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Monthly publications

#October 2017
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Concurrent laparoscopic RYGB with a paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair
This is the case of a 75-year old female patient with a medical history of bilateral mastectomy due to cancer, which occurred 30 and 15 years before referral. She was treated using adjuvant chemotherapy (tamoxifen) and radiotherapy, and had a liver-related kidney donation. The patient was found asymptomatic when she underwent a control abdominal ultrasound, which showed a 6cm hepatic mass in liver segments V and VI. A hepatic MRI was performed and showed a single liver lesion (68mm in diameter) located in the right liver lobe, and a PET-CT-scan demonstrated an increased hypermetabolic activity of the lesion without other systemic tumor dissemination. A laparoscopic right hepatectomy was scheduled. A laparoscopic surgery was performed. Laparoscopic exploration revealed multiple bilateral lesions, and an intraoperative ultrasound demonstrated a lesion in liver segment IV. An ALPPS approach was considered.
There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day.
A Duro, F Wright, PJ Castellaro, A Beskow, D Cavadas, J Montagné
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
913 views
178 likes
0 comments
06:23
Concurrent laparoscopic RYGB with a paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair
This is the case of a 75-year old female patient with a medical history of bilateral mastectomy due to cancer, which occurred 30 and 15 years before referral. She was treated using adjuvant chemotherapy (tamoxifen) and radiotherapy, and had a liver-related kidney donation. The patient was found asymptomatic when she underwent a control abdominal ultrasound, which showed a 6cm hepatic mass in liver segments V and VI. A hepatic MRI was performed and showed a single liver lesion (68mm in diameter) located in the right liver lobe, and a PET-CT-scan demonstrated an increased hypermetabolic activity of the lesion without other systemic tumor dissemination. A laparoscopic right hepatectomy was scheduled. A laparoscopic surgery was performed. Laparoscopic exploration revealed multiple bilateral lesions, and an intraoperative ultrasound demonstrated a lesion in liver segment IV. An ALPPS approach was considered.
There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day.
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
A Trovão, L Costa, M Costa, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
553 views
106 likes
0 comments
09:55
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) after failed Nissen
This is the case of a 62-year old female patient with a BMI of 35 and a history of high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and morbid obesity. She underwent a laparoscopic Nissen surgery 8 years earlier and presented with recurrent GERD symptoms.

A CT-scan, an endoscopy, and a barium swallow showed a hiatal hernia. It was decided to perform a paraesophageal hernia repair as well as a gastric bypass. A laparoscopic surgery was performed.

There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the second postoperative day. An esogastroduodenal contrast examination was performed 1 month after the procedure. It showed the absence of hiatal hernia. The patient was controlled 3 months after surgery and was found asymptomatic with an Excess Weight Loss (EWL) of 42%.
A Duro, V Cano Busnelli, A Beskow, D Cavadas, F Wright, P Saleg, PJ Castellaro
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1799 views
171 likes
0 comments
06:12
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) after failed Nissen
This is the case of a 62-year old female patient with a BMI of 35 and a history of high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and morbid obesity. She underwent a laparoscopic Nissen surgery 8 years earlier and presented with recurrent GERD symptoms.

A CT-scan, an endoscopy, and a barium swallow showed a hiatal hernia. It was decided to perform a paraesophageal hernia repair as well as a gastric bypass. A laparoscopic surgery was performed.

There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the second postoperative day. An esogastroduodenal contrast examination was performed 1 month after the procedure. It showed the absence of hiatal hernia. The patient was controlled 3 months after surgery and was found asymptomatic with an Excess Weight Loss (EWL) of 42%.
A stepwise personal technique of RYGB with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy
With more than 25 years of experience, we have created a unique laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass technique with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy and several additional steps which offer our patients a safe and reliable procedure.
We routinely use 5 bladeless 12mm trocars. The procedure begins with the creation of a 15-20mL gastric pouch with a tilted orientation for the first stapling (not horizontal), and staple lines are oversewn for both gastric pouch and gastric remnant. A blue dye test is always performed at this stage. The second stage of the procedure includes the creation of a 75cm biliopancreatic limb with division of the mesentery and creation of a mechanical jejunojejunostomy with a 100cm alimentary limb, and hand-sewn closure of the enterotomy. Anti-torsion stitches are mandatory at this point. Closure of mesenteric defects (intermesenteric space and Petersen's space) is accomplished with non-absorbable sutures performed in a routine manner. The third and final stage of the procedure involves the creation of the hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy with an interposed limb and 4 layers of absorbable sutures over a 28-30 French bougie.
Closure of all trocar defects is performed in every patient.
L Zorrilla-Nunez, P Zorrilla
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1123 views
216 likes
0 comments
10:05
A stepwise personal technique of RYGB with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy
With more than 25 years of experience, we have created a unique laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass technique with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy and several additional steps which offer our patients a safe and reliable procedure.
We routinely use 5 bladeless 12mm trocars. The procedure begins with the creation of a 15-20mL gastric pouch with a tilted orientation for the first stapling (not horizontal), and staple lines are oversewn for both gastric pouch and gastric remnant. A blue dye test is always performed at this stage. The second stage of the procedure includes the creation of a 75cm biliopancreatic limb with division of the mesentery and creation of a mechanical jejunojejunostomy with a 100cm alimentary limb, and hand-sewn closure of the enterotomy. Anti-torsion stitches are mandatory at this point. Closure of mesenteric defects (intermesenteric space and Petersen's space) is accomplished with non-absorbable sutures performed in a routine manner. The third and final stage of the procedure involves the creation of the hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy with an interposed limb and 4 layers of absorbable sutures over a 28-30 French bougie.
Closure of all trocar defects is performed in every patient.
Minimally invasive management of an epiphrenic diverticulum
We present the case of a 65-year-old gentleman who was referred to our department with long standing symptoms of dysphagia, reflux, and regurgitation. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was initially performed to evaluate his symptoms and showed food residue in the esophagus and a wide-necked epiphrenic diverticulum extending from 38 to 41cm with superficial ulceration within it. The esophagogastric junction was at 45cm and appeared tight, which was consistent with the appearance of achalasia. A subsequent barium swallow and manometric studies confirmed the endoscopic findings. A minimally invasive laparoscopic approach was adopted for trans-hiatal dissection and diverticulectomy. Heller’s myotomy combined with an anti-reflux procedure was also performed to deal with the underlying achalasia as the cause of this pulsion diverticulum. The patient’s postoperative recovery was uneventful with complete resolution of his symptoms.
M Arumugasamy
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
942 views
60 likes
0 comments
08:19
Minimally invasive management of an epiphrenic diverticulum
We present the case of a 65-year-old gentleman who was referred to our department with long standing symptoms of dysphagia, reflux, and regurgitation. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was initially performed to evaluate his symptoms and showed food residue in the esophagus and a wide-necked epiphrenic diverticulum extending from 38 to 41cm with superficial ulceration within it. The esophagogastric junction was at 45cm and appeared tight, which was consistent with the appearance of achalasia. A subsequent barium swallow and manometric studies confirmed the endoscopic findings. A minimally invasive laparoscopic approach was adopted for trans-hiatal dissection and diverticulectomy. Heller’s myotomy combined with an anti-reflux procedure was also performed to deal with the underlying achalasia as the cause of this pulsion diverticulum. The patient’s postoperative recovery was uneventful with complete resolution of his symptoms.
Laparoscopic enucleation of a horseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the distal esophagus
This is the case of a 17-year-old girl, complaining of weight loss and dysphagia. In the preoperative work-up, gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a 3-4cm multilobulated submucosal mass. Computed tomography and MRI showed a distal esophageal mass of 4cm in diameter. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was compatible with a leiomyoma. The patient was admitted to hospital for surgery, and a laparoscopic transhiatal enucleation of the esophageal leiomyoma was performed. The patient was placed in a gynecologic position, with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs. The first assistant stood on the right side of the patient and the second assistant on the left. The procedure was performed using 5 trocars. The phrenoesophageal membrane was divided. The distal esophagus was circumferentially mobilized. Dissection was started by separating the layer over the tumor. Blunt dissection was preferred. The use of energy devices discouraged to prevent any delayed mucosal burn injury. The leiomyoma was completely enucleated. Esophageal muscle layers were closed. The postoperative period was uneventful. This video demonstrates technical details of a laparoscopic enucleation of a hoseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the distal esophagus.
K Karabulut, S Usta, E Sahin, Z Cetinkaya
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
534 views
42 likes
0 comments
11:21
Laparoscopic enucleation of a horseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the distal esophagus
This is the case of a 17-year-old girl, complaining of weight loss and dysphagia. In the preoperative work-up, gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a 3-4cm multilobulated submucosal mass. Computed tomography and MRI showed a distal esophageal mass of 4cm in diameter. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was compatible with a leiomyoma. The patient was admitted to hospital for surgery, and a laparoscopic transhiatal enucleation of the esophageal leiomyoma was performed. The patient was placed in a gynecologic position, with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs. The first assistant stood on the right side of the patient and the second assistant on the left. The procedure was performed using 5 trocars. The phrenoesophageal membrane was divided. The distal esophagus was circumferentially mobilized. Dissection was started by separating the layer over the tumor. Blunt dissection was preferred. The use of energy devices discouraged to prevent any delayed mucosal burn injury. The leiomyoma was completely enucleated. Esophageal muscle layers were closed. The postoperative period was uneventful. This video demonstrates technical details of a laparoscopic enucleation of a hoseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the distal esophagus.
A rare cause of abdominal pain (liposarcoma) treated by a minimally invasive approach
A 53-year-old woman is referred to the emergency department with complaints of an insidious pain in the left lower abdominal quadrant, with no associated fever, neither changes in her bowel habits, nor other complaints. She had a cardiac arrhythmia, medicated with atenolol, and no previous surgeries. Laboratory results showed no significant changes. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated an inflammatory mass adjacent to the left colon. The abdominal and pelvic CT-scan showed a bulky and capsulated mass at the left iliac fossa extending along the left flank until the lower pole of the left kidney, measuring 9x12x20cm, probably corresponding to a peritoneal lipoma, with no signs of aggressiveness towards adjacent organs. The patient was admitted to hospital for clinical vigilance and complementary exams. Upper and lower endoscopic studies were performed and revealed no significant changes. The patient was then proposed for elective surgery – laparoscopic excision of the intra-abdominal mass, which was independent of the intra-abdominal visceral content. In the postoperative period, the patient had no complications with clinical discharge four days after surgery. The pathology report revealed a well-differentiated lipomatous neoplasia, a lipoma-like liposarcoma. In a multidisciplinary meeting, it was decided not to perform any adjuvant treatment. The patient remains with neither clinical nor imaging signs of the disease after 10 months of follow-up.
A Tojal, J Marques, S Coelho, M Fernandes, N Carrilho, H Oliveira, C Casimiro
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
869 views
62 likes
0 comments
07:41
A rare cause of abdominal pain (liposarcoma) treated by a minimally invasive approach
A 53-year-old woman is referred to the emergency department with complaints of an insidious pain in the left lower abdominal quadrant, with no associated fever, neither changes in her bowel habits, nor other complaints. She had a cardiac arrhythmia, medicated with atenolol, and no previous surgeries. Laboratory results showed no significant changes. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated an inflammatory mass adjacent to the left colon. The abdominal and pelvic CT-scan showed a bulky and capsulated mass at the left iliac fossa extending along the left flank until the lower pole of the left kidney, measuring 9x12x20cm, probably corresponding to a peritoneal lipoma, with no signs of aggressiveness towards adjacent organs. The patient was admitted to hospital for clinical vigilance and complementary exams. Upper and lower endoscopic studies were performed and revealed no significant changes. The patient was then proposed for elective surgery – laparoscopic excision of the intra-abdominal mass, which was independent of the intra-abdominal visceral content. In the postoperative period, the patient had no complications with clinical discharge four days after surgery. The pathology report revealed a well-differentiated lipomatous neoplasia, a lipoma-like liposarcoma. In a multidisciplinary meeting, it was decided not to perform any adjuvant treatment. The patient remains with neither clinical nor imaging signs of the disease after 10 months of follow-up.
Laparoscopic partial splenectomy
A 39-year-old male patient was referred to our institution for a total laparoscopic splenectomy. The patient presented a CT-scan with a heterogeneous lesion in the lower aspect of the spleen. Two different hematologists-oncologists recommended a total splenectomy due the characteristics of the lesion. We discussed this recommendation during the oncological committee at our institution and due to the anatomical variation of the splenic artery and the absence of characterization of the lesion as 100% malignant, a laparoscopic partial splenectomy was decided upon with an intraoperative frozen analysis to determine if any further resection would be necessary. In this video, the authors present the technical aspects of a complex surgical resection.
D Awruch, M Grimoldi, M Blanco, R Sanchez Almeyra
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1939 views
177 likes
0 comments
05:28
Laparoscopic partial splenectomy
A 39-year-old male patient was referred to our institution for a total laparoscopic splenectomy. The patient presented a CT-scan with a heterogeneous lesion in the lower aspect of the spleen. Two different hematologists-oncologists recommended a total splenectomy due the characteristics of the lesion. We discussed this recommendation during the oncological committee at our institution and due to the anatomical variation of the splenic artery and the absence of characterization of the lesion as 100% malignant, a laparoscopic partial splenectomy was decided upon with an intraoperative frozen analysis to determine if any further resection would be necessary. In this video, the authors present the technical aspects of a complex surgical resection.
Laparoscopic postpartum right diaphragmatic hernia reduction
A 35-year-old patient was referred to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and respiratory distress. The patient gave natural childbirth three days before the episode, a childbirth without immediate complications.
Clinically, the patient presented with tachypnea, tachycardia, and desaturation, nauseas and constipation, depressible abdomen with generalized pain on palpation. The absence of vesicular murmur and right lung dullness were noted.
Blood lab findings showed increased inflammatory parameters.
An abdominothoracic CT-scan with contrast was performed. It showed a voluminous right diaphragmatic hernia containing the omentum, a distended colon and liver segment VIII with signs of hypoperfusion.
A surgical procedure was performed. A laparoscopic approach was performed and the patient’s hiatal hernia was reduced by closing the defect with a non-absorbable suture and by placing a Vicryl mesh.
The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 3.
A D'Urso, P Saleg, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1468 views
112 likes
0 comments
09:10
Laparoscopic postpartum right diaphragmatic hernia reduction
A 35-year-old patient was referred to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and respiratory distress. The patient gave natural childbirth three days before the episode, a childbirth without immediate complications.
Clinically, the patient presented with tachypnea, tachycardia, and desaturation, nauseas and constipation, depressible abdomen with generalized pain on palpation. The absence of vesicular murmur and right lung dullness were noted.
Blood lab findings showed increased inflammatory parameters.
An abdominothoracic CT-scan with contrast was performed. It showed a voluminous right diaphragmatic hernia containing the omentum, a distended colon and liver segment VIII with signs of hypoperfusion.
A surgical procedure was performed. A laparoscopic approach was performed and the patient’s hiatal hernia was reduced by closing the defect with a non-absorbable suture and by placing a Vicryl mesh.
The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Live interactive transanal TME (TaTME) with the TEO™ platform
Randomized clinical trials such as COLOR II, COREAN and CLASICC, have shown better results for laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME), in terms of short-term and long-term outcomes, when compared with open TME.
Laparoscopic TME presents some limitations such as low rectal cancer which has a high risk of leaving a positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) and a narrow pelvis. Conversion to open procedures remains unsatisfactory.
Transanal TME (taTME) has been proposed to give a new option in cases where laparoscopic TME is difficult.
In this video, we present the case of a transanal approach with the TEO™ platform for low rectal cancer.
A Melani, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2985 views
324 likes
0 comments
45:51
Live interactive transanal TME (TaTME) with the TEO™ platform
Randomized clinical trials such as COLOR II, COREAN and CLASICC, have shown better results for laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME), in terms of short-term and long-term outcomes, when compared with open TME.
Laparoscopic TME presents some limitations such as low rectal cancer which has a high risk of leaving a positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) and a narrow pelvis. Conversion to open procedures remains unsatisfactory.
Transanal TME (taTME) has been proposed to give a new option in cases where laparoscopic TME is difficult.
In this video, we present the case of a transanal approach with the TEO™ platform for low rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation in an 18-month-old boy
Performing Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation using a laparoscopic approach can be confusing and challenging. This can be attributed to the small working space in children as compared to the length of small and large bowel to be handled. The procedure also requires some understanding of the overall anatomical disorder in order to separate it into smaller steps of correction. The first step is to confirm the diagnosis. The operator has to identify the ligament of Treitz and the presence of Ladd’s bands stretching between the colon and the right abdomen. The bands are divided first to the left of the duodenum, and then between the duodenum and the colon. As a result, the mesentery is widened. Bowel derotation is then started placing the small bowel in the right side and the colon in the left side of the abdomen. The procedure is concluded with an appendectomy.
TA Wafa, S Abdelmaksoud
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
717 views
139 likes
0 comments
06:00
Laparoscopic Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation in an 18-month-old boy
Performing Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation using a laparoscopic approach can be confusing and challenging. This can be attributed to the small working space in children as compared to the length of small and large bowel to be handled. The procedure also requires some understanding of the overall anatomical disorder in order to separate it into smaller steps of correction. The first step is to confirm the diagnosis. The operator has to identify the ligament of Treitz and the presence of Ladd’s bands stretching between the colon and the right abdomen. The bands are divided first to the left of the duodenum, and then between the duodenum and the colon. As a result, the mesentery is widened. Bowel derotation is then started placing the small bowel in the right side and the colon in the left side of the abdomen. The procedure is concluded with an appendectomy.