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Laparoscopic ileocecal resection for unresectable appendix
This is the case of a 36-year-old woman who has had an exploratory laparoscopy in another institution 2 months earlier. Acute appendicitis was suspected, based on ultrasound exam. However, exploration has shown an inflammatory appendicular mass, impossible to dissect. The patient was administered antibiotics for a period of 3 weeks. A laparoscopic appendectomy was decided upon at an interval of 2 months. Work-up included CT-scan and colonoscopy, which did not demonstrate anything specific.
Laparoscopic exploration demonstrated important fibrotic and scarry tissues around the appendix and the cecum. Despite painstaking dissection, appendectomy was impossible. Ileocecal resection was decided upon. Operative steps, namely exposure, division of the last ileal loop, division of the meso, division of the right colon above the ampulla coli and the intracorporeal side-to-side stapled anastomosis are demonstrated. Pathological findings evidenced an endometriotic nodule. The postoperative course was uneventful.
D Mutter, M Ignat, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6329 views
337 likes
4 comments
08:23
Laparoscopic ileocecal resection for unresectable appendix
This is the case of a 36-year-old woman who has had an exploratory laparoscopy in another institution 2 months earlier. Acute appendicitis was suspected, based on ultrasound exam. However, exploration has shown an inflammatory appendicular mass, impossible to dissect. The patient was administered antibiotics for a period of 3 weeks. A laparoscopic appendectomy was decided upon at an interval of 2 months. Work-up included CT-scan and colonoscopy, which did not demonstrate anything specific.
Laparoscopic exploration demonstrated important fibrotic and scarry tissues around the appendix and the cecum. Despite painstaking dissection, appendectomy was impossible. Ileocecal resection was decided upon. Operative steps, namely exposure, division of the last ileal loop, division of the meso, division of the right colon above the ampulla coli and the intracorporeal side-to-side stapled anastomosis are demonstrated. Pathological findings evidenced an endometriotic nodule. The postoperative course was uneventful.
Laparoscopic appendectomy for abscessed and necrotic appendix
This video of an emergency appendectomy demonstrates some of the advantages of the laparoscopic approach. Multiple abscess cavities are identified by a thorough exploration, including the necrotic appendix. Control of bleeding from the appendiceal artery and control of a gangrenous base of the appendix are clearly shown.

This male patient had emergency surgery after a 1-week history of diffuse abdominal pain with signs of inflammatory syndrome. CT showed a pelvic abscess.

The author begins the laparoscopic approach with a 1-cm incision just above the umbilicus and establishes pneumoperitoneum with the open technique. Dissection of the abscess must proceed cautiously. A suction device in tandem with a probe prove useful for continuing dissection to help mobilize the cecum.

As the appendix comes into view, the author identifies the mesoappendix to begin dissection. Significant edema makes it difficult to continue dissection with the blunt probe, so the author uses bipolar cautery to begin dissection of the mesoappendix.
A Rossini
Surgical intervention
12 years ago
10167 views
85 likes
0 comments
05:04
Laparoscopic appendectomy for abscessed and necrotic appendix
This video of an emergency appendectomy demonstrates some of the advantages of the laparoscopic approach. Multiple abscess cavities are identified by a thorough exploration, including the necrotic appendix. Control of bleeding from the appendiceal artery and control of a gangrenous base of the appendix are clearly shown.

This male patient had emergency surgery after a 1-week history of diffuse abdominal pain with signs of inflammatory syndrome. CT showed a pelvic abscess.

The author begins the laparoscopic approach with a 1-cm incision just above the umbilicus and establishes pneumoperitoneum with the open technique. Dissection of the abscess must proceed cautiously. A suction device in tandem with a probe prove useful for continuing dissection to help mobilize the cecum.

As the appendix comes into view, the author identifies the mesoappendix to begin dissection. Significant edema makes it difficult to continue dissection with the blunt probe, so the author uses bipolar cautery to begin dissection of the mesoappendix.
Laparoscopic appendectomy for recurrent appendicitis after medical treatment
Appendectomy is the only curative treatment of appendicitis. However, the management of patients with an appendiceal mass or abscess can be temporarily managed medically with intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or percutaneous drainage. And yet, there are many controversies over the non-operative management of acute appendicitis. In 2015, Fair et al. used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project to evaluate 30-day morbidity and mortality of intervention (laparoscopic and open appendectomy) at different time periods. A delay of operative intervention longer than 48 hours was associated with a doubling of complication rates. Elective appendectomy can be performed after 6 to 8 weeks later, which proves successful in the vast majority of patients.
This is the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with an acute appendicitis treated medically in another hospital. The patient had a past medical history of arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathy, previous cerebral ischemia, and rectal polyp. A delayed appendectomy was planned. However, before the procedure, a total colonoscopy was performed because of the history of polyps. This elderly patient was hospitalized for colonoscopy. At admission, he presented with fever, right iliac fossa tenderness, and a biological inflammatory syndrome. A CT-scan was performed. It showed a recurrent acute appendicitis without mass, with a 2cm abscess on the tip of the appendix. An appendectomy was performed in this case.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5123 views
342 likes
0 comments
05:00
Laparoscopic appendectomy for recurrent appendicitis after medical treatment
Appendectomy is the only curative treatment of appendicitis. However, the management of patients with an appendiceal mass or abscess can be temporarily managed medically with intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or percutaneous drainage. And yet, there are many controversies over the non-operative management of acute appendicitis. In 2015, Fair et al. used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project to evaluate 30-day morbidity and mortality of intervention (laparoscopic and open appendectomy) at different time periods. A delay of operative intervention longer than 48 hours was associated with a doubling of complication rates. Elective appendectomy can be performed after 6 to 8 weeks later, which proves successful in the vast majority of patients.
This is the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with an acute appendicitis treated medically in another hospital. The patient had a past medical history of arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathy, previous cerebral ischemia, and rectal polyp. A delayed appendectomy was planned. However, before the procedure, a total colonoscopy was performed because of the history of polyps. This elderly patient was hospitalized for colonoscopy. At admission, he presented with fever, right iliac fossa tenderness, and a biological inflammatory syndrome. A CT-scan was performed. It showed a recurrent acute appendicitis without mass, with a 2cm abscess on the tip of the appendix. An appendectomy was performed in this case.
Laparoscopic appendectomy and fenestration of hemorrhagic ovarian cyst
This is the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted to the emergency department for lower abdominal pain going on for 24 hours. No abdominal guarding was noted. Biological findings showed an inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 112. CT-scan showed the presence of an enlarged appendix (9mm thick) along with a voluminous adnexal cyst, which may be suggestive of a tubo-ovarian abscess. Laparoscopic exploration is performed. Congestive appendicitis is confirmed, as well as the presence of a hemorrhagic right ovarian cyst. Laparoscopic appendectomy is performed and the hemorrhagic ovarian cyst is fenestrated.
M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4505 views
413 likes
0 comments
04:57
Laparoscopic appendectomy and fenestration of hemorrhagic ovarian cyst
This is the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted to the emergency department for lower abdominal pain going on for 24 hours. No abdominal guarding was noted. Biological findings showed an inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 112. CT-scan showed the presence of an enlarged appendix (9mm thick) along with a voluminous adnexal cyst, which may be suggestive of a tubo-ovarian abscess. Laparoscopic exploration is performed. Congestive appendicitis is confirmed, as well as the presence of a hemorrhagic right ovarian cyst. Laparoscopic appendectomy is performed and the hemorrhagic ovarian cyst is fenestrated.
Laparoscopic appendectomy for appendicitis with peritonitis
This is the case of a 37-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain and fever at 39.4°C. The work-up demonstrated important inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 169. CT-scan confirmed an acute appendicitis with an appendicolith at the base. The appendix is probably perforated as the CT-scan also demonstrated a pneumoperitoneum. Laparoscopic appendectomy is decided upon. The operative set-up is standard with an optical port placed at the umbilicus, a port in the left iliac fossa, and a suprapubic port. Exposure, appendectomy with stapling of the appendicular base, and cleansing of the peritoneal cavity are thoroughly demonstrated.
M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4674 views
474 likes
0 comments
05:03
Laparoscopic appendectomy for appendicitis with peritonitis
This is the case of a 37-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain and fever at 39.4°C. The work-up demonstrated important inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 169. CT-scan confirmed an acute appendicitis with an appendicolith at the base. The appendix is probably perforated as the CT-scan also demonstrated a pneumoperitoneum. Laparoscopic appendectomy is decided upon. The operative set-up is standard with an optical port placed at the umbilicus, a port in the left iliac fossa, and a suprapubic port. Exposure, appendectomy with stapling of the appendicular base, and cleansing of the peritoneal cavity are thoroughly demonstrated.
Laparoscopic appendectomy after appendicular phlegmon
Appendicitis is one of the main reasons for consultation and surgical interventions in the emergency departments around the world. If it is not diagnosed and treated timely, it can evolve towards an appendicular perforation, and as a result, it can become a peritonitis or an appendicular phlegmon. This latter case may occur in approximately 10% of cases.
Currently, the management of the appendicular phlegmon is controversial. Some authors prefer to perform an appendectomy immediately, and others are in favor of medical treatment using antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainage if possible and delay appendectomy.
In this case, we present a patient presenting with an appendicular phlegmon in which a conservative management with percutaneous drainage and delayed surgery were decided upon.
P Saleg, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
9116 views
522 likes
0 comments
04:17
Laparoscopic appendectomy after appendicular phlegmon
Appendicitis is one of the main reasons for consultation and surgical interventions in the emergency departments around the world. If it is not diagnosed and treated timely, it can evolve towards an appendicular perforation, and as a result, it can become a peritonitis or an appendicular phlegmon. This latter case may occur in approximately 10% of cases.
Currently, the management of the appendicular phlegmon is controversial. Some authors prefer to perform an appendectomy immediately, and others are in favor of medical treatment using antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainage if possible and delay appendectomy.
In this case, we present a patient presenting with an appendicular phlegmon in which a conservative management with percutaneous drainage and delayed surgery were decided upon.
Low-cost laparoscopic appendectomy: how to teach
Laparoscopic appendectomy must be the gold standard. Nowadays, many centers still continue to go on with McBurney’s incisions. Why? Expensive devices may be a reason. Low cost appendectomy allows for a diagnostic laparoscopy and offers a therapeutic option with the lowest price.
On the other hand, residents must begin the learning curve in laparoscopy as soon as possible not only with a training center (training in cadaveric or animals) but they must also start practicing on humans with watchful surgeon/teacher’s eyes.
The aim of this video is to demonstrate that low-cost laparoscopic appendectomy is feasible not only for surgeons but also for residents operating with an expert.
S Rua, G Machado , P Mira
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
10210 views
569 likes
0 comments
08:49
Low-cost laparoscopic appendectomy: how to teach
Laparoscopic appendectomy must be the gold standard. Nowadays, many centers still continue to go on with McBurney’s incisions. Why? Expensive devices may be a reason. Low cost appendectomy allows for a diagnostic laparoscopy and offers a therapeutic option with the lowest price.
On the other hand, residents must begin the learning curve in laparoscopy as soon as possible not only with a training center (training in cadaveric or animals) but they must also start practicing on humans with watchful surgeon/teacher’s eyes.
The aim of this video is to demonstrate that low-cost laparoscopic appendectomy is feasible not only for surgeons but also for residents operating with an expert.
Laparoscopic interval appendectomy after conservative treatment of an appendiceal abscess
Appendectomy is the standard treatment for acute appendicitis in adults and children. However, more and more studies demonstrate that a conservative treatment with antibiotics and radiological drainage, if required, is effective and may be of importance in complicated cases and in older frail patients [1].
In the absence of randomized controlled trials, there is no consensus on whether an appendectomy at distance from the acute phase (interval appendectomy) is necessary for conservatively treated patients. A large observational study has shown that about 10% of these patients will require an appendectomy [2] over a period of several years. However, a histopathological study of appendices removed during interval appendectomy after conservative management of pediatric patients with acute appendicitis with an inflammatory mass or abscess concluded that more than half of the patients had strong histopathological changes in the appendix, thereby suggesting a high possibility of recurrence [3].
This is the case of a 58-year-old female patient presenting with a perforated appendix with an appendiceal abscess, treated by antibiotherapy and radiological drainage. She has a past history of uterine cancer treated by radiochemotherapy and total hysterectomy, complicated by bilateral ureteral stenoses after radiotherapy, treated by long-term pig-tail urinary catheters, as well as a postoperative abdominal hernia treated by means of an abdominal underlay mesh. Even though the initial non-surgical treatment of her complicated acute appendicitis was successful, an interval appendectomy was indicated because of persistent abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant (RLQ). The operation was performed laparoscopically with a simple postoperative course.
References:
1. Tannoury J. Abboud B. Treatment options of inflammatory appendiceal masses in adults. World J Gastroenterol 2013;19:3942-50.
2. McCutcheon BA, Chang DC, Marcus LP, Inui T, Noorbakhsh A, Schallhorn C, Parina R, Salazar FR, Talamini MA. Long-term outcomes of patients with nonsurgically managed uncomplicated appendicitis. J Am Coll Surg 2014;218:905-13.
3. Otake S, Suzuki N, Takahashi A, Toki F, Nishi A, Yamamoto H, Kuroiwa M, Kuwano H. Histological analysis of appendices removed during interval appendectomy after conservative management of pediatric patients with acute appendicitis with an inflammatory mass or abscess. Surg Today 2014;44:1400-5.
D Ntourakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
5388 views
170 likes
0 comments
12:12
Laparoscopic interval appendectomy after conservative treatment of an appendiceal abscess
Appendectomy is the standard treatment for acute appendicitis in adults and children. However, more and more studies demonstrate that a conservative treatment with antibiotics and radiological drainage, if required, is effective and may be of importance in complicated cases and in older frail patients [1].
In the absence of randomized controlled trials, there is no consensus on whether an appendectomy at distance from the acute phase (interval appendectomy) is necessary for conservatively treated patients. A large observational study has shown that about 10% of these patients will require an appendectomy [2] over a period of several years. However, a histopathological study of appendices removed during interval appendectomy after conservative management of pediatric patients with acute appendicitis with an inflammatory mass or abscess concluded that more than half of the patients had strong histopathological changes in the appendix, thereby suggesting a high possibility of recurrence [3].
This is the case of a 58-year-old female patient presenting with a perforated appendix with an appendiceal abscess, treated by antibiotherapy and radiological drainage. She has a past history of uterine cancer treated by radiochemotherapy and total hysterectomy, complicated by bilateral ureteral stenoses after radiotherapy, treated by long-term pig-tail urinary catheters, as well as a postoperative abdominal hernia treated by means of an abdominal underlay mesh. Even though the initial non-surgical treatment of her complicated acute appendicitis was successful, an interval appendectomy was indicated because of persistent abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant (RLQ). The operation was performed laparoscopically with a simple postoperative course.
References:
1. Tannoury J. Abboud B. Treatment options of inflammatory appendiceal masses in adults. World J Gastroenterol 2013;19:3942-50.
2. McCutcheon BA, Chang DC, Marcus LP, Inui T, Noorbakhsh A, Schallhorn C, Parina R, Salazar FR, Talamini MA. Long-term outcomes of patients with nonsurgically managed uncomplicated appendicitis. J Am Coll Surg 2014;218:905-13.
3. Otake S, Suzuki N, Takahashi A, Toki F, Nishi A, Yamamoto H, Kuroiwa M, Kuwano H. Histological analysis of appendices removed during interval appendectomy after conservative management of pediatric patients with acute appendicitis with an inflammatory mass or abscess. Surg Today 2014;44:1400-5.
Monopolar laparoscopic appendectomy
The laparoscopic approach is the gold standard for acute appendicitis. There are several surgical devices to achieve hemostatic control of the appendicular artery (monopolar electrocautery, endoclip, endostapler, ultrasonic scalpel, and LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device), which vary widely according to the surgeon’s preference and availability in the institution. All devices are effective and safe, but monopolar electrocautery systems are the most cost-effective ones.
A 24-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency department with a 24-hour evolution of right iliac fossa pain. No other symptoms were noted. An abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an acute appendicitis.
This full length surgical movie shows the feasibility and safety of monopolar electrocautery for meso-appendiceal dissection. The intra-abdominal procedure was achieved in 5 minutes 30 seconds.
No complications were observed and the patient was discharged home on the next postoperative day.
P Leão, A Goulart
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
9900 views
334 likes
0 comments
06:14
Monopolar laparoscopic appendectomy
The laparoscopic approach is the gold standard for acute appendicitis. There are several surgical devices to achieve hemostatic control of the appendicular artery (monopolar electrocautery, endoclip, endostapler, ultrasonic scalpel, and LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device), which vary widely according to the surgeon’s preference and availability in the institution. All devices are effective and safe, but monopolar electrocautery systems are the most cost-effective ones.
A 24-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency department with a 24-hour evolution of right iliac fossa pain. No other symptoms were noted. An abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an acute appendicitis.
This full length surgical movie shows the feasibility and safety of monopolar electrocautery for meso-appendiceal dissection. The intra-abdominal procedure was achieved in 5 minutes 30 seconds.
No complications were observed and the patient was discharged home on the next postoperative day.
Single port appendectomy using the EK glove port: a cost-effective innovation
Single port laparoscopic surgery has emerged to enhance the cosmetic benefits and to decrease morbidity in minimally invasive surgery. However, this technique requires a specialized multichannel port (to introduce the laparoscope and instruments) which is very costly and not affordable for the majority of the population. We have improvised a single port access system using readily available materials like surgical gloves, the rigid plastic ring, the inner flexible ring and conventional laparoscopic trocars (the EK Port) with no added cost for the patient. This also eliminates the need for an Alexis® wound retractor. We have performed about 130 single port surgeries since September 2009 using this technique without any complications.
E Khiangte, I Newme
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
10857 views
63 likes
0 comments
05:09
Single port appendectomy using the EK glove port: a cost-effective innovation
Single port laparoscopic surgery has emerged to enhance the cosmetic benefits and to decrease morbidity in minimally invasive surgery. However, this technique requires a specialized multichannel port (to introduce the laparoscope and instruments) which is very costly and not affordable for the majority of the population. We have improvised a single port access system using readily available materials like surgical gloves, the rigid plastic ring, the inner flexible ring and conventional laparoscopic trocars (the EK Port) with no added cost for the patient. This also eliminates the need for an Alexis® wound retractor. We have performed about 130 single port surgeries since September 2009 using this technique without any complications.
Appendicular mucocele: laparoscopic management
Appendicular mucocele is a rare, yet typical tumor of the appendix. Its potentially malignant nature, the risk of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) in case of rupture mandates a surgical resection without damage. In this case, diagnosis was suspected during colonoscopy performed because of right iliac fossa pain. The exam revealed an appendicular protrusion. CT-scan demonstrated the presence of an appendicular mucocele. A laparoscopic approach was decided upon. Parietal adhesions were identified. A primary vascular approach is then carried out. Once the ileocolic division has been achieved, a medial approach allows to complete the dissection within the wall keeping away from the lesion. Following the complete specimen resection, an ileocolic anastomosis is performed laparoscopically. At the end of the intervention, a small bowel exploration helps to identify a Meckel’s diverticulum that will be resected.
M Vix, D Mutter, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
6977 views
94 likes
0 comments
15:47
Appendicular mucocele: laparoscopic management
Appendicular mucocele is a rare, yet typical tumor of the appendix. Its potentially malignant nature, the risk of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) in case of rupture mandates a surgical resection without damage. In this case, diagnosis was suspected during colonoscopy performed because of right iliac fossa pain. The exam revealed an appendicular protrusion. CT-scan demonstrated the presence of an appendicular mucocele. A laparoscopic approach was decided upon. Parietal adhesions were identified. A primary vascular approach is then carried out. Once the ileocolic division has been achieved, a medial approach allows to complete the dissection within the wall keeping away from the lesion. Following the complete specimen resection, an ileocolic anastomosis is performed laparoscopically. At the end of the intervention, a small bowel exploration helps to identify a Meckel’s diverticulum that will be resected.
Laparoscopic splenic flexure mobilization during low anterior resection (LAR), extra central connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems
This is the case of two adult patients who presented with a low rectal carcinoma. A low anterior resection was performed laparoscopically. In both cases, the procedure was begun with a mobilization of the splenic flexure to ensure sufficient length on the proximal colonic segment to facilitate a tension-free low colorectal anastomosis. In the first case, a small aberrant artery, and during the second case, an aberrant artery of greater caliber can be appreciated. Anatomical studies report an extra central arterial connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems in addition to the marginal artery of Drummond in 10 to 30% of cases. In such cases, there is an extra connection from the ascending branch of the left colic artery to the middle colic artery or the marginal artery of Drummond. Different names have been given to these connections, such as for example the meandering mesenteric artery, the artery of Moskovitch and Riolan’s arch.
A Wijsmuller, RJ Franken, JB Tuynman, J Bonjer
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
8471 views
43 likes
0 comments
19:46
Laparoscopic splenic flexure mobilization during low anterior resection (LAR), extra central connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems
This is the case of two adult patients who presented with a low rectal carcinoma. A low anterior resection was performed laparoscopically. In both cases, the procedure was begun with a mobilization of the splenic flexure to ensure sufficient length on the proximal colonic segment to facilitate a tension-free low colorectal anastomosis. In the first case, a small aberrant artery, and during the second case, an aberrant artery of greater caliber can be appreciated. Anatomical studies report an extra central arterial connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems in addition to the marginal artery of Drummond in 10 to 30% of cases. In such cases, there is an extra connection from the ascending branch of the left colic artery to the middle colic artery or the marginal artery of Drummond. Different names have been given to these connections, such as for example the meandering mesenteric artery, the artery of Moskovitch and Riolan’s arch.
Three-trocar laparoscopic right ileocolectomy for advanced small bowel neuroendocrine tumor
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) was shown to offer advantages in general and oncologic surgery (1). Over the last decade, reduced port laparoscopy (RPL) has been introduced to reduce the risks related to ports and abdominal wall trauma, with enhanced cosmetic outcomes (2). In this video, the authors report the case of a 59-year-old man with a small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, and who underwent a three-trocar right ileocolectomy.
Video: Preoperative work-up, including endoscopic ultrasound, octreoscan, PET-scan, and FDG PET-CT, showed a 15mm small bowel tumor with mesenteric and transverse mesocolic extension, until the muscularis propria of the third portion of the duodenum. The biopsy revealed a low-grade well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. The procedure was performed using three abdominal trocars: a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, and a 5mm port in the left flank (Figure 1). Abdominal cavity exploration demonstrated the presence of a tumor located in the mesentery of the last small bowel loop, with consequent bowel retraction, dislocation of the caecum and appendix, located under the right lobe of the liver, and tumoral extension into the proximal transverse mesocolon. After mobilization of the right colon from laterally to medially, the second and third duodenal segments were exposed, showing tumor extension towards the anterior duodenal wall of these segments. After encircling the anterior aspect of the duodenal wall with a piece of cotton tape (Figure 2), an endoscopic linear stapler was inserted through the umbilical trocar under the visual guidance of a 5mm scope in the left flank (Figure 3a), and it was fired (Figure 3b). The specimen was removed through a suprapubic access. Perioperative frozen section biopsy showed a free duodenal margin, and the procedure was subsequently completed with an ileocolic anastomosis, performed in a side-to-side handsewn intracorporeal fashion. At the end, the mesocolic defect was closed.

Results: Operative time was 4 hours. No added trocars were necessary. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. Pathological findings showed a grade I well-differentiated small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, with lymphovascular emboli and perinervous infiltration (1/20 metastatic nodes, free margins, stage: pT3N1 (8 UICC edition). A follow-up under somatostatin therapy was put forward.

Conclusions: RPL is a feasible option when performing advanced oncological surgery. Patients benefit from all MIS advantages, including reduced trocar complications and enhanced cosmetic outcomes.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6413 views
112 likes
0 comments
11:10
Three-trocar laparoscopic right ileocolectomy for advanced small bowel neuroendocrine tumor
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) was shown to offer advantages in general and oncologic surgery (1). Over the last decade, reduced port laparoscopy (RPL) has been introduced to reduce the risks related to ports and abdominal wall trauma, with enhanced cosmetic outcomes (2). In this video, the authors report the case of a 59-year-old man with a small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, and who underwent a three-trocar right ileocolectomy.
Video: Preoperative work-up, including endoscopic ultrasound, octreoscan, PET-scan, and FDG PET-CT, showed a 15mm small bowel tumor with mesenteric and transverse mesocolic extension, until the muscularis propria of the third portion of the duodenum. The biopsy revealed a low-grade well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. The procedure was performed using three abdominal trocars: a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, and a 5mm port in the left flank (Figure 1). Abdominal cavity exploration demonstrated the presence of a tumor located in the mesentery of the last small bowel loop, with consequent bowel retraction, dislocation of the caecum and appendix, located under the right lobe of the liver, and tumoral extension into the proximal transverse mesocolon. After mobilization of the right colon from laterally to medially, the second and third duodenal segments were exposed, showing tumor extension towards the anterior duodenal wall of these segments. After encircling the anterior aspect of the duodenal wall with a piece of cotton tape (Figure 2), an endoscopic linear stapler was inserted through the umbilical trocar under the visual guidance of a 5mm scope in the left flank (Figure 3a), and it was fired (Figure 3b). The specimen was removed through a suprapubic access. Perioperative frozen section biopsy showed a free duodenal margin, and the procedure was subsequently completed with an ileocolic anastomosis, performed in a side-to-side handsewn intracorporeal fashion. At the end, the mesocolic defect was closed.

Results: Operative time was 4 hours. No added trocars were necessary. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. Pathological findings showed a grade I well-differentiated small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, with lymphovascular emboli and perinervous infiltration (1/20 metastatic nodes, free margins, stage: pT3N1 (8 UICC edition). A follow-up under somatostatin therapy was put forward.

Conclusions: RPL is a feasible option when performing advanced oncological surgery. Patients benefit from all MIS advantages, including reduced trocar complications and enhanced cosmetic outcomes.
Laparoscopic appendectomy following transparietal drainage of an abscess
Patients presenting with complicated appendicitis represent a common and challenging problem. Conflicting data exist concerning optimal treatment of these patients with primary versus delayed appendectomy. This video shows the case of a 48-year-old female patient operated upon previously for a collection at the rectouterine (Douglas') pouch following a suspected acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic exploration was performed along with a laparoscopic drainage of the collection, but the appendix had not been identified. Fifteen days later and the patient presents with a 15cm residual collection for which we performed a puncture under CT-scan guidance. Following a 3-month interval, the patient is admitted to our Department to perform an appendectomy.
F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
3137 views
23 likes
2 comments
04:05
Laparoscopic appendectomy following transparietal drainage of an abscess
Patients presenting with complicated appendicitis represent a common and challenging problem. Conflicting data exist concerning optimal treatment of these patients with primary versus delayed appendectomy. This video shows the case of a 48-year-old female patient operated upon previously for a collection at the rectouterine (Douglas') pouch following a suspected acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic exploration was performed along with a laparoscopic drainage of the collection, but the appendix had not been identified. Fifteen days later and the patient presents with a 15cm residual collection for which we performed a puncture under CT-scan guidance. Following a 3-month interval, the patient is admitted to our Department to perform an appendectomy.
Benefit of laparoscopic approach in an appendicular purulent peritonitis
This video is one of a series of laparoscopic appendicectomies and shows the advantage of the videoscopic approach in accessing the entire peritoneal cavity in cases of diffuse peritonitis.
Blood tests revealed an inflammatory syndrome in a young woman with a 3-day history of diffuse abdominal pain and fever. Exploration of the abdominal cavity during emergency laparoscopy confirmed the clinical impressions. The authors performed aspiration and lavage of the peritoneal cavity. Thorough assessment revealed the omentum to be concentrated in the right iliac fossa, and gentle dissection uncovered a necrotic, perforated appendix. Dissection of the cecum and appendix was difficult because the tissues were friable and adherent. The usual tissue planes were not present, but the laparoscopic view allowed for a safe approach.
F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
12 years ago
798 views
101 likes
0 comments
04:04
Benefit of laparoscopic approach in an appendicular purulent peritonitis
This video is one of a series of laparoscopic appendicectomies and shows the advantage of the videoscopic approach in accessing the entire peritoneal cavity in cases of diffuse peritonitis.
Blood tests revealed an inflammatory syndrome in a young woman with a 3-day history of diffuse abdominal pain and fever. Exploration of the abdominal cavity during emergency laparoscopy confirmed the clinical impressions. The authors performed aspiration and lavage of the peritoneal cavity. Thorough assessment revealed the omentum to be concentrated in the right iliac fossa, and gentle dissection uncovered a necrotic, perforated appendix. Dissection of the cecum and appendix was difficult because the tissues were friable and adherent. The usual tissue planes were not present, but the laparoscopic view allowed for a safe approach.
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
M Lotti, E Poiasina, G Panyor, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2906 views
442 likes
0 comments
11:18
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction for a terminal achalasia
Introduction: Idiopathic achalasia is the most frequent esophageal motility disorder. Generally, treatment is the "palliation" of symptoms and improvement in quality of life. Although Heller myotomy is the standard treatment, achieving good results in 90 to 95% of cases, esophagectomy is required in 5 to 10% of cases.
The authors present a case of a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction in a woman with long-term achalasia and megaesophagus.
Clinical case: A 54-year-old woman, with a previous history of a "psychological eating disorder", was referred to the Emergency Department. She complained of epigastric pain and dysphagia. A thoraco-abdominal CT-scan was requested and revealed a dilated, tortuous, sigmoid esophagus, filled with food content, with no identifiable mass causing obstruction. The patient was admitted to hospital and further study was performed --esophagogastroscopy and esophageal manometry - which confirmed the diagnosis of achalasia with esophageal aperistalses.
The patient was proposed a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction.
No complications were reported in the postoperative period, and discharge was possible on postoperative day 7. Six months later, an esophagram showed adequate contrast passage and progression.
Discussion/Conclusion: Esophagectomy as a primary treatment of achalasia might be considered if severe symptomatic (dysphagia, regurgitation), anatomical (megaesophagus) or functional (esophagus aperistalses) disorders are contraindications to a more conservative approach.
AM Pereira, J Magalhães, R Ferreira de Almeida, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3817 views
291 likes
0 comments
09:29
Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction for a terminal achalasia
Introduction: Idiopathic achalasia is the most frequent esophageal motility disorder. Generally, treatment is the "palliation" of symptoms and improvement in quality of life. Although Heller myotomy is the standard treatment, achieving good results in 90 to 95% of cases, esophagectomy is required in 5 to 10% of cases.
The authors present a case of a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction in a woman with long-term achalasia and megaesophagus.
Clinical case: A 54-year-old woman, with a previous history of a "psychological eating disorder", was referred to the Emergency Department. She complained of epigastric pain and dysphagia. A thoraco-abdominal CT-scan was requested and revealed a dilated, tortuous, sigmoid esophagus, filled with food content, with no identifiable mass causing obstruction. The patient was admitted to hospital and further study was performed --esophagogastroscopy and esophageal manometry - which confirmed the diagnosis of achalasia with esophageal aperistalses.
The patient was proposed a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction.
No complications were reported in the postoperative period, and discharge was possible on postoperative day 7. Six months later, an esophagram showed adequate contrast passage and progression.
Discussion/Conclusion: Esophagectomy as a primary treatment of achalasia might be considered if severe symptomatic (dysphagia, regurgitation), anatomical (megaesophagus) or functional (esophagus aperistalses) disorders are contraindications to a more conservative approach.