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Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy for a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas
This video shows a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.
This is the case of a woman with a cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas, diagnosed in the study of an abdominal pain.
She was submitted to a CT-scan which showed a regular, well-defined 45mm cystic lesion in the pancreatic body, with voluminous hepatic hemangiomas. The findings of endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy were inconclusive, with a CEA of 653ng/dL.
The patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.
There were no postoperative complications. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Histological findings demonstrated the presence of a mucinous cystic neoplasm.
L Ferreira, N Vilela, O Oliveira, J Miranda
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2191 views
149 likes
0 comments
10:35
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy for a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas
This video shows a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.
This is the case of a woman with a cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas, diagnosed in the study of an abdominal pain.
She was submitted to a CT-scan which showed a regular, well-defined 45mm cystic lesion in the pancreatic body, with voluminous hepatic hemangiomas. The findings of endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy were inconclusive, with a CEA of 653ng/dL.
The patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.
There were no postoperative complications. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Histological findings demonstrated the presence of a mucinous cystic neoplasm.
Laparoscopic enucleation of a cystic tumor of the pancreas in a child
This short video describes the laparoscopic enucleation of a benign congenital excretory cyst of the pancreas in a 13-year-old girl.
No prenatal diagnosis had been envisaged and this teen girl was admitted in an emergency setting, with iterative abdominal pain followed by vomiting and weight loss (3Kg) over the last two months.
The entire work-up allowed to rule out the presence of parenchymal tumor involvement and the perfectly regular isolated and apparently normal nature of a cyst situated on the posterior aspect of the pancreatic head, which is totally separate from the biliary tract and from the duodenum.
In these conditions, the diagnosis of Frantz tumor was ruled out and the most probable hypothesis was that of a congenital cystic pancreatic tumor which had recently increased in size. The specificity of the technique used consisted in a pancreatic detachment using a Kocher’s maneuver. The posterior aspect of the pancreatic head was then detached in order to "plicate" or fold the pancreas upon itself.
Once turned over 180 degrees to the left, the posterior aspect of the pancreatic head was perfectly exposed. In addition, after puncture of the cyst, the clear fluid content of the cyst was replaced by a blue dye in order to perfectly identify it through a thin layer of pancreatic parenchyma.
The cyst’s enucleation was subsequently facilitated. No adhesion impaired its detachment from the remainder of the pancreatic tissue. Since the pericystic area was preserved, the risk of secondary pancreatic fistula was prevented, especially because the cyst had been previously opacified, which allowed to rule out any potential communication with the excretory ducts of the pancreas.
I Kauffmann, F Becmeur
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
635 views
13 likes
0 comments
02:59
Laparoscopic enucleation of a cystic tumor of the pancreas in a child
This short video describes the laparoscopic enucleation of a benign congenital excretory cyst of the pancreas in a 13-year-old girl.
No prenatal diagnosis had been envisaged and this teen girl was admitted in an emergency setting, with iterative abdominal pain followed by vomiting and weight loss (3Kg) over the last two months.
The entire work-up allowed to rule out the presence of parenchymal tumor involvement and the perfectly regular isolated and apparently normal nature of a cyst situated on the posterior aspect of the pancreatic head, which is totally separate from the biliary tract and from the duodenum.
In these conditions, the diagnosis of Frantz tumor was ruled out and the most probable hypothesis was that of a congenital cystic pancreatic tumor which had recently increased in size. The specificity of the technique used consisted in a pancreatic detachment using a Kocher’s maneuver. The posterior aspect of the pancreatic head was then detached in order to "plicate" or fold the pancreas upon itself.
Once turned over 180 degrees to the left, the posterior aspect of the pancreatic head was perfectly exposed. In addition, after puncture of the cyst, the clear fluid content of the cyst was replaced by a blue dye in order to perfectly identify it through a thin layer of pancreatic parenchyma.
The cyst’s enucleation was subsequently facilitated. No adhesion impaired its detachment from the remainder of the pancreatic tissue. Since the pericystic area was preserved, the risk of secondary pancreatic fistula was prevented, especially because the cyst had been previously opacified, which allowed to rule out any potential communication with the excretory ducts of the pancreas.
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
R Araujo, MA Sanctis, F Felippe, D Burgardt, D Wohnrath
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
770 views
2 likes
0 comments
08:04
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
F Freire Lisboa Junior, R de Lima França, A de Araujo Lima Liguori, AC de Medeiros Junior, M HSMP Tavares, F Medeiros de Azevedo, D Myller Barros Lima
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
1091 views
5 likes
0 comments
14:36
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
Laparoscopic distal splenopancreatectomy for pancreatic cystadenoma: clockwise technique assisted with T’Lift device
Serous cystic neoplasm is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, which is increasingly detected at an asymptomatic stage. Serous cystadenomas are benign cystic tumors which occur more often in women than in men, and particularly in the seventh decade of life. Despite this, in the literature, three patients were reported to have malignant serous cystadenomas, with sizes greater than 7cm. The serous cystic neoplasm was confirmed by an imaging characteristic appearance, with multiple small or different-sized cysts, but when the diagnosis is doubtful, which often leads to surgery.
The clinical case is the one of a 79-year-old woman with a cystadenoma of the pancreas. She had a history of partial cystectomy for bladder neoplasia and recently (in 2017), she was submitted to laparoscopic focal cryotherapy for the treatment of a left unilateral renal tumor. At that time, she underwent a CT-can, which found a cystic neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas. A heterogeneous 5cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, near the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies highly suggestive of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
In October 2018, in a follow-up CT-scan, there was an increase in size of the lesion (6.6cm) and a surgical resection was planned. A distal splenopancreatectomy using a clockwise technique was performed using the Signia™ stapling system with no complications. Histological examination confirmed a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
M Rui Martins, J Correia, D Jordão, S Martins, H Ferrão
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
991 views
4 likes
0 comments
20:59
Laparoscopic distal splenopancreatectomy for pancreatic cystadenoma: clockwise technique assisted with T’Lift device
Serous cystic neoplasm is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, which is increasingly detected at an asymptomatic stage. Serous cystadenomas are benign cystic tumors which occur more often in women than in men, and particularly in the seventh decade of life. Despite this, in the literature, three patients were reported to have malignant serous cystadenomas, with sizes greater than 7cm. The serous cystic neoplasm was confirmed by an imaging characteristic appearance, with multiple small or different-sized cysts, but when the diagnosis is doubtful, which often leads to surgery.
The clinical case is the one of a 79-year-old woman with a cystadenoma of the pancreas. She had a history of partial cystectomy for bladder neoplasia and recently (in 2017), she was submitted to laparoscopic focal cryotherapy for the treatment of a left unilateral renal tumor. At that time, she underwent a CT-can, which found a cystic neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas. A heterogeneous 5cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, near the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies highly suggestive of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
In October 2018, in a follow-up CT-scan, there was an increase in size of the lesion (6.6cm) and a surgical resection was planned. A distal splenopancreatectomy using a clockwise technique was performed using the Signia™ stapling system with no complications. Histological examination confirmed a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2051 views
5 likes
0 comments
13:26
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2211 views
3 likes
3 comments
07:01
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
Laparoscopic en bloc splenopancreatectomy with left adrenalectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The objective of this video is to present a surgical approach to a left adrenal mass caused by the invasion of a pancreatic lesion. A pulmonary lesion was also found. However, a preoperative biopsy of that lesion was impossible to perform. In order to distinguish the primary origin of this lung lesion, a laparoscopic ‘en bloc’ splenopancreatectomy combined with a left adrenalectomy and a para-aortic lymphadenectomy were planned.
Retrograde distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy is the standard procedure for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. In the literature, fewer studies describe the feasibility and the oncological safety of the laparoscopic approach.
This video aims to show the different operative steps of the procedure beginning with laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by distal pancreatectomy and para-aortic lympadenectomy.
R Romito, L Portigliotti, G Bondonno, M Zacchero, A Volpe
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
978 views
8 likes
0 comments
13:28
Laparoscopic en bloc splenopancreatectomy with left adrenalectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The objective of this video is to present a surgical approach to a left adrenal mass caused by the invasion of a pancreatic lesion. A pulmonary lesion was also found. However, a preoperative biopsy of that lesion was impossible to perform. In order to distinguish the primary origin of this lung lesion, a laparoscopic ‘en bloc’ splenopancreatectomy combined with a left adrenalectomy and a para-aortic lymphadenectomy were planned.
Retrograde distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy is the standard procedure for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. In the literature, fewer studies describe the feasibility and the oncological safety of the laparoscopic approach.
This video aims to show the different operative steps of the procedure beginning with laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by distal pancreatectomy and para-aortic lympadenectomy.
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
P Agami, A Andrianov, V Shchadrova, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
4386 views
15 likes
3 comments
12:28
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection
We reported a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection for a mucinous cystic lesion. Four ports were positioned. The greater omentum was retracted to the superior part of the abdomen in order to detach the colon from the omentum and approach the lesser sac. The stomach was dissected. A tape was placed around the stomach through the abdominal wall, making it possible to retract the stomach at the level of the pyloric junction towards the upper part of the abdomen. A second tape was placed at the antral part in order to achieve a retraction towards the left hypochondrium at the superior part of the abdomen. The mesentericoportal axis was identified and dissected at the inferior border of the pancreas. The right gastroepiploic vein was one of the landmarks. The superior border of the pancreas was dissected in order to identify the splenic artery and a tape was positioned around it. The dissection was performed progressively at the anterior aspect of the mesentericoportal axis through an avascular channel. A tape was subsequently positioned around the pancreatic isthmus. The pancreas was divided with a stapler. The stapling was performed very progressively to avoid crushing the pancreas. The splenic vein was dissected in order to preserve the left gastric vein and a tape was positioned around it. The splenic artery was first divided between two clips on the remaining surface. The splenic vein was also divided. Dissection was pursued from the right to the left, making it possible to mobilize the pancreas. The inferior mesenteric vein was dissected and divided. Dissection of the posterior mesogastrium was initiated, making it possible to mobilize the splenopancreatic block. The dissection was performed anteriorly to the plane of Gerota’s fascia, anteriorly to the kidney. Since the posterior dissection was almost complete, our attention was turned to the superior part to complete the dissection of lesser sac adhesions at the superior border of the pancreas. It was necessary to divide the greater omentum by gradually dividing the short gastric vessels. Due to venous derivations linked to segmental portal hypertension, this dissection was performed through the application of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Since the entire specimen had been divided and freed, it was placed in a bag to be extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
P Pessaux, X Untereiner, Z Cherkaoui, V Louis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5007 views
604 likes
0 comments
45:34
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection
We reported a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection for a mucinous cystic lesion. Four ports were positioned. The greater omentum was retracted to the superior part of the abdomen in order to detach the colon from the omentum and approach the lesser sac. The stomach was dissected. A tape was placed around the stomach through the abdominal wall, making it possible to retract the stomach at the level of the pyloric junction towards the upper part of the abdomen. A second tape was placed at the antral part in order to achieve a retraction towards the left hypochondrium at the superior part of the abdomen. The mesentericoportal axis was identified and dissected at the inferior border of the pancreas. The right gastroepiploic vein was one of the landmarks. The superior border of the pancreas was dissected in order to identify the splenic artery and a tape was positioned around it. The dissection was performed progressively at the anterior aspect of the mesentericoportal axis through an avascular channel. A tape was subsequently positioned around the pancreatic isthmus. The pancreas was divided with a stapler. The stapling was performed very progressively to avoid crushing the pancreas. The splenic vein was dissected in order to preserve the left gastric vein and a tape was positioned around it. The splenic artery was first divided between two clips on the remaining surface. The splenic vein was also divided. Dissection was pursued from the right to the left, making it possible to mobilize the pancreas. The inferior mesenteric vein was dissected and divided. Dissection of the posterior mesogastrium was initiated, making it possible to mobilize the splenopancreatic block. The dissection was performed anteriorly to the plane of Gerota’s fascia, anteriorly to the kidney. Since the posterior dissection was almost complete, our attention was turned to the superior part to complete the dissection of lesser sac adhesions at the superior border of the pancreas. It was necessary to divide the greater omentum by gradually dividing the short gastric vessels. Due to venous derivations linked to segmental portal hypertension, this dissection was performed through the application of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Since the entire specimen had been divided and freed, it was placed in a bag to be extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma
We report the case of a robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma. The patient is positioned in the French position with the assistant between the legs and the robot at the head. Five trocars are used: the camera is introduced through the umbilical trocar. The operation begins with the exploration of the peritoneum and of the liver. The gastric antrum is divided. Each structure of the hepatic pedicle is skeletonized. The superior border of the pancreas is dissected, hence allowing to approach the mesentericoportal axis.
The surgeon proceeds to the inferior border of the pancreas in order to find the mesentericoportal axis and to achieve a retropancreatic passage, which is where the pancreas will be divided. The pancreas is divided using the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device. The first jejunal loop is divided with a stapler. The specimen is totally mobilized ‘en bloc’, and freed from the portal vascular axis with a dissection of the right border of the coeliac trunk. At the end of the dissection, the different arterial and venous structures are skeletonized with a lymph node resection. The reconstruction is performed with a pancreaticogastrostomy, hepaticojejunostomy, and gastrojejunostomy.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2344 views
235 likes
0 comments
28:02
Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma
We report the case of a robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma. The patient is positioned in the French position with the assistant between the legs and the robot at the head. Five trocars are used: the camera is introduced through the umbilical trocar. The operation begins with the exploration of the peritoneum and of the liver. The gastric antrum is divided. Each structure of the hepatic pedicle is skeletonized. The superior border of the pancreas is dissected, hence allowing to approach the mesentericoportal axis.
The surgeon proceeds to the inferior border of the pancreas in order to find the mesentericoportal axis and to achieve a retropancreatic passage, which is where the pancreas will be divided. The pancreas is divided using the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device. The first jejunal loop is divided with a stapler. The specimen is totally mobilized ‘en bloc’, and freed from the portal vascular axis with a dissection of the right border of the coeliac trunk. At the end of the dissection, the different arterial and venous structures are skeletonized with a lymph node resection. The reconstruction is performed with a pancreaticogastrostomy, hepaticojejunostomy, and gastrojejunostomy.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
JP Pinto, T Moreno, D Poletto, A Toscano, M Lozano
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
2186 views
4 likes
0 comments
14:02
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
In this video, a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with a splenectomy is demonstrated. The colon is mobilized from the omentum and the splenic flexure is lowered completely. The dissection is completed towards the right side in order to access the pancreatic isthmus. The dissection is initiated at the level of the inferior pancreatic port in order to identify the mesentericoportal axis. The retropancreatic dissection is performed. The splenic vein and the splenic artery are dissected and taped. A tape is placed around the pancreas in order to facilitate the dissection thanks to the traction exerted. The pancreas is divided by means of a stapler, tan cartridge. The splenic vessels were divided through Hem-o-lok™ Polymer Locking Ligation Systems. The dissection is performed from the right to the left side of the retropancreatic region. The greater omentum is dissected in close contact with the greater curvature of the stomach. The short gastric vessels are progressively divided. The division of the posterior mesogastrium allows to completely free the specimen, which is then placed in a bag. The specimen is removed through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2342 views
161 likes
0 comments
21:51
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
In this video, a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with a splenectomy is demonstrated. The colon is mobilized from the omentum and the splenic flexure is lowered completely. The dissection is completed towards the right side in order to access the pancreatic isthmus. The dissection is initiated at the level of the inferior pancreatic port in order to identify the mesentericoportal axis. The retropancreatic dissection is performed. The splenic vein and the splenic artery are dissected and taped. A tape is placed around the pancreas in order to facilitate the dissection thanks to the traction exerted. The pancreas is divided by means of a stapler, tan cartridge. The splenic vessels were divided through Hem-o-lok™ Polymer Locking Ligation Systems. The dissection is performed from the right to the left side of the retropancreatic region. The greater omentum is dissected in close contact with the greater curvature of the stomach. The short gastric vessels are progressively divided. The division of the posterior mesogastrium allows to completely free the specimen, which is then placed in a bag. The specimen is removed through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, R Araujo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5194 views
598 likes
0 comments
38:09
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
Completely intracorporeal handsewn laparoscopic anastomoses during Whipple procedure
Background: Since 1935, the Whipple procedure was described, using conventional open surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it was reported to be feasible also using the latest technology. In this video, the authors demonstrate a full laparoscopic Whipple procedure, performing the three anastomoses using an intracorporeal handsewn method.

Video: A 70-year-old man presenting with an adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, infiltrating the pancreatic parenchyma, underwent a laparoscop ic Whipple procedure. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N1M0 tumor.

Results: Total operative time was 8 hours 20minutes; time for the dissection was 6 hours 20 minutes; time for specimen extraction was 20 minutes, and time for the three laparoscopic intracorporeal handsewn anastomoses was 1 hour 40 minutes. Operative bleeding was 350cc. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 9. Pathological findings confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, with perinervous infiltration and lymphovascular emboli, free margins, 2 metastatic lymph nodes on 23 isolated; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4N1.

Conclusions: The laparoscopic Whipple procedure remains an advanced procedure to be performed laparoscopically and/or using open surgery. All the advantages of MIS such as reduced abdominal trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, improved patient’s comfort, and enhanced cosmesis are offered using laparoscopy.
G Dapri, NA Bascombe, L Gerard, C Samaniego Ballar, C Jiménez Viñas
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2720 views
223 likes
1 comment
10:22
Completely intracorporeal handsewn laparoscopic anastomoses during Whipple procedure
Background: Since 1935, the Whipple procedure was described, using conventional open surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it was reported to be feasible also using the latest technology. In this video, the authors demonstrate a full laparoscopic Whipple procedure, performing the three anastomoses using an intracorporeal handsewn method.

Video: A 70-year-old man presenting with an adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, infiltrating the pancreatic parenchyma, underwent a laparoscop ic Whipple procedure. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N1M0 tumor.

Results: Total operative time was 8 hours 20minutes; time for the dissection was 6 hours 20 minutes; time for specimen extraction was 20 minutes, and time for the three laparoscopic intracorporeal handsewn anastomoses was 1 hour 40 minutes. Operative bleeding was 350cc. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 9. Pathological findings confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, with perinervous infiltration and lymphovascular emboli, free margins, 2 metastatic lymph nodes on 23 isolated; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4N1.

Conclusions: The laparoscopic Whipple procedure remains an advanced procedure to be performed laparoscopically and/or using open surgery. All the advantages of MIS such as reduced abdominal trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, improved patient’s comfort, and enhanced cosmesis are offered using laparoscopy.
Spleen and splenic vessel preserving distal pancreatectomy for bifocal PNET in a young patient with MEN1
In this key lecture, Dr. Conrad outlines key steps related to spleen and splenic vessel preserving distal pancreatectomy, laparoscopic insulinoma enucleation of the posterior pancreatic neck, and laparoscopic partial splenectomy. He stresses the technical aspects of intraoperative ultrasonography, celiac trunk dissection, and gives some recommendations with regards to leak reduction, vascular dissection, and energy device use. He provides tips and tricks for insulinoma dissection and emphasizes key concepts and technical points for main pancreatic duct preservation, hilum dissection, and spleen transection.
C Conrad
Lecture
2 years ago
939 views
67 likes
0 comments
15:24
Spleen and splenic vessel preserving distal pancreatectomy for bifocal PNET in a young patient with MEN1
In this key lecture, Dr. Conrad outlines key steps related to spleen and splenic vessel preserving distal pancreatectomy, laparoscopic insulinoma enucleation of the posterior pancreatic neck, and laparoscopic partial splenectomy. He stresses the technical aspects of intraoperative ultrasonography, celiac trunk dissection, and gives some recommendations with regards to leak reduction, vascular dissection, and energy device use. He provides tips and tricks for insulinoma dissection and emphasizes key concepts and technical points for main pancreatic duct preservation, hilum dissection, and spleen transection.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for mucinous cystadenoma
This video presents the case of a 39-year-old woman complaining of epigastric and right upper quadrant pain with dorsal irradiation and postprandial pain without nausea or vomiting. Abdominal ultrasound showed the presence of a 21mm cystic mass with multi-lobulated appearance at the tail of the pancreas. MRI confirmed the cystic nature of this tumor lesion of the tail of the pancreas, which was probably compatible with a mucinous cystadenoma (with a 23mm long axis) without communication with Wirsung’s duct. Transgastric echo-endoscopy revealed an ovoid cystic lesion of the pancreatic tail, with clean wall, measuring 19 by 10mm with small septa and a 4mm thick mural nodule without communication with the pancreatic duct. A laparoscopic left pancreatectomy was indicated because of the presence of a mucinous cystadenoma. This video demonstrates a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy approach. A spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy by preserving the splenic vessels (Kimura technique) was decided upon.
F Costantino, M Shahbaz, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1953 views
95 likes
0 comments
12:01
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for mucinous cystadenoma
This video presents the case of a 39-year-old woman complaining of epigastric and right upper quadrant pain with dorsal irradiation and postprandial pain without nausea or vomiting. Abdominal ultrasound showed the presence of a 21mm cystic mass with multi-lobulated appearance at the tail of the pancreas. MRI confirmed the cystic nature of this tumor lesion of the tail of the pancreas, which was probably compatible with a mucinous cystadenoma (with a 23mm long axis) without communication with Wirsung’s duct. Transgastric echo-endoscopy revealed an ovoid cystic lesion of the pancreatic tail, with clean wall, measuring 19 by 10mm with small septa and a 4mm thick mural nodule without communication with the pancreatic duct. A laparoscopic left pancreatectomy was indicated because of the presence of a mucinous cystadenoma. This video demonstrates a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy approach. A spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy by preserving the splenic vessels (Kimura technique) was decided upon.
Basic principles and technical tips for laparoscopic pancreatectomy
With the improved laparoscopic instruments and energy devices, laparoscopy has become increasingly popular among surgeons. In this video, Professor Asbun outlines principles and tips for laparoscopic pancreatectomy. Beginners and young surgeons have to fully commit themselves in the training as there is no shortcut in the learning of laparoscopic surgery. Patient position plays a key role in laparoscopic solid organ surgery. The surgeons are using gravity to make the surgery easier. Placement of ports for pancreaticoduodenectomy in Kocher’s maneuver is as essential as the exposure of the operative field. Camera, laparoscope and instrumentation also play a key role. As energy devices are diverse and since the learning curve is different for each surgeon, the importance of technical tips cannot be neglected. In advanced techniques, HPB training is essential and suturing is the basic and most important part. Exposure, division of the duodenum and hepatoduodenal ligament, SMV-PV trunk exposure, Kocher’s maneuver, pancreatic neck division, identification of the pancreatic duct, uncinate process dissection, SMA dissection, lymph node dissection, and specimen removal represent the steps of the procedure. Laparoscopic surgery should be a standard for distal pancreatectomy. The superiority of laparoscopy over open surgery still needs to be proven as laparoscopy requires a high level of skills.
HJ Asbun
Lecture
2 years ago
4353 views
162 likes
0 comments
33:33
Basic principles and technical tips for laparoscopic pancreatectomy
With the improved laparoscopic instruments and energy devices, laparoscopy has become increasingly popular among surgeons. In this video, Professor Asbun outlines principles and tips for laparoscopic pancreatectomy. Beginners and young surgeons have to fully commit themselves in the training as there is no shortcut in the learning of laparoscopic surgery. Patient position plays a key role in laparoscopic solid organ surgery. The surgeons are using gravity to make the surgery easier. Placement of ports for pancreaticoduodenectomy in Kocher’s maneuver is as essential as the exposure of the operative field. Camera, laparoscope and instrumentation also play a key role. As energy devices are diverse and since the learning curve is different for each surgeon, the importance of technical tips cannot be neglected. In advanced techniques, HPB training is essential and suturing is the basic and most important part. Exposure, division of the duodenum and hepatoduodenal ligament, SMV-PV trunk exposure, Kocher’s maneuver, pancreatic neck division, identification of the pancreatic duct, uncinate process dissection, SMA dissection, lymph node dissection, and specimen removal represent the steps of the procedure. Laparoscopic surgery should be a standard for distal pancreatectomy. The superiority of laparoscopy over open surgery still needs to be proven as laparoscopy requires a high level of skills.
Total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with pancreaticogastric anastomosis
The safe feasibility of total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy has been demonstrated by several authors. In order to achieve it, a 5-port approach is used. Kocher’s maneuver allows to access the inferior vena cava, the subrenal aorta, the posterior plate of the unciform process, and the superior mesenteric artery. Lymph node resection of the region may be performed completely, namely an interaorticocaval lymphadenectomy around the hepatoduodenal ligament and around the coeliac trunk and its branches. After portal vein dissection, the pancreas must be divided distally from the tumor, and its right part must be separated from the portal vein. The duodenal bulb and the first jejunal loop are divided using a linear stapler. After cholecystectomy, the hepatic duct is cut proximally to the cystic duct. Reconstruction will include three anastomoses, a telescoping posterior end-to-side pancreaticogastrostomy, an end-to-side duodenojejunostomy, and an end-to-side hepaticojejunostomy.
B Ghavami
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1789 views
61 likes
0 comments
13:35
Total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with pancreaticogastric anastomosis
The safe feasibility of total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy has been demonstrated by several authors. In order to achieve it, a 5-port approach is used. Kocher’s maneuver allows to access the inferior vena cava, the subrenal aorta, the posterior plate of the unciform process, and the superior mesenteric artery. Lymph node resection of the region may be performed completely, namely an interaorticocaval lymphadenectomy around the hepatoduodenal ligament and around the coeliac trunk and its branches. After portal vein dissection, the pancreas must be divided distally from the tumor, and its right part must be separated from the portal vein. The duodenal bulb and the first jejunal loop are divided using a linear stapler. After cholecystectomy, the hepatic duct is cut proximally to the cystic duct. Reconstruction will include three anastomoses, a telescoping posterior end-to-side pancreaticogastrostomy, an end-to-side duodenojejunostomy, and an end-to-side hepaticojejunostomy.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy
Almost all lesions smaller than 7cm, which do not involve the coeliac or mesenteric vessels, should be considered for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. Several meta-analyses showed the clear benefits of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy over open surgery regarding blood loss, hospital stay, morbidity, and wound infection. The comparison of open surgery vs. laparoscopic surgery in patients presenting with adenocarcinoma shows the benefits of laparoscopic surgery. It is much easier to learn this technique. In this lecture, the clockwise technique is briefly demonstrated. Gravity, ports position and instrumentation are essential. The key steps of the clockwise technique are as follows: mobilization of the splenic flexure and of the proximal descending colon, dissection from lateral to medial along the lower edge of the pancreas, determination of the point of division (stapled or hand-sewn), posterior dissection, mobilization of the spleen using gravity along the superior edge of the pancreas, and removal of the specimen.
HJ Asbun
Lecture
3 years ago
2070 views
62 likes
0 comments
13:55
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy
Almost all lesions smaller than 7cm, which do not involve the coeliac or mesenteric vessels, should be considered for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. Several meta-analyses showed the clear benefits of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy over open surgery regarding blood loss, hospital stay, morbidity, and wound infection. The comparison of open surgery vs. laparoscopic surgery in patients presenting with adenocarcinoma shows the benefits of laparoscopic surgery. It is much easier to learn this technique. In this lecture, the clockwise technique is briefly demonstrated. Gravity, ports position and instrumentation are essential. The key steps of the clockwise technique are as follows: mobilization of the splenic flexure and of the proximal descending colon, dissection from lateral to medial along the lower edge of the pancreas, determination of the point of division (stapled or hand-sewn), posterior dissection, mobilization of the spleen using gravity along the superior edge of the pancreas, and removal of the specimen.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation
Distal pancreatectomy is the standard curative treatment for symptomatic benign, premalignant, and malignant disease of the pancreatic body and tail. Nowadays, more than 80% of distal pancreatectomies are performed laparoscopically. The basic advantages of this approach over the open approach are the following: reduced blood loss, fewer complications, and shorter hospital stay. Pancreatic neoplasms, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cysts are the main indications for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. Distal pancreatosplenectomy and spleen-preserving pancreatectomy are contraindicated in metastatic diseases, peritoneal carcinosis, vascular invasion, and pancreatitis involving the entire pancreas. Spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy should be attempted in case of benign disease. Spleen preservation should preferably be achieved by preserving the splenic vessels (Kimura technique), but also by resecting the splenic vessels and maintaining vascularity through the short gastric vessels and the left gastroepiploic artery (Warshaw’s technique).
AM Cury
Lecture
2 years ago
1956 views
73 likes
0 comments
11:42
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation
Distal pancreatectomy is the standard curative treatment for symptomatic benign, premalignant, and malignant disease of the pancreatic body and tail. Nowadays, more than 80% of distal pancreatectomies are performed laparoscopically. The basic advantages of this approach over the open approach are the following: reduced blood loss, fewer complications, and shorter hospital stay. Pancreatic neoplasms, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cysts are the main indications for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. Distal pancreatosplenectomy and spleen-preserving pancreatectomy are contraindicated in metastatic diseases, peritoneal carcinosis, vascular invasion, and pancreatitis involving the entire pancreas. Spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy should be attempted in case of benign disease. Spleen preservation should preferably be achieved by preserving the splenic vessels (Kimura technique), but also by resecting the splenic vessels and maintaining vascularity through the short gastric vessels and the left gastroepiploic artery (Warshaw’s technique).
Total laparoscopic pancreatico-duodenectomy
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy has recently emerged as one of the most advanced applications of surgery and total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (TLPD) has proven to be among one of the most advanced laparoscopic procedures. The evolution in laparoscopic technology and instrumentation within the past decade has let laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy gain wider acceptance. Also known as the Whipple procedure, it was first performed laparoscopically in 1994. It consists of a biliary-enteric and of a gastro-enteric anastomosis. It is a two-step procedure: dissection is performed first, reconstruction follows. The laparoscopic approach requires comparatively longer operative times and necessitates advanced laparoscopic skills and hybrid approaches. Bleeding is a severe complication. People die of gastroduodenal and hepatic artery bleeding. The retroperitoneal part of the pancreas is involved in 51 to 93% of cases. Bleeding is a major complication during this procedure, which can be controlled by compressing, inserting another port, clamping, and stitching.
AM Cury
Lecture
2 years ago
2888 views
131 likes
0 comments
24:39
Total laparoscopic pancreatico-duodenectomy
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy has recently emerged as one of the most advanced applications of surgery and total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (TLPD) has proven to be among one of the most advanced laparoscopic procedures. The evolution in laparoscopic technology and instrumentation within the past decade has let laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy gain wider acceptance. Also known as the Whipple procedure, it was first performed laparoscopically in 1994. It consists of a biliary-enteric and of a gastro-enteric anastomosis. It is a two-step procedure: dissection is performed first, reconstruction follows. The laparoscopic approach requires comparatively longer operative times and necessitates advanced laparoscopic skills and hybrid approaches. Bleeding is a severe complication. People die of gastroduodenal and hepatic artery bleeding. The retroperitoneal part of the pancreas is involved in 51 to 93% of cases. Bleeding is a major complication during this procedure, which can be controlled by compressing, inserting another port, clamping, and stitching.
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation with splenic vascular resection (Warshaw's technique)
We report the case of a 39-year-old woman who underwent morphological examination (CT-scan and MRI) for poorly systematized abdominal pain, which demonstrated the presence of a unilocular macrocystic lesion at the tail of the pancreas. The diagnosis established reported a mucinous cystadenoma, and a robotic distal spleen-preserving pancreatectomy was decided upon.
The dissection is initiated at the inferior border of the pancreas. Dissection has been performed at the level of the splenic hilum with freeing of the pancreatic tail. The splenic branches of the splenic vein are identified at the posterior aspect of the pancreas. These branches are freed progressively. As a result, the distal part of the pancreas is freed from the splenic hilum, and dissection will be performed from left to right. This dissection was decided upon as the lesion is located very distally. The splenic vein and the splenic artery are freed at the level of the hilum. Dissection is continued progressively to the right.
Dissection of the cyst in relation to the splenic vein is uneasy as there are several inflammatory adhesions. Dissection is then performed at the isthmic part of the pancreas. The splenic artery is dissected at the superior border of the pancreas. Dissection is then carried out at the posterior aspect of the pancreas. Considering the presence of adhesions, the operative strategy is changed. It is decided to perform a distal pancreatectomy with preservation of the spleen without vessels preservation. However, the splenic vessels are divided. Consequently, the splenic artery is ligated by a clip and divided. The distal part of the splenic artery is also ligated. Proximally, the splenic vein is dissected and divided. The distal part has also been clipped.
The distal division of arterial and venous vessels is performed. The pancreas was divided at the level of its body. The specimen is placed into a bag and extracted by means of a small Pfannenstiel incision. At the end of the procedure, the spleen appears to be well-vascularized by short vessels. The CT-scan performed on postoperative day 5 demonstrates that the spleen is well-vascularized and rules out the presence of any collection in the place left by pancreatectomy. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. There is no pancreatic fistula. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 7. Pathological findings confirm the presence of a mucinous cystadenoma without any malignancy.
P Pessaux, J Hallet, R Memeo, JB Delhorme, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1290 views
27 likes
0 comments
12:38
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation with splenic vascular resection (Warshaw's technique)
We report the case of a 39-year-old woman who underwent morphological examination (CT-scan and MRI) for poorly systematized abdominal pain, which demonstrated the presence of a unilocular macrocystic lesion at the tail of the pancreas. The diagnosis established reported a mucinous cystadenoma, and a robotic distal spleen-preserving pancreatectomy was decided upon.
The dissection is initiated at the inferior border of the pancreas. Dissection has been performed at the level of the splenic hilum with freeing of the pancreatic tail. The splenic branches of the splenic vein are identified at the posterior aspect of the pancreas. These branches are freed progressively. As a result, the distal part of the pancreas is freed from the splenic hilum, and dissection will be performed from left to right. This dissection was decided upon as the lesion is located very distally. The splenic vein and the splenic artery are freed at the level of the hilum. Dissection is continued progressively to the right.
Dissection of the cyst in relation to the splenic vein is uneasy as there are several inflammatory adhesions. Dissection is then performed at the isthmic part of the pancreas. The splenic artery is dissected at the superior border of the pancreas. Dissection is then carried out at the posterior aspect of the pancreas. Considering the presence of adhesions, the operative strategy is changed. It is decided to perform a distal pancreatectomy with preservation of the spleen without vessels preservation. However, the splenic vessels are divided. Consequently, the splenic artery is ligated by a clip and divided. The distal part of the splenic artery is also ligated. Proximally, the splenic vein is dissected and divided. The distal part has also been clipped.
The distal division of arterial and venous vessels is performed. The pancreas was divided at the level of its body. The specimen is placed into a bag and extracted by means of a small Pfannenstiel incision. At the end of the procedure, the spleen appears to be well-vascularized by short vessels. The CT-scan performed on postoperative day 5 demonstrates that the spleen is well-vascularized and rules out the presence of any collection in the place left by pancreatectomy. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. There is no pancreatic fistula. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 7. Pathological findings confirm the presence of a mucinous cystadenoma without any malignancy.