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A young lady with dysphagia and GIST after a complicated sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity
A 34 year-old woman was referred to us for persistent dysphagia and retrosternal chest pain, aggravated by eating. Two years earlier, she underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.
Her operation was complicated by septic shock due to an esophagogastric fistula with subphrenic abscesses, and on postoperative day 20, she underwent a laparotomy, abscess debridement and drainage, splenectomy and application of cyanoacrylate-based glue, followed by endoscopic positioning of a self-expandable partially coated prosthesis.
Three weeks afterwards, her prosthesis was replaced with a self-expandable fully coated prosthesis due to persistent leak. This prosthesis was finally removed after 7 weeks.
One year after her operation, at gastroscopy, a 25mm submucosal nodule covered with an ulcerated mucosa was found in the proximal antrum. Biopsy was negative, and endoscopic ultrasonography was suggestive of GIST.
She underwent an esophageal manometry, which was indicative of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Her barium swallow test showed a delayed esophageal emptying due to the narrowing and twisting of the proximal part of the stomach. Her abdominal MRI was normal.
An exploratory laparoscopy was indicated for adhesiolysis and removal of the antral lesion.
Total duration of the operation was 3 hours. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Her postoperative swallow study showed the easy passage of the contrast agent with no leaks. The patient completely recovered from her symptoms, and remained asymptomatic after 30 months. Final histology of her lesion evidenced a foreign body granuloma.
S Greco, M Giulii Capponi, M Lotti, M Khotcholava
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
1799 views
4 likes
2 comments
14:14
A young lady with dysphagia and GIST after a complicated sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity
A 34 year-old woman was referred to us for persistent dysphagia and retrosternal chest pain, aggravated by eating. Two years earlier, she underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.
Her operation was complicated by septic shock due to an esophagogastric fistula with subphrenic abscesses, and on postoperative day 20, she underwent a laparotomy, abscess debridement and drainage, splenectomy and application of cyanoacrylate-based glue, followed by endoscopic positioning of a self-expandable partially coated prosthesis.
Three weeks afterwards, her prosthesis was replaced with a self-expandable fully coated prosthesis due to persistent leak. This prosthesis was finally removed after 7 weeks.
One year after her operation, at gastroscopy, a 25mm submucosal nodule covered with an ulcerated mucosa was found in the proximal antrum. Biopsy was negative, and endoscopic ultrasonography was suggestive of GIST.
She underwent an esophageal manometry, which was indicative of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Her barium swallow test showed a delayed esophageal emptying due to the narrowing and twisting of the proximal part of the stomach. Her abdominal MRI was normal.
An exploratory laparoscopy was indicated for adhesiolysis and removal of the antral lesion.
Total duration of the operation was 3 hours. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Her postoperative swallow study showed the easy passage of the contrast agent with no leaks. The patient completely recovered from her symptoms, and remained asymptomatic after 30 months. Final histology of her lesion evidenced a foreign body granuloma.
Management of persisting dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication
Dysphagia is a normal observation after fundoplication for GERD. It usually lasts for 4 to 6 weeks and results from esophageal motility disorders related to the esophageal dissection and to the outlet obstruction created by the fundoplication. It is managed by appropriate diet. When dysphagia persists after 3 months, there is some concern and need for objective evaluation. This video shows the management of this type of persisting dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, during which a big hematoma developed on the wrap. This usually does not lead to any long-term problems but, in this patient, dysphagia persisted over a 3-month period of time and led to re-operation.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, T Piardi, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1909 views
27 likes
0 comments
18:17
Management of persisting dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication
Dysphagia is a normal observation after fundoplication for GERD. It usually lasts for 4 to 6 weeks and results from esophageal motility disorders related to the esophageal dissection and to the outlet obstruction created by the fundoplication. It is managed by appropriate diet. When dysphagia persists after 3 months, there is some concern and need for objective evaluation. This video shows the management of this type of persisting dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, during which a big hematoma developed on the wrap. This usually does not lead to any long-term problems but, in this patient, dysphagia persisted over a 3-month period of time and led to re-operation.
Unusual cause of new onset persistent dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication
Persistent troublesome dysphagia develops in a small percentage of patients after Nissen fundoplication. Mild transient solid food dysphagia is an unavoidable side-effect of the operation. However, severe persistent dysphagia is probably related to poor patient selection, inadequate preoperative evaluation or technical errors, in most cases, excessively tight or long fundoplication. If dysphagia persists after dilatation, an outflow obstruction different to too tight or too long a wrap should be suspected as in this case. Re-operation may be needed if evidence of a poorly constructed wrap is apparent during the evaluation.
B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
629 views
35 likes
0 comments
18:38
Unusual cause of new onset persistent dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication
Persistent troublesome dysphagia develops in a small percentage of patients after Nissen fundoplication. Mild transient solid food dysphagia is an unavoidable side-effect of the operation. However, severe persistent dysphagia is probably related to poor patient selection, inadequate preoperative evaluation or technical errors, in most cases, excessively tight or long fundoplication. If dysphagia persists after dilatation, an outflow obstruction different to too tight or too long a wrap should be suspected as in this case. Re-operation may be needed if evidence of a poorly constructed wrap is apparent during the evaluation.
Laparoscopic re-operation for severe dysphagia following fundoplication and prosthetic reinforcement of the hiatus
Complications related to prosthetic hiatoplasty for hiatal hernia repair are more common than previously reported with no apparent relationship between mesh type and mesh configuration. The aim of this video is to show a case of mesh repair complication.
A 50-year-old woman presented with severe dysphagia and important weight loss one year after redo laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication with prosthetic crural repair. At re-operation, important esophageal stenosis and angulation was found arising from the key-hole-shaped polypropylene mesh with pseudodiverticular dilatation of the distal esophagus. The esophagus was freed from the dense fibrotic capsule surrounding the prosthesis and a myotomy was performed.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
11 years ago
408 views
10 likes
0 comments
19:50
Laparoscopic re-operation for severe dysphagia following fundoplication and prosthetic reinforcement of the hiatus
Complications related to prosthetic hiatoplasty for hiatal hernia repair are more common than previously reported with no apparent relationship between mesh type and mesh configuration. The aim of this video is to show a case of mesh repair complication.
A 50-year-old woman presented with severe dysphagia and important weight loss one year after redo laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication with prosthetic crural repair. At re-operation, important esophageal stenosis and angulation was found arising from the key-hole-shaped polypropylene mesh with pseudodiverticular dilatation of the distal esophagus. The esophagus was freed from the dense fibrotic capsule surrounding the prosthesis and a myotomy was performed.
Right thoracoscopic mediastinal mass resection and bronchial injury repair
The objective is to demonstrate our technique for thoracoscopic mediastinal mass excision with concomitant bronchial injury repair.
A 13-year-old boy presented with one-month of dysphagia and a history of a recent tick bite prophylactically treated. Esophagram showed a mid-esophageal externally compressing mass confirmed by endoscopy. Chest MRI showed a 5cm mediastinal mass. Differential diagnosis included infected esophageal duplication cyst versus histoplasmoma. A thoracoscopic mass resection was scheduled.
Upon accessing the right chest, a mid-thoracic lesion next to the esophagus was noted. The mass was adherent to the esophageal wall during dissection. Intraoperative biopsy revealed a cottage cheese-like substance in the mass. Frozen section suspected a duplication cyst in the esophageal musculature. As a result, we proceeded with the resection. The cavity was then irrigated and some fluid was noted at the endotracheal tube. A 5mm right mainstem bronchus tear was found. Flexible bronchoscopy was used to repair the injury with absorbable sutures. The mass was removed from the esophageal wall and repaired with absorbable sutures. A small pleural flap was created to prevent the sutures from communicating. The patient had a small persistent pneumothorax several days postoperatively. Repeat flexible bronchoscopy showed no leak or narrowing on postoperative day (POD) 7. The patient was discharged home on POD 8. Final pathology showed a mediastinal lymph node with a non-caseating granuloma. He had positive antibodies to Francisella tularensis (tularemia Ab). His final diagnosis was mediastinal tularemia.
This video demonstrates mediastinal mass diagnostic and treatment challenges. It also shows that concomitant bronchial injuries are safe and effective to repair thoracoscopically.
T Huy, AS Munoz Abraham, H Osei, C Cappiello, GA Villalona
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
892 views
8 likes
0 comments
05:17
Right thoracoscopic mediastinal mass resection and bronchial injury repair
The objective is to demonstrate our technique for thoracoscopic mediastinal mass excision with concomitant bronchial injury repair.
A 13-year-old boy presented with one-month of dysphagia and a history of a recent tick bite prophylactically treated. Esophagram showed a mid-esophageal externally compressing mass confirmed by endoscopy. Chest MRI showed a 5cm mediastinal mass. Differential diagnosis included infected esophageal duplication cyst versus histoplasmoma. A thoracoscopic mass resection was scheduled.
Upon accessing the right chest, a mid-thoracic lesion next to the esophagus was noted. The mass was adherent to the esophageal wall during dissection. Intraoperative biopsy revealed a cottage cheese-like substance in the mass. Frozen section suspected a duplication cyst in the esophageal musculature. As a result, we proceeded with the resection. The cavity was then irrigated and some fluid was noted at the endotracheal tube. A 5mm right mainstem bronchus tear was found. Flexible bronchoscopy was used to repair the injury with absorbable sutures. The mass was removed from the esophageal wall and repaired with absorbable sutures. A small pleural flap was created to prevent the sutures from communicating. The patient had a small persistent pneumothorax several days postoperatively. Repeat flexible bronchoscopy showed no leak or narrowing on postoperative day (POD) 7. The patient was discharged home on POD 8. Final pathology showed a mediastinal lymph node with a non-caseating granuloma. He had positive antibodies to Francisella tularensis (tularemia Ab). His final diagnosis was mediastinal tularemia.
This video demonstrates mediastinal mass diagnostic and treatment challenges. It also shows that concomitant bronchial injuries are safe and effective to repair thoracoscopically.
Minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy for end-stage achalasia
Achalasia is the most frequent esophageal motility disorder. Although Heller myotomy is the standard treatment, achieving good results in 90 to 95% of cases, esophagectomy could be the last surgical chance to treat end-stage achalasia and might be considered if severe symptomatic (dysphagia, regurgitation), anatomical (megaesophagus) or functional (esophagus aperistalses) disorders are not relieved with a more conservative approach.
Clinical case: We present the case of a 21-year-old female patient suffering from esophageal achalasia from the age of 3. After numerous attempts to grant her a good quality of life in a conservative way, when she gets to end-stage achalasia without any benefits from endoscopic therapies, a minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy is put forward to her in order to relieve her symptoms. Discussion/Conclusion: Esophagectomy could be performed in patients who are fit for major surgery and present with disabling symptoms, poor quality of life, and dolichomegaesophagus unresponsive to multiple endoscopic dilatations and/or surgical myotomies.
S Perretta, B Dallemagne, G Laracca, A Spota, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
1763 views
21 likes
1 comment
13:39
Minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy for end-stage achalasia
Achalasia is the most frequent esophageal motility disorder. Although Heller myotomy is the standard treatment, achieving good results in 90 to 95% of cases, esophagectomy could be the last surgical chance to treat end-stage achalasia and might be considered if severe symptomatic (dysphagia, regurgitation), anatomical (megaesophagus) or functional (esophagus aperistalses) disorders are not relieved with a more conservative approach.
Clinical case: We present the case of a 21-year-old female patient suffering from esophageal achalasia from the age of 3. After numerous attempts to grant her a good quality of life in a conservative way, when she gets to end-stage achalasia without any benefits from endoscopic therapies, a minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy is put forward to her in order to relieve her symptoms. Discussion/Conclusion: Esophagectomy could be performed in patients who are fit for major surgery and present with disabling symptoms, poor quality of life, and dolichomegaesophagus unresponsive to multiple endoscopic dilatations and/or surgical myotomies.
Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
H Inoue, RA Ciurezu, M Pizzicannella, F Habersetzer
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
486 views
6 likes
0 comments
25:51
Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
Heller's cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Achalasia stems from Greek and means “a” (not) and “khálasis” (relaxation).
Idiopathic megaesophagus (achalasia) is an esophageal primary motor irregularity. It is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis, together with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter after swallowing.
Differential diagnosis must be made between Chagas disease and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate ranges from 0.5 to 1 per 100,000 persons-years of study. Although there are several theories, the etiology remains unknown.
The first clinical description was made by Sir Thomas Wills (1672). He used to treat the disease via dilation with a sponge attached to a whalebone. Arthur Hertz was the first to name the disease “achalasia”. Ernest Heller performed the first successful esophagectomy in 1913. Zaaijer was the first to describe the anterior myotomy in 1923.
Other therapeutic procedures include botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter. It has transient effects and patients can develop tolerance to the injections. Another option is endoscopic hydropneumatic dilation, which should be fluoroscopically-guided. When it fails, the efficacy of other therapeutic options decreases. The most serious complication is esophageal perforation.
The diagnostic criteria are based on endoscopic findings. Endoscopy reveals there are food remains as well as esophageal dilation, and decreased motility. X-ray exams show esophageal dilation and narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric findings show decreased esophageal motility, increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
The patient was operated on. Since there was no hiatal hernia, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication was chosen, based on its efficacy in preventing reflux, as well as in keeping the myotomy free of a wrap.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres, NS Gómez Peña-Alfaro
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
8169 views
35 likes
4 comments
12:40
Heller's cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Achalasia stems from Greek and means “a” (not) and “khálasis” (relaxation).
Idiopathic megaesophagus (achalasia) is an esophageal primary motor irregularity. It is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis, together with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter after swallowing.
Differential diagnosis must be made between Chagas disease and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate ranges from 0.5 to 1 per 100,000 persons-years of study. Although there are several theories, the etiology remains unknown.
The first clinical description was made by Sir Thomas Wills (1672). He used to treat the disease via dilation with a sponge attached to a whalebone. Arthur Hertz was the first to name the disease “achalasia”. Ernest Heller performed the first successful esophagectomy in 1913. Zaaijer was the first to describe the anterior myotomy in 1923.
Other therapeutic procedures include botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter. It has transient effects and patients can develop tolerance to the injections. Another option is endoscopic hydropneumatic dilation, which should be fluoroscopically-guided. When it fails, the efficacy of other therapeutic options decreases. The most serious complication is esophageal perforation.
The diagnostic criteria are based on endoscopic findings. Endoscopy reveals there are food remains as well as esophageal dilation, and decreased motility. X-ray exams show esophageal dilation and narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric findings show decreased esophageal motility, increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
The patient was operated on. Since there was no hiatal hernia, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication was chosen, based on its efficacy in preventing reflux, as well as in keeping the myotomy free of a wrap.
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
D Kadoche, M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
980 views
8 likes
0 comments
08:22
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Robotic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for esophageal achalasia
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by an incomplete or absent esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation associated with loss of peristalsis or uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal body in response to swallowing. All available treatments for achalasia are palliative, directed towards the elimination of the outflow resistance caused by abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function and aiming to improve the symptoms related to esophageal stasis, such as dysphagia and regurgitation. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is the current standard of care for the treatment of achalasia. It is associated with symptom improvement or relief in about 90% of patients. However, it is a challenging procedure with the potential risk of esophageal perforation reported in up to 10% of cases. Interestingly, laparoscopic myotomy has some limitations which depend on the laparoscopic technique (bidimensional vision, poor range of movement) and on the surgeon’s experience. Recently, the use of the robotic technology has been proposed claiming that it might reduce intraoperative esophageal perforation rates and improve postoperative quality of life after Heller myotomy, mainly due to the 3D view and enhanced dexterity of the surgeon. Despite significant improvements in surgical treatment, the length of myotomy is still a matter of debate to date. Substantially, although some authors proposed a limited myotomy on the lower esophagus preserving a small portion of the LES to prevent postoperative reflux, most authors recommended a myotomy extending 4 to 6cm on the esophagus and 1 to 2cm on the gastric side. In this video, we performed a 6cm long esophagogastric myotomy, with a 2.5cm proximal extension above the Z-line (endoscopically recognized) and a 3.5cm distal extension below the same landmark. In a previous experimental study with intraoperative computerized manometry, we observed that myotomy of the esophageal portion of the LES (without dissection of the gastric fibers) did not lead to any significant variation in sphincteric pressure. Instead, the dissection of the gastric fibers for at least 2 to 2.5cm on the anterior gastric wall created a significant modification of the LES pressure profile. This may be due to the interruption of the anterior portion of gastric semicircular clasp and sling fibers, with consequent loss of their hook properties on the LES pressure profile.
L Marano, A Spaziani, G Castagnoli
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2358 views
12 likes
0 comments
08:13
Robotic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for esophageal achalasia
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by an incomplete or absent esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation associated with loss of peristalsis or uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal body in response to swallowing. All available treatments for achalasia are palliative, directed towards the elimination of the outflow resistance caused by abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function and aiming to improve the symptoms related to esophageal stasis, such as dysphagia and regurgitation. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is the current standard of care for the treatment of achalasia. It is associated with symptom improvement or relief in about 90% of patients. However, it is a challenging procedure with the potential risk of esophageal perforation reported in up to 10% of cases. Interestingly, laparoscopic myotomy has some limitations which depend on the laparoscopic technique (bidimensional vision, poor range of movement) and on the surgeon’s experience. Recently, the use of the robotic technology has been proposed claiming that it might reduce intraoperative esophageal perforation rates and improve postoperative quality of life after Heller myotomy, mainly due to the 3D view and enhanced dexterity of the surgeon. Despite significant improvements in surgical treatment, the length of myotomy is still a matter of debate to date. Substantially, although some authors proposed a limited myotomy on the lower esophagus preserving a small portion of the LES to prevent postoperative reflux, most authors recommended a myotomy extending 4 to 6cm on the esophagus and 1 to 2cm on the gastric side. In this video, we performed a 6cm long esophagogastric myotomy, with a 2.5cm proximal extension above the Z-line (endoscopically recognized) and a 3.5cm distal extension below the same landmark. In a previous experimental study with intraoperative computerized manometry, we observed that myotomy of the esophageal portion of the LES (without dissection of the gastric fibers) did not lead to any significant variation in sphincteric pressure. Instead, the dissection of the gastric fibers for at least 2 to 2.5cm on the anterior gastric wall created a significant modification of the LES pressure profile. This may be due to the interruption of the anterior portion of gastric semicircular clasp and sling fibers, with consequent loss of their hook properties on the LES pressure profile.
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
C Viana, M Lozano, D Poletto, T Moreno, C Varela, A Toscano
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4488 views
14 likes
1 comment
15:27
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.