We use cookies to offer you an optimal experience on our website. By browsing our website, you accept the use of cookies.
Filter by
Specialties Clear filter
View more
Technologies Clear filter
View more
Media type Clear filter
View more
Category Clear filter
View more
Publication date
Sort by:
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
D Kadoche, M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
984 views
8 likes
0 comments
08:22
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Laparoscopic treatment of a giant mesenteric cyst
Mesenteric cysts are very rare entities (annually worldwide estimated incidence of 1/140 000 inhabitants). They do not have pathognomonic features and require a differential diagnosis with lymphangiomas, sarcomas, adenocarcinomas, and intestinal duplications. They typically appear more in women (twice the incidence) and are mostly benign swellings (malignancy rate of about 3%). The gold standard treatment is laparoscopic surgical resection.
The case is that of a 49-year-old female patient referred for an abdominal swelling in the periumbilical region, which was uncomfortable for the patient, namely in the contraction of the abdominals. She did not describe any changes in intestinal transit, anorexia, asthenia or associated weight loss. The imaging study by computer tomography documented a "cystic lesion of 13cm in the root of the mesentery in contact with great vessels and duodenum". The patient was resected laparoscopically in March 2016, discharged on the second postoperative day, without intercurrences. The video of the mesenteric cyst excision surgery demonstrates some of the risks of the laparoscopic approach of the mesentery and underlines the possibility of dissection of these cysts even when they are giant cysts and in close relation with vital structures such as the vena cava and the iliac arteries.
P Leão, H Cristino, JP Pinto
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1493 views
95 likes
0 comments
04:09
Laparoscopic treatment of a giant mesenteric cyst
Mesenteric cysts are very rare entities (annually worldwide estimated incidence of 1/140 000 inhabitants). They do not have pathognomonic features and require a differential diagnosis with lymphangiomas, sarcomas, adenocarcinomas, and intestinal duplications. They typically appear more in women (twice the incidence) and are mostly benign swellings (malignancy rate of about 3%). The gold standard treatment is laparoscopic surgical resection.
The case is that of a 49-year-old female patient referred for an abdominal swelling in the periumbilical region, which was uncomfortable for the patient, namely in the contraction of the abdominals. She did not describe any changes in intestinal transit, anorexia, asthenia or associated weight loss. The imaging study by computer tomography documented a "cystic lesion of 13cm in the root of the mesentery in contact with great vessels and duodenum". The patient was resected laparoscopically in March 2016, discharged on the second postoperative day, without intercurrences. The video of the mesenteric cyst excision surgery demonstrates some of the risks of the laparoscopic approach of the mesentery and underlines the possibility of dissection of these cysts even when they are giant cysts and in close relation with vital structures such as the vena cava and the iliac arteries.
Small bowel obstruction and ileal strangulation by adhesions: role of laparoscopy in early diagnosis and treatment
Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a common surgical emergency, most frequently caused by adhesions. In the absence of signs of strangulations or CT-scan evidence (free fluid mesenteric edema, “small bowel faeces” sign, devascularization), a large portion of ASBO can be resolved using non-operative methods even if a significant number of patients will require an emergency surgery.
Laparoscopy in acute care surgery continues to expand even in cases of small bowel obstruction which were conventionally managed by means of laparotomy.
The authors report a case of a 45-year-old woman, completely laparoscopically treated, with a history of previous appendectomy with pelvic abscess, cholecystectomy and removal of right ovarian cysts. She was admitted to the emergency room five hours before surgery with severe acute abdominal pain which appeared 24 hours before.
CT-scan with oral administration of gastrografin showed signs of intestinal obstruction and adhesions were suspected. The exploratory laparoscopy revealed adhesive small bowel obstruction with ileal strangulation. The intestine was viable and resection was unnecessary.
The role of diagnostic imaging modalities is relevant to decrease ASBO-related morbidity and mortality. However, because of the lack of specific radiological signs and laboratory findings of bowel strangulation, the diagnosis requires, when it is not contraindicated, a timely laparoscopic exploration with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
V Guarino, A Cappiello, N Perrotta, A Scotti, F Mastellone, D Loffredo
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2049 views
89 likes
0 comments
08:20
Small bowel obstruction and ileal strangulation by adhesions: role of laparoscopy in early diagnosis and treatment
Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a common surgical emergency, most frequently caused by adhesions. In the absence of signs of strangulations or CT-scan evidence (free fluid mesenteric edema, “small bowel faeces” sign, devascularization), a large portion of ASBO can be resolved using non-operative methods even if a significant number of patients will require an emergency surgery.
Laparoscopy in acute care surgery continues to expand even in cases of small bowel obstruction which were conventionally managed by means of laparotomy.
The authors report a case of a 45-year-old woman, completely laparoscopically treated, with a history of previous appendectomy with pelvic abscess, cholecystectomy and removal of right ovarian cysts. She was admitted to the emergency room five hours before surgery with severe acute abdominal pain which appeared 24 hours before.
CT-scan with oral administration of gastrografin showed signs of intestinal obstruction and adhesions were suspected. The exploratory laparoscopy revealed adhesive small bowel obstruction with ileal strangulation. The intestine was viable and resection was unnecessary.
The role of diagnostic imaging modalities is relevant to decrease ASBO-related morbidity and mortality. However, because of the lack of specific radiological signs and laboratory findings of bowel strangulation, the diagnosis requires, when it is not contraindicated, a timely laparoscopic exploration with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair for unilateral inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient
In this video, we present the case of a left-sided unilateral indirect inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient. Treatment was performed using the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair technique. The hernia sac was promptly identified and dissected without any concern to cord structures since the patient was a female. The herniotomy was performed with an Endoloop®. The only constraints of surgery were limited operating space and ergonomic handling of instruments. The patient was discharged in the evening of surgery and wounds healed within a week. Postoperative follow-up after 6 months revealed excellent cosmesis and a complete absence of hernia on the operated site. Mini laparoscopic instruments can also be used to improve surgical cosmesis and ensure same day discharge without any postoperative sequelae.
KB Kaundinya
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1528 views
6 likes
0 comments
03:35
Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair for unilateral inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient
In this video, we present the case of a left-sided unilateral indirect inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient. Treatment was performed using the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair technique. The hernia sac was promptly identified and dissected without any concern to cord structures since the patient was a female. The herniotomy was performed with an Endoloop®. The only constraints of surgery were limited operating space and ergonomic handling of instruments. The patient was discharged in the evening of surgery and wounds healed within a week. Postoperative follow-up after 6 months revealed excellent cosmesis and a complete absence of hernia on the operated site. Mini laparoscopic instruments can also be used to improve surgical cosmesis and ensure same day discharge without any postoperative sequelae.
Small bowel volvulus over acute bowel invagination: laparoscopic management
Digestive angiodysplasia is a condition defined by an innate alteration of digestive wall vascular structures, which has been well-described since the development of endoscopy. Its cause is not well known and most occurrences are probably innate. Digestive angiodysplasias can be isolated or multiple. They most frequently affect the right colon, and more rarely the stomach, the duodenum and the small bowel. They are the most frequent cause of occult digestive hemorrhage (30 to 40% of cases) and can more rarely cause occlusive episodes through intestinal invagination, linked to a voluminous angiodysplasia lesion.
Here we describe the case of a girl treated for colonic angiodysplasia lesions. She was admitted to our intensive care unit for an occlusive syndrome. CT-scan helped to diagnose a small bowel invagination and decision is made to treat this patient laparoscopically.
More specifically, this 15-year-old girl has a history of strabismus repair in 2011 and right foot surgery for an arteriovenous angiodysplasia lesion. Angiodysplasia was diagnosed after an episode of abdominal pain and a rectorrhagia in 2010. Colonoscopy at this time allowed to find three lesions of 5 to 8mm in diameter. A yearly colonoscopy control is performed. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for an occlusive syndrome with abdominal pain. Abdominal ultrasonography suggested an invagination which was confirmed by injected CT-scan. Decision was made to perform a laparoscopic exploration for a disinvagination or a bowel resection.
J Leroy, L Marx, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1492 views
19 likes
0 comments
07:41
Small bowel volvulus over acute bowel invagination: laparoscopic management
Digestive angiodysplasia is a condition defined by an innate alteration of digestive wall vascular structures, which has been well-described since the development of endoscopy. Its cause is not well known and most occurrences are probably innate. Digestive angiodysplasias can be isolated or multiple. They most frequently affect the right colon, and more rarely the stomach, the duodenum and the small bowel. They are the most frequent cause of occult digestive hemorrhage (30 to 40% of cases) and can more rarely cause occlusive episodes through intestinal invagination, linked to a voluminous angiodysplasia lesion.
Here we describe the case of a girl treated for colonic angiodysplasia lesions. She was admitted to our intensive care unit for an occlusive syndrome. CT-scan helped to diagnose a small bowel invagination and decision is made to treat this patient laparoscopically.
More specifically, this 15-year-old girl has a history of strabismus repair in 2011 and right foot surgery for an arteriovenous angiodysplasia lesion. Angiodysplasia was diagnosed after an episode of abdominal pain and a rectorrhagia in 2010. Colonoscopy at this time allowed to find three lesions of 5 to 8mm in diameter. A yearly colonoscopy control is performed. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for an occlusive syndrome with abdominal pain. Abdominal ultrasonography suggested an invagination which was confirmed by injected CT-scan. Decision was made to perform a laparoscopic exploration for a disinvagination or a bowel resection.
Laparoscopic management of small bowel perforation induced by foreign body
Ingested foreign bodies are a common cause for emergency hospital admission. A precise interview of the patient often allows to establish the diagnosis. In 90% of cases, the foreign body is spontaneously eliminated without inducing any particular symptoms. In less than 10% of cases, it requires non-surgical extraction maneuvers (enemas, endoscopy). Only 1% of cases are treated surgically. Modern imaging frequently allows to establish a precise topographic diagnosis based on aspect, size and density. Coupled with laparoscopic surgery, it allows for an early, targeted and minimally invasive management. In this video, we show the case of a patient presenting with typical signs of peritonitis along with the incidental discovery of an intraluminal foreign body in the small bowel which brought about a micro-perforation.
L Marx, M Raharimanantsoa, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1883 views
13 likes
0 comments
10:15
Laparoscopic management of small bowel perforation induced by foreign body
Ingested foreign bodies are a common cause for emergency hospital admission. A precise interview of the patient often allows to establish the diagnosis. In 90% of cases, the foreign body is spontaneously eliminated without inducing any particular symptoms. In less than 10% of cases, it requires non-surgical extraction maneuvers (enemas, endoscopy). Only 1% of cases are treated surgically. Modern imaging frequently allows to establish a precise topographic diagnosis based on aspect, size and density. Coupled with laparoscopic surgery, it allows for an early, targeted and minimally invasive management. In this video, we show the case of a patient presenting with typical signs of peritonitis along with the incidental discovery of an intraluminal foreign body in the small bowel which brought about a micro-perforation.
Arthroscopic reconstruction of the TFCC using a free tendon graft
Instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) results from injury or laxity of the ligaments responsible for stabilizing the joint. Of note, the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) plays a crucial role in maintaining DRUJ stability. Sometimes, it may be impossible to repair the TFCC due to degenerative changes in the TFCC. In such cases, DRUJ reconstruction is possible provided that there are no arthritic changes in the DRUJ with the use of tendon graft. The aim of this procedure is to reconstruct the ligament and restore function, thus providing multidirectional stability. This procedure uses a tendon graft, preferably the Palmaris Longus (PL), which is woven through trans-osseous tunnels in the distal radius, converging at the fovea through a distal ulnar trans-osseous tunnel.
C Mathoulin
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
507 views
4 likes
0 comments
12:20
Arthroscopic reconstruction of the TFCC using a free tendon graft
Instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) results from injury or laxity of the ligaments responsible for stabilizing the joint. Of note, the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) plays a crucial role in maintaining DRUJ stability. Sometimes, it may be impossible to repair the TFCC due to degenerative changes in the TFCC. In such cases, DRUJ reconstruction is possible provided that there are no arthritic changes in the DRUJ with the use of tendon graft. The aim of this procedure is to reconstruct the ligament and restore function, thus providing multidirectional stability. This procedure uses a tendon graft, preferably the Palmaris Longus (PL), which is woven through trans-osseous tunnels in the distal radius, converging at the fovea through a distal ulnar trans-osseous tunnel.
Inanimate model to train for the thoracoscopic repair of all varieties of left congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
We present a new low-cost model designed for training skills and strategies for the thoracoscopic repair of left congenital diaphragmatic defects. We will present guidelines to make this type of models, the educational strategy that we use in our advanced training models, the defects that can be trained, and the scope of this model. Advanced training, learning tips and tricks from experts, and the use of innovative ideas from other authors used in our model are outlined. This educational tool was developed for pediatric surgeons requiring advanced training. It reinforces the concept of advanced and continuous training, in a safe environment, and it is assisted by experienced surgeons. This model shows a scenario where dimensions and anatomical repairs are carefully preserved.
We share our vision of continuous endosurgical education to encourage all enthusiastic surgeons to train in safe and controlled environments.
Materials and methods: The model consists in a plastic 3D printed left rib cage, extracted from a 6-month-old baby CT-scan combined with simulated mediastinal structures, diaphragm, bowel, lung, and spleen made of latex, silicone, and polyester sponge respectively. A self-adhesive film is used as parietal pleura. A removable part (spare part) represents the last three ribs where the diaphragm is partially inserted, and a base as the upper abdomen is assembled to the left rib cage (ribs 1 to 9). Abdominal viscera (plastic or animal) are placed in this base. The cost of materials is 150 US$.
The model is meant to simulate the most frequent diaphragmatic defects such as type A, B, and C, with or without sac. However, other rare defects can also be simulated. Live animal tissues such as diaphragm or intestine also can be used, as it was already published by other authors. However, the main characteristic of this model is to be inanimate, portable, and easily reloadable to be reused.
The video shows a junior surgeon in his advanced training process. In the model, we perform the reduction of the viscera slid to the thorax. In this case, it is the rabbit intestine, but we usually use latex simulated intestine. The spleen is completely synthetic and bleeds if the instruments damage it during the reduction.
We use 3mm regular instruments. The repair of the defect is made with separate stitches of 2/0 or 3/0 braided polyester as usual, and we encourage trainees to practice the intracorporeal sliding knot and running suture. We collect the performance data in a specially prepared form and carry out the debriefing.
Conclusions: With this model, we can reinforce the concept of low cost, but with a high precision environment simulation, included within a standardized training program in minimally invasive neonatal surgery. We believe that it is a very useful tool. In addition, this type of models allows the use of new surgical techniques, tips and tricks given by experienced surgeons who assist in the training process.
M Maricic, M Bailez
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1680 views
9 likes
1 comment
08:14
Inanimate model to train for the thoracoscopic repair of all varieties of left congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
We present a new low-cost model designed for training skills and strategies for the thoracoscopic repair of left congenital diaphragmatic defects. We will present guidelines to make this type of models, the educational strategy that we use in our advanced training models, the defects that can be trained, and the scope of this model. Advanced training, learning tips and tricks from experts, and the use of innovative ideas from other authors used in our model are outlined. This educational tool was developed for pediatric surgeons requiring advanced training. It reinforces the concept of advanced and continuous training, in a safe environment, and it is assisted by experienced surgeons. This model shows a scenario where dimensions and anatomical repairs are carefully preserved.
We share our vision of continuous endosurgical education to encourage all enthusiastic surgeons to train in safe and controlled environments.
Materials and methods: The model consists in a plastic 3D printed left rib cage, extracted from a 6-month-old baby CT-scan combined with simulated mediastinal structures, diaphragm, bowel, lung, and spleen made of latex, silicone, and polyester sponge respectively. A self-adhesive film is used as parietal pleura. A removable part (spare part) represents the last three ribs where the diaphragm is partially inserted, and a base as the upper abdomen is assembled to the left rib cage (ribs 1 to 9). Abdominal viscera (plastic or animal) are placed in this base. The cost of materials is 150 US$.
The model is meant to simulate the most frequent diaphragmatic defects such as type A, B, and C, with or without sac. However, other rare defects can also be simulated. Live animal tissues such as diaphragm or intestine also can be used, as it was already published by other authors. However, the main characteristic of this model is to be inanimate, portable, and easily reloadable to be reused.
The video shows a junior surgeon in his advanced training process. In the model, we perform the reduction of the viscera slid to the thorax. In this case, it is the rabbit intestine, but we usually use latex simulated intestine. The spleen is completely synthetic and bleeds if the instruments damage it during the reduction.
We use 3mm regular instruments. The repair of the defect is made with separate stitches of 2/0 or 3/0 braided polyester as usual, and we encourage trainees to practice the intracorporeal sliding knot and running suture. We collect the performance data in a specially prepared form and carry out the debriefing.
Conclusions: With this model, we can reinforce the concept of low cost, but with a high precision environment simulation, included within a standardized training program in minimally invasive neonatal surgery. We believe that it is a very useful tool. In addition, this type of models allows the use of new surgical techniques, tips and tricks given by experienced surgeons who assist in the training process.
Three-trocar laparoscopic right ileocolectomy for advanced small bowel neuroendocrine tumor
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) was shown to offer advantages in general and oncologic surgery (1). Over the last decade, reduced port laparoscopy (RPL) has been introduced to reduce the risks related to ports and abdominal wall trauma, with enhanced cosmetic outcomes (2). In this video, the authors report the case of a 59-year-old man with a small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, and who underwent a three-trocar right ileocolectomy.
Video: Preoperative work-up, including endoscopic ultrasound, octreoscan, PET-scan, and FDG PET-CT, showed a 15mm small bowel tumor with mesenteric and transverse mesocolic extension, until the muscularis propria of the third portion of the duodenum. The biopsy revealed a low-grade well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. The procedure was performed using three abdominal trocars: a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, and a 5mm port in the left flank (Figure 1). Abdominal cavity exploration demonstrated the presence of a tumor located in the mesentery of the last small bowel loop, with consequent bowel retraction, dislocation of the caecum and appendix, located under the right lobe of the liver, and tumoral extension into the proximal transverse mesocolon. After mobilization of the right colon from laterally to medially, the second and third duodenal segments were exposed, showing tumor extension towards the anterior duodenal wall of these segments. After encircling the anterior aspect of the duodenal wall with a piece of cotton tape (Figure 2), an endoscopic linear stapler was inserted through the umbilical trocar under the visual guidance of a 5mm scope in the left flank (Figure 3a), and it was fired (Figure 3b). The specimen was removed through a suprapubic access. Perioperative frozen section biopsy showed a free duodenal margin, and the procedure was subsequently completed with an ileocolic anastomosis, performed in a side-to-side handsewn intracorporeal fashion. At the end, the mesocolic defect was closed.

Results: Operative time was 4 hours. No added trocars were necessary. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. Pathological findings showed a grade I well-differentiated small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, with lymphovascular emboli and perinervous infiltration (1/20 metastatic nodes, free margins, stage: pT3N1 (8 UICC edition). A follow-up under somatostatin therapy was put forward.

Conclusions: RPL is a feasible option when performing advanced oncological surgery. Patients benefit from all MIS advantages, including reduced trocar complications and enhanced cosmetic outcomes.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
7267 views
112 likes
0 comments
11:10
Three-trocar laparoscopic right ileocolectomy for advanced small bowel neuroendocrine tumor
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) was shown to offer advantages in general and oncologic surgery (1). Over the last decade, reduced port laparoscopy (RPL) has been introduced to reduce the risks related to ports and abdominal wall trauma, with enhanced cosmetic outcomes (2). In this video, the authors report the case of a 59-year-old man with a small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, and who underwent a three-trocar right ileocolectomy.
Video: Preoperative work-up, including endoscopic ultrasound, octreoscan, PET-scan, and FDG PET-CT, showed a 15mm small bowel tumor with mesenteric and transverse mesocolic extension, until the muscularis propria of the third portion of the duodenum. The biopsy revealed a low-grade well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. The procedure was performed using three abdominal trocars: a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, and a 5mm port in the left flank (Figure 1). Abdominal cavity exploration demonstrated the presence of a tumor located in the mesentery of the last small bowel loop, with consequent bowel retraction, dislocation of the caecum and appendix, located under the right lobe of the liver, and tumoral extension into the proximal transverse mesocolon. After mobilization of the right colon from laterally to medially, the second and third duodenal segments were exposed, showing tumor extension towards the anterior duodenal wall of these segments. After encircling the anterior aspect of the duodenal wall with a piece of cotton tape (Figure 2), an endoscopic linear stapler was inserted through the umbilical trocar under the visual guidance of a 5mm scope in the left flank (Figure 3a), and it was fired (Figure 3b). The specimen was removed through a suprapubic access. Perioperative frozen section biopsy showed a free duodenal margin, and the procedure was subsequently completed with an ileocolic anastomosis, performed in a side-to-side handsewn intracorporeal fashion. At the end, the mesocolic defect was closed.

Results: Operative time was 4 hours. No added trocars were necessary. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. Pathological findings showed a grade I well-differentiated small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, with lymphovascular emboli and perinervous infiltration (1/20 metastatic nodes, free margins, stage: pT3N1 (8 UICC edition). A follow-up under somatostatin therapy was put forward.

Conclusions: RPL is a feasible option when performing advanced oncological surgery. Patients benefit from all MIS advantages, including reduced trocar complications and enhanced cosmetic outcomes.
Explorative laparoscopy: resection of small bowel for vascular tumor
The management of patients with small bowel bleeding remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. In about 5% of cases, upper endoscopy and colonoscopy are nondiagnostic, and the small intestine is the site of bleeding,
This is the case of a 55-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for a digestive hemorrhagic syndrome. The patient’s hemoglobin levels dropped to 6 grams per 100mL. The patient’s resuscitation allowed for the stabilization and restoration of blood volume.
Gastroscopy and colonoscopy did not demonstrate any etiology of bleeding. An emergency CT-scan found a suspected lesion at the level of the small bowel with contrast medium extravasation.
A video-endoscopic capsule was administered to the patient. It helped to identify the presence of a bleeding polypoid lesion on the middle portion of the jejunum. This video shows the laparoscopid resection of the lesion.
M Vix, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
1891 views
14 likes
0 comments
11:59
Explorative laparoscopy: resection of small bowel for vascular tumor
The management of patients with small bowel bleeding remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. In about 5% of cases, upper endoscopy and colonoscopy are nondiagnostic, and the small intestine is the site of bleeding,
This is the case of a 55-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for a digestive hemorrhagic syndrome. The patient’s hemoglobin levels dropped to 6 grams per 100mL. The patient’s resuscitation allowed for the stabilization and restoration of blood volume.
Gastroscopy and colonoscopy did not demonstrate any etiology of bleeding. An emergency CT-scan found a suspected lesion at the level of the small bowel with contrast medium extravasation.
A video-endoscopic capsule was administered to the patient. It helped to identify the presence of a bleeding polypoid lesion on the middle portion of the jejunum. This video shows the laparoscopid resection of the lesion.
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
M Lotti, E Poiasina, G Panyor, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3085 views
442 likes
0 comments
11:18
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
Video-assisted exploration of the four parathyroid lobes for primary hyperparathyroidism
Background:
The presence of a single parathyroid adenoma accurately located using preoperative imaging is the best indication for minimally invasive surgery when dealing with primary hyperparathyroidism. It is certainly possible to search for several glands that may be suspicious of adenoma, but an extensive experience in video-assisted cervical surgery is required to find the anatomical structures allowing to explore the four parathyroid locations.
Patient and methods:
A 75-year-old obese woman is diagnosed with hypercalcemia, hypophosphoremia, and a high level of PTH during a work-up for joint pain.

Preoperative imaging includes a 3D-reconstructed cervico-mediastinal CT-scan —a computer program developed at the IRCAD-Strasbourg, named VrAnat™, Vr planning™, is used for that purpose. This 3D virtual reconstruction demonstrates three suspicious images respectively located at the right superior parathyroid territory, at the right latero-esophageal area, and at the left inferior parathyroid territory. A video-assisted cervical exploration, guided by this reconstruction, is decided upon. The objective is to find the three suspicious images and to explore the four parathyroid glands.

A 3cm median incision is carried out 2cm above the sternal notch. The right thyrotracheal groove is reached through a dissection performed laterally to the strap muscles and medially to the omohyoid muscle. A complete dissection of the lateral aspect of the thyroid lobe is obtained using blunt dissection and small instruments under endoscopic vision, which is provided by a 30-degree, 5mm scope (Storz, Tüttlingen, Germany). The recurrent laryngeal nerve is identified.

Dissection is now carried on above the inferior thyroid artery. It allows to rapidly identify a superior parathyroid adenoma, which will be resected. It exactly matches with one of the suspicious images.

Dissection is pursued anterior to the intersection between the artery and the nerve so as to find the right inferior parathyroid, which is healthy, underneath the capsule. The latero-esophageal image is now searched for. It is nothing but an anthracosic lymph node.

The left side is approached by dissecting the left jugulocarotid gutter. The left recurrent nerve is identified. The left inferior parathyroid is identified and looks healthy. The suspected image is nothing else but a nodule of the apex of the thyrothymic ligament. The left superior parathyroid, which is healthy, can be finally identified in a strictly orthotopic position, although partially hidden behind a Zuckerkandl’s nodule.

Conclusion:
This cervical exploration has led to the dissection and visualization of the four parathyroid lobes in compliance with classical parathyroid surgery principles.
References:
Berti P, Materazzi G, Picone A, Miccoli P. Limits and drawbacks of video-assisted parathyroidectomy. Br J Surg 2003;90:743-7.

Miccoli P, Materazzi G, Baggiani A, Miccoli M. Mini-invasive video-assisted surgery of the thyroid and parathyroid glands: a 2011 update. J Endocrinol Invest 2011;34:473-80.
M Vix, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
707 views
71 likes
0 comments
09:39
Video-assisted exploration of the four parathyroid lobes for primary hyperparathyroidism
Background:
The presence of a single parathyroid adenoma accurately located using preoperative imaging is the best indication for minimally invasive surgery when dealing with primary hyperparathyroidism. It is certainly possible to search for several glands that may be suspicious of adenoma, but an extensive experience in video-assisted cervical surgery is required to find the anatomical structures allowing to explore the four parathyroid locations.
Patient and methods:
A 75-year-old obese woman is diagnosed with hypercalcemia, hypophosphoremia, and a high level of PTH during a work-up for joint pain.

Preoperative imaging includes a 3D-reconstructed cervico-mediastinal CT-scan —a computer program developed at the IRCAD-Strasbourg, named VrAnat™, Vr planning™, is used for that purpose. This 3D virtual reconstruction demonstrates three suspicious images respectively located at the right superior parathyroid territory, at the right latero-esophageal area, and at the left inferior parathyroid territory. A video-assisted cervical exploration, guided by this reconstruction, is decided upon. The objective is to find the three suspicious images and to explore the four parathyroid glands.

A 3cm median incision is carried out 2cm above the sternal notch. The right thyrotracheal groove is reached through a dissection performed laterally to the strap muscles and medially to the omohyoid muscle. A complete dissection of the lateral aspect of the thyroid lobe is obtained using blunt dissection and small instruments under endoscopic vision, which is provided by a 30-degree, 5mm scope (Storz, Tüttlingen, Germany). The recurrent laryngeal nerve is identified.

Dissection is now carried on above the inferior thyroid artery. It allows to rapidly identify a superior parathyroid adenoma, which will be resected. It exactly matches with one of the suspicious images.

Dissection is pursued anterior to the intersection between the artery and the nerve so as to find the right inferior parathyroid, which is healthy, underneath the capsule. The latero-esophageal image is now searched for. It is nothing but an anthracosic lymph node.

The left side is approached by dissecting the left jugulocarotid gutter. The left recurrent nerve is identified. The left inferior parathyroid is identified and looks healthy. The suspected image is nothing else but a nodule of the apex of the thyrothymic ligament. The left superior parathyroid, which is healthy, can be finally identified in a strictly orthotopic position, although partially hidden behind a Zuckerkandl’s nodule.

Conclusion:
This cervical exploration has led to the dissection and visualization of the four parathyroid lobes in compliance with classical parathyroid surgery principles.
References:
Berti P, Materazzi G, Picone A, Miccoli P. Limits and drawbacks of video-assisted parathyroidectomy. Br J Surg 2003;90:743-7.

Miccoli P, Materazzi G, Baggiani A, Miccoli M. Mini-invasive video-assisted surgery of the thyroid and parathyroid glands: a 2011 update. J Endocrinol Invest 2011;34:473-80.