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Monthly publications

#December 2017
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Laparoscopic gastric bypass with unexpected intestinal malrotation
There are only a few descriptions of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in the setting of intestinal malrotation and these are limited to clinical case reports. Intestinal malrotations usually present in the first months of life with symptoms of bowel obstruction. However, in rare cases, it can persist undetected into adulthood when it could be incidentally identified. The anatomical abnormalities which should alert us to this possibility are an absent duodenojejunal angle, the small bowel on the right side of the abdomen, the caecum on the left, and the absence of a transverse colon crossing the abdomen. Identification and adjustment of the surgical technique at the time of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is crucial to prevent a very distal RYGB or avoid confusion between the Roux limb and the common channel. The construction of the laparoscopic Roux limb can be safely performed with adjustments to the standard technique.
We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a long history of morbid obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The patient had no complaints and presented a normal preoperative evaluation. After a multidisciplinary evaluation, she was elected to undergo a LRYGB. We report an intestinal malrotation discovered at the time of LRYGB, and detail the incidental findings and the technical aspects which require to be incorporated in order to complete the operation safely.
A Laranjeira, S Silva, M Amaro, M Carvalho, J Caravana
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
1696 views
418 likes
0 comments
08:33
Laparoscopic gastric bypass with unexpected intestinal malrotation
There are only a few descriptions of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in the setting of intestinal malrotation and these are limited to clinical case reports. Intestinal malrotations usually present in the first months of life with symptoms of bowel obstruction. However, in rare cases, it can persist undetected into adulthood when it could be incidentally identified. The anatomical abnormalities which should alert us to this possibility are an absent duodenojejunal angle, the small bowel on the right side of the abdomen, the caecum on the left, and the absence of a transverse colon crossing the abdomen. Identification and adjustment of the surgical technique at the time of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is crucial to prevent a very distal RYGB or avoid confusion between the Roux limb and the common channel. The construction of the laparoscopic Roux limb can be safely performed with adjustments to the standard technique.
We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a long history of morbid obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The patient had no complaints and presented a normal preoperative evaluation. After a multidisciplinary evaluation, she was elected to undergo a LRYGB. We report an intestinal malrotation discovered at the time of LRYGB, and detail the incidental findings and the technical aspects which require to be incorporated in order to complete the operation safely.
Laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy
A laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy was performed for a gastric liver metastasis. After the dissection of the anatomical structure of the hepatic pedicle and an ultrasound examination, the right portal vein and the right branch of the hepatic artery were clamped, hence allowing to skeletonize the demarcation between the right liver and the left liver. The devascularization line was subsequently marked by means of electrocautery. The right hepatic branch and the right branch of the portal vein were divided between locked clips. The hepatotomy was started. The first very superficial centimeters were dissected using the Sonicision® Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device. No pedicular clamping was performed. The dissection followed the ischemic demarcation line between the right liver and the left liver. Hemostasis and biliostasis were completed using the Aquamantys® Bipolar Sealers. Once the first centimeters had been dissected, dissection was carried on using the CUSA™ ultrasonic dissector (Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator). Liver segment I was divided in order to open the posterior aspect of the hilar plate. The dissection was performed on the right border of the vena cava. The hilar plate was dissected, making it possible to control the right branch of the biliary tract intraparenchymally. The right hepatic vein was dissected and divided with an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Makuuchi’s ligament was subsequently dissected and divided by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler, white cartridge. Mobilization of the right liver was completed by dividing the triangular ligament’s attachments at the level of the diaphragm. The right hepatectomy specimen was introduced into a bag, which was extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pneumoperitoneum pressure was diminished in order to control hemostasis and biliostasis.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, J Hallet, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
5915 views
935 likes
0 comments
32:12
Laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy
A laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy was performed for a gastric liver metastasis. After the dissection of the anatomical structure of the hepatic pedicle and an ultrasound examination, the right portal vein and the right branch of the hepatic artery were clamped, hence allowing to skeletonize the demarcation between the right liver and the left liver. The devascularization line was subsequently marked by means of electrocautery. The right hepatic branch and the right branch of the portal vein were divided between locked clips. The hepatotomy was started. The first very superficial centimeters were dissected using the Sonicision® Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device. No pedicular clamping was performed. The dissection followed the ischemic demarcation line between the right liver and the left liver. Hemostasis and biliostasis were completed using the Aquamantys® Bipolar Sealers. Once the first centimeters had been dissected, dissection was carried on using the CUSA™ ultrasonic dissector (Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator). Liver segment I was divided in order to open the posterior aspect of the hilar plate. The dissection was performed on the right border of the vena cava. The hilar plate was dissected, making it possible to control the right branch of the biliary tract intraparenchymally. The right hepatic vein was dissected and divided with an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Makuuchi’s ligament was subsequently dissected and divided by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler, white cartridge. Mobilization of the right liver was completed by dividing the triangular ligament’s attachments at the level of the diaphragm. The right hepatectomy specimen was introduced into a bag, which was extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pneumoperitoneum pressure was diminished in order to control hemostasis and biliostasis.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: laparoscopic right hepatectomy in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome
In this live interactive video, Professor Luc Soler provided a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling for precise tumor localization and future liver remnant before and after chemoembolization and right portal vein embolization. Dr. Soubrane briefly described the main principles, key steps, and preoperative planning in a 62-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome. He demonstrated the main technical aspects of port placement, hepatic pedicle dissection, exploration and dissection of vessels, and transection of liver parenchyma.
O Soubrane, P Pessaux, R Memeo, L Soler, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
3693 views
565 likes
0 comments
51:19
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: laparoscopic right hepatectomy in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome
In this live interactive video, Professor Luc Soler provided a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling for precise tumor localization and future liver remnant before and after chemoembolization and right portal vein embolization. Dr. Soubrane briefly described the main principles, key steps, and preoperative planning in a 62-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome. He demonstrated the main technical aspects of port placement, hepatic pedicle dissection, exploration and dissection of vessels, and transection of liver parenchyma.
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
4376 views
592 likes
1 comment
38:09
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection
We reported a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection for a mucinous cystic lesion. Four ports were positioned. The greater omentum was retracted to the superior part of the abdomen in order to detach the colon from the omentum and approach the lesser sac. The stomach was dissected. A tape was placed around the stomach through the abdominal wall, making it possible to retract the stomach at the level of the pyloric junction towards the upper part of the abdomen. A second tape was placed at the antral part in order to achieve a retraction towards the left hypochondrium at the superior part of the abdomen. The mesentericoportal axis was identified and dissected at the inferior border of the pancreas. The right gastroepiploic vein was one of the landmarks. The superior border of the pancreas was dissected in order to identify the splenic artery and a tape was positioned around it. The dissection was performed progressively at the anterior aspect of the mesentericoportal axis through an avascular channel. A tape was subsequently positioned around the pancreatic isthmus. The pancreas was divided with a stapler. The stapling was performed very progressively to avoid crushing the pancreas. The splenic vein was dissected in order to preserve the left gastric vein and a tape was positioned around it. The splenic artery was first divided between two clips on the remaining surface. The splenic vein was also divided. Dissection was pursued from the right to the left, making it possible to mobilize the pancreas. The inferior mesenteric vein was dissected and divided. Dissection of the posterior mesogastrium was initiated, making it possible to mobilize the splenopancreatic block. The dissection was performed anteriorly to the plane of Gerota’s fascia, anteriorly to the kidney. Since the posterior dissection was almost complete, our attention was turned to the superior part to complete the dissection of lesser sac adhesions at the superior border of the pancreas. It was necessary to divide the greater omentum by gradually dividing the short gastric vessels. Due to venous derivations linked to segmental portal hypertension, this dissection was performed through the application of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Since the entire specimen had been divided and freed, it was placed in a bag to be extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
P Pessaux, X Untereiner, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
4029 views
597 likes
0 comments
45:34
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection
We reported a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection for a mucinous cystic lesion. Four ports were positioned. The greater omentum was retracted to the superior part of the abdomen in order to detach the colon from the omentum and approach the lesser sac. The stomach was dissected. A tape was placed around the stomach through the abdominal wall, making it possible to retract the stomach at the level of the pyloric junction towards the upper part of the abdomen. A second tape was placed at the antral part in order to achieve a retraction towards the left hypochondrium at the superior part of the abdomen. The mesentericoportal axis was identified and dissected at the inferior border of the pancreas. The right gastroepiploic vein was one of the landmarks. The superior border of the pancreas was dissected in order to identify the splenic artery and a tape was positioned around it. The dissection was performed progressively at the anterior aspect of the mesentericoportal axis through an avascular channel. A tape was subsequently positioned around the pancreatic isthmus. The pancreas was divided with a stapler. The stapling was performed very progressively to avoid crushing the pancreas. The splenic vein was dissected in order to preserve the left gastric vein and a tape was positioned around it. The splenic artery was first divided between two clips on the remaining surface. The splenic vein was also divided. Dissection was pursued from the right to the left, making it possible to mobilize the pancreas. The inferior mesenteric vein was dissected and divided. Dissection of the posterior mesogastrium was initiated, making it possible to mobilize the splenopancreatic block. The dissection was performed anteriorly to the plane of Gerota’s fascia, anteriorly to the kidney. Since the posterior dissection was almost complete, our attention was turned to the superior part to complete the dissection of lesser sac adhesions at the superior border of the pancreas. It was necessary to divide the greater omentum by gradually dividing the short gastric vessels. Due to venous derivations linked to segmental portal hypertension, this dissection was performed through the application of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Since the entire specimen had been divided and freed, it was placed in a bag to be extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
Transhepatic percutaneous biliary tract drainage
Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an effective method for the primary or palliative treatment of many biliary strictures. It is a procedure which includes the cannulation of an intrahepatic biliary tree using image-guided wire and catheter manipulation, and placement of a tube or stent for external and/or internal drainage. This video shows this technique applied in a patient with a pancreatic tumor.
This is the case of an 80-year-old male patient with signs of jaundice and a diagnosis of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation and pancreatic tumor.
A transhepatic percutaneous biliary tract drainage was the therapeutic strategy.
ME Gimenez, EJ Houghton, M Palermo, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
3115 views
588 likes
0 comments
20:25
Transhepatic percutaneous biliary tract drainage
Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an effective method for the primary or palliative treatment of many biliary strictures. It is a procedure which includes the cannulation of an intrahepatic biliary tree using image-guided wire and catheter manipulation, and placement of a tube or stent for external and/or internal drainage. This video shows this technique applied in a patient with a pancreatic tumor.
This is the case of an 80-year-old male patient with signs of jaundice and a diagnosis of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation and pancreatic tumor.
A transhepatic percutaneous biliary tract drainage was the therapeutic strategy.
Thoracoscopic repair of pure esophageal atresia
A full-term baby weighing 2.8 kg was diagnosed with pure esophageal atresia. No other associated anomalies were found by abdominal sonography and echocardiography. The primary anastomosis was completed thoracoscopically after mobilization of both esophageal pouches. The patient was placed in a prone position at the edge of the operating table. A 5mm, 30-degree angled scope was introduced one fingerbreadth below the lower angle of the scapula. Two 3mm working ports were also inserted; the first in the same costal space as the camera port 3cm from the middle line and the second as high as possible in the axilla. A thin fibrous strand was found connecting both ends of the esophagus. The azygos vein was left intact. Blunt dissection was used throughout the whole procedure to preserve the aortic branches to the lower pouch, dissecting in between them. Without traction, the distance between both pouches was approximately 4cm or 4 vertebral bodies. No tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was identified. Nine polyglactin 5/0 sliding tumble square knots were used to complete the anastomosis. The operative time was 85 minutes. The postoperative period was uneventful. Nasogatric tube feeding started on postoperative day 2, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6 after performing a contrast swallow test ensuring that there is no leakage.
MM Elbarbary, KHK Bahaaeldin, AE Fares, H Seleim, A Shalaby, M Elseoudi, MM Ragab
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
1476 views
228 likes
0 comments
18:13
Thoracoscopic repair of pure esophageal atresia
A full-term baby weighing 2.8 kg was diagnosed with pure esophageal atresia. No other associated anomalies were found by abdominal sonography and echocardiography. The primary anastomosis was completed thoracoscopically after mobilization of both esophageal pouches. The patient was placed in a prone position at the edge of the operating table. A 5mm, 30-degree angled scope was introduced one fingerbreadth below the lower angle of the scapula. Two 3mm working ports were also inserted; the first in the same costal space as the camera port 3cm from the middle line and the second as high as possible in the axilla. A thin fibrous strand was found connecting both ends of the esophagus. The azygos vein was left intact. Blunt dissection was used throughout the whole procedure to preserve the aortic branches to the lower pouch, dissecting in between them. Without traction, the distance between both pouches was approximately 4cm or 4 vertebral bodies. No tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was identified. Nine polyglactin 5/0 sliding tumble square knots were used to complete the anastomosis. The operative time was 85 minutes. The postoperative period was uneventful. Nasogatric tube feeding started on postoperative day 2, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6 after performing a contrast swallow test ensuring that there is no leakage.
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
AM Benaired
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
893 views
141 likes
0 comments
04:03
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
M Lotti, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
2246 views
443 likes
0 comments
11:18
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
JB Dubuisson
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
3416 views
573 likes
0 comments
08:01
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.