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Monthly publications

#February 2018
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Laparoscopic ileocecal resection for unresectable appendix
This is the case of a 36-year-old woman who has had an exploratory laparoscopy in another institution 2 months earlier. Acute appendicitis was suspected, based on ultrasound exam. However, exploration has shown an inflammatory appendicular mass, impossible to dissect. The patient was administered antibiotics for a period of 3 weeks. A laparoscopic appendectomy was decided upon at an interval of 2 months. Work-up included CT-scan and colonoscopy, which did not demonstrate anything specific.
Laparoscopic exploration demonstrated important fibrotic and scarry tissues around the appendix and the cecum. Despite painstaking dissection, appendectomy was impossible. Ileocecal resection was decided upon. Operative steps, namely exposure, division of the last ileal loop, division of the meso, division of the right colon above the ampulla coli and the intracorporeal side-to-side stapled anastomosis are demonstrated. Pathological findings evidenced an endometriotic nodule. The postoperative course was uneventful.
D Mutter, M Ignat, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2337 views
323 likes
0 comments
08:23
Laparoscopic ileocecal resection for unresectable appendix
This is the case of a 36-year-old woman who has had an exploratory laparoscopy in another institution 2 months earlier. Acute appendicitis was suspected, based on ultrasound exam. However, exploration has shown an inflammatory appendicular mass, impossible to dissect. The patient was administered antibiotics for a period of 3 weeks. A laparoscopic appendectomy was decided upon at an interval of 2 months. Work-up included CT-scan and colonoscopy, which did not demonstrate anything specific.
Laparoscopic exploration demonstrated important fibrotic and scarry tissues around the appendix and the cecum. Despite painstaking dissection, appendectomy was impossible. Ileocecal resection was decided upon. Operative steps, namely exposure, division of the last ileal loop, division of the meso, division of the right colon above the ampulla coli and the intracorporeal side-to-side stapled anastomosis are demonstrated. Pathological findings evidenced an endometriotic nodule. The postoperative course was uneventful.
Laparoscopic appendectomy and fenestration of hemorrhagic ovarian cyst
This is the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted to the emergency department for lower abdominal pain going on for 24 hours. No abdominal guarding was noted. Biological findings showed an inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 112. CT-scan showed the presence of an enlarged appendix (9mm thick) along with a voluminous adnexal cyst, which may be suggestive of a tubo-ovarian abscess. Laparoscopic exploration is performed. Congestive appendicitis is confirmed, as well as the presence of a hemorrhagic right ovarian cyst. Laparoscopic appendectomy is performed and the hemorrhagic ovarian cyst is fenestrated.
M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2185 views
407 likes
1 comment
04:57
Laparoscopic appendectomy and fenestration of hemorrhagic ovarian cyst
This is the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted to the emergency department for lower abdominal pain going on for 24 hours. No abdominal guarding was noted. Biological findings showed an inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 112. CT-scan showed the presence of an enlarged appendix (9mm thick) along with a voluminous adnexal cyst, which may be suggestive of a tubo-ovarian abscess. Laparoscopic exploration is performed. Congestive appendicitis is confirmed, as well as the presence of a hemorrhagic right ovarian cyst. Laparoscopic appendectomy is performed and the hemorrhagic ovarian cyst is fenestrated.
Laparoscopic appendectomy for recurrent appendicitis after medical treatment
Appendectomy is the only curative treatment of appendicitis. However, the management of patients with an appendiceal mass or abscess can be temporarily managed medically with intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or percutaneous drainage. And yet, there are many controversies over the non-operative management of acute appendicitis. In 2015, Fair et al. used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project to evaluate 30-day morbidity and mortality of intervention (laparoscopic and open appendectomy) at different time periods. A delay of operative intervention longer than 48 hours was associated with a doubling of complication rates. Elective appendectomy can be performed after 6 to 8 weeks later, which proves successful in the vast majority of patients.
This is the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with an acute appendicitis treated medically in another hospital. The patient had a past medical history of arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathy, previous cerebral ischemia, and rectal polyp. A delayed appendectomy was planned. However, before the procedure, a total colonoscopy was performed because of the history of polyps. This elderly patient was hospitalized for colonoscopy. At admission, he presented with fever, right iliac fossa tenderness, and a biological inflammatory syndrome. A CT-scan was performed. It showed a recurrent acute appendicitis without mass, with a 2cm abscess on the tip of the appendix. An appendectomy was performed in this case.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2052 views
335 likes
0 comments
05:00
Laparoscopic appendectomy for recurrent appendicitis after medical treatment
Appendectomy is the only curative treatment of appendicitis. However, the management of patients with an appendiceal mass or abscess can be temporarily managed medically with intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or percutaneous drainage. And yet, there are many controversies over the non-operative management of acute appendicitis. In 2015, Fair et al. used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project to evaluate 30-day morbidity and mortality of intervention (laparoscopic and open appendectomy) at different time periods. A delay of operative intervention longer than 48 hours was associated with a doubling of complication rates. Elective appendectomy can be performed after 6 to 8 weeks later, which proves successful in the vast majority of patients.
This is the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with an acute appendicitis treated medically in another hospital. The patient had a past medical history of arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathy, previous cerebral ischemia, and rectal polyp. A delayed appendectomy was planned. However, before the procedure, a total colonoscopy was performed because of the history of polyps. This elderly patient was hospitalized for colonoscopy. At admission, he presented with fever, right iliac fossa tenderness, and a biological inflammatory syndrome. A CT-scan was performed. It showed a recurrent acute appendicitis without mass, with a 2cm abscess on the tip of the appendix. An appendectomy was performed in this case.
Laparoscopic appendectomy for appendicitis with peritonitis
This is the case of a 37-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain and fever at 39.4°C. The work-up demonstrated important inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 169. CT-scan confirmed an acute appendicitis with an appendicolith at the base. The appendix is probably perforated as the CT-scan also demonstrated a pneumoperitoneum. Laparoscopic appendectomy is decided upon. The operative set-up is standard with an optical port placed at the umbilicus, a port in the left iliac fossa, and a suprapubic port. Exposure, appendectomy with stapling of the appendicular base, and cleansing of the peritoneal cavity are thoroughly demonstrated.
M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2744 views
469 likes
0 comments
05:03
Laparoscopic appendectomy for appendicitis with peritonitis
This is the case of a 37-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain and fever at 39.4°C. The work-up demonstrated important inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 169. CT-scan confirmed an acute appendicitis with an appendicolith at the base. The appendix is probably perforated as the CT-scan also demonstrated a pneumoperitoneum. Laparoscopic appendectomy is decided upon. The operative set-up is standard with an optical port placed at the umbilicus, a port in the left iliac fossa, and a suprapubic port. Exposure, appendectomy with stapling of the appendicular base, and cleansing of the peritoneal cavity are thoroughly demonstrated.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
7157 views
1068 likes
0 comments
13:33
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach
Note from the WeBSurg-IRCAD Scientific Committee:
This video entitled “Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach" shows an original technique of segmental colonic resection for benign conditions. Although, in the present case, the indication is not specified, there seems to be a tattooing on a lesion, which would not correspond to the initial indication of benign conditions. The indication might be a polyp. Such indications remain rare. The given approach is difficult to perform for inflammatory pathologies generating significant adhesions. However, although the video quality is not ideal, it was decided to publish this film with a special mention “case for debate” stating that this is not the IRCAD position, but the technique can be discussed.
Note from the authors of the video:
We have designed a modified caudal-to-cranial approach to perform a laparoscopic left colectomy preserving the inferior mesenteric artery for benign colorectal diseases.
A dissection is performed to separate the descending mesocolon from the plane of Gerota's fascia from the medial aspect to the peritoneal lining to the left parietal gutter. The peritoneal layer is incised parallel to the vessel and close to the colonic wall. The dissection is continued anteriorly up to reach the resected parietal gutter. A passage into the mesentery of the upper rectum is created for the use of the stapler and the dissection of the rectum. These maneuvers allow to straighten the mesentery simplifying the identification and division of the sigmoid arteries. A caudal-to-cranial dissection of the mesentery is performed from the divided rectum to the proximal descending colon using a sealed envelope device. It can be very useful to mobilize the colon in any direction: laterally, medially, or upward. The dissection is performed along the course of the vessel up to the proximal colon, with progressive division of the sigmoid arterial branches. The specimen is extracted through a Pfannenstiel incision. The anastomosis is performed transanally with a circular stapler according to the Knight-Griffen technique.
M Milone, P Anoldo, M Manigrasso, F Milone
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2740 views
504 likes
0 comments
09:27
Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach
Note from the WeBSurg-IRCAD Scientific Committee:
This video entitled “Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach" shows an original technique of segmental colonic resection for benign conditions. Although, in the present case, the indication is not specified, there seems to be a tattooing on a lesion, which would not correspond to the initial indication of benign conditions. The indication might be a polyp. Such indications remain rare. The given approach is difficult to perform for inflammatory pathologies generating significant adhesions. However, although the video quality is not ideal, it was decided to publish this film with a special mention “case for debate” stating that this is not the IRCAD position, but the technique can be discussed.
Note from the authors of the video:
We have designed a modified caudal-to-cranial approach to perform a laparoscopic left colectomy preserving the inferior mesenteric artery for benign colorectal diseases.
A dissection is performed to separate the descending mesocolon from the plane of Gerota's fascia from the medial aspect to the peritoneal lining to the left parietal gutter. The peritoneal layer is incised parallel to the vessel and close to the colonic wall. The dissection is continued anteriorly up to reach the resected parietal gutter. A passage into the mesentery of the upper rectum is created for the use of the stapler and the dissection of the rectum. These maneuvers allow to straighten the mesentery simplifying the identification and division of the sigmoid arteries. A caudal-to-cranial dissection of the mesentery is performed from the divided rectum to the proximal descending colon using a sealed envelope device. It can be very useful to mobilize the colon in any direction: laterally, medially, or upward. The dissection is performed along the course of the vessel up to the proximal colon, with progressive division of the sigmoid arterial branches. The specimen is extracted through a Pfannenstiel incision. The anastomosis is performed transanally with a circular stapler according to the Knight-Griffen technique.
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
951 views
232 likes
1 comment
07:49
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.