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Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
H Inoue, RA Ciurezu, M Pizzicannella, F Habersetzer
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
238 views
1 like
0 comments
25:51
Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: live procedure
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system mounted on a dual-channel Olympus® scope allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to reduce the volume and the size of the stomach. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. Once the Overtube™ was placed, the scope equipped with the OverStitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery®, Austin, Tex) suturing device was inserted through the stomach, and the suturing was initiated at the level of the incisura. The tissue-retracting helix device was used to grab the stomach wall, allowing for full-thickness bites. Each suture consisted of multiple sequential U-shaped bites along the anterior wall, the greater curvature, the posterior wall, and then in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device. Three sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization, and to spare the fundus.
S Perretta, M Pizzicannella, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
392 views
0 likes
0 comments
18:32
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: live procedure
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system mounted on a dual-channel Olympus® scope allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to reduce the volume and the size of the stomach. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. Once the Overtube™ was placed, the scope equipped with the OverStitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery®, Austin, Tex) suturing device was inserted through the stomach, and the suturing was initiated at the level of the incisura. The tissue-retracting helix device was used to grab the stomach wall, allowing for full-thickness bites. Each suture consisted of multiple sequential U-shaped bites along the anterior wall, the greater curvature, the posterior wall, and then in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device. Three sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization, and to spare the fundus.
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of multiple hyperplastic polyps of the stomach
A 69 year-old man with a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and renal insufficiency underwent a gastroscopy for chronic anemia. During this procedure, a 3cm hyperplastic gastric polyp was discovered. The patient was scheduled for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The procedure started with a gastroscopy, which showed a normal duodenum and many gastric hyperplastic polyps. The largest one was a pedunculated polyp of about 3cm in size at the level of the greater curvature. The operator opted for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the multiple polyps. After submucosal injection, polyps were resected using a snare (ENDO CUT® Q mode). All resected polyps were retrieved with a Roth Net® for histological evaluation.
A Lemmers, M Pizzicannella, F Habersetzer
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
149 views
0 likes
0 comments
08:46
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of multiple hyperplastic polyps of the stomach
A 69 year-old man with a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and renal insufficiency underwent a gastroscopy for chronic anemia. During this procedure, a 3cm hyperplastic gastric polyp was discovered. The patient was scheduled for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The procedure started with a gastroscopy, which showed a normal duodenum and many gastric hyperplastic polyps. The largest one was a pedunculated polyp of about 3cm in size at the level of the greater curvature. The operator opted for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the multiple polyps. After submucosal injection, polyps were resected using a snare (ENDO CUT® Q mode). All resected polyps were retrieved with a Roth Net® for histological evaluation.
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Gf Donatelli, S Perretta, M Ignat, M Pizzicannella, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
646 views
2 likes
0 comments
14:45
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
A D'Urso, Gf Donatelli, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
92 views
2 likes
0 comments
12:02
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading tumor in rectum and resolution of late bleeding
The objectives of this video are manifold, namely to present the totally endoscopic treatment of a laterally spreading tumor in the upper rectum with a piecemeal technique, and how to act against one of its most frequent complications, post-polypectomy bleeding.
Methods: The procedure was performed in an advanced flexible endoscopy unit, with the patient lying supine, with anesthesia (Propofol), and insufflation of carbon dioxide. A videocolonoscope was used, the lesion was identified and elevated with hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven). It was dried with a hot snare in parts ("piecemeal" technique), thereby achieving complete resection. The defect was closed with metal clips. The specimen was recovered for histopathological study.
Results: During screening colonoscopy, a 56-year-old patient was found with a 30mm granular laterally spreading tumor of the rectum (LST-G or nodular mixed type), located 15cm from the anal verge. Complete endoscopic resection of the lesion with a curative intent was performed. On postoperative day 5, proctorrhagia presented without hemodynamic alteration. Emergency endoscopy was decided upon. Upon entering with the colonoscope, we identified a clot attached to the surgical site. Once the bleeding had been confirmed, a saline solution with 1/20,000 adrenaline was injected. And then, with a hot snare, electrocoagulation was performed in the same area, combining an injection method with a thermal one and achieving a satisfying hemostasis. The patient was discharged on the same day without any other complications. The pathology report showed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, including patches of high-grade dysplasia, and injury-free resection margins.
Conclusions: EMR of laterally spreading tumors is safe, although it is not devoid of complications such as bleeding, which is present in up to 9.8 of every 100,000 polypectomies in some series (Reumkens et al., AJG 2016). It is essential to suspect and know how to solve it efficiently with the tools available at that time of emergency.
J Isaguirre, A Insausti
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
393 views
0 likes
0 comments
05:38
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading tumor in rectum and resolution of late bleeding
The objectives of this video are manifold, namely to present the totally endoscopic treatment of a laterally spreading tumor in the upper rectum with a piecemeal technique, and how to act against one of its most frequent complications, post-polypectomy bleeding.
Methods: The procedure was performed in an advanced flexible endoscopy unit, with the patient lying supine, with anesthesia (Propofol), and insufflation of carbon dioxide. A videocolonoscope was used, the lesion was identified and elevated with hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven). It was dried with a hot snare in parts ("piecemeal" technique), thereby achieving complete resection. The defect was closed with metal clips. The specimen was recovered for histopathological study.
Results: During screening colonoscopy, a 56-year-old patient was found with a 30mm granular laterally spreading tumor of the rectum (LST-G or nodular mixed type), located 15cm from the anal verge. Complete endoscopic resection of the lesion with a curative intent was performed. On postoperative day 5, proctorrhagia presented without hemodynamic alteration. Emergency endoscopy was decided upon. Upon entering with the colonoscope, we identified a clot attached to the surgical site. Once the bleeding had been confirmed, a saline solution with 1/20,000 adrenaline was injected. And then, with a hot snare, electrocoagulation was performed in the same area, combining an injection method with a thermal one and achieving a satisfying hemostasis. The patient was discharged on the same day without any other complications. The pathology report showed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, including patches of high-grade dysplasia, and injury-free resection margins.
Conclusions: EMR of laterally spreading tumors is safe, although it is not devoid of complications such as bleeding, which is present in up to 9.8 of every 100,000 polypectomies in some series (Reumkens et al., AJG 2016). It is essential to suspect and know how to solve it efficiently with the tools available at that time of emergency.