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Hysteroscopic treatment of a symptomatic isthmocele in a bicorporeal uterus
Clinical case: We report the case of a primigravida 36-year-old woman, with a unicervical bicorporeal uterus type. An isthmocele was diagnosed within a context of postmenstrual abnormal uterine bleeding and secondary infertility arising after C-section. The hydrosonography evidenced a moderate scar defect, the myometrium next to the "niche" measuring 3mm. Because of the symptomatology and the failure of multiple embryo transfer procedures, an operative hysteroscopy was performed. The patient was able to become pregnant spontaneously and give birth to a healthy child via C-section.

Conclusion: A minimally invasive procedure using a hysteroscopic resection of the fibrotic scar tissue is to be considered first, given the existence of an isthmocele in a symptomatic and/or infertile woman, even in the case of a uterine malformation. It is an effective and safe treatment option. However, it has to be considered only if the residual myometrium measures more than 3mm next to the defect.

Key words:
Hysteroscopic resection, isthmocele, cesarean section, bicorporeal uterus.
J Dubuisson, S Wegener, I Streuli
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5832 views
315 likes
0 comments
05:12
Hysteroscopic treatment of a symptomatic isthmocele in a bicorporeal uterus
Clinical case: We report the case of a primigravida 36-year-old woman, with a unicervical bicorporeal uterus type. An isthmocele was diagnosed within a context of postmenstrual abnormal uterine bleeding and secondary infertility arising after C-section. The hydrosonography evidenced a moderate scar defect, the myometrium next to the "niche" measuring 3mm. Because of the symptomatology and the failure of multiple embryo transfer procedures, an operative hysteroscopy was performed. The patient was able to become pregnant spontaneously and give birth to a healthy child via C-section.

Conclusion: A minimally invasive procedure using a hysteroscopic resection of the fibrotic scar tissue is to be considered first, given the existence of an isthmocele in a symptomatic and/or infertile woman, even in the case of a uterine malformation. It is an effective and safe treatment option. However, it has to be considered only if the residual myometrium measures more than 3mm next to the defect.

Key words:
Hysteroscopic resection, isthmocele, cesarean section, bicorporeal uterus.
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, I Argay
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
5765 views
318 likes
2 comments
42:42
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy in case of large uterus
This video demonstrates the case of a 46-year-old patient presented with menorrhagia and anemia.
Clinical examination revealed a large mass almost reaching the level of the umbilicus.
The uterus appeared much bigger than usual on MRI, with a large myoma coming out of the pelvis.
It was decided to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy combined with bilateral salpingectomy.
This video demonstrates the appropriate strategy to safely perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy in case of large uterus, showing the appropriate surgical steps and providing safety tips. The specimen weighed more than 1kg.
A Wattiez, F Asencio, J Faria, I Argay, L Schwartz
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
9587 views
313 likes
0 comments
25:01
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy in case of large uterus
This video demonstrates the case of a 46-year-old patient presented with menorrhagia and anemia.
Clinical examination revealed a large mass almost reaching the level of the umbilicus.
The uterus appeared much bigger than usual on MRI, with a large myoma coming out of the pelvis.
It was decided to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy combined with bilateral salpingectomy.
This video demonstrates the appropriate strategy to safely perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy in case of large uterus, showing the appropriate surgical steps and providing safety tips. The specimen weighed more than 1kg.
Laparoscopic management of a cavitated non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn of a unicornuate uterus: a case report
Introduction: A unicornuate uterus with a cavitated non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn is one of the most uncommon uterine anomalies of the female genital tract. It has an estimated frequency of 1 in 100,000 among the fertile female population. This anomaly results from the abnormal maturation of one Müllerian duct with the normal development of the contralateral one.
Case: This video describes the laparoscopic diagnosis and management of a unicornuate uterus with a left cavitated non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn in a 27-year old woman who presented with lower abdominal pain and severe dysmenorrhea. She was submitted to a preoperative imaging study with a MRI, a uro-CT and a CT-scan of the vertebral column. There were no concomitant urinary anomalies and the sagittal CT-scan revealed abnormalities in the development of the terminal portion of the column. A laparoscopic removal of this cavitated non-communicating uterine horn was performed without any complication in the postoperative period.
Conclusion: Operative laparoscopy proved to be a successful approach in the treatment of this congenital Müllerian anomaly.
H Ferreira Carvalho
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1821 views
56 likes
0 comments
05:13
Laparoscopic management of a cavitated non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn of a unicornuate uterus: a case report
Introduction: A unicornuate uterus with a cavitated non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn is one of the most uncommon uterine anomalies of the female genital tract. It has an estimated frequency of 1 in 100,000 among the fertile female population. This anomaly results from the abnormal maturation of one Müllerian duct with the normal development of the contralateral one.
Case: This video describes the laparoscopic diagnosis and management of a unicornuate uterus with a left cavitated non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn in a 27-year old woman who presented with lower abdominal pain and severe dysmenorrhea. She was submitted to a preoperative imaging study with a MRI, a uro-CT and a CT-scan of the vertebral column. There were no concomitant urinary anomalies and the sagittal CT-scan revealed abnormalities in the development of the terminal portion of the column. A laparoscopic removal of this cavitated non-communicating uterine horn was performed without any complication in the postoperative period.
Conclusion: Operative laparoscopy proved to be a successful approach in the treatment of this congenital Müllerian anomaly.
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
H Grover, R Syed, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
12808 views
112 likes
26 comments
07:04
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
Laparoscopic complete parametrectomy associated with upper vaginectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
This video shows a reproducible approach to complete parametrectomy in a patient who had had a hysterectomy. The procedure begins with adhesiolysis and dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the parametrium. The paravesical fossa is then dissected medially and laterally using the umbilical artery as a landmark. The surgeon identifies the uterine artery and parametrium by following the umbilical artery. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the parametrium, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the pararectal spaces in order to isolate the posterior part of the parametrium. The ureter is dissected towards the ureteral channel and unroofed. The procedure is carried on with the complete isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the parametrium and the bladder. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum, paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The parametrium is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel. The vagina is cut with ultrasonic scissors using a cap of RUMI II as a guide, and the specimen is extracted vaginally. The surgeon performs a bilateral lymphadenectomy. In this step, the obturator nerve is dissected to prevent injuries at the medial aspect of the obturator artery. The vagina is closed with continued stitches vaginally using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
H Camuzcuoglu, B Sezgin
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
6434 views
457 likes
1 comment
11:55
Laparoscopic complete parametrectomy associated with upper vaginectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
This video shows a reproducible approach to complete parametrectomy in a patient who had had a hysterectomy. The procedure begins with adhesiolysis and dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the parametrium. The paravesical fossa is then dissected medially and laterally using the umbilical artery as a landmark. The surgeon identifies the uterine artery and parametrium by following the umbilical artery. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the parametrium, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the pararectal spaces in order to isolate the posterior part of the parametrium. The ureter is dissected towards the ureteral channel and unroofed. The procedure is carried on with the complete isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the parametrium and the bladder. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum, paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The parametrium is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel. The vagina is cut with ultrasonic scissors using a cap of RUMI II as a guide, and the specimen is extracted vaginally. The surgeon performs a bilateral lymphadenectomy. In this step, the obturator nerve is dissected to prevent injuries at the medial aspect of the obturator artery. The vagina is closed with continued stitches vaginally using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
4096 views
392 likes
0 comments
06:01
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Laparoscopic hysterectomy: removal of a large (1300g) uterus
Some believe that laparoscopy is almost impossible to perform in cases of very big uterus or large adnexal masses that obstruct our view to the pelvis. However, if the same surgical steps are always followed and a specific strategy is determined, it is feasible and safe to choose laparoscopy even in the case of large organs. In this video, we present the case of a 45-year-old patient with a large fibromatous uterus, suffering from abdominal discomfort and bleeding. The patient was anemic and decision was made to perform a laparoscopic total hysterectomy. With the appropriate surgical steps and some safety tips, the operation took place quickly and with success. The weight of the specimen was 1300g.
A Wattiez, P Trompoukis, J Nassif, B Gabriel
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
5448 views
54 likes
0 comments
10:21
Laparoscopic hysterectomy: removal of a large (1300g) uterus
Some believe that laparoscopy is almost impossible to perform in cases of very big uterus or large adnexal masses that obstruct our view to the pelvis. However, if the same surgical steps are always followed and a specific strategy is determined, it is feasible and safe to choose laparoscopy even in the case of large organs. In this video, we present the case of a 45-year-old patient with a large fibromatous uterus, suffering from abdominal discomfort and bleeding. The patient was anemic and decision was made to perform a laparoscopic total hysterectomy. With the appropriate surgical steps and some safety tips, the operation took place quickly and with success. The weight of the specimen was 1300g.