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Didier MUTTER

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg
Strasbourg, France
MD, PhD, FACS
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Complex cases in laparoscopic recurrent and incisional hernia repair: multi-recurrence, infections, fistulas, difficult abdomen
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
5555 views
1 like
0 comments
03:00
Complex cases in laparoscopic recurrent and incisional hernia repair: multi-recurrence, infections, fistulas, difficult abdomen
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
Recurrent and incisional hernia repair: complex cases
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
State of the art
3 months ago
1099 views
4 likes
0 comments
00:00
Recurrent and incisional hernia repair: complex cases
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: live procedure
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system mounted on a dual-channel Olympus® scope allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to reduce the volume and the size of the stomach. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. Once the Overtube™ was placed, the scope equipped with the OverStitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery®, Austin, Tex) suturing device was inserted through the stomach, and the suturing was initiated at the level of the incisura. The tissue-retracting helix device was used to grab the stomach wall, allowing for full-thickness bites. Each suture consisted of multiple sequential U-shaped bites along the anterior wall, the greater curvature, the posterior wall, and then in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device. Three sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization, and to spare the fundus.
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
579 views
1 like
0 comments
18:32
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: live procedure
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system mounted on a dual-channel Olympus® scope allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to reduce the volume and the size of the stomach. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. Once the Overtube™ was placed, the scope equipped with the OverStitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery®, Austin, Tex) suturing device was inserted through the stomach, and the suturing was initiated at the level of the incisura. The tissue-retracting helix device was used to grab the stomach wall, allowing for full-thickness bites. Each suture consisted of multiple sequential U-shaped bites along the anterior wall, the greater curvature, the posterior wall, and then in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device. Three sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization, and to spare the fundus.
Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocarcinoma in a cirrhotic patient
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a cirrhotic liver with hemochromatosis. This is the case of a 77-year-old patient who presented with a 40mm HCC located in Couinaud’s liver segment II and III. After left liver mobilization, parenchymal transection was initiated along the left side of the falciform ligament, mainly using the cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA®). Tissue Select mode was used during the exposure of the vascular structure. The Glissonian pedicles of segments III and II were encircled and transected, and finally the suprahepatic vein was divided using an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. The specimen was extracted with a short suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a well-differentiated HCC.
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1954 views
9 likes
0 comments
07:22
Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocarcinoma in a cirrhotic patient
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a cirrhotic liver with hemochromatosis. This is the case of a 77-year-old patient who presented with a 40mm HCC located in Couinaud’s liver segment II and III. After left liver mobilization, parenchymal transection was initiated along the left side of the falciform ligament, mainly using the cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA®). Tissue Select mode was used during the exposure of the vascular structure. The Glissonian pedicles of segments III and II were encircled and transected, and finally the suprahepatic vein was divided using an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. The specimen was extracted with a short suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a well-differentiated HCC.
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
2410 views
4 likes
3 comments
07:01
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
2564 views
5 likes
0 comments
13:26
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
Laparoscopic partial liver resection for hepatocellular adenoma
We report a laparoscopic partial liver resection for a large hepatocellular adenoma. This is the case of a 34-year-old patient with several small hepatic nodules. One out of three nodules was a 13cm hepatocellular adenoma, which was found to be located in Couinaud’s segments V and VI. After clamping via blood flow occlusion, parenchymal transection was performed along the outer edge of the tumor using a Sonicision™ Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device and an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. After liver resection, cholecystectomy was performed. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of an inflammatory type of hepatocellular adenoma.
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1577 views
2 likes
0 comments
05:51
Laparoscopic partial liver resection for hepatocellular adenoma
We report a laparoscopic partial liver resection for a large hepatocellular adenoma. This is the case of a 34-year-old patient with several small hepatic nodules. One out of three nodules was a 13cm hepatocellular adenoma, which was found to be located in Couinaud’s segments V and VI. After clamping via blood flow occlusion, parenchymal transection was performed along the outer edge of the tumor using a Sonicision™ Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device and an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. After liver resection, cholecystectomy was performed. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of an inflammatory type of hepatocellular adenoma.
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1886 views
2 likes
0 comments
34:11
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
5194 views
14 likes
2 comments
06:55
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
4563 views
17 likes
2 comments
42:53
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
7808 views
50 likes
0 comments
46:18
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
1922 views
18 likes
1 comment
39:46
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
624 views
4 likes
0 comments
08:22
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
697 views
2 likes
0 comments
14:45
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
2342 views
11 likes
2 comments
08:23
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
116 views
2 likes
0 comments
12:02
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
Fully robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is becoming increasingly popular. The use of the surgical robot is developing rapidly, and this is especially true for digestive surgery. The aim of this video is to show that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be performed using a totally robotic approach. When using the robot, one follows the same steps as for a conventional intervention. The 3D vision and the degrees of freedom of the instruments facilitate the dissection, especially around the cardia, and for suturing procedures. The surgeon takes advantage of the console's user friendly set-up which does not put his/her shoulders or back in a vulnerable position, as they sometimes are when using a laparoscopic approach.
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1440 views
4 likes
0 comments
12:00
Fully robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is becoming increasingly popular. The use of the surgical robot is developing rapidly, and this is especially true for digestive surgery. The aim of this video is to show that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be performed using a totally robotic approach. When using the robot, one follows the same steps as for a conventional intervention. The 3D vision and the degrees of freedom of the instruments facilitate the dissection, especially around the cardia, and for suturing procedures. The surgeon takes advantage of the console's user friendly set-up which does not put his/her shoulders or back in a vulnerable position, as they sometimes are when using a laparoscopic approach.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: cystic duct stone management
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 69-year-old woman who had multiple episodes of biliary colic. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the presence of multiple gallbladder stones. MRI also showed a folded gallbladder infundibulum over the cystic duct, which is enlarged and contains a stone. The common bile duct is otherwise perfectly thin and free of stones. In this video, one can observe a stepwise cholecystectomy technique, with exposure, dissection of the serosa and of Calot’s triangle. Cystic artery division is first performed in order to allow complete cystic duct dissection obtaining the critical view of safety. The dissection of the dilated cystic duct is thoroughly demonstrated. A small stone is pushed back into the gallbladder; the cystic duct is opened and checked for residual stones, and the cystic duct convergence with the common bile duct is evidenced prior to clip positioning and duct division.
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2987 views
11 likes
0 comments
10:44
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: cystic duct stone management
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 69-year-old woman who had multiple episodes of biliary colic. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the presence of multiple gallbladder stones. MRI also showed a folded gallbladder infundibulum over the cystic duct, which is enlarged and contains a stone. The common bile duct is otherwise perfectly thin and free of stones. In this video, one can observe a stepwise cholecystectomy technique, with exposure, dissection of the serosa and of Calot’s triangle. Cystic artery division is first performed in order to allow complete cystic duct dissection obtaining the critical view of safety. The dissection of the dilated cystic duct is thoroughly demonstrated. A small stone is pushed back into the gallbladder; the cystic duct is opened and checked for residual stones, and the cystic duct convergence with the common bile duct is evidenced prior to clip positioning and duct division.
LIVE UNCUT SURGERY: laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy.
The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected.
After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe.
Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia.
This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
14346 views
88 likes
10 comments
30:23
LIVE UNCUT SURGERY: laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy.
The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected.
After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe.
Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia.
This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
Fully robotically assisted transabdominal left adrenalectomy for hypercortisolism due to two left adrenal adenomas
This video demonstrates the case of a female patient who had been followed up by endocrinologists for 6 years. The size of the left adrenal gland had increased and two nodules of 2.5cm were found. Serum chemistries showed a progressive increase in cortisol secretion with a pathological dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Mineralocorticoids and catecholamines were normal. Noriodocholesterol scintigraphy showed an exclusive fixation of the left adrenal gland. Surgery was indicated due to the hypersecretion of the left adrenal gland.
We now have a surgical robot (da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system, Intuitive Surgical) and we use it for most of the adrenalectomies we perform. It provides great stability of the operative field. The precise dissection is facilitated by the dexterity of the articulated instruments.
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
521 views
4 likes
0 comments
13:06
Fully robotically assisted transabdominal left adrenalectomy for hypercortisolism due to two left adrenal adenomas
This video demonstrates the case of a female patient who had been followed up by endocrinologists for 6 years. The size of the left adrenal gland had increased and two nodules of 2.5cm were found. Serum chemistries showed a progressive increase in cortisol secretion with a pathological dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Mineralocorticoids and catecholamines were normal. Noriodocholesterol scintigraphy showed an exclusive fixation of the left adrenal gland. Surgery was indicated due to the hypersecretion of the left adrenal gland.
We now have a surgical robot (da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system, Intuitive Surgical) and we use it for most of the adrenalectomies we perform. It provides great stability of the operative field. The precise dissection is facilitated by the dexterity of the articulated instruments.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic total gastrectomy highlighting esojejunal anastomosis
This video presents the case of a 71-year-old man with a BMI of 29. He was admitted to the emergency room for fatigue, severe anemia, and abdominal pain. His past medical history was significant for cardiac disease, aortic valve stenosis, and small adrenal adenoma. His past surgical history included a cholecystectomy and a prostatectomy. Work-up started with an endoscopy which showed an ulcer at the antrum, which was biopsied and showed signet cell adenocarcinoma. CT-scan confirmed the presence of a large bulky lesion and ruled out the presence of a metastatic disease. The patient was admitted again for bleeding and hematemesis and he was scheduled for a total gastrectomy. He had an exploratory laparoscopy which showed no signs of carcinomatosis. He also had preoperative chemotherapy.
This live interactive video demonstrates a robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including a stepwise lymphadenectomy and precise thorough description of esojejunal anastomosis.
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1911 views
14 likes
0 comments
04:27
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic total gastrectomy highlighting esojejunal anastomosis
This video presents the case of a 71-year-old man with a BMI of 29. He was admitted to the emergency room for fatigue, severe anemia, and abdominal pain. His past medical history was significant for cardiac disease, aortic valve stenosis, and small adrenal adenoma. His past surgical history included a cholecystectomy and a prostatectomy. Work-up started with an endoscopy which showed an ulcer at the antrum, which was biopsied and showed signet cell adenocarcinoma. CT-scan confirmed the presence of a large bulky lesion and ruled out the presence of a metastatic disease. The patient was admitted again for bleeding and hematemesis and he was scheduled for a total gastrectomy. He had an exploratory laparoscopy which showed no signs of carcinomatosis. He also had preoperative chemotherapy.
This live interactive video demonstrates a robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including a stepwise lymphadenectomy and precise thorough description of esojejunal anastomosis.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
Morbid obesity surgery, which induces a rapid weight loss, is a predisposing factor for the onset of gallstones. There are treatments which help to reduce this risk. However, the observance is poor and lithogenicity brings about risks of complications such as cholecystitis, stone migration, and acute pancreatitis.
This video demonstrates the case of a patient who underwent a sleeve gastrectomy with a substantial weight loss. Stone migration was found along with a less serious pancreatic response. During a blood test analysis, thrombocytopenia was found and investigated by hematologists. Besides a low platelet count, a qualitative anomaly was observed increasing the risk of bleeding. Despite of this, cholecystectomy was necessary to prevent any new stone migration.
The operator was skilled and used a conventional laparoscopic approach. The patient’s liver is the site of a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), making the procedure even more complex. Four ports were placed to allow for an adequate gallbladder retraction and for a minute dissection. Calot’s triangle was classically approached first as soon as the adhesions between the omentum and the gallbladder were taken down. Due to a thickened and inflammatory cystic duct, the entire gallbladder was dissected before ligating the cystic duct with two ligatures, one of them being reinforced by means of a surgical loop.
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
830 views
2 likes
0 comments
13:25
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
Morbid obesity surgery, which induces a rapid weight loss, is a predisposing factor for the onset of gallstones. There are treatments which help to reduce this risk. However, the observance is poor and lithogenicity brings about risks of complications such as cholecystitis, stone migration, and acute pancreatitis.
This video demonstrates the case of a patient who underwent a sleeve gastrectomy with a substantial weight loss. Stone migration was found along with a less serious pancreatic response. During a blood test analysis, thrombocytopenia was found and investigated by hematologists. Besides a low platelet count, a qualitative anomaly was observed increasing the risk of bleeding. Despite of this, cholecystectomy was necessary to prevent any new stone migration.
The operator was skilled and used a conventional laparoscopic approach. The patient’s liver is the site of a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), making the procedure even more complex. Four ports were placed to allow for an adequate gallbladder retraction and for a minute dissection. Calot’s triangle was classically approached first as soon as the adhesions between the omentum and the gallbladder were taken down. Due to a thickened and inflammatory cystic duct, the entire gallbladder was dissected before ligating the cystic duct with two ligatures, one of them being reinforced by means of a surgical loop.
Fully robotically assisted transabdominal right adrenalectomy for a right adrenal incidentaloma
This video presents the case of a female patient in whom a right adrenal incidentaloma was found. It was 40mm in size and was found incidentally during a pancreatitis treatment.
Endocrinologists controlled the absence of abnormal secretion. The size of the lesion increased slightly over a period of 6 months and allowed to establish an indication for surgery. Our team performs adrenalectomies using a transabdominal laparoscopic approach with the patient in a lateral decubitus position. In order to facilitate the intervention, we asked the Visible Patient company to use the CT-scan images to make a 3D model. This reconstruction allowed to better indentify the relationships of the gland, to improve resection, and confirm the operative strategy. During the intervention, the surgeon can use it to better understand the anatomy hidden by peri-adrenal adipose tissue and operate accordingly. We now have a surgical robot (da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system, Intuitive Surgical) and we use it for most of the adrenalectomies we perform. It provides great stability of the operative field. The precise dissection is facilitated by the dexterity of the articulated instruments.
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1264 views
2 likes
0 comments
11:41
Fully robotically assisted transabdominal right adrenalectomy for a right adrenal incidentaloma
This video presents the case of a female patient in whom a right adrenal incidentaloma was found. It was 40mm in size and was found incidentally during a pancreatitis treatment.
Endocrinologists controlled the absence of abnormal secretion. The size of the lesion increased slightly over a period of 6 months and allowed to establish an indication for surgery. Our team performs adrenalectomies using a transabdominal laparoscopic approach with the patient in a lateral decubitus position. In order to facilitate the intervention, we asked the Visible Patient company to use the CT-scan images to make a 3D model. This reconstruction allowed to better indentify the relationships of the gland, to improve resection, and confirm the operative strategy. During the intervention, the surgeon can use it to better understand the anatomy hidden by peri-adrenal adipose tissue and operate accordingly. We now have a surgical robot (da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system, Intuitive Surgical) and we use it for most of the adrenalectomies we perform. It provides great stability of the operative field. The precise dissection is facilitated by the dexterity of the articulated instruments.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
How to
8 months ago
14310 views
87 likes
0 comments
00:30:23
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
1577 views
2 likes
0 comments
32:48
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.