We use cookies to offer you an optimal experience on our website. By browsing our website, you accept the use of cookies.

Monthly publications

#October 2009
Filter by
Specialty

Type
Category
Which patient should not have laparoscopic surgery? Who should have open surgery?
The benefits of laparoscopic colon cancer resection, such as reduced morbidity and shorter hospital stay, have been clearly demonstrated. Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery is thought to be more challenging. Some authors question the oncological outcome, the anastomotic technique and the complications. In this lecture, Dr. Tom Cecil discusses the difficulties and challenges of laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery within the context of his own personal experience and with regard to some of the current literature. He offers that laparoscopic and open rectal cancer surgery both have a role and that the challenge is to appropriately select according to the patient, technique and pathology.
T Cecil
Lecture
9 years ago
944 views
1 like
0 comments
15:18
Which patient should not have laparoscopic surgery? Who should have open surgery?
The benefits of laparoscopic colon cancer resection, such as reduced morbidity and shorter hospital stay, have been clearly demonstrated. Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery is thought to be more challenging. Some authors question the oncological outcome, the anastomotic technique and the complications. In this lecture, Dr. Tom Cecil discusses the difficulties and challenges of laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery within the context of his own personal experience and with regard to some of the current literature. He offers that laparoscopic and open rectal cancer surgery both have a role and that the challenge is to appropriately select according to the patient, technique and pathology.
Laparoscopic surgery for transverse colon cancer
Laparoscopic surgery is feasible and safe in selected patients with rectal cancer, with favorable short-term and mid-term outcomes. Recently, results of large randomized controlled trials comparing laparoscopic with conventional open surgery have been published, demonstrating that laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer was equivalent to open surgery in terms of postoperative complications and long-term outcomes. In this lecture, Professor Junji Okuda presents the laparoscopic approach for transverse colon cancer and shows the port and patient positioning, precious technical details when performing splenic flexure dissection and anatomical notes along with a demonstration video.
J Okuda, N Tanigawa
Lecture
9 years ago
3364 views
33 likes
0 comments
10:47
Laparoscopic surgery for transverse colon cancer
Laparoscopic surgery is feasible and safe in selected patients with rectal cancer, with favorable short-term and mid-term outcomes. Recently, results of large randomized controlled trials comparing laparoscopic with conventional open surgery have been published, demonstrating that laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer was equivalent to open surgery in terms of postoperative complications and long-term outcomes. In this lecture, Professor Junji Okuda presents the laparoscopic approach for transverse colon cancer and shows the port and patient positioning, precious technical details when performing splenic flexure dissection and anatomical notes along with a demonstration video.
Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS): gastric banding removal for acute gastric pouch dilatation
In a significantly short time, Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) for morbid obesity has become a common operation in Europe and elsewhere.
Recent series show a high percentage of patients re-operated on, almost always with excision of the banding system. The reasons for re-operation are esophagitis, band erosion, pouch dilatation, leakage from the balloon, and esophageal dilatation.
This video demonstrates the removal of a gastric band for acute gastric pouch dilatation. The procedure was completed using a single access technique, with conventional laparoscopic instrumentation. A 2cm incision is performed on the port site and the same one is removed first maintaining the connection tube on site in order to place traction on the band. A 10mm port is inserted using an open technique, and two further 5mm ports are placed anteriorly just to the left and to the right side of the previous one.
N Perrotta, A Cappiello, C Giudicianni, N Andriulo, T Marinelli, D Loffredo
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
2921 views
8 likes
0 comments
06:06
Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS): gastric banding removal for acute gastric pouch dilatation
In a significantly short time, Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) for morbid obesity has become a common operation in Europe and elsewhere.
Recent series show a high percentage of patients re-operated on, almost always with excision of the banding system. The reasons for re-operation are esophagitis, band erosion, pouch dilatation, leakage from the balloon, and esophageal dilatation.
This video demonstrates the removal of a gastric band for acute gastric pouch dilatation. The procedure was completed using a single access technique, with conventional laparoscopic instrumentation. A 2cm incision is performed on the port site and the same one is removed first maintaining the connection tube on site in order to place traction on the band. A 10mm port is inserted using an open technique, and two further 5mm ports are placed anteriorly just to the left and to the right side of the previous one.
Laparoscopic resection of liver segments V and VIII for colorectal metastasis
Laparoscopic liver resection in selected patients in highly specialized centers provides comparable oncological results to treatment with open liver resection for patients with colorectal liver metastases. In this video, we present the case of a patient who underwent the resection of two liver segments in the context of a colorectal pathology. Initially, this lesion was estimated as sitting in the liver’s segment IV, but using a specific software dedicated to reconstructions of CT-scan data, it was discovered that this lesion was situated across segment V and segment VIII. This reconstruction allows to obtain a perfect visualization of the different relationships between the vessels and also allows to guide the procedure and to simulate the operative maneuver.
B Dallemagne, D Mutter, L Soler, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
714 views
31 likes
0 comments
10:39
Laparoscopic resection of liver segments V and VIII for colorectal metastasis
Laparoscopic liver resection in selected patients in highly specialized centers provides comparable oncological results to treatment with open liver resection for patients with colorectal liver metastases. In this video, we present the case of a patient who underwent the resection of two liver segments in the context of a colorectal pathology. Initially, this lesion was estimated as sitting in the liver’s segment IV, but using a specific software dedicated to reconstructions of CT-scan data, it was discovered that this lesion was situated across segment V and segment VIII. This reconstruction allows to obtain a perfect visualization of the different relationships between the vessels and also allows to guide the procedure and to simulate the operative maneuver.
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the colon and its mesentery (including virtual sentinel node biopsy) by natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of 2–3mm slicing in opaque samples and so provides real-time cross-sectional images from the specimen. OCT can also achieve resolutions approaching that of conventional histology (c. 2–5μm) as it employs very short wave near-infrared light with precise interferometric detection. Although now mainly used in ophthalmology, OCT has already been found to have clinical applications in dermatology, cardiology, neurology, gynecology and gastroenterology. Dr. Ronan Cahill have deployed a commercially available probe (NIRIS™, Imulax Corporation, Cleveland OH, USA) via the working channel of a gastroscope used as a N.O.T.E.S. peritoneoscope in an experimental model. By this means, high-resolution real-time images mesenteric sentinel nodes have been obtained. Placing such a probe on the surface of the node should provide examination of the tissue to a depth of 2mm. In this video, we show the application of this technique in an experimental model.
R Cahill, M Asakuma, J Trunzo, SJ Schomisch, J Leroy, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux, J Marks
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
181 views
2 likes
0 comments
07:42
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the colon and its mesentery (including virtual sentinel node biopsy) by natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of 2–3mm slicing in opaque samples and so provides real-time cross-sectional images from the specimen. OCT can also achieve resolutions approaching that of conventional histology (c. 2–5μm) as it employs very short wave near-infrared light with precise interferometric detection. Although now mainly used in ophthalmology, OCT has already been found to have clinical applications in dermatology, cardiology, neurology, gynecology and gastroenterology. Dr. Ronan Cahill have deployed a commercially available probe (NIRIS™, Imulax Corporation, Cleveland OH, USA) via the working channel of a gastroscope used as a N.O.T.E.S. peritoneoscope in an experimental model. By this means, high-resolution real-time images mesenteric sentinel nodes have been obtained. Placing such a probe on the surface of the node should provide examination of the tissue to a depth of 2mm. In this video, we show the application of this technique in an experimental model.