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Laparoscopic ligation of middle sacral artery and dissection of sacrococcygeal teratoma to decrease intraoperative hemorrhagic risk
Sacrococcygeal teratomas are the most common teratomas presenting at birth. Life-threatening bleeding is a major complication during tumor excision in children. In this video, we demonstrate our technique for the laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery during dissection of sacrococcygeal teratomas in two pediatric patients.
Two female infants diagnosed with type IV and type III sacrococcygeal teratomas underwent preoperative evaluation in the postnatal period. The first patient was an 18-month-old female patient who presented with a metastatic type IV teratoma resected after neoadjuvant therapy. The second patient was a 6-day-old female infant with a prenatal diagnosis of cystic type III teratoma. Using laparoscopy in both patients, the presacral space was reached by opening the peritoneal reflection with blunt dissection and the middle sacral artery was identified. It was then carefully isolated and divided with a 5mm LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device. The pelvic components of the tumors were partially dissected using laparoscopy. The first patient’s tumor resection was completed using a posterior sagittal approach and the second patient required a standard Chevron incision.
Both patients underwent a successful laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery and resection of the sacrococcygeal teratomas without complications. As a result, laparoscopic middle sacral artery division before sacrococcygeal teratoma excision offers a safe approach which can reduce the risk of hemorrhage during surgery.
T Huy, H Osei, AS Munoz Abraham, R Damle, GA Villalona
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
548 views
4 likes
0 comments
05:33
Laparoscopic ligation of middle sacral artery and dissection of sacrococcygeal teratoma to decrease intraoperative hemorrhagic risk
Sacrococcygeal teratomas are the most common teratomas presenting at birth. Life-threatening bleeding is a major complication during tumor excision in children. In this video, we demonstrate our technique for the laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery during dissection of sacrococcygeal teratomas in two pediatric patients.
Two female infants diagnosed with type IV and type III sacrococcygeal teratomas underwent preoperative evaluation in the postnatal period. The first patient was an 18-month-old female patient who presented with a metastatic type IV teratoma resected after neoadjuvant therapy. The second patient was a 6-day-old female infant with a prenatal diagnosis of cystic type III teratoma. Using laparoscopy in both patients, the presacral space was reached by opening the peritoneal reflection with blunt dissection and the middle sacral artery was identified. It was then carefully isolated and divided with a 5mm LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device. The pelvic components of the tumors were partially dissected using laparoscopy. The first patient’s tumor resection was completed using a posterior sagittal approach and the second patient required a standard Chevron incision.
Both patients underwent a successful laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery and resection of the sacrococcygeal teratomas without complications. As a result, laparoscopic middle sacral artery division before sacrococcygeal teratoma excision offers a safe approach which can reduce the risk of hemorrhage during surgery.
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
R Adjerid, F Sebaa, N Otsmane, A Khelifaoui
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
1491 views
7 likes
0 comments
05:13
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
Pheochromocytoma: laparoscopic right adrenalectomy in a child
In the context of major headaches in a 9-year-old patient whose brother had been operated on for pheochromocytoma, a right adrenal pheochromocytoma with severe arterial hypertension was found.
The given video aims to demonstrate the usefulness of performing a 3D reconstruction of the tumor (using Visible Patient™ 3D reconstruction tool). It is essential to have precise preoperative information and work out a surgical strategy taking into account observed anatomical anomalies, since tumor and/or vascular anatomy may have numerous variations in case of pheochromocytomas.
A reconstruction model can be easily manipulated on a touch screen. It can be oriented in such a way that the angle of view changes allowing for a better understanding of the anatomy, so that an approach to vessels or neighboring organs is easily decided upon. Additionally, the option of adding or deleting this or that anatomical element allows for a simplified visual approach, which usually represents a potential difficulty during dissection.
Finally, the 3D reconstruction of this patient perfectly corresponds to her real anatomy. Thanks to a mere scanning based on the reconstruction, the vascularization mode of the tumor as well as the existence of a hidden part of healthy tissue can be verified.
F Becmeur, A Lachkar, L Soler
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
2300 views
6 likes
0 comments
08:30
Pheochromocytoma: laparoscopic right adrenalectomy in a child
In the context of major headaches in a 9-year-old patient whose brother had been operated on for pheochromocytoma, a right adrenal pheochromocytoma with severe arterial hypertension was found.
The given video aims to demonstrate the usefulness of performing a 3D reconstruction of the tumor (using Visible Patient™ 3D reconstruction tool). It is essential to have precise preoperative information and work out a surgical strategy taking into account observed anatomical anomalies, since tumor and/or vascular anatomy may have numerous variations in case of pheochromocytomas.
A reconstruction model can be easily manipulated on a touch screen. It can be oriented in such a way that the angle of view changes allowing for a better understanding of the anatomy, so that an approach to vessels or neighboring organs is easily decided upon. Additionally, the option of adding or deleting this or that anatomical element allows for a simplified visual approach, which usually represents a potential difficulty during dissection.
Finally, the 3D reconstruction of this patient perfectly corresponds to her real anatomy. Thanks to a mere scanning based on the reconstruction, the vascularization mode of the tumor as well as the existence of a hidden part of healthy tissue can be verified.
Laparoscopic repair of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
Eligibility criteria for the thoracoscopic approach in case of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) in infants were jointly addressed at the ESPES/IPEG-ESPU Masterclass in March 2017 held at IRCAD, and also published on WeBSurg.
This video aims to show a series of technical details in case of thoracoscopy for CDH grade B according to the currently accepted international classification. At the beginning of the procedure, short intrathoracic low pressure carbon dioxide insufflation at 4mmHg and 1.5 Liter per minute was performed during hernia reduction. The posterior diaphragmatic border was then freed and a diaphragmatic suture was performed using non-absorbable separate 2/0 stitches. A GoreTex DualMesh® patch was used to complete the external suturing of the diaphragm and to achieve fixation stitches.
I Kauffmann, F Becmeur
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
2836 views
14 likes
0 comments
04:17
Laparoscopic repair of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
Eligibility criteria for the thoracoscopic approach in case of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) in infants were jointly addressed at the ESPES/IPEG-ESPU Masterclass in March 2017 held at IRCAD, and also published on WeBSurg.
This video aims to show a series of technical details in case of thoracoscopy for CDH grade B according to the currently accepted international classification. At the beginning of the procedure, short intrathoracic low pressure carbon dioxide insufflation at 4mmHg and 1.5 Liter per minute was performed during hernia reduction. The posterior diaphragmatic border was then freed and a diaphragmatic suture was performed using non-absorbable separate 2/0 stitches. A GoreTex DualMesh® patch was used to complete the external suturing of the diaphragm and to achieve fixation stitches.
Incidental finding of a voluminous bronchogenic cyst in a 13-year-old child
This rare case of a giant bronchogenic cyst in the lower right hemithorax allows to provide the following tips: patient positioning and port placement should allow for a 180-degree reversal of the screen and free movement of the surgical team; use of a LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device used as a dissection instrument in lung surgery is helpful but does not guarantee perfect aerostasis, which should be controlled by taking enough time at the end of the procedure when reventilating an excluded lobe intraoperatively; along with low intrathoracic carbon dioxide insufflation, the use of a blocker in pediatric thoracoscopic surgery is an unconditional factor, which contributes to a satisfactory operating field.
F Becmeur, L Donato
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
820 views
0 likes
0 comments
05:31
Incidental finding of a voluminous bronchogenic cyst in a 13-year-old child
This rare case of a giant bronchogenic cyst in the lower right hemithorax allows to provide the following tips: patient positioning and port placement should allow for a 180-degree reversal of the screen and free movement of the surgical team; use of a LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device used as a dissection instrument in lung surgery is helpful but does not guarantee perfect aerostasis, which should be controlled by taking enough time at the end of the procedure when reventilating an excluded lobe intraoperatively; along with low intrathoracic carbon dioxide insufflation, the use of a blocker in pediatric thoracoscopic surgery is an unconditional factor, which contributes to a satisfactory operating field.
Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy on non-functional, symptomatic right lower pole of the kidney
In this video, we present the case of a 13-year-old girl presenting with a complicated urological anomaly discovered very late. The lower part of her right kidney is dysplastic (or destroyed) with pseudocystic pyelocalyceal cavities filled with stones and cloudy urine. The first hypothesis is that we are dealing with a true renal duplicity with a destroyed non-functional inferior pole. In this case, there is one ureter per kidney pole. As a result, polar ureteronephrectomy does not cause any potential vascular problems.
In this case, thanks to 3D reconstruction (Visible Patient™, a spinoff of IRCAD), it is clear that there is no kidney duplicity, but a pyelic bifurcation. It means that we should manage the only ureter, which drains the superior and inferior pelvis. For that reason, the placement of a double J catheter is essential prior to partial nephrectomy. This catheter should be pulled up until the superior pelvis.
Tridimensional reconstruction of the CT-scan images of a patient with a malformation is extremely helpful to better understand the original and unique anatomy of the patient and to determine a tailored operative strategy.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy on non-functional, symptomatic right lower pole of the kidney in a 13-year-old girl as an outpatient surgery.
F Becmeur, A Lachkar, L Soler
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
1878 views
2 likes
0 comments
07:24
Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy on non-functional, symptomatic right lower pole of the kidney
In this video, we present the case of a 13-year-old girl presenting with a complicated urological anomaly discovered very late. The lower part of her right kidney is dysplastic (or destroyed) with pseudocystic pyelocalyceal cavities filled with stones and cloudy urine. The first hypothesis is that we are dealing with a true renal duplicity with a destroyed non-functional inferior pole. In this case, there is one ureter per kidney pole. As a result, polar ureteronephrectomy does not cause any potential vascular problems.
In this case, thanks to 3D reconstruction (Visible Patient™, a spinoff of IRCAD), it is clear that there is no kidney duplicity, but a pyelic bifurcation. It means that we should manage the only ureter, which drains the superior and inferior pelvis. For that reason, the placement of a double J catheter is essential prior to partial nephrectomy. This catheter should be pulled up until the superior pelvis.
Tridimensional reconstruction of the CT-scan images of a patient with a malformation is extremely helpful to better understand the original and unique anatomy of the patient and to determine a tailored operative strategy.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy on non-functional, symptomatic right lower pole of the kidney in a 13-year-old girl as an outpatient surgery.
Inanimate model to train for the thoracoscopic repair of all varieties of left congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
We present a new low-cost model designed for training skills and strategies for the thoracoscopic repair of left congenital diaphragmatic defects. We will present guidelines to make this type of models, the educational strategy that we use in our advanced training models, the defects that can be trained, and the scope of this model. Advanced training, learning tips and tricks from experts, and the use of innovative ideas from other authors used in our model are outlined. This educational tool was developed for pediatric surgeons requiring advanced training. It reinforces the concept of advanced and continuous training, in a safe environment, and it is assisted by experienced surgeons. This model shows a scenario where dimensions and anatomical repairs are carefully preserved.
We share our vision of continuous endosurgical education to encourage all enthusiastic surgeons to train in safe and controlled environments.
Materials and methods: The model consists in a plastic 3D printed left rib cage, extracted from a 6-month-old baby CT-scan combined with simulated mediastinal structures, diaphragm, bowel, lung, and spleen made of latex, silicone, and polyester sponge respectively. A self-adhesive film is used as parietal pleura. A removable part (spare part) represents the last three ribs where the diaphragm is partially inserted, and a base as the upper abdomen is assembled to the left rib cage (ribs 1 to 9). Abdominal viscera (plastic or animal) are placed in this base. The cost of materials is 150 US$.
The model is meant to simulate the most frequent diaphragmatic defects such as type A, B, and C, with or without sac. However, other rare defects can also be simulated. Live animal tissues such as diaphragm or intestine also can be used, as it was already published by other authors. However, the main characteristic of this model is to be inanimate, portable, and easily reloadable to be reused.
The video shows a junior surgeon in his advanced training process. In the model, we perform the reduction of the viscera slid to the thorax. In this case, it is the rabbit intestine, but we usually use latex simulated intestine. The spleen is completely synthetic and bleeds if the instruments damage it during the reduction.
We use 3mm regular instruments. The repair of the defect is made with separate stitches of 2/0 or 3/0 braided polyester as usual, and we encourage trainees to practice the intracorporeal sliding knot and running suture. We collect the performance data in a specially prepared form and carry out the debriefing.
Conclusions: With this model, we can reinforce the concept of low cost, but with a high precision environment simulation, included within a standardized training program in minimally invasive neonatal surgery. We believe that it is a very useful tool. In addition, this type of models allows the use of new surgical techniques, tips and tricks given by experienced surgeons who assist in the training process.
M Maricic, M Bailez
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
1456 views
7 likes
0 comments
08:14
Inanimate model to train for the thoracoscopic repair of all varieties of left congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
We present a new low-cost model designed for training skills and strategies for the thoracoscopic repair of left congenital diaphragmatic defects. We will present guidelines to make this type of models, the educational strategy that we use in our advanced training models, the defects that can be trained, and the scope of this model. Advanced training, learning tips and tricks from experts, and the use of innovative ideas from other authors used in our model are outlined. This educational tool was developed for pediatric surgeons requiring advanced training. It reinforces the concept of advanced and continuous training, in a safe environment, and it is assisted by experienced surgeons. This model shows a scenario where dimensions and anatomical repairs are carefully preserved.
We share our vision of continuous endosurgical education to encourage all enthusiastic surgeons to train in safe and controlled environments.
Materials and methods: The model consists in a plastic 3D printed left rib cage, extracted from a 6-month-old baby CT-scan combined with simulated mediastinal structures, diaphragm, bowel, lung, and spleen made of latex, silicone, and polyester sponge respectively. A self-adhesive film is used as parietal pleura. A removable part (spare part) represents the last three ribs where the diaphragm is partially inserted, and a base as the upper abdomen is assembled to the left rib cage (ribs 1 to 9). Abdominal viscera (plastic or animal) are placed in this base. The cost of materials is 150 US$.
The model is meant to simulate the most frequent diaphragmatic defects such as type A, B, and C, with or without sac. However, other rare defects can also be simulated. Live animal tissues such as diaphragm or intestine also can be used, as it was already published by other authors. However, the main characteristic of this model is to be inanimate, portable, and easily reloadable to be reused.
The video shows a junior surgeon in his advanced training process. In the model, we perform the reduction of the viscera slid to the thorax. In this case, it is the rabbit intestine, but we usually use latex simulated intestine. The spleen is completely synthetic and bleeds if the instruments damage it during the reduction.
We use 3mm regular instruments. The repair of the defect is made with separate stitches of 2/0 or 3/0 braided polyester as usual, and we encourage trainees to practice the intracorporeal sliding knot and running suture. We collect the performance data in a specially prepared form and carry out the debriefing.
Conclusions: With this model, we can reinforce the concept of low cost, but with a high precision environment simulation, included within a standardized training program in minimally invasive neonatal surgery. We believe that it is a very useful tool. In addition, this type of models allows the use of new surgical techniques, tips and tricks given by experienced surgeons who assist in the training process.
IRCAD Webinar: Third ESPES/IPEG Masterclass with the participation of the ESPU
ACUTE APPENDICITIS and PERITONITIS
1. Laparoscopic vs. open appendectomy in children - Mark Wulkan (IPEG)
2. Single port vs. Multiport and the role of new technologies in the management of pediatric complicated appendicitis - Ciro Esposito (ESPES)

CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA (CDH)
1. Open approach for the treatment of CDH - François Becmeur (ESPES)
2. Minimally invasive management of pediatric CDH - Holger Till (IPEG)

VESICOURETERAL REFLUX (VUR)
1. Open, endourological, and robotic management of pediatric VUR - Ramnath Subramaniam (ESPU)
2. Laparoscopic management of VUR according to Lich-Gregoir procedure - François Varlet (ESPES)

Masters of ceremonies:
François Becmeur (IRCAD-Strasbourg)
Philippe Montupet (APHP-Paris)

Chairmen:
Mario Mendoza Sagaon (ESPES)
Alaa El Ghoneimi (ESPU)
Philippe Szavay (IPEG)
F Becmeur, P Montupet, A El-Ghoneimi, P Szavay, M Mendoza Sagaon, M Wulkan, C Esposito, H Till, R Subramaniam, F Varlet
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1466 views
88 likes
0 comments
11:17
IRCAD Webinar: Third ESPES/IPEG Masterclass with the participation of the ESPU
ACUTE APPENDICITIS and PERITONITIS
1. Laparoscopic vs. open appendectomy in children - Mark Wulkan (IPEG)
2. Single port vs. Multiport and the role of new technologies in the management of pediatric complicated appendicitis - Ciro Esposito (ESPES)

CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA (CDH)
1. Open approach for the treatment of CDH - François Becmeur (ESPES)
2. Minimally invasive management of pediatric CDH - Holger Till (IPEG)

VESICOURETERAL REFLUX (VUR)
1. Open, endourological, and robotic management of pediatric VUR - Ramnath Subramaniam (ESPU)
2. Laparoscopic management of VUR according to Lich-Gregoir procedure - François Varlet (ESPES)

Masters of ceremonies:
François Becmeur (IRCAD-Strasbourg)
Philippe Montupet (APHP-Paris)

Chairmen:
Mario Mendoza Sagaon (ESPES)
Alaa El Ghoneimi (ESPU)
Philippe Szavay (IPEG)
IRCAD Webinar: Third ESPES/IPEG Masterclass with the participation of the ESPU
ACUTE APPENDICITIS and PERITONITIS
1. Laparoscopic vs. open appendectomy in children - Mark Wulkan (IPEG)
2. Single port vs. Multiport and the role of new technologies in the management of pediatric complicated appendicitis - Ciro Esposito (ESPES)

CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA (CDH)
1. Open approach for the treatment of CDH - François Becmeur (ESPES)
2. Minimally invasive management of pediatric CDH - Holger Till (IPEG)

VESICOURETERAL REFLUX (VUR)
1. Open, endourological, and robotic management of pediatric VUR - Ramnath Subramaniam (ESPU)
2. Laparoscopic management of VUR according to Lich-Gregoir procedure - François Varlet (ESPES)

Masters of ceremonies:
François Becmeur (IRCAD-Strasbourg)
Philippe Montupet (APHP-Paris)

Chairmen:
Mario Mendoza Sagaon (ESPES)
Alaa El Ghoneimi (ESPU)
Philippe Szavay (IPEG)
F Becmeur, P Montupet, A El-Ghoneimi, P Szavay, M Mendoza Sagaon, M Wulkan, C Esposito, H Till, R Subramaniam, F Varlet
Webinar
1 year ago
1022 views
10 likes
0 comments
11:17
IRCAD Webinar: Third ESPES/IPEG Masterclass with the participation of the ESPU
ACUTE APPENDICITIS and PERITONITIS
1. Laparoscopic vs. open appendectomy in children - Mark Wulkan (IPEG)
2. Single port vs. Multiport and the role of new technologies in the management of pediatric complicated appendicitis - Ciro Esposito (ESPES)

CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA (CDH)
1. Open approach for the treatment of CDH - François Becmeur (ESPES)
2. Minimally invasive management of pediatric CDH - Holger Till (IPEG)

VESICOURETERAL REFLUX (VUR)
1. Open, endourological, and robotic management of pediatric VUR - Ramnath Subramaniam (ESPU)
2. Laparoscopic management of VUR according to Lich-Gregoir procedure - François Varlet (ESPES)

Masters of ceremonies:
François Becmeur (IRCAD-Strasbourg)
Philippe Montupet (APHP-Paris)

Chairmen:
Mario Mendoza Sagaon (ESPES)
Alaa El Ghoneimi (ESPU)
Philippe Szavay (IPEG)
Thoracoscopic repair of pure esophageal atresia
A full-term baby weighing 2.8 kg was diagnosed with pure esophageal atresia. No other associated anomalies were found by abdominal sonography and echocardiography. The primary anastomosis was completed thoracoscopically after mobilization of both esophageal pouches. The patient was placed in a prone position at the edge of the operating table. A 5mm, 30-degree angled scope was introduced one fingerbreadth below the lower angle of the scapula. Two 3mm working ports were also inserted; the first in the same costal space as the camera port 3cm from the middle line and the second as high as possible in the axilla. A thin fibrous strand was found connecting both ends of the esophagus. The azygos vein was left intact. Blunt dissection was used throughout the whole procedure to preserve the aortic branches to the lower pouch, dissecting in between them. Without traction, the distance between both pouches was approximately 4cm or 4 vertebral bodies. No tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was identified. Nine polyglactin 5/0 sliding tumble square knots were used to complete the anastomosis. The operative time was 85 minutes. The postoperative period was uneventful. Nasogatric tube feeding started on postoperative day 2, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6 after performing a contrast swallow test ensuring that there is no leakage.
MM Elbarbary, KHK Bahaaeldin, AE Fares, H Seleim, A Shalaby, M Elseoudi, MM Ragab
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2149 views
233 likes
0 comments
18:13
Thoracoscopic repair of pure esophageal atresia
A full-term baby weighing 2.8 kg was diagnosed with pure esophageal atresia. No other associated anomalies were found by abdominal sonography and echocardiography. The primary anastomosis was completed thoracoscopically after mobilization of both esophageal pouches. The patient was placed in a prone position at the edge of the operating table. A 5mm, 30-degree angled scope was introduced one fingerbreadth below the lower angle of the scapula. Two 3mm working ports were also inserted; the first in the same costal space as the camera port 3cm from the middle line and the second as high as possible in the axilla. A thin fibrous strand was found connecting both ends of the esophagus. The azygos vein was left intact. Blunt dissection was used throughout the whole procedure to preserve the aortic branches to the lower pouch, dissecting in between them. Without traction, the distance between both pouches was approximately 4cm or 4 vertebral bodies. No tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was identified. Nine polyglactin 5/0 sliding tumble square knots were used to complete the anastomosis. The operative time was 85 minutes. The postoperative period was uneventful. Nasogatric tube feeding started on postoperative day 2, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6 after performing a contrast swallow test ensuring that there is no leakage.
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
AM Benaired
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1149 views
142 likes
0 comments
04:03
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
Laparoscopic Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation in an 18-month-old boy
Performing Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation using a laparoscopic approach can be confusing and challenging. This can be attributed to the small working space in children as compared to the length of small and large bowel to be handled. The procedure also requires some understanding of the overall anatomical disorder in order to separate it into smaller steps of correction. The first step is to confirm the diagnosis. The operator has to identify the ligament of Treitz and the presence of Ladd’s bands stretching between the colon and the right abdomen. The bands are divided first to the left of the duodenum, and then between the duodenum and the colon. As a result, the mesentery is widened. Bowel derotation is then started placing the small bowel in the right side and the colon in the left side of the abdomen. The procedure is concluded with an appendectomy.
TA Wafa, S Abdelmaksoud
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
922 views
141 likes
0 comments
06:00
Laparoscopic Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation in an 18-month-old boy
Performing Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation using a laparoscopic approach can be confusing and challenging. This can be attributed to the small working space in children as compared to the length of small and large bowel to be handled. The procedure also requires some understanding of the overall anatomical disorder in order to separate it into smaller steps of correction. The first step is to confirm the diagnosis. The operator has to identify the ligament of Treitz and the presence of Ladd’s bands stretching between the colon and the right abdomen. The bands are divided first to the left of the duodenum, and then between the duodenum and the colon. As a result, the mesentery is widened. Bowel derotation is then started placing the small bowel in the right side and the colon in the left side of the abdomen. The procedure is concluded with an appendectomy.
Ovarian tissue cryopreservation
The French law on bioethics dated August 6 2004 now states the possibility for any person to benefit from a gamete or a germinal tissue collection as well as its preservation. Collection and preservation are planned when the patient’s management may induce a fertility alteration or when the patient’s fertility may be prematurely altered. Young girls who have not reached the age of puberty and who are about to undergo high-dose chemotherapy and/or major radiation therapy for cancer, can benefit from a cryopreservation of their ovarian tissue. It will allow to preserve fertility when these patients have a wish for pregnancy. Once collected, preserved ovarian cortical strips are systematically sent for frozen section to the pathology department in order to be processed for cryopreservation. Later on, when these young women have been healed and wish to become pregnant, the thawing of preserved ovarian cortical strips and the orthotopic autograft can take place. We suggest to collect the anterior cortex from both ovaries, which allows to preserve the two remaining ovaries. Another technique, which is performed by other teams, involves a unilateral oophorectomy for ovarian tissue preservation. A bilateral hemicortical sampling on both ovaries is well accepted by patients and their parents. Indeed, the video does not present an oophorectomy, which is considered as a definitive procedure, but a bilateral sampling which leaves two ovaries in place. The ovaries are reduced in size but are anatomically and functionally healthy.
F Becmeur
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1066 views
55 likes
0 comments
03:05
Ovarian tissue cryopreservation
The French law on bioethics dated August 6 2004 now states the possibility for any person to benefit from a gamete or a germinal tissue collection as well as its preservation. Collection and preservation are planned when the patient’s management may induce a fertility alteration or when the patient’s fertility may be prematurely altered. Young girls who have not reached the age of puberty and who are about to undergo high-dose chemotherapy and/or major radiation therapy for cancer, can benefit from a cryopreservation of their ovarian tissue. It will allow to preserve fertility when these patients have a wish for pregnancy. Once collected, preserved ovarian cortical strips are systematically sent for frozen section to the pathology department in order to be processed for cryopreservation. Later on, when these young women have been healed and wish to become pregnant, the thawing of preserved ovarian cortical strips and the orthotopic autograft can take place. We suggest to collect the anterior cortex from both ovaries, which allows to preserve the two remaining ovaries. Another technique, which is performed by other teams, involves a unilateral oophorectomy for ovarian tissue preservation. A bilateral hemicortical sampling on both ovaries is well accepted by patients and their parents. Indeed, the video does not present an oophorectomy, which is considered as a definitive procedure, but a bilateral sampling which leaves two ovaries in place. The ovaries are reduced in size but are anatomically and functionally healthy.
Pediatric laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication
Surgical therapy is well-established in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is known that the laparoscopic approach is safe and effective. We tailored our surgical strategy based on two main studies which we conducted: one observational long-term follow-up and the other one related to the effect of Thal fundoplication on pulmonary affections. Our conclusions are summarized as follows:
- no surgery in the first 12 months,
- indications determined together with the consent of parents,
- a radiological contrast study should always be performed preoperatively,
- history taking and at least two positive objective diagnoses leading to indication,
- for neurologically impaired patients, a Nissen fundoplication is selected,
- first-line treatment: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) implantation, second step: fundoplication if necessary,
- for neurologically healthy patients without inborn anatomical diseases, a Thal fundoplication is selected,
- postoperative diagnoses in the follow-up period are only performed if necessary.
For this personal experience and in comparison with the established approach in the current literature, we have only poor evidence. It is due to the lack of prospective studies available and to an inadequate number of patients, which is typical in pediatric studies.
S Holland-Cunz
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2015 views
208 likes
0 comments
03:54
Pediatric laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication
Surgical therapy is well-established in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is known that the laparoscopic approach is safe and effective. We tailored our surgical strategy based on two main studies which we conducted: one observational long-term follow-up and the other one related to the effect of Thal fundoplication on pulmonary affections. Our conclusions are summarized as follows:
- no surgery in the first 12 months,
- indications determined together with the consent of parents,
- a radiological contrast study should always be performed preoperatively,
- history taking and at least two positive objective diagnoses leading to indication,
- for neurologically impaired patients, a Nissen fundoplication is selected,
- first-line treatment: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) implantation, second step: fundoplication if necessary,
- for neurologically healthy patients without inborn anatomical diseases, a Thal fundoplication is selected,
- postoperative diagnoses in the follow-up period are only performed if necessary.
For this personal experience and in comparison with the established approach in the current literature, we have only poor evidence. It is due to the lack of prospective studies available and to an inadequate number of patients, which is typical in pediatric studies.