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Olivier GARBIN

Centre médico-chirurgical et Obstétrique (CMCO)
Strasbourg, Франция
MD
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Laparoscopic dissection of sacral promontory for sacrocolpopexy
Objective: To describe the laparoscopic dissection of the sacral promontory during a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, with a special focus on anatomical landmarks and surgical traps.
Setting: Department of Gynecology, CMCO, Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
Patients: Women with invalidating genital prolapse
Interventions: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is performed using three operative ports (one midline, suprapubic port and two lateral ports) and a 0-degree umbilical Karl Storz optical port. In order to suture a polypropylene mesh to the anterior vertebral ligament, the promontory area must be dissected. To improve sacral promontory exposure, the rectum is usually suspended to the left anterior abdominal wall by means of T’Lift™ tissue retraction systems. By palpating the area under the aortic bifurcation and the confluence of iliac veins, the sacral promontory is identified. The right ureter is also identified. Using two duck jaw fenestrated forceps, the peritoneum is lifted --retroperitoneal vessels are fixed to the vertebral elements, and widely opened. The promontory is carefully dissected until the anterior vertebral ligament becomes visible. As the presacral space is rich in blood vessels and nerve elements, surgeons are advised to preserve it.
However, the surgical approach to the vertebral ligament is sometimes difficult in obese women, when patients present anatomical variations such as a low iliac venous circulation confluence, a duplicity of middle sacral vessels, periosteal perforators, a winding right common iliac artery, or in the presence of lymph nodes.
Discussion: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy complications rates such as bleeding originating from the promontory varying from 0 to 4.7%, which sometimes require conversion to open abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Described by radiologists at almost 3cm from the sacral promontory, the right ureter can also be injured during reperitonization.
Conclusion: Laparoscopic dissection of the promontory requires specific and careful attention to be paid to non-infrequent anatomical variations.
Хирургические операции
4 года назад
5425 просмотров
227 лайков
1 комментарий
07:24
Laparoscopic dissection of sacral promontory for sacrocolpopexy
Objective: To describe the laparoscopic dissection of the sacral promontory during a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, with a special focus on anatomical landmarks and surgical traps.
Setting: Department of Gynecology, CMCO, Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
Patients: Women with invalidating genital prolapse
Interventions: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is performed using three operative ports (one midline, suprapubic port and two lateral ports) and a 0-degree umbilical Karl Storz optical port. In order to suture a polypropylene mesh to the anterior vertebral ligament, the promontory area must be dissected. To improve sacral promontory exposure, the rectum is usually suspended to the left anterior abdominal wall by means of T’Lift™ tissue retraction systems. By palpating the area under the aortic bifurcation and the confluence of iliac veins, the sacral promontory is identified. The right ureter is also identified. Using two duck jaw fenestrated forceps, the peritoneum is lifted --retroperitoneal vessels are fixed to the vertebral elements, and widely opened. The promontory is carefully dissected until the anterior vertebral ligament becomes visible. As the presacral space is rich in blood vessels and nerve elements, surgeons are advised to preserve it.
However, the surgical approach to the vertebral ligament is sometimes difficult in obese women, when patients present anatomical variations such as a low iliac venous circulation confluence, a duplicity of middle sacral vessels, periosteal perforators, a winding right common iliac artery, or in the presence of lymph nodes.
Discussion: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy complications rates such as bleeding originating from the promontory varying from 0 to 4.7%, which sometimes require conversion to open abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Described by radiologists at almost 3cm from the sacral promontory, the right ureter can also be injured during reperitonization.
Conclusion: Laparoscopic dissection of the promontory requires specific and careful attention to be paid to non-infrequent anatomical variations.
Laparoscopic tubo-cornual anastomosis for reversal of sterilization
This video shows a case of tubo-cornual anastomosis for reversal after tubal sterilization. A 43-year-old patient has requested a reversal of sterilization. She already had 4 deliveries. On the hysterosalpingography, one can see that Hulka clips are really near the uterine horns.
The video demonstrates the removal of Hulka clips, the dissection of the interstitial part of the tube, the catheterization of a guide through the ostium in the proximal, then distal part of the tube hysteroscopically, and finally a tubo-cornual anastomosis. In our opinion, the quality of the anastomosis directly depends on the complete congruence of the two tubal stumps. Different prognostic factors have been discussed in previous studies (e.g., age, type of sterilization (clips or coagulation), length of remaining tube, and site of anastomosis). According to the literature, the best anastomotic site, in terms of successful pregnancy, would be the isthmic-isthmic position. In our experience, the use of a tubal hysteroscopic guide seems the best aid to obtain a luminal alignment and it is more comfortable for the suture.
Хирургические операции
4 года назад
2839 просмотров
108 лайков
0 комментариев
08:01
Laparoscopic tubo-cornual anastomosis for reversal of sterilization
This video shows a case of tubo-cornual anastomosis for reversal after tubal sterilization. A 43-year-old patient has requested a reversal of sterilization. She already had 4 deliveries. On the hysterosalpingography, one can see that Hulka clips are really near the uterine horns.
The video demonstrates the removal of Hulka clips, the dissection of the interstitial part of the tube, the catheterization of a guide through the ostium in the proximal, then distal part of the tube hysteroscopically, and finally a tubo-cornual anastomosis. In our opinion, the quality of the anastomosis directly depends on the complete congruence of the two tubal stumps. Different prognostic factors have been discussed in previous studies (e.g., age, type of sterilization (clips or coagulation), length of remaining tube, and site of anastomosis). According to the literature, the best anastomotic site, in terms of successful pregnancy, would be the isthmic-isthmic position. In our experience, the use of a tubal hysteroscopic guide seems the best aid to obtain a luminal alignment and it is more comfortable for the suture.