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Monthly publications

#February 2019
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Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
Gianluca Baiocchi, Riccardo Nascimbeni, Nereo Vettoretto, Nicolo de Manzini, Mario Morino
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1373 views
3 likes
1 comment
09:24
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
Xavier Untereiner, Margherita Pizzicannella, Bernard Dallemagne, Didier Mutter, Jacques Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
4483 views
12 likes
4 comments
06:55
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
Salvador Morales-Conde, Takeshi Urade, Didier Mutter, Jacques Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
3845 views
15 likes
4 comments
42:53
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
Didier Mutter, Takeshi Urade, Jacques Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
5479 views
37 likes
4 comments
46:18
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
Bernard Dallemagne, Takeshi Urade, Didier Mutter, Jacques Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1262 views
16 likes
1 comment
39:46
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Deborah Kadoche, Mihaela Ignat, Didier Mutter, Jacques Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
483 views
2 likes
0 comments
08:22
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Gianfranco Donatelli, Silvana Perretta, Mihaela Ignat, Margherita Pizzicannella, Didier Mutter, Jacques Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
603 views
2 likes
0 comments
14:45
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioplasty to treat biliary strictures after biliary-enteric anastomosis
This is the case of a 50-year-old female patient presenting with a bilio-enteric anastomosis stricture caused by a bile duct injury during a cholecystectomy 10 years ago. The patient presents with multiple episodes of cholangitis treated by antibiotics, causing multiple hospital admissions. Blood test assessment demonstrates high levels of alkaline phosphatase. Her magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed a stricture at the level of the hepaticojejunal anastomosis as well as mild intrahepatic biliary duct dilatation. An endoscopic approach was not suitable for this patient, because of the anatomical disturbance induced by the bilio-enteric surgical reconstruction. A percutaneous balloon catheter dilatation strategy was adopted. After two previous cholangioplasty sessions, a final session is presented here. The total duration of the last procedure was less than 1 hour, and a final stricture dilatation was achieved. After 24 hours of the final procedure, the biliary catheter was removed and the patient was discharged home without any complications.
Mariano Eduardo Gimenez, Alain Garcia
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
172 views
2 likes
0 comments
13:34
Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioplasty to treat biliary strictures after biliary-enteric anastomosis
This is the case of a 50-year-old female patient presenting with a bilio-enteric anastomosis stricture caused by a bile duct injury during a cholecystectomy 10 years ago. The patient presents with multiple episodes of cholangitis treated by antibiotics, causing multiple hospital admissions. Blood test assessment demonstrates high levels of alkaline phosphatase. Her magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed a stricture at the level of the hepaticojejunal anastomosis as well as mild intrahepatic biliary duct dilatation. An endoscopic approach was not suitable for this patient, because of the anatomical disturbance induced by the bilio-enteric surgical reconstruction. A percutaneous balloon catheter dilatation strategy was adopted. After two previous cholangioplasty sessions, a final session is presented here. The total duration of the last procedure was less than 1 hour, and a final stricture dilatation was achieved. After 24 hours of the final procedure, the biliary catheter was removed and the patient was discharged home without any complications.
ICG fluorescent cholangiography in difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy with inflammatory biliary fusion post-cholecystitis and pancreatitis
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the presence of inflammatory billiary fusion is a technically challenging procedure associated with a 0.5% risk of injury to major extrahepatic bile ducts.
Preoperative planning and intraoperative visualization of the anatomy of the biliary tree using an intraoperative cholangiogram reduces the risk or the severity of injury to major biliary ducts.
Indocyanine green cholangiography has emerged as a promising non-invasive modality for visualization of extra-hepatic biliary ducts, having the advantage of very easy use repetitively at various stages of critical areas of dissection.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient who had an emergency admission for mild acute cholecystitis (as per Tokyo guidelines, 2018) and concomitant moderately severe acute gallstone pancreatitis (revised Atlanta classification) with a preoperative MRCP predictive of biliary inflammatory fusion between the gallbladder neck and the common hepatic duct.
Consequently, we planned and performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an indocyanine green cholangiogram as a non-invasive method to help identify the intraoperative anatomy of the extra-hepatic biliary ducts.
The main feature of our video is the use of indocyanine green during the difficult dissection of the gallbladder neck and exposure of the critical view of safety in Calot’s triangle as cased with clear features of significant biliary inflammatory fusion between the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.
ICG fluorescent demonstration of the extra-hepatic biliary tree is used in real time and with ease repeatedly at several stages of this difficult dissection, facilitating a safe completion of a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may become a standard practice.
Gautam Kumar, Sridharan Ramachandran, Marius Paraoan
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
195 views
3 likes
1 comment
13:21
ICG fluorescent cholangiography in difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy with inflammatory biliary fusion post-cholecystitis and pancreatitis
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the presence of inflammatory billiary fusion is a technically challenging procedure associated with a 0.5% risk of injury to major extrahepatic bile ducts.
Preoperative planning and intraoperative visualization of the anatomy of the biliary tree using an intraoperative cholangiogram reduces the risk or the severity of injury to major biliary ducts.
Indocyanine green cholangiography has emerged as a promising non-invasive modality for visualization of extra-hepatic biliary ducts, having the advantage of very easy use repetitively at various stages of critical areas of dissection.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient who had an emergency admission for mild acute cholecystitis (as per Tokyo guidelines, 2018) and concomitant moderately severe acute gallstone pancreatitis (revised Atlanta classification) with a preoperative MRCP predictive of biliary inflammatory fusion between the gallbladder neck and the common hepatic duct.
Consequently, we planned and performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an indocyanine green cholangiogram as a non-invasive method to help identify the intraoperative anatomy of the extra-hepatic biliary ducts.
The main feature of our video is the use of indocyanine green during the difficult dissection of the gallbladder neck and exposure of the critical view of safety in Calot’s triangle as cased with clear features of significant biliary inflammatory fusion between the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.
ICG fluorescent demonstration of the extra-hepatic biliary tree is used in real time and with ease repeatedly at several stages of this difficult dissection, facilitating a safe completion of a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may become a standard practice.
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
Antonio D'Urso, Didier Mutter, Jacques Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1734 views
8 likes
1 comment
08:23
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
Antonio D'Urso, Gianfranco Donatelli, Bernard Dallemagne, Didier Mutter, Jacques Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
81 views
0 likes
0 comments
12:02
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis with HOT AXIOS® stent after Whipple pancreatectomy, filling blind loop through percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage
A 67-year-old woman underwent a Whipple pancreatectomy for cancer one year earlier. She was readmitted to hospital for abdominal pain and subocclusion with jaundice. CT-scan showed a dilatation of the jejunal stump with associated biliary tree dilatation. Percutaneous biliary transhepatic drainage (PBTHD) was performed and a stenosis was diagnosed in the afferent loop, accountable for subocclusion and secondary jaundice. Two double pigtails were delivered by the interventional radiologist through PBTHD across the jejunal stricture without resolution of symptoms. Biliary drainage was left in place causing patient discomfort. EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis (GJA) using the HOT AXIOS® stent was attempted in order to bypass the stricture. EUS allows to find the jejunal stump, detected by mechanical staple line visualization. Additionally, the blind loop was detected as it was filled up with liquid and contrast through the PBTHD. The HOT AXIOS® stent was delivered without any complications (VIDEO). Afterwards, flow of bile and liquid was observed through the lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS). PBTHD was immediately removed. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on a normal diet with no pain on the following day. EUS-GJA via a LAMS is a well-described technique in experts’ hands (Technical review of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided gastroenterostomy in 2017. Itoi T, Baron TH, Khashab MA, et al. Dig Endosc 2017;29:495-502). Special skills and techniques are necessary in order to recognize the exact small bowel loop to puncture (Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience. Tyberg A, Perez-Miranda M, Sanchez-Ocaña R et al. Endosc Int Open 2016;4:E276-81). In that case, we show that filling this loop using a previous transhepatic access should be considered an alternative in case of alterated anatomy. Also direct EUS transgastric injection of contrast medium in the dilated biliary tree to fill up the jejunal stump could be considered an option to perform GJA by a single operator in a single session after safely recognizing the right loop. In addition, fluoroscopy helps to detect the exact loop puncture site. In conclusion, GJA using a LAMS is feasible, safe and useful, and transhepatic injection of liquid and contrast medium helps to adequately recognize the jejunal stump after biliopancreatic surgery.
Gianfranco Donatelli, Guillaume Pourcher, David Fuks, Silvana Perretta, Bernard Dallemagne, Margherita Pizzicannella
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
72 views
2 likes
0 comments
02:30
EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis with HOT AXIOS® stent after Whipple pancreatectomy, filling blind loop through percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage
A 67-year-old woman underwent a Whipple pancreatectomy for cancer one year earlier. She was readmitted to hospital for abdominal pain and subocclusion with jaundice. CT-scan showed a dilatation of the jejunal stump with associated biliary tree dilatation. Percutaneous biliary transhepatic drainage (PBTHD) was performed and a stenosis was diagnosed in the afferent loop, accountable for subocclusion and secondary jaundice. Two double pigtails were delivered by the interventional radiologist through PBTHD across the jejunal stricture without resolution of symptoms. Biliary drainage was left in place causing patient discomfort. EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis (GJA) using the HOT AXIOS® stent was attempted in order to bypass the stricture. EUS allows to find the jejunal stump, detected by mechanical staple line visualization. Additionally, the blind loop was detected as it was filled up with liquid and contrast through the PBTHD. The HOT AXIOS® stent was delivered without any complications (VIDEO). Afterwards, flow of bile and liquid was observed through the lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS). PBTHD was immediately removed. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on a normal diet with no pain on the following day. EUS-GJA via a LAMS is a well-described technique in experts’ hands (Technical review of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided gastroenterostomy in 2017. Itoi T, Baron TH, Khashab MA, et al. Dig Endosc 2017;29:495-502). Special skills and techniques are necessary in order to recognize the exact small bowel loop to puncture (Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience. Tyberg A, Perez-Miranda M, Sanchez-Ocaña R et al. Endosc Int Open 2016;4:E276-81). In that case, we show that filling this loop using a previous transhepatic access should be considered an alternative in case of alterated anatomy. Also direct EUS transgastric injection of contrast medium in the dilated biliary tree to fill up the jejunal stump could be considered an option to perform GJA by a single operator in a single session after safely recognizing the right loop. In addition, fluoroscopy helps to detect the exact loop puncture site. In conclusion, GJA using a LAMS is feasible, safe and useful, and transhepatic injection of liquid and contrast medium helps to adequately recognize the jejunal stump after biliopancreatic surgery.
Esophagectomy : Thoracoscopic or robotic?
For esophageal cancer patients, radical esophagolymphadenectomy is the cornerstone of multimodality therapy with a curative intent. However, the percentage of cardiopulmonary complications associated with the transthoracic approach is high. Recent studies have shown that robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy (RATE) is at least equivalent to the open transthoracic approach for esophageal cancer in terms of short-term oncological outcomes. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. YK Chao, MD, PhD, presents a comparison between techniques, goes through a review of the literature and provides a single surgeon’s experience with the use of the robot in the management of this disease.
Yin-Kai Chao
Lecture
3 months ago
48 views
0 likes
0 comments
19:50
Esophagectomy : Thoracoscopic or robotic?
For esophageal cancer patients, radical esophagolymphadenectomy is the cornerstone of multimodality therapy with a curative intent. However, the percentage of cardiopulmonary complications associated with the transthoracic approach is high. Recent studies have shown that robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy (RATE) is at least equivalent to the open transthoracic approach for esophageal cancer in terms of short-term oncological outcomes. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. YK Chao, MD, PhD, presents a comparison between techniques, goes through a review of the literature and provides a single surgeon’s experience with the use of the robot in the management of this disease.
Robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy
The standard curative treatment for patients with esophageal cancer is perioperative chemotherapy or preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by open transthoracic esophagectomy (OTE). However, robot-assisted minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy (RAMIE) resulted in a lower percentage of overall surgery-related and cardiopulmonary complications with lower postoperative pain, better short-term quality of life, and a better short-term postoperative functional recovery as compared to OTE. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. JP Ruurda, MD, PhD addresses his team experience with RAMIE since 2003. He goes through a review of the literature and presents a clinical case describing the operative steps of the robot-assisted minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy.
Jelle P Ruurda
Lecture
3 months ago
99 views
0 likes
0 comments
26:15
Robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy
The standard curative treatment for patients with esophageal cancer is perioperative chemotherapy or preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by open transthoracic esophagectomy (OTE). However, robot-assisted minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy (RAMIE) resulted in a lower percentage of overall surgery-related and cardiopulmonary complications with lower postoperative pain, better short-term quality of life, and a better short-term postoperative functional recovery as compared to OTE. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. JP Ruurda, MD, PhD addresses his team experience with RAMIE since 2003. He goes through a review of the literature and presents a clinical case describing the operative steps of the robot-assisted minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy.