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General and digestive surgery

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.
Laparoscopic rectal resection with ICG-guided nodal navigation
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 66-year-old woman with a sigmoid-rectal junction early stage cancer submitted to laparoscopic resection. Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to mark the distal margin of the neoplasia, and 2mL of ICG were injected into the mucosa of the rectum, 2cm distal to the inferior border of the tumor.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588 camera system), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
It was possible to verify the good perfusion of the proximal stump of the anastomosis before the Knight-Griffen anastomosis was performed, thanks to an intravenous injection of ICG.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection, a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures, and could be related with a lower risk of anastomotic fistula, controlling the adequate perfusion of the stump.
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, A Titi, G Gaverini
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
2324 views
5 likes
1 comment
11:48
Laparoscopic rectal resection with ICG-guided nodal navigation
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 66-year-old woman with a sigmoid-rectal junction early stage cancer submitted to laparoscopic resection. Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to mark the distal margin of the neoplasia, and 2mL of ICG were injected into the mucosa of the rectum, 2cm distal to the inferior border of the tumor.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588 camera system), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
It was possible to verify the good perfusion of the proximal stump of the anastomosis before the Knight-Griffen anastomosis was performed, thanks to an intravenous injection of ICG.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection, a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures, and could be related with a lower risk of anastomotic fistula, controlling the adequate perfusion of the stump.
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
S Qian, P Tejedor, M Leon, M Ortega, C Pastor
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
2651 views
3 likes
2 comments
06:45
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
Laparoscopic splenic flexure mobilization during low anterior resection (LAR), extra central connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems
This is the case of two adult patients who presented with a low rectal carcinoma. A low anterior resection was performed laparoscopically. In both cases, the procedure was begun with a mobilization of the splenic flexure to ensure sufficient length on the proximal colonic segment to facilitate a tension-free low colorectal anastomosis. In the first case, a small aberrant artery, and during the second case, an aberrant artery of greater caliber can be appreciated. Anatomical studies report an extra central arterial connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems in addition to the marginal artery of Drummond in 10 to 30% of cases. In such cases, there is an extra connection from the ascending branch of the left colic artery to the middle colic artery or the marginal artery of Drummond. Different names have been given to these connections, such as for example the meandering mesenteric artery, the artery of Moskovitch and Riolan’s arch.
A Wijsmuller, RJ Franken, JB Tuynman, J Bonjer
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
3439 views
5 likes
0 comments
19:49
Laparoscopic splenic flexure mobilization during low anterior resection (LAR), extra central connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems
This is the case of two adult patients who presented with a low rectal carcinoma. A low anterior resection was performed laparoscopically. In both cases, the procedure was begun with a mobilization of the splenic flexure to ensure sufficient length on the proximal colonic segment to facilitate a tension-free low colorectal anastomosis. In the first case, a small aberrant artery, and during the second case, an aberrant artery of greater caliber can be appreciated. Anatomical studies report an extra central arterial connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems in addition to the marginal artery of Drummond in 10 to 30% of cases. In such cases, there is an extra connection from the ascending branch of the left colic artery to the middle colic artery or the marginal artery of Drummond. Different names have been given to these connections, such as for example the meandering mesenteric artery, the artery of Moskovitch and Riolan’s arch.
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1220 views
5 likes
0 comments
15:36
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
Transanal minimally invasive full-thickness middle rectum polyp resection with the patient in a prone position
Background: Nowadays, rectal preservation has gained popularity when it comes to the management of degenerated rectal polyps or early rectal cancer (1, 2). Tis/T1 rectal lesions can be safely treated without chemoradiation (3). Treatment via transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) offers more advantages than endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (4). The authors report the case of a 60-year-old woman who underwent a TAMIS procedure for a large polyp located anteriorly in the middle rectum, which was 7cm away from the pectineal line and staged as uTisN0M0 preoperatively.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone position with a split-leg kneeling position. A reusable transanal D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was introduced into the anus together with DAPRI monocurved instruments (Figure 1). The polyp was put in evidence (Figure 2) and resection margins were defined circumferentially using the monocurved coagulating hook. A full-thickness resection was performed with a complete removal of the rectal serosa and exposure of the peritoneal cavity, due to the anatomical polyp positioning (Figure 3). The rectal opening was subsequently closed using two converging full-thickness running sutures using 3/0 V-loc™ sutures (Figure 4a). The two sutures were started laterally and joined together medially (Figure 4b).
Results: Total operative time was 60 minutes whereas suturing time was 35 minutes. There was no perioperative bleeding. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 2 days. The pathological report showed a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and clear margins.
Conclusions: In the presence of degenerated rectal polyps, full-thickness TAMIS is oncologically safe and feasible. The final rectal flap can be safely closed by means of laparoscopic endoluminal sutures.
G Dapri, L Qin Yi, A Wong, P Tan Enjiu, S Hsien Lin, D Lee, T Kok Yang, S Mantoo
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
710 views
195 likes
0 comments
05:53
Transanal minimally invasive full-thickness middle rectum polyp resection with the patient in a prone position
Background: Nowadays, rectal preservation has gained popularity when it comes to the management of degenerated rectal polyps or early rectal cancer (1, 2). Tis/T1 rectal lesions can be safely treated without chemoradiation (3). Treatment via transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) offers more advantages than endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (4). The authors report the case of a 60-year-old woman who underwent a TAMIS procedure for a large polyp located anteriorly in the middle rectum, which was 7cm away from the pectineal line and staged as uTisN0M0 preoperatively.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone position with a split-leg kneeling position. A reusable transanal D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was introduced into the anus together with DAPRI monocurved instruments (Figure 1). The polyp was put in evidence (Figure 2) and resection margins were defined circumferentially using the monocurved coagulating hook. A full-thickness resection was performed with a complete removal of the rectal serosa and exposure of the peritoneal cavity, due to the anatomical polyp positioning (Figure 3). The rectal opening was subsequently closed using two converging full-thickness running sutures using 3/0 V-loc™ sutures (Figure 4a). The two sutures were started laterally and joined together medially (Figure 4b).
Results: Total operative time was 60 minutes whereas suturing time was 35 minutes. There was no perioperative bleeding. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 2 days. The pathological report showed a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and clear margins.
Conclusions: In the presence of degenerated rectal polyps, full-thickness TAMIS is oncologically safe and feasible. The final rectal flap can be safely closed by means of laparoscopic endoluminal sutures.
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
1028 views
232 likes
1 comment
07:49
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.
Live interactive transanal TME (TaTME) with the TEO™ platform
Randomized clinical trials such as COLOR II, COREAN and CLASICC, have shown better results for laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME), in terms of short-term and long-term outcomes, when compared with open TME.
Laparoscopic TME presents some limitations such as low rectal cancer which has a high risk of leaving a positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) and a narrow pelvis. Conversion to open procedures remains unsatisfactory.
Transanal TME (taTME) has been proposed to give a new option in cases where laparoscopic TME is difficult.
In this video, we present the case of a transanal approach with the TEO™ platform for low rectal cancer.
A Melani, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3181 views
324 likes
0 comments
45:51
Live interactive transanal TME (TaTME) with the TEO™ platform
Randomized clinical trials such as COLOR II, COREAN and CLASICC, have shown better results for laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME), in terms of short-term and long-term outcomes, when compared with open TME.
Laparoscopic TME presents some limitations such as low rectal cancer which has a high risk of leaving a positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) and a narrow pelvis. Conversion to open procedures remains unsatisfactory.
Transanal TME (taTME) has been proposed to give a new option in cases where laparoscopic TME is difficult.
In this video, we present the case of a transanal approach with the TEO™ platform for low rectal cancer.
Transanal minimally invasive surgical anal canal polyp resection
Background: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been known for a long time. Recently, transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) started to be popularized and it can be used in front of difficult cases for ESD.

Video: A 36-year-old woman underwent a TAMIS resection, after unsuccessful ESD, for a 2cm polyp located anteriorly in the anal canal, just beside the pectineal line. Preoperative work-up showed a uT1m versus T1sm N0 M0 lesion. The patient was placed in a prone position with a split leg kneeling position. The procedure was performed with a new reusable transanal platform, a monocurved coagulating hook, and a grasping forceps. The mucosal flap was closed using two absorbable running sutures, a monocurved needle holder, and a grasping forceps.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No perioperative complications were noted, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. Pathological findings showed a 2 by 1.3 by 0.5cm villotubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins.

Conclusions: TAMIS anal canal polyp resection allows for a meticulous dissection under a magnified exposure of the operative field, with a final mucosal flap closure in adequate ergonomic conditions.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1873 views
102 likes
0 comments
05:13
Transanal minimally invasive surgical anal canal polyp resection
Background: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been known for a long time. Recently, transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) started to be popularized and it can be used in front of difficult cases for ESD.

Video: A 36-year-old woman underwent a TAMIS resection, after unsuccessful ESD, for a 2cm polyp located anteriorly in the anal canal, just beside the pectineal line. Preoperative work-up showed a uT1m versus T1sm N0 M0 lesion. The patient was placed in a prone position with a split leg kneeling position. The procedure was performed with a new reusable transanal platform, a monocurved coagulating hook, and a grasping forceps. The mucosal flap was closed using two absorbable running sutures, a monocurved needle holder, and a grasping forceps.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No perioperative complications were noted, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. Pathological findings showed a 2 by 1.3 by 0.5cm villotubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins.

Conclusions: TAMIS anal canal polyp resection allows for a meticulous dissection under a magnified exposure of the operative field, with a final mucosal flap closure in adequate ergonomic conditions.
The 3 approaches to splenic flexure mobilization
Background: The mobilization of the splenic flexure during laparoscopic colorectal surgery can be a challenge, especially in anatomically difficult patients. In this video, the inframesocolic, the supramesocolic, and lateral-to-medial approaches are demonstrated.

Video: The first part of the video shows the inframesocolic approach where the opening of the transverse mesocolon, above the pancreatic body and tail, allows access to the lesser sac and the exposure of the spleen. The second part of the video shows the supramesocolic approach where reaching Gerota’s fascia allows the flexure to be taken down. The third part of the video shows the lateral-to-medial approach where opening the lesser sac allows the flexure to be mobilized.

Results: All three approaches are laparoscopically feasible and safe. The goal remains similar, that is to avoid anastomotic tension. The operative time for this step, during the entire colorectal procedure, is influenced by the patient’s characteristics (previous surgery, high splenic flexure, short mesentery, etc.) and obviously, by the surgeon’s learning curve.

Conclusions: The choice between the three approaches depends on the patient’s characteristics and on the surgeon’s habits.
G Dapri, NA Bascombe, GB Cadière, J Marks
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4129 views
340 likes
0 comments
11:51
The 3 approaches to splenic flexure mobilization
Background: The mobilization of the splenic flexure during laparoscopic colorectal surgery can be a challenge, especially in anatomically difficult patients. In this video, the inframesocolic, the supramesocolic, and lateral-to-medial approaches are demonstrated.

Video: The first part of the video shows the inframesocolic approach where the opening of the transverse mesocolon, above the pancreatic body and tail, allows access to the lesser sac and the exposure of the spleen. The second part of the video shows the supramesocolic approach where reaching Gerota’s fascia allows the flexure to be taken down. The third part of the video shows the lateral-to-medial approach where opening the lesser sac allows the flexure to be mobilized.

Results: All three approaches are laparoscopically feasible and safe. The goal remains similar, that is to avoid anastomotic tension. The operative time for this step, during the entire colorectal procedure, is influenced by the patient’s characteristics (previous surgery, high splenic flexure, short mesentery, etc.) and obviously, by the surgeon’s learning curve.

Conclusions: The choice between the three approaches depends on the patient’s characteristics and on the surgeon’s habits.
Pure transanal laparoscopic repair of early rectovaginal fistula
Background: Rectovaginal fistula is an abnormal connection between the rectum and the vagina, with leakage of rectal contents through the vagina. Different surgeries have been attempted such as direct repair, plug placement, advancement flap, muscle interposition, colostomy, proctectomy or delayed pull-through colo-anal anastomosis. Recently, transanal minimally invasive surgery has been described amongst the surgical options.

Video: The authors present a pure transanal laparoscopic repair of early rectovaginal fistula in a 74-year-old lady, submitted 3 weeks before to a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum with ‘en bloc’ hysterectomy for rectal adenocarcinoma (pT4aN0M0). A protective ileostomy was performed at the time of rectal surgery, and the postoperative course was uneventful. After having positioned the patient in a gynecologic position, a new reusable transanal platform according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was adopted. The exploration of the lower rectum put in evidence a 2cm rectovaginal fistula, located at a 3 o’clock position and at a 12cm distance from the anal margin. Absorbable figure-of-8 sutures using Vicryl 2/0 were performed to close the defect. Thanks to the curves of the instruments, the surgeon worked under ergonomic positions, without clashing of the instruments’ tips and any conflict of the surgeon’s hands. At the end of the procedure, injection of methylene blue through the vagina did not show any passage of the product into the lower rectum.

Results: The operative time was 120 minutes and intraoperative bleeding was insignificant. The postoperative course was uneventful, and patient discharge was allowed after 6 days. Due to the reusable nature of all the material implemented, no supplementary cost was necessary. The gastrograffin enema after 2 months showed a complete healing of the fistula. As a result, the protective ileostomy was closed.
Conclusion: Rectovaginal fistula can be repaired through a pure transanal laparoscopy, which prevents complicated and demolition surgeries usually performed through the abdomen.
G Dapri, M Degueldre
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1278 views
96 likes
0 comments
04:58
Pure transanal laparoscopic repair of early rectovaginal fistula
Background: Rectovaginal fistula is an abnormal connection between the rectum and the vagina, with leakage of rectal contents through the vagina. Different surgeries have been attempted such as direct repair, plug placement, advancement flap, muscle interposition, colostomy, proctectomy or delayed pull-through colo-anal anastomosis. Recently, transanal minimally invasive surgery has been described amongst the surgical options.

Video: The authors present a pure transanal laparoscopic repair of early rectovaginal fistula in a 74-year-old lady, submitted 3 weeks before to a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum with ‘en bloc’ hysterectomy for rectal adenocarcinoma (pT4aN0M0). A protective ileostomy was performed at the time of rectal surgery, and the postoperative course was uneventful. After having positioned the patient in a gynecologic position, a new reusable transanal platform according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was adopted. The exploration of the lower rectum put in evidence a 2cm rectovaginal fistula, located at a 3 o’clock position and at a 12cm distance from the anal margin. Absorbable figure-of-8 sutures using Vicryl 2/0 were performed to close the defect. Thanks to the curves of the instruments, the surgeon worked under ergonomic positions, without clashing of the instruments’ tips and any conflict of the surgeon’s hands. At the end of the procedure, injection of methylene blue through the vagina did not show any passage of the product into the lower rectum.

Results: The operative time was 120 minutes and intraoperative bleeding was insignificant. The postoperative course was uneventful, and patient discharge was allowed after 6 days. Due to the reusable nature of all the material implemented, no supplementary cost was necessary. The gastrograffin enema after 2 months showed a complete healing of the fistula. As a result, the protective ileostomy was closed.
Conclusion: Rectovaginal fistula can be repaired through a pure transanal laparoscopy, which prevents complicated and demolition surgeries usually performed through the abdomen.
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) through single right iliac fossa (RIF) incision
Background: Single incision laparoscopy is worth of interest during up-to-down rectal resection because it allows to use the single site as the site of temporary ileostomy placement at the end of the procedure.
Video: This video shows an up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection in a 49-year-old woman presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma located 12cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor. The procedure was entirely performed with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), inserted in the right flank. The uterus and the peritoneal sheet covering the vagina were retrieved using percutaneous sutures. A circular mechanical colorectal anastomosis was performed and a final temporary ileostomy was placed at the site of the single access.
Results: The procedure duration was 297 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (20 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection allows to place the temporary ileostomy at the single incision site, offering oncological results comparable to conventional laparoscopy.
G Dapri, N Bachir, L Antolino, K Grozdev, D Guta, K Jottard, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2156 views
107 likes
0 comments
09:22
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) through single right iliac fossa (RIF) incision
Background: Single incision laparoscopy is worth of interest during up-to-down rectal resection because it allows to use the single site as the site of temporary ileostomy placement at the end of the procedure.
Video: This video shows an up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection in a 49-year-old woman presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma located 12cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor. The procedure was entirely performed with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), inserted in the right flank. The uterus and the peritoneal sheet covering the vagina were retrieved using percutaneous sutures. A circular mechanical colorectal anastomosis was performed and a final temporary ileostomy was placed at the site of the single access.
Results: The procedure duration was 297 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (20 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection allows to place the temporary ileostomy at the single incision site, offering oncological results comparable to conventional laparoscopy.
Transanal circumferential mucosectomy for symptomatic benign rectal stenosis
Background: Transanal laparoscopy has been described for more than 30 years. In the presence of benign lesions, it gathers increasing interest, especially if such lesions are located in the low rectum or close to the anal margin.
Video: This video demonstrates the case of a 38-year-old man presented with a circumferential rectal stenosis due to a rectal ulcer. The patient underwent a transanal mucosectomy using laparoscopy, after a sequence of unsuccessful endoscopic dilatations. Preoperative work-up showed a circumferential benign stenosis, 2.5cm away from the anal margin. The procedure was entirely performed with a new reusable transanal platform made up by the DAPRI-Port and DAPRI curved instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany). Once the 360-degree mucosectomy had been completed, the mucosal layer was repaired using separate absorbable sutures.
Results: The operative length was 163 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. The pathological report confirmed the benign nature of the lesion.
Conclusions: Although transanal laparoscopy has been documented for years, it gathers increasing interest and should be considered as the technique of choice for the treatment of benign rectal lesions, which can be difficult to treat using other methods.
G Dapri, N Bachir, L Antolino, K Grozdev, D Guta, K Jottard, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1014 views
13 likes
0 comments
08:37
Transanal circumferential mucosectomy for symptomatic benign rectal stenosis
Background: Transanal laparoscopy has been described for more than 30 years. In the presence of benign lesions, it gathers increasing interest, especially if such lesions are located in the low rectum or close to the anal margin.
Video: This video demonstrates the case of a 38-year-old man presented with a circumferential rectal stenosis due to a rectal ulcer. The patient underwent a transanal mucosectomy using laparoscopy, after a sequence of unsuccessful endoscopic dilatations. Preoperative work-up showed a circumferential benign stenosis, 2.5cm away from the anal margin. The procedure was entirely performed with a new reusable transanal platform made up by the DAPRI-Port and DAPRI curved instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany). Once the 360-degree mucosectomy had been completed, the mucosal layer was repaired using separate absorbable sutures.
Results: The operative length was 163 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. The pathological report confirmed the benign nature of the lesion.
Conclusions: Although transanal laparoscopy has been documented for years, it gathers increasing interest and should be considered as the technique of choice for the treatment of benign rectal lesions, which can be difficult to treat using other methods.
Transanal laparoscopic TME with a new port assisted by single incision
Background: Rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) can be performed through the anus going up into the abdominal cavity. This approach has to be performed using a transanal device in order to create a retroperitoneum, allowing the surgeon to perform a TME similar to the one performed from the abdomen going down to the anus. A new reusable port named DAPRI Port or D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) has been developed, and a new platform together with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope) has been created. The D-Port allows to maintain one of the rules of laparoscopy, which is the optical system in the middle of the two ancillary operative tools. In addition, the cost of the procedure is not increased, due to the reusable material.
Video: This video shows a down-to-up rectal resection assisted by single incision laparoscopy, in a 65-year old man presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma 4cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor, after radiochemotherapy. The procedure was performed transabdominally for the vascular dissection and transanally for the TME. The abdominal single site was then used for the placement of the temporary ileostomy.
Results: Total operative time was 301 minutes, and partial transanal laparoscopy was 145 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged after 5 days. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (15 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Down-to-up rectal resection is an interesting procedure, and when associated with single incision laparoscopy, it offers the possibility to use the single site as the site for temporary ileostomy.
G Dapri, L Antolino, N Bachir, D Guta, K Grozdev, B Nebbot, K Jottard, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2694 views
39 likes
0 comments
12:53
Transanal laparoscopic TME with a new port assisted by single incision
Background: Rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) can be performed through the anus going up into the abdominal cavity. This approach has to be performed using a transanal device in order to create a retroperitoneum, allowing the surgeon to perform a TME similar to the one performed from the abdomen going down to the anus. A new reusable port named DAPRI Port or D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) has been developed, and a new platform together with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope) has been created. The D-Port allows to maintain one of the rules of laparoscopy, which is the optical system in the middle of the two ancillary operative tools. In addition, the cost of the procedure is not increased, due to the reusable material.
Video: This video shows a down-to-up rectal resection assisted by single incision laparoscopy, in a 65-year old man presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma 4cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor, after radiochemotherapy. The procedure was performed transabdominally for the vascular dissection and transanally for the TME. The abdominal single site was then used for the placement of the temporary ileostomy.
Results: Total operative time was 301 minutes, and partial transanal laparoscopy was 145 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged after 5 days. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (15 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Down-to-up rectal resection is an interesting procedure, and when associated with single incision laparoscopy, it offers the possibility to use the single site as the site for temporary ileostomy.
Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy in a male patient
Introduction
Ventral rectopexy, with or without mesh, has a lower recurrence rate than a perineal approach for rectal prolapse treatment. One of the techniques which are gaining a wider acceptance is the laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy, also called D'Hoore rectopexy. The unique feature of this technique is that it avoids any posterolateral dissection of the rectum. Clinical outcomes demonstrate that this technique present good results in terms of recurrence, a low rate of constipation induced by the procedure, as well a low risk of sexual dysfunction.

Clinical case
A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a one-year evolution of rectal prolapse with complaints of sporadic rectal bleeding and soiling. He reports daily bowel movements with a necessity of manual prolapse reduction. His past medical history includes follicular lymphoma. He has no history of previous surgeries.
After preoperative investigation with colonoscopy, a barium enema and anorectal function tests, a laparoscopic D’Hoore rectopexy was proposed to the patient.
In this video, we present the critical steps of the procedure with special attention to the preservation of the hypogastric nerves.
The postoperative outcome was uneventful. In the follow-up period, the patient reports a significant improvement of symptoms, without rectal prolapse at defecation, no constipation, and no change in sexual function.
M Manzanera Díaz, C Moreno Sanz, J De Pedro Conal, A Goulart, F Cortina Oliva
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
4159 views
245 likes
0 comments
07:35
Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy in a male patient
Introduction
Ventral rectopexy, with or without mesh, has a lower recurrence rate than a perineal approach for rectal prolapse treatment. One of the techniques which are gaining a wider acceptance is the laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy, also called D'Hoore rectopexy. The unique feature of this technique is that it avoids any posterolateral dissection of the rectum. Clinical outcomes demonstrate that this technique present good results in terms of recurrence, a low rate of constipation induced by the procedure, as well a low risk of sexual dysfunction.

Clinical case
A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a one-year evolution of rectal prolapse with complaints of sporadic rectal bleeding and soiling. He reports daily bowel movements with a necessity of manual prolapse reduction. His past medical history includes follicular lymphoma. He has no history of previous surgeries.
After preoperative investigation with colonoscopy, a barium enema and anorectal function tests, a laparoscopic D’Hoore rectopexy was proposed to the patient.
In this video, we present the critical steps of the procedure with special attention to the preservation of the hypogastric nerves.
The postoperative outcome was uneventful. In the follow-up period, the patient reports a significant improvement of symptoms, without rectal prolapse at defecation, no constipation, and no change in sexual function.
Pure NOTES total transanal caudal-to-cranial low rectal resection
A 37-year-old female patient underwent a pure NOTES transanal rectal resection without transabdominal laparoscopic assistance for a rectal lesion located 5cm away from the anal verge (cT2N0M0 adenocarcinoma). All oncologic principles were fulfilled.
A GelPOINT Path Transanal® access platform was used. The procedure was achieved with no-flexible cameras and straight laparoscopic instruments. An Ultracision® device was used for dissection. A circular stapler with a long anvil was selected because it helped to achieve the anastomosis.
No complications were observed and the patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day.
P Leão, A Goulart, N Marcos, C Veiga, H Cristino
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1302 views
29 likes
0 comments
15:43
Pure NOTES total transanal caudal-to-cranial low rectal resection
A 37-year-old female patient underwent a pure NOTES transanal rectal resection without transabdominal laparoscopic assistance for a rectal lesion located 5cm away from the anal verge (cT2N0M0 adenocarcinoma). All oncologic principles were fulfilled.
A GelPOINT Path Transanal® access platform was used. The procedure was achieved with no-flexible cameras and straight laparoscopic instruments. An Ultracision® device was used for dissection. A circular stapler with a long anvil was selected because it helped to achieve the anastomosis.
No complications were observed and the patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day.
PROGRESS - Transanal TME with colo-anal anastomosis without trans-abdominal assistance for rectal cancer in a male patient
The authors put forward an original oncologic Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) technique combined with distal sigmoidectomy followed by a mechanical colo-anal side-to-end anastomosis using a purely transanal route.
The originality of this technique lies in the strictly transanal approach without any laparoscopic assistance as well as in the oncologic dissection of the rectum around its fascia propria. In addition, the technique is outstanding in the mobilization of the sigmoid mesocolon’s root as well as in the retroperitoneal mobilization of the vascular inferior mesenteric axis, hence avoiding contact with intra-abdominal organs.
This technique is called PROGRESS (Peri Rectal Oncologic Gateway for Retroperitoneal EndoScopic Surgery) due to the retroperitoneal endoscopic dissection using a perirectal access.
The video shows images of remarkable quality, especially of anatomical nerve structures, due to the use of a 4mm, 30-degree scope and a Karl Storz High-Definition camera introduced through the TEO™ device.
J Leroy, D Ntourakis, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
5880 views
34 likes
1 comment
18:55
PROGRESS - Transanal TME with colo-anal anastomosis without trans-abdominal assistance for rectal cancer in a male patient
The authors put forward an original oncologic Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) technique combined with distal sigmoidectomy followed by a mechanical colo-anal side-to-end anastomosis using a purely transanal route.
The originality of this technique lies in the strictly transanal approach without any laparoscopic assistance as well as in the oncologic dissection of the rectum around its fascia propria. In addition, the technique is outstanding in the mobilization of the sigmoid mesocolon’s root as well as in the retroperitoneal mobilization of the vascular inferior mesenteric axis, hence avoiding contact with intra-abdominal organs.
This technique is called PROGRESS (Peri Rectal Oncologic Gateway for Retroperitoneal EndoScopic Surgery) due to the retroperitoneal endoscopic dissection using a perirectal access.
The video shows images of remarkable quality, especially of anatomical nerve structures, due to the use of a 4mm, 30-degree scope and a Karl Storz High-Definition camera introduced through the TEO™ device.
Laparoscopic rectovaginal resection for endometriosis: transvaginal specimen extraction and anastomosis
The authors demonstrate a rectovaginal resection technique for invasive endometriosis. The original nature of this approach hinges on the mesorectum dissection technique in contact with the rectal wall in order to preserve rectal vascularization and innervation. Additionally, rectal exteriorization through the vagina to prepare for the colorectal anastomosis using a mechanical circular stapling without any abdominal incision is truly original as it contributes to limiting parietal trauma and improving cosmesis. The film truly focuses on the digestive approach just after anterior pelvic dissection has been completed by the team of gynecologic surgeons.
J Leroy, CY Akladios, V Thoma, A Wattiez, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1314 views
23 likes
0 comments
21:33
Laparoscopic rectovaginal resection for endometriosis: transvaginal specimen extraction and anastomosis
The authors demonstrate a rectovaginal resection technique for invasive endometriosis. The original nature of this approach hinges on the mesorectum dissection technique in contact with the rectal wall in order to preserve rectal vascularization and innervation. Additionally, rectal exteriorization through the vagina to prepare for the colorectal anastomosis using a mechanical circular stapling without any abdominal incision is truly original as it contributes to limiting parietal trauma and improving cosmesis. The film truly focuses on the digestive approach just after anterior pelvic dissection has been completed by the team of gynecologic surgeons.