Laparoscopic repair of a giant type III paraesophageal hernia with mesenteric-axial gastric volvulus
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic repair of a giant type III paraesophageal hernia with an associated mesenteric-axial gastric volvulus in a 61-year-old woman. Dissection of the hernia sac was difficult because the esophageal hiatus was not very enlarged and the overlying peritoneum was very thickened because of chronic hernia incarceration. Once the stomach was replaced into the peritoneal cavity, mediastinal mobilization of the esophagus up to the pulmonary vein was performed. After crural repair, a standard posterior fundoplication was performed, as the intra-abdominal esophageal length was adequate.
Upper GI obstruction due to incarcerated recurrent hiatal hernia with mesh repair
This is the case of a 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 43 who presented to our clinic complaining of aphasia. Her past medical history is significant for a hiatal hernia repair and a diaphragmatic mesh reinforcement performed in July 2013. After surgery, she complained of dysphagia even after the three postoperative months, and the upper GI series showed a recurrence of her hiatal hernia. The dysphagia got worse, and in January 2015, a CT-scan showed a complete blockage of the gastroesophageal junction due to the herniation of the stomach. A 5-trocar technique was used, very similar to what we would use for a Nissen fundoplication.
S Perretta, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
885 views
31 likes
0 comments
12:26
Upper GI obstruction due to incarcerated recurrent hiatal hernia with mesh repair
This is the case of a 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 43 who presented to our clinic complaining of aphasia. Her past medical history is significant for a hiatal hernia repair and a diaphragmatic mesh reinforcement performed in July 2013. After surgery, she complained of dysphagia even after the three postoperative months, and the upper GI series showed a recurrence of her hiatal hernia. The dysphagia got worse, and in January 2015, a CT-scan showed a complete blockage of the gastroesophageal junction due to the herniation of the stomach. A 5-trocar technique was used, very similar to what we would use for a Nissen fundoplication.
Gastric GIST: minimally invasive surgical modalities
Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor, and the stomach is the most frequent location (50-60%). Gastric GIST presents as a submucosal tumor and is often found incidentally. Submucosal tumors greater than 2cm are indicated for resection. Indication for laparoscopic surgery is not strictly determined by the size, but whether surgery can follow resection principles, 1) R0 resection with histologically negative margins, 2) all efforts are made to prevent tumor rupture. Wedge resection using a linear stapler, also called “exogastric resection” is effective in most cases. However, the operator should pay attention to align the direction of the linear stapler “transversely” to the long axis of the stomach, otherwise it can cause gastric lumen narrowing after resection, especially in case of a relatively large tumor with endophytical growth. Endoscopy is very useful to identify and define tumor resection margins for endophytic tumor, and the “eversion” technique is one option to reduce the amount of normal mucosa resection. GIST cases located at the posterior wall of the upper stomach are technically challenging, and transgastric or intragastric techniques are suggested as good surgical options for such tumors. Laparoscopic or endoscopic “coring out” techniques can be dangerous, because of the high risk of tumor rupture and gastric wall perforation, which can cause peritoneal seeding when both take place simultaneously.
SH Kong
Lecture
3 years ago
1984 views
116 likes
0 comments
22:10
Gastric GIST: minimally invasive surgical modalities
Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor, and the stomach is the most frequent location (50-60%). Gastric GIST presents as a submucosal tumor and is often found incidentally. Submucosal tumors greater than 2cm are indicated for resection. Indication for laparoscopic surgery is not strictly determined by the size, but whether surgery can follow resection principles, 1) R0 resection with histologically negative margins, 2) all efforts are made to prevent tumor rupture. Wedge resection using a linear stapler, also called “exogastric resection” is effective in most cases. However, the operator should pay attention to align the direction of the linear stapler “transversely” to the long axis of the stomach, otherwise it can cause gastric lumen narrowing after resection, especially in case of a relatively large tumor with endophytical growth. Endoscopy is very useful to identify and define tumor resection margins for endophytic tumor, and the “eversion” technique is one option to reduce the amount of normal mucosa resection. GIST cases located at the posterior wall of the upper stomach are technically challenging, and transgastric or intragastric techniques are suggested as good surgical options for such tumors. Laparoscopic or endoscopic “coring out” techniques can be dangerous, because of the high risk of tumor rupture and gastric wall perforation, which can cause peritoneal seeding when both take place simultaneously.
Laparoscopic endoluminal resection of a Brunner’s gland hamartoma
Brunner glands are located in the proximal submucosal part of the duodenum. They secrete an alkaline mucin, which protects the mucosa from gastric acid. Hyperplasia of the Brunner glands larger than 1cm can evolve to a Brunner’s gland hamartoma. It is a hamartoma because the lesion does not have a capsule, a mix of acini, mucosal cells, adipose tissue, smooth muscle and Paneth cells, but no cell atypia. Such hamartomas are very rare and represent between 5 and 10% of benign duodenal tumors with the highest prevalence in patients aged between 40 and 60. The most common clinical presentation is bleeding or obstructive symptoms. Excision is recommended because of the risk of bleeding. Long-term outcome is good and no recurrence after complete excision has been reported.
This video presents the case of a 40-year-old patient who was admitted to our hospital with anemia (5.1g/dL), dark stools, and a past history of Hodgkin’s lymphoma with dysfunction of the spleen and of thyroid gland. Further examination using upper GI flexible endoscopy revealed a pedunculated mass in the duodenal bulb (D1). This mass migrates through the pylorus to the antrum. Additional imaging (CT-scan, MRI) confirms the localization of the mass. Biopsy is suggestive of a Brunner’s gland hamartoma. It was decided to perform a minimally invasive approach using flexible endoscopy in combination with laparoscopy. A laparoscopic endoluminal mass resection was performed using a stapling device. The finding was confirmed on the final pathological report.
S Heyman, Y Pirenne, D Vervloessem, P Willemsen
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
343 views
8 likes
0 comments
05:12
Laparoscopic endoluminal resection of a Brunner’s gland hamartoma
Brunner glands are located in the proximal submucosal part of the duodenum. They secrete an alkaline mucin, which protects the mucosa from gastric acid. Hyperplasia of the Brunner glands larger than 1cm can evolve to a Brunner’s gland hamartoma. It is a hamartoma because the lesion does not have a capsule, a mix of acini, mucosal cells, adipose tissue, smooth muscle and Paneth cells, but no cell atypia. Such hamartomas are very rare and represent between 5 and 10% of benign duodenal tumors with the highest prevalence in patients aged between 40 and 60. The most common clinical presentation is bleeding or obstructive symptoms. Excision is recommended because of the risk of bleeding. Long-term outcome is good and no recurrence after complete excision has been reported.
This video presents the case of a 40-year-old patient who was admitted to our hospital with anemia (5.1g/dL), dark stools, and a past history of Hodgkin’s lymphoma with dysfunction of the spleen and of thyroid gland. Further examination using upper GI flexible endoscopy revealed a pedunculated mass in the duodenal bulb (D1). This mass migrates through the pylorus to the antrum. Additional imaging (CT-scan, MRI) confirms the localization of the mass. Biopsy is suggestive of a Brunner’s gland hamartoma. It was decided to perform a minimally invasive approach using flexible endoscopy in combination with laparoscopy. A laparoscopic endoluminal mass resection was performed using a stapling device. The finding was confirmed on the final pathological report.
Robotic distal gastrectomy with the EndoWrist® One Vessel Sealer
The EndoWrist® One vessel sealer is a wristed, single-use instrument of the da Vinci surgical robotic system intended for bipolar coagulation and mechanical transection of vessels up to 7mm in diameter and tissue bundles. It could be a potential instrument to overcome the limitation of straight energy-based devices. Although it has the advantage of having an endowrist function which allows easy access to the surgical planes in ideal directions, it requires special caution and know-how to use the device safely and effectively, because of a relatively blunt tip and the absence of an active blade at the tip.
This video of the robotic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer shows how to harmonize the use of a sharp instrument with conventional bipolar electricity and of the vessel sealer device to maximize the advantages of such devices and to ensure safety. A conventional bipolar forceps is used to make entrance holes on the tissue for a safe application of the vessel sealer, and to perform fine dissections of small tissues, which are difficult to manage using a vessel sealer. Once the access hole has been made, the vessel sealer is applied in an ideal axis to the avascular tissue plane, thanks to the free wrist function. This technique combined with a sharp instrument using conventional bipolar electricity seems to be helpful for a safe and effective operation, which can use the benefit of the vessel sealer to its full potential, for instance with a high degree of freedom of the movement and secure sealing of lymphovascular structures.
HK Yang, SH Kong
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1348 views
81 likes
0 comments
10:38
Robotic distal gastrectomy with the EndoWrist® One Vessel Sealer
The EndoWrist® One vessel sealer is a wristed, single-use instrument of the da Vinci surgical robotic system intended for bipolar coagulation and mechanical transection of vessels up to 7mm in diameter and tissue bundles. It could be a potential instrument to overcome the limitation of straight energy-based devices. Although it has the advantage of having an endowrist function which allows easy access to the surgical planes in ideal directions, it requires special caution and know-how to use the device safely and effectively, because of a relatively blunt tip and the absence of an active blade at the tip.
This video of the robotic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer shows how to harmonize the use of a sharp instrument with conventional bipolar electricity and of the vessel sealer device to maximize the advantages of such devices and to ensure safety. A conventional bipolar forceps is used to make entrance holes on the tissue for a safe application of the vessel sealer, and to perform fine dissections of small tissues, which are difficult to manage using a vessel sealer. Once the access hole has been made, the vessel sealer is applied in an ideal axis to the avascular tissue plane, thanks to the free wrist function. This technique combined with a sharp instrument using conventional bipolar electricity seems to be helpful for a safe and effective operation, which can use the benefit of the vessel sealer to its full potential, for instance with a high degree of freedom of the movement and secure sealing of lymphovascular structures.
Laparoscopic wedge resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with linear staplers in a transverse direction
This video presents a case of laparoscopic wedge resection for a gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Exogastric resection using a stapler is effective for most GIST cases. However, there is a risk of gastric lumen narrowing after stapling in case of endophytically growing tumor unless the direction of the stapler is aligned transversely, which means in a perpendicular direction to the long axis of the stomach. This video shows how to access the tumor located at the posterior wall of the stomach, usefulness of the intraoperative endoscopy to identify the location of the tumor, and the presence of intraluminal bleeding from the staple line, and how to apply the linear stapler in a transverse direction in a laparoscopic wedge resection for gastric GIST.
HK Yang, SH Kong
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2013 views
116 likes
0 comments
03:36
Laparoscopic wedge resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with linear staplers in a transverse direction
This video presents a case of laparoscopic wedge resection for a gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Exogastric resection using a stapler is effective for most GIST cases. However, there is a risk of gastric lumen narrowing after stapling in case of endophytically growing tumor unless the direction of the stapler is aligned transversely, which means in a perpendicular direction to the long axis of the stomach. This video shows how to access the tumor located at the posterior wall of the stomach, usefulness of the intraoperative endoscopy to identify the location of the tumor, and the presence of intraluminal bleeding from the staple line, and how to apply the linear stapler in a transverse direction in a laparoscopic wedge resection for gastric GIST.
Laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy for superior mesenteric artery syndrome
Purpose:
The superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is a rare disease in which the third portion of the duodenum is compressed by the narrow space of the SMA and the aorta. Surgical treatment such as duodenojejunostomy (DJS) could resolve this problem. Here we report our experience of laparoscopic DJS with a video demonstration.

Materials and Methods:
This 18-year-old woman suffered from vomiting, abdominal distention and progressive weight loss during 6 months before admission. The abdominal discomfort usually occurred after meals and it could be alleviated by a decubitus position. Endoscopic exams revealed gastritis and reflux esophagitis. Computed tomography (CT) with contrast identified the distended stomach and the proximal duodenum obstructed by the SMA. Surgical treatment was advised after a complete preoperative survey, including a series of image survey, psychological evaluation and nutrition status. A three-port laparoscopic approach was used. After opening a small window through the mesocolon, a side-to-side DJS was created with a linear stapler and the common channel was closed with a hand-sewn suture.

Results:
There were no intraoperative complications. The laparoscopic DJS tooks 52 mins and blood loss was minimal. The nasogastric tube was removed on postoperative day 3 and she was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 7. The postoperative upper GI series showed a smooth contrast passage from the DJS to the intestine and the patient gained 6 kg within 4 months after surgery.

Conclusion:
Laparoscopic DJS is a surgical option for SMA syndrome after conservative treatment failure. It is safe, feasible and provides the benefits of a minimally invasive approach.
CH Hsu, KH Liu, CY Tsai, TS Yeh
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1874 views
65 likes
0 comments
08:42
Laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy for superior mesenteric artery syndrome
Purpose:
The superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is a rare disease in which the third portion of the duodenum is compressed by the narrow space of the SMA and the aorta. Surgical treatment such as duodenojejunostomy (DJS) could resolve this problem. Here we report our experience of laparoscopic DJS with a video demonstration.

Materials and Methods:
This 18-year-old woman suffered from vomiting, abdominal distention and progressive weight loss during 6 months before admission. The abdominal discomfort usually occurred after meals and it could be alleviated by a decubitus position. Endoscopic exams revealed gastritis and reflux esophagitis. Computed tomography (CT) with contrast identified the distended stomach and the proximal duodenum obstructed by the SMA. Surgical treatment was advised after a complete preoperative survey, including a series of image survey, psychological evaluation and nutrition status. A three-port laparoscopic approach was used. After opening a small window through the mesocolon, a side-to-side DJS was created with a linear stapler and the common channel was closed with a hand-sewn suture.

Results:
There were no intraoperative complications. The laparoscopic DJS tooks 52 mins and blood loss was minimal. The nasogastric tube was removed on postoperative day 3 and she was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 7. The postoperative upper GI series showed a smooth contrast passage from the DJS to the intestine and the patient gained 6 kg within 4 months after surgery.

Conclusion:
Laparoscopic DJS is a surgical option for SMA syndrome after conservative treatment failure. It is safe, feasible and provides the benefits of a minimally invasive approach.