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Laparoscopic dissection of sacral promontory for sacrocolpopexy
Objective: To describe the laparoscopic dissection of the sacral promontory during a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, with a special focus on anatomical landmarks and surgical traps.
Setting: Department of Gynecology, CMCO, Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
Patients: Women with invalidating genital prolapse
Interventions: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is performed using three operative ports (one midline, suprapubic port and two lateral ports) and a 0-degree umbilical Karl Storz optical port. In order to suture a polypropylene mesh to the anterior vertebral ligament, the promontory area must be dissected. To improve sacral promontory exposure, the rectum is usually suspended to the left anterior abdominal wall by means of T’Lift™ tissue retraction systems. By palpating the area under the aortic bifurcation and the confluence of iliac veins, the sacral promontory is identified. The right ureter is also identified. Using two duck jaw fenestrated forceps, the peritoneum is lifted --retroperitoneal vessels are fixed to the vertebral elements, and widely opened. The promontory is carefully dissected until the anterior vertebral ligament becomes visible. As the presacral space is rich in blood vessels and nerve elements, surgeons are advised to preserve it.
However, the surgical approach to the vertebral ligament is sometimes difficult in obese women, when patients present anatomical variations such as a low iliac venous circulation confluence, a duplicity of middle sacral vessels, periosteal perforators, a winding right common iliac artery, or in the presence of lymph nodes.
Discussion: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy complications rates such as bleeding originating from the promontory varying from 0 to 4.7%, which sometimes require conversion to open abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Described by radiologists at almost 3cm from the sacral promontory, the right ureter can also be injured during reperitonization.
Conclusion: Laparoscopic dissection of the promontory requires specific and careful attention to be paid to non-infrequent anatomical variations.
V Gabriele, AJ Carin, K Afors, O Garbin
Intervención quirúrgica
4 años atrás
5617 visualizaciones
232 me gusta
% count% comentario
07:24
Laparoscopic dissection of sacral promontory for sacrocolpopexy
Objective: To describe the laparoscopic dissection of the sacral promontory during a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, with a special focus on anatomical landmarks and surgical traps.
Setting: Department of Gynecology, CMCO, Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
Patients: Women with invalidating genital prolapse
Interventions: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is performed using three operative ports (one midline, suprapubic port and two lateral ports) and a 0-degree umbilical Karl Storz optical port. In order to suture a polypropylene mesh to the anterior vertebral ligament, the promontory area must be dissected. To improve sacral promontory exposure, the rectum is usually suspended to the left anterior abdominal wall by means of T’Lift™ tissue retraction systems. By palpating the area under the aortic bifurcation and the confluence of iliac veins, the sacral promontory is identified. The right ureter is also identified. Using two duck jaw fenestrated forceps, the peritoneum is lifted --retroperitoneal vessels are fixed to the vertebral elements, and widely opened. The promontory is carefully dissected until the anterior vertebral ligament becomes visible. As the presacral space is rich in blood vessels and nerve elements, surgeons are advised to preserve it.
However, the surgical approach to the vertebral ligament is sometimes difficult in obese women, when patients present anatomical variations such as a low iliac venous circulation confluence, a duplicity of middle sacral vessels, periosteal perforators, a winding right common iliac artery, or in the presence of lymph nodes.
Discussion: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy complications rates such as bleeding originating from the promontory varying from 0 to 4.7%, which sometimes require conversion to open abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Described by radiologists at almost 3cm from the sacral promontory, the right ureter can also be injured during reperitonization.
Conclusion: Laparoscopic dissection of the promontory requires specific and careful attention to be paid to non-infrequent anatomical variations.
Bowel obstruction: a late complication after laparoscopic colposacropexy
This video illustrates the case of a patient with bowel adherent to an exposed portion of mesh used for treatment of a previous apical prolapse. The patient presents with abdominal symptoms following a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy.
In this video, Professor Wattiez performs an extensive pelvic adhesiolysis, detaching the bowel from the mesh, and identifying adequate correction of vaginal prolapse, without any sign of infection. Reperitonization of the vaginal vault and the long arm (sacrum arm) of the mesh was also performed.
This unique case highlights the importance of peritonization when using mesh. Complications such as mesh exposure may occur, however this can be appropriately managed laparoscopically.
A Wattiez, J Castellano, R Fernandes, G Centini, C Meza Paul, K Afors
Intervención quirúrgica
5 años atrás
1871 visualizaciones
37 me gusta
0 comentarios
23:25
Bowel obstruction: a late complication after laparoscopic colposacropexy
This video illustrates the case of a patient with bowel adherent to an exposed portion of mesh used for treatment of a previous apical prolapse. The patient presents with abdominal symptoms following a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy.
In this video, Professor Wattiez performs an extensive pelvic adhesiolysis, detaching the bowel from the mesh, and identifying adequate correction of vaginal prolapse, without any sign of infection. Reperitonization of the vaginal vault and the long arm (sacrum arm) of the mesh was also performed.
This unique case highlights the importance of peritonization when using mesh. Complications such as mesh exposure may occur, however this can be appropriately managed laparoscopically.
Colonic stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia: laparoscopic Sugarbaker repair procedure
The objective of this film is to demonstrate stoma prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia repair according to the technique described by Sugarbaker in open surgery, reproduced here with a laparoscopic approach.
Mesh placement into the abdominal cavity presents a risk that seems minimized by the development of dual-sided composite meshes, with one collagen coating that will be in contact with the digestive tract, hence limiting the risk of adhesions.
The principle of the Sugarbaker technique is to create a colonic zigzag route and to fix it on the non-absorbable side of the mesh, thereby preventing colonic prolapse. The mesh is also used as an obstacle to the passage of small bowel loops into the parastomal defect.
Here, the difficulty lies in the combined presence of an incisional hernia and prolapse on a diverting transverse colostomy. The risk of vascular injury is all the more important. Here, authors highlight pitfalls as well as tips and tricks to overcome them.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Intervención quirúrgica
6 años atrás
4240 visualizaciones
109 me gusta
0 comentarios
11:09
Colonic stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia: laparoscopic Sugarbaker repair procedure
The objective of this film is to demonstrate stoma prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia repair according to the technique described by Sugarbaker in open surgery, reproduced here with a laparoscopic approach.
Mesh placement into the abdominal cavity presents a risk that seems minimized by the development of dual-sided composite meshes, with one collagen coating that will be in contact with the digestive tract, hence limiting the risk of adhesions.
The principle of the Sugarbaker technique is to create a colonic zigzag route and to fix it on the non-absorbable side of the mesh, thereby preventing colonic prolapse. The mesh is also used as an obstacle to the passage of small bowel loops into the parastomal defect.
Here, the difficulty lies in the combined presence of an incisional hernia and prolapse on a diverting transverse colostomy. The risk of vascular injury is all the more important. Here, authors highlight pitfalls as well as tips and tricks to overcome them.
Laparoscopic colposacropexy for the treatment of an apical defect in a patient with previous total hysterectomy
We present the case of a 69-year-old patient who suffered from an elytrocele. Previously, she had undergone a total hysterectomy with anterior and posterior colpoperineoplasty due to the presence of a grade 2 cystocele, without urinary incontinence. The management of genital prolapse requires a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the female pelvic floor. This video outlines the main steps to follow for the repair of an apical defect with no true rectocele or cystocele. It also offers a very good insight of the specific issues to be considered when performing dissection and mesh fixation in specific situations, such as distortion of the normal anatomy due to the scarring process from a previous surgery and obesity. This surgery was performed and streamed live.
A Wattiez, C Redondo Guisasola, M Puga, F Asencio
Intervención quirúrgica
6 años atrás
4625 visualizaciones
79 me gusta
0 comentarios
18:00
Laparoscopic colposacropexy for the treatment of an apical defect in a patient with previous total hysterectomy
We present the case of a 69-year-old patient who suffered from an elytrocele. Previously, she had undergone a total hysterectomy with anterior and posterior colpoperineoplasty due to the presence of a grade 2 cystocele, without urinary incontinence. The management of genital prolapse requires a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the female pelvic floor. This video outlines the main steps to follow for the repair of an apical defect with no true rectocele or cystocele. It also offers a very good insight of the specific issues to be considered when performing dissection and mesh fixation in specific situations, such as distortion of the normal anatomy due to the scarring process from a previous surgery and obesity. This surgery was performed and streamed live.
Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with subtotal hysterectomy: the six points technique
Standardization means: implementing guidelines or measurements in order to obtain solutions to a disorganized system. Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is a long and complete surgical procedure that requires good knowledge of the anatomy and of the surgical technique, as well as advanced suturing skills. Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is also the gold standard procedure for POP repair, and its standardization is justified by its difficulty.
This video demonstrates the standard technique for laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with sub-total hysterectomy. It is called “the six-point technique” due to the six stitches used to fix the meshes.
A Wattiez, E Baulon, J Nassif, S Maia, P Trompoukis, J Alcocer, A Vázquez Rodriguez
Intervención quirúrgica
8 años atrás
8566 visualizaciones
103 me gusta
0 comentarios
28:50
Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with subtotal hysterectomy: the six points technique
Standardization means: implementing guidelines or measurements in order to obtain solutions to a disorganized system. Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is a long and complete surgical procedure that requires good knowledge of the anatomy and of the surgical technique, as well as advanced suturing skills. Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is also the gold standard procedure for POP repair, and its standardization is justified by its difficulty.
This video demonstrates the standard technique for laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with sub-total hysterectomy. It is called “the six-point technique” due to the six stitches used to fix the meshes.
Surgical tutorial: laparoscopic prolapse repair
In this lecture, Dr. Ted Lee, MD, director of the department of minimally invasive gynecologic surgery in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, focuses on the sacrocolpopexy procedure in relation to his experience in the treatment of genital organ prolapse. He highlights some important key steps of the procedure, together with some tips and tricks on optimizing exposure, facilitating dissection, suturing of the mesh and how to minimize complications.
The first step of the procedure is an adequate exposure with bowel retraction in order to have sufficient space to work in the sacral promontory area.
The next step is the rectovaginal dissection, with caution to keep the dissection close to the vagina, leave enough adipose tissue to the rectum, and dissect the pararectal spaces until the levator ani muscles. Dr. Lee stresses the fact that the depth of the dissection depends on the posterior wall defect. So in patients with a posterior defect not protruding outside the hymen, the dissection should stop at the level of the midvagina. This is in order to avoid future constipation with deep dissection. Only in patients with large posterior wall defects, the dissection should be performed at the level of the levator ani. Dr. Lee indicates some surgical instruments, such as the rectal probes and retractors, that are useful for the dissection of the rectovaginal space.
Next step is the vesicovaginal dissection, which can be very challenging, especially in patients with previous hysterectomy. Some tips and tricks such as the use of a Foley catheter or the use of a large probe to distend the vagina in order to facilitate dissection are demonstrated.
Next is the presacral dissection with skeletonization of the fibrofatty tissue, dissection from right to left to preserve the hypogastric nerve, and identification of a good plane of dissection to avoid bleeding, especially from the left common iliac vein, but also from sacral vessels, which can be dissected.
The last step is the suturing of the mesh. He explains that there is no longer the need to use non-absorbable sutures together with the use of tackers in order to secure the mesh to the sacrum without complications. A nice technique of suturing and knotting is demonstrated during mesh peritonization.
Finally, in patients where the uterus needs to be preserved for fertility purposes (sacrohysteropexy), Dr. Lee explains an alternative method to place the mesh medial to the uterine vessels in order to perform, if need be, a hysterectomy more easily later on. He also demonstrates a nice uterosacral suspension technique used in patients who do not wish to be treated with a mesh for their prolapse.
T Lee
Conferencia
9 años atrás
2699 visualizaciones
65 me gusta
0 comentarios
25:34
Surgical tutorial: laparoscopic prolapse repair
In this lecture, Dr. Ted Lee, MD, director of the department of minimally invasive gynecologic surgery in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, focuses on the sacrocolpopexy procedure in relation to his experience in the treatment of genital organ prolapse. He highlights some important key steps of the procedure, together with some tips and tricks on optimizing exposure, facilitating dissection, suturing of the mesh and how to minimize complications.
The first step of the procedure is an adequate exposure with bowel retraction in order to have sufficient space to work in the sacral promontory area.
The next step is the rectovaginal dissection, with caution to keep the dissection close to the vagina, leave enough adipose tissue to the rectum, and dissect the pararectal spaces until the levator ani muscles. Dr. Lee stresses the fact that the depth of the dissection depends on the posterior wall defect. So in patients with a posterior defect not protruding outside the hymen, the dissection should stop at the level of the midvagina. This is in order to avoid future constipation with deep dissection. Only in patients with large posterior wall defects, the dissection should be performed at the level of the levator ani. Dr. Lee indicates some surgical instruments, such as the rectal probes and retractors, that are useful for the dissection of the rectovaginal space.
Next step is the vesicovaginal dissection, which can be very challenging, especially in patients with previous hysterectomy. Some tips and tricks such as the use of a Foley catheter or the use of a large probe to distend the vagina in order to facilitate dissection are demonstrated.
Next is the presacral dissection with skeletonization of the fibrofatty tissue, dissection from right to left to preserve the hypogastric nerve, and identification of a good plane of dissection to avoid bleeding, especially from the left common iliac vein, but also from sacral vessels, which can be dissected.
The last step is the suturing of the mesh. He explains that there is no longer the need to use non-absorbable sutures together with the use of tackers in order to secure the mesh to the sacrum without complications. A nice technique of suturing and knotting is demonstrated during mesh peritonization.
Finally, in patients where the uterus needs to be preserved for fertility purposes (sacrohysteropexy), Dr. Lee explains an alternative method to place the mesh medial to the uterine vessels in order to perform, if need be, a hysterectomy more easily later on. He also demonstrates a nice uterosacral suspension technique used in patients who do not wish to be treated with a mesh for their prolapse.
Laparoscopic treatment of a chronic mesh infection 4 years after sacral colpopexy
In this video, we present the case of a late infectious complication after abdominal hysterectomy and sacral colpopexy using mesh interposition. We demonstrate the complete laparoscopic removal of the infected mesh, including excision of all the affected surrounding tissue. This is the case of a 57-year-old patient who had a total hysterectomy with bilateral adnexectomy and sacrocolpopexy in 2005. In 2009, she started to complain of an abundant, continuous and smelly vaginal discharge. The microbiological exam revealed a vaginal infection by Proteus mirabilis and the gynecologic examination showed a painful vaginal tumor with a drainage hole.
A Wattiez, S Barata, B Gabriel, J Nassif
Intervención quirúrgica
9 años atrás
3998 visualizaciones
25 me gusta
0 comentarios
09:55
Laparoscopic treatment of a chronic mesh infection 4 years after sacral colpopexy
In this video, we present the case of a late infectious complication after abdominal hysterectomy and sacral colpopexy using mesh interposition. We demonstrate the complete laparoscopic removal of the infected mesh, including excision of all the affected surrounding tissue. This is the case of a 57-year-old patient who had a total hysterectomy with bilateral adnexectomy and sacrocolpopexy in 2005. In 2009, she started to complain of an abundant, continuous and smelly vaginal discharge. The microbiological exam revealed a vaginal infection by Proteus mirabilis and the gynecologic examination showed a painful vaginal tumor with a drainage hole.