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Hall of Fame

Participate in the Hall of Fame contest of WebSurg.

Participate in the Hall of Fame contest

The Hall of Fame contest is a one-year contest organized by WebSurg. Our members can send us their contributions: it is a way to become a world-renowned expert, and share knowledge with thousands of people worldwide. In July, our team of international experts will choose and reveal the name of the author of the best contribution, which covered a topic of minimally invasive surgery in an original and academic way.

To be part of the contest, all you need to do is contribute to WebSurg, it is completely free and very easy to use.

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The last winner - 2018

Surgical intervention
05:37
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision for advanced ascending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vascular ligation (CVL) is a potentially superior oncological technique in colon cancer surgery. The tenets of high vascular ligation at the origin and mesocolic dissection facilitate a greater lymph node yield. We present the case of a 70-year-old lady with chronic right iliac fossa discomfort. Computer tomographic scans showed a bulky ascending colon cancer with a 2.6cm right mesocolic lymph node. She underwent laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with CVL. Three operative trocars were used (a 12mm trocar in the left iliac fossa, 5mm ports in the left flank and right iliac fossa). Dissection begins in an inferior to superior approach, starting with mobilization of the ileocolic mesentery off the right common iliac vessels, then progressing to separate the mesentery off the duodenum and Gerota's fascia, exposing the head of the pancreas and the duodenal loop. CVL begins with the identification of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV). The vascular structures are isolated individually and ligated high at the level of the SMV, removing the metastatic right mesocolic node ‘en bloc’. Following proximal and distal transections, an intracorporeal ileo-transverse anastomosis is performed. Histology findings demonstrate the presence of a pT4a N2a M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma with 5 out of 17 lymph nodes (including the large mesocolic lymph node) positive for metastasis.
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision for advanced ascending colon cancer
JL Ng, SAE Yeo
10146 views
11 months ago
Jia Lin NG, MD
Singapore, Singapore
Shen-Ann Eugene YEO, MBBS, MMed (Surg), FRCS (Ed)
Singapore, Singapore
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The last contributions

Surgical intervention
07:37
Advanced bariatric surgery: reduced port simplified gastric bypass, a reproducible 3-port technique
Minimally invasive surgery is a field of continuous evolution and the advantages of this approach is no longer a matter of debate. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has shown to be the cornerstone in the treatment of morbid obesity and so far all the efforts in this technique have been conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Nowadays, reduced port surgery is regaining momentum as the evolution of minimally invasive surgery.
The purpose is to describe our technique of LRYGB, which mimics all the fundamental aspects of the “simplified gastric bypass” described by A. Cardoso Ramos et al. in a conventional laparoscopic surgical approach (5 ports) while incorporating some innovative technical features to reduce the quantity of ports. Despite the use of only three trocars, there is no problem with exposure or ergonomics, which represent major drawbacks when performing reduced port surgery.

Our technique can be a useful and feasible tool in selected patients in order to minimize parietal trauma and its possible complications, to improve cosmetic results, and to indirectly avoid the need for a second assistant, thereby improving the logistics, team dynamics, and economic aspects of the procedure.

In our experience, this technique is indicated as primary surgery in patients without previous surgery and with a BMI ranging from 35 to 50. Major contraindications are liver steatosis, superobese patients, and potentially revisional surgery. Although based on the experience of the team, we had also to perform revisional surgery mostly from ring vertical gastroplasty.

From January 2015 to June 2017, we analyzed 72 consecutive cases in our institution with a mean initial BMI of 43.12 (range: 30.1-58.7) using this approach, and the mean operative time was 64.77 minutes (range: 30-155, n=72) and excluding revisional cases or cases associated with cholecystectomy (58.72 min, range: 30-104, n=62).

This approach should be performed by highly skilled surgeons experienced with conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and with one of the patients feeling particularly comfortable. We strongly suggest using additional trocars if patient safety is jeopardized.
Advanced bariatric surgery: reduced port simplified gastric bypass, a reproducible 3-port technique
S Targa
2056 views
7 months ago
Surgical intervention
11:55
Laparoscopic complete parametrectomy associated with upper vaginectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
This video shows a reproducible approach to complete parametrectomy in a patient who had had a hysterectomy. The procedure begins with adhesiolysis and dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the parametrium. The paravesical fossa is then dissected medially and laterally using the umbilical artery as a landmark. The surgeon identifies the uterine artery and parametrium by following the umbilical artery. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the parametrium, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the pararectal spaces in order to isolate the posterior part of the parametrium. The ureter is dissected towards the ureteral channel and unroofed. The procedure is carried on with the complete isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the parametrium and the bladder. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum, paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The parametrium is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel. The vagina is cut with ultrasonic scissors using a cap of RUMI II as a guide, and the specimen is extracted vaginally. The surgeon performs a bilateral lymphadenectomy. In this step, the obturator nerve is dissected to prevent injuries at the medial aspect of the obturator artery. The vagina is closed with continued stitches vaginally using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
Laparoscopic complete parametrectomy associated with upper vaginectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
H Camuzcuoglu, B Sezgin
3125 views
7 months ago
Surgical intervention
06:01
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
1972 views
7 months ago
Surgical intervention
09:27
Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach
Note from the WeBSurg-IRCAD Scientific Committee:
This video entitled “Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach" shows an original technique of segmental colonic resection for benign conditions. Although, in the present case, the indication is not specified, there seems to be a tattooing on a lesion, which would not correspond to the initial indication of benign conditions. The indication might be a polyp. Such indications remain rare. The given approach is difficult to perform for inflammatory pathologies generating significant adhesions. However, although the video quality is not ideal, it was decided to publish this film with a special mention “case for debate” stating that this is not the IRCAD position, but the technique can be discussed.
Note from the authors of the video:
We have designed a modified caudal-to-cranial approach to perform a laparoscopic left colectomy preserving the inferior mesenteric artery for benign colorectal diseases.
A dissection is performed to separate the descending mesocolon from the plane of Gerota's fascia from the medial aspect to the peritoneal lining to the left parietal gutter. The peritoneal layer is incised parallel to the vessel and close to the colonic wall. The dissection is continued anteriorly up to reach the resected parietal gutter. A passage into the mesentery of the upper rectum is created for the use of the stapler and the dissection of the rectum. These maneuvers allow to straighten the mesentery simplifying the identification and division of the sigmoid arteries. A caudal-to-cranial dissection of the mesentery is performed from the divided rectum to the proximal descending colon using a sealed envelope device. It can be very useful to mobilize the colon in any direction: laterally, medially, or upward. The dissection is performed along the course of the vessel up to the proximal colon, with progressive division of the sigmoid arterial branches. The specimen is extracted through a Pfannenstiel incision. The anastomosis is performed transanally with a circular stapler according to the Knight-Griffen technique.
Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach
M Milone, P Anoldo, M Manigrasso, F Milone
2739 views
8 months ago
Surgical intervention
13:33
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
SAE Yeo
7146 views
8 months ago
Surgical intervention
07:49
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
G Dapri
951 views
8 months ago

The last winner

Hall of Fame
2018
Jia Lin NG, MD
Singapore, Singapore

Shen-Ann Eugene YEO, MBBS, MMed (Surg), FRCS (Ed)
Singapore, Singapore

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Hall of Fame
2017
Stelio RUA, MD
Aurillac, France

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