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Laparoscopic rectal shaving for rectocervical endometriotic nodule
This is the case of a 32-year-old G0P0 woman presenting with severe dysmenorrhea, severe dyspareunia, and constipation. Pelvic examination showed a normal vagina, a fixed uterus, and mobile adnexae. Transvaginal ultrasonography (TvUSG) showed that the uterus and both ovaries were normal. A left parasalpingeal endometrioma (15mm), an obliterated Douglas pouch, as well as rectocervical and infiltrated rectal nodules (18mm and 0.6mm respectively) were also evidenced. Since bilateral ovaries were fixed to the pelvic sidewall, the operative strategy included bilateral ureterolysis and dissection of the hypogastric nerve and the pararectal fossa. Finally, the rectocervical nodule was mobilized by performing cervical and rectal shaving. The rectum was controlled by means of a methylene blue test. The final pathology was endometriosis.
H Altuntaş
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
6671 views
491 likes
0 comments
06:58
Laparoscopic rectal shaving for rectocervical endometriotic nodule
This is the case of a 32-year-old G0P0 woman presenting with severe dysmenorrhea, severe dyspareunia, and constipation. Pelvic examination showed a normal vagina, a fixed uterus, and mobile adnexae. Transvaginal ultrasonography (TvUSG) showed that the uterus and both ovaries were normal. A left parasalpingeal endometrioma (15mm), an obliterated Douglas pouch, as well as rectocervical and infiltrated rectal nodules (18mm and 0.6mm respectively) were also evidenced. Since bilateral ovaries were fixed to the pelvic sidewall, the operative strategy included bilateral ureterolysis and dissection of the hypogastric nerve and the pararectal fossa. Finally, the rectocervical nodule was mobilized by performing cervical and rectal shaving. The rectum was controlled by means of a methylene blue test. The final pathology was endometriosis.
Laparoscopic anatomy of the pelvic floor involved in laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence
In this key lecture, Professor Jean-Bernard Dubuisson delineates the laparoscopic pelvic floor anatomy involved in surgical procedures for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Traditional anatomy considers three levels: pelvic and perineal muscles, ligaments, and the space between all fascias covering the organs. Visceral ligaments occupy an anteroposterior axis (pubovesical ligaments, bladder pillars, and uterosacral ligaments) and a transverse axis (lateral bladder ligaments, cardinal ligaments, paracervix and rectal pillars). The four attachment sites which may be used by the surgeon for fascia and pelvic organ attachment in POP surgery are discussed-- Cooper’s ligament, white line, ischial spine, and sacral promontory. Approximately 90 laparoscopic anatomy pictures are presented in this authoritative lecture. The dissection planes and the different pelvic spaces used for surgery are explained, insisting on the main vessels, nerves, plexus, ureters which are obstacles to bear in mind and to avoid.
JB Dubuisson
Lecture
2 years ago
5808 views
618 likes
0 comments
24:09
Laparoscopic anatomy of the pelvic floor involved in laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence
In this key lecture, Professor Jean-Bernard Dubuisson delineates the laparoscopic pelvic floor anatomy involved in surgical procedures for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Traditional anatomy considers three levels: pelvic and perineal muscles, ligaments, and the space between all fascias covering the organs. Visceral ligaments occupy an anteroposterior axis (pubovesical ligaments, bladder pillars, and uterosacral ligaments) and a transverse axis (lateral bladder ligaments, cardinal ligaments, paracervix and rectal pillars). The four attachment sites which may be used by the surgeon for fascia and pelvic organ attachment in POP surgery are discussed-- Cooper’s ligament, white line, ischial spine, and sacral promontory. Approximately 90 laparoscopic anatomy pictures are presented in this authoritative lecture. The dissection planes and the different pelvic spaces used for surgery are explained, insisting on the main vessels, nerves, plexus, ureters which are obstacles to bear in mind and to avoid.
Colorectal resection in deep endometriosis: multidisciplinary laparoscopic approach (colorectal and gynecologic surgical teams)
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 42-year-old woman with deep pelvic endometriosis with rectal infiltration. After hormone therapy, the patient was operated on due to chronic pain. A laparoscopic approach was performed by a multidisciplinary team including colorectal and gynecologic surgeons having a wide experience in this field.
A CT-scan, MRI, and colonoscopy were performed before the surgery showing a deep infiltrating endometriosis with anterior rectal bowel involvement in the images and normal colorectal mucosa in the endoscopy.
Under general anesthesia, the laparoscopic approach was performed with 4 trocars. Deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) required a hysterectomy and rectal resection to clean all the pelvic space. An end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed and the extraction of the specimen (uterus and rectum) was carried out transvaginally. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4 without complications.
JF Noguera, MD, PhD, J Gilabert-Estelles, J Aguirrezabalaga, B López, J Dolz
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3511 views
305 likes
1 comment
09:55
Colorectal resection in deep endometriosis: multidisciplinary laparoscopic approach (colorectal and gynecologic surgical teams)
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 42-year-old woman with deep pelvic endometriosis with rectal infiltration. After hormone therapy, the patient was operated on due to chronic pain. A laparoscopic approach was performed by a multidisciplinary team including colorectal and gynecologic surgeons having a wide experience in this field.
A CT-scan, MRI, and colonoscopy were performed before the surgery showing a deep infiltrating endometriosis with anterior rectal bowel involvement in the images and normal colorectal mucosa in the endoscopy.
Under general anesthesia, the laparoscopic approach was performed with 4 trocars. Deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) required a hysterectomy and rectal resection to clean all the pelvic space. An end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed and the extraction of the specimen (uterus and rectum) was carried out transvaginally. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4 without complications.
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, I Argay
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
5769 views
318 likes
2 comments
42:42
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
Endometrial cancer surgical indications
The surgical management of endometrial cancer has been markedly changed by minimally invasive techniques. After three decades of laparoscopy, robotic surgery has built upon and expanded the population of patients able to benefit from minimally invasive techniques. Updates in the field of laparoscopy continue, including single site surgery. The emergence and rapid uptake of robotics continues to produce favorable outcomes while simultaneously expanding minimal access surgery to the obese and elderly populations. Sentinel lymph node detection and single port surgery are expanding areas which will continue to push the role of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in endometrial cancer. In this key lecture, Dr. Querleu will discuss the role of MIS in the management of endometrial cancer.
D Querleu
Lecture
3 years ago
1577 views
104 likes
0 comments
29:34
Endometrial cancer surgical indications
The surgical management of endometrial cancer has been markedly changed by minimally invasive techniques. After three decades of laparoscopy, robotic surgery has built upon and expanded the population of patients able to benefit from minimally invasive techniques. Updates in the field of laparoscopy continue, including single site surgery. The emergence and rapid uptake of robotics continues to produce favorable outcomes while simultaneously expanding minimal access surgery to the obese and elderly populations. Sentinel lymph node detection and single port surgery are expanding areas which will continue to push the role of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in endometrial cancer. In this key lecture, Dr. Querleu will discuss the role of MIS in the management of endometrial cancer.
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, A Host
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
4303 views
163 likes
0 comments
31:22
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.