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Right thoracoscopic mediastinal mass resection and bronchial injury repair
The objective is to demonstrate our technique for thoracoscopic mediastinal mass excision with concomitant bronchial injury repair.
A 13-year-old boy presented with one-month of dysphagia and a history of a recent tick bite prophylactically treated. Esophagram showed a mid-esophageal externally compressing mass confirmed by endoscopy. Chest MRI showed a 5cm mediastinal mass. Differential diagnosis included infected esophageal duplication cyst versus histoplasmoma. A thoracoscopic mass resection was scheduled.
Upon accessing the right chest, a mid-thoracic lesion next to the esophagus was noted. The mass was adherent to the esophageal wall during dissection. Intraoperative biopsy revealed a cottage cheese-like substance in the mass. Frozen section suspected a duplication cyst in the esophageal musculature. As a result, we proceeded with the resection. The cavity was then irrigated and some fluid was noted at the endotracheal tube. A 5mm right mainstem bronchus tear was found. Flexible bronchoscopy was used to repair the injury with absorbable sutures. The mass was removed from the esophageal wall and repaired with absorbable sutures. A small pleural flap was created to prevent the sutures from communicating. The patient had a small persistent pneumothorax several days postoperatively. Repeat flexible bronchoscopy showed no leak or narrowing on postoperative day (POD) 7. The patient was discharged home on POD 8. Final pathology showed a mediastinal lymph node with a non-caseating granuloma. He had positive antibodies to Francisella tularensis (tularemia Ab). His final diagnosis was mediastinal tularemia.
This video demonstrates mediastinal mass diagnostic and treatment challenges. It also shows that concomitant bronchial injuries are safe and effective to repair thoracoscopically.
T Huy, AS Munoz Abraham, H Osei, C Cappiello, GA Villalona
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
895 views
8 likes
0 comments
05:17
Right thoracoscopic mediastinal mass resection and bronchial injury repair
The objective is to demonstrate our technique for thoracoscopic mediastinal mass excision with concomitant bronchial injury repair.
A 13-year-old boy presented with one-month of dysphagia and a history of a recent tick bite prophylactically treated. Esophagram showed a mid-esophageal externally compressing mass confirmed by endoscopy. Chest MRI showed a 5cm mediastinal mass. Differential diagnosis included infected esophageal duplication cyst versus histoplasmoma. A thoracoscopic mass resection was scheduled.
Upon accessing the right chest, a mid-thoracic lesion next to the esophagus was noted. The mass was adherent to the esophageal wall during dissection. Intraoperative biopsy revealed a cottage cheese-like substance in the mass. Frozen section suspected a duplication cyst in the esophageal musculature. As a result, we proceeded with the resection. The cavity was then irrigated and some fluid was noted at the endotracheal tube. A 5mm right mainstem bronchus tear was found. Flexible bronchoscopy was used to repair the injury with absorbable sutures. The mass was removed from the esophageal wall and repaired with absorbable sutures. A small pleural flap was created to prevent the sutures from communicating. The patient had a small persistent pneumothorax several days postoperatively. Repeat flexible bronchoscopy showed no leak or narrowing on postoperative day (POD) 7. The patient was discharged home on POD 8. Final pathology showed a mediastinal lymph node with a non-caseating granuloma. He had positive antibodies to Francisella tularensis (tularemia Ab). His final diagnosis was mediastinal tularemia.
This video demonstrates mediastinal mass diagnostic and treatment challenges. It also shows that concomitant bronchial injuries are safe and effective to repair thoracoscopically.
Bronchoscopy for thoracic surgeons
The idea of this lecture originated from the fact that there is very little teaching material which described bronchoscopy as practiced by the thoracic surgeon. Chest physicians (pulmonologists) perform flexible bronchoscopy on a sedated patient, and they get up-side-down views to that obtained by the surgeons. Bronchoscopy at our department is performed under general anaesthesia, usually in the anaesthetic room just before the operation. We introduce a rigid bronchoscope first, and then a flexible fibre optic 5mm bronchoscope through the rigid scope into the trachea. This arrangement enables precise diagnosis due to excellent vision, with the ability to transform the procedure into a therapeutic session, for example, to take large biopsies, and decide to laser a lesion or to put in a central airway stent. Controlled breathing makes it safer to control significant bleeding during the procedure, and it is understandable that chest physicians shy away from biopsying carcinoid tumours.
The video is divided into 6 chapters. Chapter one deals with the identification of the bronchopulmonary segments and a bit of history about the two systems of nomenclature. It describes in a simplified way the effects of the heart growing in the left chest and the results of fusion, rotation and delayed branching of bronchi. Chapter 2 deals with normal bronchoscopy and anatomy of trachea, main bronchi, and segmental bronchi. Chapter 3 deals with abnormalities of the upper airways and trachea. Chapter 4 deals with abnormalities of the right bronchial tree, and chapter 5 deals with abnormalities of the left bronchial tree. The emphasis is on surgical pathology, assessment of airway for resection and decision-making. The viewer is encouraged to take the test on chapter 6 to bolster his/her knowledge of the anatomy of the airways.

1. Objectives:
a. To identify the bronchopulmonary segments in a logical and easy way to recall.
b. To understand the embryological changes resulting from heart growing into left chest.
c. To state what the operator should look for, what is normal and what is abnormal.
d. To help decision-making at operation and in the perioperative period.

2. For whom is this video made:
a. Consultants and trainees in the specialty of cardiothoracic surgery, including paediatric thoracic surgeons.
b. Thoracic and general anaesthetists who are involved with single lung ventilation.
c. Chest physicians who perform bronchoscopy, to understand views and capabilities of flexible over rigid bronchoscopy, and to have a gist of what goes on the mind of a thoracic surgeon when performing bronchoscopy.
d. Intensivists who might perform bronchoscopy via an endotracheal tube for a ventilated patient in the intensive care unit (ICU).
e. Medical students interested in the detailed anatomy of the central airways.

3. What this video is not intended to do:
a. This is not a compendium of abnormalities and pathologies revealed by bronchoscopy.
K Amer
Lecture
4 years ago
1143 views
42 likes
0 comments
59:32
Bronchoscopy for thoracic surgeons
The idea of this lecture originated from the fact that there is very little teaching material which described bronchoscopy as practiced by the thoracic surgeon. Chest physicians (pulmonologists) perform flexible bronchoscopy on a sedated patient, and they get up-side-down views to that obtained by the surgeons. Bronchoscopy at our department is performed under general anaesthesia, usually in the anaesthetic room just before the operation. We introduce a rigid bronchoscope first, and then a flexible fibre optic 5mm bronchoscope through the rigid scope into the trachea. This arrangement enables precise diagnosis due to excellent vision, with the ability to transform the procedure into a therapeutic session, for example, to take large biopsies, and decide to laser a lesion or to put in a central airway stent. Controlled breathing makes it safer to control significant bleeding during the procedure, and it is understandable that chest physicians shy away from biopsying carcinoid tumours.
The video is divided into 6 chapters. Chapter one deals with the identification of the bronchopulmonary segments and a bit of history about the two systems of nomenclature. It describes in a simplified way the effects of the heart growing in the left chest and the results of fusion, rotation and delayed branching of bronchi. Chapter 2 deals with normal bronchoscopy and anatomy of trachea, main bronchi, and segmental bronchi. Chapter 3 deals with abnormalities of the upper airways and trachea. Chapter 4 deals with abnormalities of the right bronchial tree, and chapter 5 deals with abnormalities of the left bronchial tree. The emphasis is on surgical pathology, assessment of airway for resection and decision-making. The viewer is encouraged to take the test on chapter 6 to bolster his/her knowledge of the anatomy of the airways.

1. Objectives:
a. To identify the bronchopulmonary segments in a logical and easy way to recall.
b. To understand the embryological changes resulting from heart growing into left chest.
c. To state what the operator should look for, what is normal and what is abnormal.
d. To help decision-making at operation and in the perioperative period.

2. For whom is this video made:
a. Consultants and trainees in the specialty of cardiothoracic surgery, including paediatric thoracic surgeons.
b. Thoracic and general anaesthetists who are involved with single lung ventilation.
c. Chest physicians who perform bronchoscopy, to understand views and capabilities of flexible over rigid bronchoscopy, and to have a gist of what goes on the mind of a thoracic surgeon when performing bronchoscopy.
d. Intensivists who might perform bronchoscopy via an endotracheal tube for a ventilated patient in the intensive care unit (ICU).
e. Medical students interested in the detailed anatomy of the central airways.

3. What this video is not intended to do:
a. This is not a compendium of abnormalities and pathologies revealed by bronchoscopy.
Full endoscopic robot-assisted basal segmentectomy for bronchiectasis
Objective
Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis is often proposed in complicated situations [1]. The development of minimally invasive surgery should allow us to propose a surgical curative treatment with preventative purposes. In this video, we describe a lung-sparing surgery using a full endoscopic robotic segmentectomy as described by Dylewsky [2] to deal with localized bronchiectasis.
Case presentation
This is the case of a 40-year-old man with bronchiectasis, colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with antibiotic resistance. The patient suffered from recurrent infections. Bronchiectasis is localized in the left basal segments on CT-scan. Basal segmentectomy was decided upon using a robot-assisted procedure. This kind of patient is usually treated medically with iterative antibiotherapy until a new complication occurs.
Results
There was no postoperative complication and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. The patient resumed work after one month without any complaint.
Conclusion
When using a precise resection, basal segmentectomy seems to be feasible using a robot-assisted procedure, without increasing perioperative morbidity. This procedure should be proposed as a preventative surgery as it is a relatively new approach for benign or infectious lung disease.
Bibliographic references
1. Agasthian T. Results of surgery for bronchiectasis and pulmonary abscesses. Thorac Surg Clin. 2012;22:333-44.
2. Dylewski MR, Ohaeto AC, Pereira JF. Pulmonary resection using a total endoscopic robotic video-assisted approach. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011;23:36-42.
JM Baste, P Rinieri, A Sebestyen
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
294 views
4 likes
0 comments
07:42
Full endoscopic robot-assisted basal segmentectomy for bronchiectasis
Objective
Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis is often proposed in complicated situations [1]. The development of minimally invasive surgery should allow us to propose a surgical curative treatment with preventative purposes. In this video, we describe a lung-sparing surgery using a full endoscopic robotic segmentectomy as described by Dylewsky [2] to deal with localized bronchiectasis.
Case presentation
This is the case of a 40-year-old man with bronchiectasis, colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with antibiotic resistance. The patient suffered from recurrent infections. Bronchiectasis is localized in the left basal segments on CT-scan. Basal segmentectomy was decided upon using a robot-assisted procedure. This kind of patient is usually treated medically with iterative antibiotherapy until a new complication occurs.
Results
There was no postoperative complication and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. The patient resumed work after one month without any complaint.
Conclusion
When using a precise resection, basal segmentectomy seems to be feasible using a robot-assisted procedure, without increasing perioperative morbidity. This procedure should be proposed as a preventative surgery as it is a relatively new approach for benign or infectious lung disease.
Bibliographic references
1. Agasthian T. Results of surgery for bronchiectasis and pulmonary abscesses. Thorac Surg Clin. 2012;22:333-44.
2. Dylewski MR, Ohaeto AC, Pereira JF. Pulmonary resection using a total endoscopic robotic video-assisted approach. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011;23:36-42.
Technique for endoscopic resection of obstructive endobronchial malignancy
Invasion of the tracheo-bronchial tree by a malignant pulmonary lesion is the most frequent cause of bronchial obstruction in the adult. Malignant obstruction of major airways may require endoscopic resection for rapid palliation of dyspnea and obstructive pneumonitis.
Patients should be evaluated with flexible bronchoscopy and computed tomography of the chest to assess the anatomy of the obstruction and demonstrate patent airway distally. This criterion is critical for optimal selection.
Resection is carried out in the operating room under general anesthesia. It is important to emphasize that close collaboration between the surgical and anesthesia teams is essential at all times, as they are sharing responsibility for the airway. We use rigid bronchoscopy for piecemeal extraction of the lesion. Since moderate bleeding may be encountered, the clinician should be familiar with hemostatic manoeuvres including dabbing raw bronchial surfaces using the rigid bronchoscope, the use of epinephrine soaked pledgets, and irrigation using epinephrine solution. Hemostasis may also be accomplished using energy sources delivered through a flexible bronchoscope, including electrocautery, argon beam, and Nd:YAG laser. All energy sources should be used with caution within the airway to minimize the risk of complications.
Depending on the individual patient, endobronchial resection may be combined with airway stenting and/or postoperative chemoradiotherapy. In carefully selected patients, this will result in adequate palliation of symptoms.
Acknowledgment: we would like to thank Nathalie Leroux RN and Suzanne Desbiens RN for their continued support.
G Rakovich
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
853 views
8 likes
0 comments
04:07
Technique for endoscopic resection of obstructive endobronchial malignancy
Invasion of the tracheo-bronchial tree by a malignant pulmonary lesion is the most frequent cause of bronchial obstruction in the adult. Malignant obstruction of major airways may require endoscopic resection for rapid palliation of dyspnea and obstructive pneumonitis.
Patients should be evaluated with flexible bronchoscopy and computed tomography of the chest to assess the anatomy of the obstruction and demonstrate patent airway distally. This criterion is critical for optimal selection.
Resection is carried out in the operating room under general anesthesia. It is important to emphasize that close collaboration between the surgical and anesthesia teams is essential at all times, as they are sharing responsibility for the airway. We use rigid bronchoscopy for piecemeal extraction of the lesion. Since moderate bleeding may be encountered, the clinician should be familiar with hemostatic manoeuvres including dabbing raw bronchial surfaces using the rigid bronchoscope, the use of epinephrine soaked pledgets, and irrigation using epinephrine solution. Hemostasis may also be accomplished using energy sources delivered through a flexible bronchoscope, including electrocautery, argon beam, and Nd:YAG laser. All energy sources should be used with caution within the airway to minimize the risk of complications.
Depending on the individual patient, endobronchial resection may be combined with airway stenting and/or postoperative chemoradiotherapy. In carefully selected patients, this will result in adequate palliation of symptoms.
Acknowledgment: we would like to thank Nathalie Leroux RN and Suzanne Desbiens RN for their continued support.
Endoscopic resection of an endobronchial hamartoma
Invasion of the tracheo-bronchial tree by a malignant pulmonary lesion is the most frequent cause of bronchial obstruction in the adult. However, benign lesions, although rare, may also occur.
Hamartoma is amongst the most frequent benign endobronchial tumors. In many cases, these tumors are amenable to endoscopic treatment (either resection or laser ablation), thus sparing the patient the potential morbidity of a thoracotomy and bronchial or parenchymal resection.
We present a case of bronchoscopic resection of a hamartoma obstructing the left lower lobe bronchus in a 58-year-old patient who had presented with cough and post-obstructive pneumonia.
Key aspects of the procedure include:
- Optimal pre-operative evaluation with flexible bronchoscopy and computed tomography of the chest.
- Close collaboration between the surgical and anesthesia teams who are sharing responsibility for the airway.
- Careful use of energy sources within the airway.
- Adequate precautions in case of an unexpected major endobronchial bleed.
The prognosis of completely resected benign tumors is excellent.
Acknowledgment: we would like to thank Nathalie Leroux RN and Mélodie Leclerc RN for their continued support.
G Rakovich, D Ouellette, G Beauchamp
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
1425 views
12 likes
0 comments
03:33
Endoscopic resection of an endobronchial hamartoma
Invasion of the tracheo-bronchial tree by a malignant pulmonary lesion is the most frequent cause of bronchial obstruction in the adult. However, benign lesions, although rare, may also occur.
Hamartoma is amongst the most frequent benign endobronchial tumors. In many cases, these tumors are amenable to endoscopic treatment (either resection or laser ablation), thus sparing the patient the potential morbidity of a thoracotomy and bronchial or parenchymal resection.
We present a case of bronchoscopic resection of a hamartoma obstructing the left lower lobe bronchus in a 58-year-old patient who had presented with cough and post-obstructive pneumonia.
Key aspects of the procedure include:
- Optimal pre-operative evaluation with flexible bronchoscopy and computed tomography of the chest.
- Close collaboration between the surgical and anesthesia teams who are sharing responsibility for the airway.
- Careful use of energy sources within the airway.
- Adequate precautions in case of an unexpected major endobronchial bleed.
The prognosis of completely resected benign tumors is excellent.
Acknowledgment: we would like to thank Nathalie Leroux RN and Mélodie Leclerc RN for their continued support.
Uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy for bronchiectasis
As thoracoscopic surgical techniques are getting increasingly advanced, some thoracic surgeons are dissatisfied with the use of 3 or 4 ports to perform lobectomy. They start to try biportal or uniportal lobectomy in order to make it increasingly less invasive. As compared to 3-portal VATS lobectomy, the literature showed that uniportal VATS lobectomies have even more decreased postoperative pain, without significantly lengthening operative time, increasing blood loss or complications. After acquiring uniportal VATS techniques by adjusting the angle of view, by reorganizing the positions of the instruments, and by updating the anatomical concepts and dissecting process, lobectomy, and even composite-lobe resection, can be managed as a regular procedure.
We present the case of a 52-year-old man with a left lower lobe and lingular segment bronchiectasis. The patient underwent a left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy using a uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic approach.
J He, DJ Ma
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1190 views
33 likes
0 comments
09:45
Uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy for bronchiectasis
As thoracoscopic surgical techniques are getting increasingly advanced, some thoracic surgeons are dissatisfied with the use of 3 or 4 ports to perform lobectomy. They start to try biportal or uniportal lobectomy in order to make it increasingly less invasive. As compared to 3-portal VATS lobectomy, the literature showed that uniportal VATS lobectomies have even more decreased postoperative pain, without significantly lengthening operative time, increasing blood loss or complications. After acquiring uniportal VATS techniques by adjusting the angle of view, by reorganizing the positions of the instruments, and by updating the anatomical concepts and dissecting process, lobectomy, and even composite-lobe resection, can be managed as a regular procedure.
We present the case of a 52-year-old man with a left lower lobe and lingular segment bronchiectasis. The patient underwent a left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy using a uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic approach.
How fluorescence can help to obtain the critical view of safety (CVS) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a live educational procedure broadcasted from IRCAD Taiwan
This live educational video broadcasted from IRCAD Taiwan shows the case of a 31-year-old woman admitted to hospital for chronic abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant for one month. Ultrasonography (US) demonstrated gallstones with a moderate thickening of the gallbladder wall. The patient had a BMI of 26 and she had a past surgical history of laparotomy for perforated appendicitis and thyroidectomy for papillary cancer.
This procedure highlights the benefits of intraoperative guidance with ICG fluorescence. In addition to a conventional preoperative intravenous (IV) injection, ICG fluorescence was used intraoperatively to understand and demonstrate the vascular anatomy of the hepatocystic triangle. During this procedure, technical points are discussed between Dr. M Lin, the operator, and Drs. B Dallemagne, HP Wong, W Huang.
M Lin, B Dallemagne, HP Wong, W Huang, A Garcia
Surgical intervention
12 days ago
178 views
7 likes
1 comment
20:59
How fluorescence can help to obtain the critical view of safety (CVS) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a live educational procedure broadcasted from IRCAD Taiwan
This live educational video broadcasted from IRCAD Taiwan shows the case of a 31-year-old woman admitted to hospital for chronic abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant for one month. Ultrasonography (US) demonstrated gallstones with a moderate thickening of the gallbladder wall. The patient had a BMI of 26 and she had a past surgical history of laparotomy for perforated appendicitis and thyroidectomy for papillary cancer.
This procedure highlights the benefits of intraoperative guidance with ICG fluorescence. In addition to a conventional preoperative intravenous (IV) injection, ICG fluorescence was used intraoperatively to understand and demonstrate the vascular anatomy of the hepatocystic triangle. During this procedure, technical points are discussed between Dr. M Lin, the operator, and Drs. B Dallemagne, HP Wong, W Huang.
Stress impact on healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: preliminary results of a worldwide survey-based study
During an epidemic of a novel infectious disease, many healthcare workers may suffer from stress. Fear and fatigue can be overwhelming and cause severe psychological distress such as anxiety, depression, burnout, and hostility. The recent outbreak of COVID-19 may be a major source of stress for healthcare workers. The psychological monitoring of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 outbreak is essential since it may allow for the early detection and early management of distress and deliver timely support and stress management training recommendations. The preliminary results of a survey-based study were presented during this weekly fellows meeting session jointly organized by the IHU and IRCAD France (as of May 2020).
A Garcia, J Verde, S Perretta
Surgical intervention
16 days ago
63 views
3 likes
0 comments
52:26
Stress impact on healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: preliminary results of a worldwide survey-based study
During an epidemic of a novel infectious disease, many healthcare workers may suffer from stress. Fear and fatigue can be overwhelming and cause severe psychological distress such as anxiety, depression, burnout, and hostility. The recent outbreak of COVID-19 may be a major source of stress for healthcare workers. The psychological monitoring of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 outbreak is essential since it may allow for the early detection and early management of distress and deliver timely support and stress management training recommendations. The preliminary results of a survey-based study were presented during this weekly fellows meeting session jointly organized by the IHU and IRCAD France (as of May 2020).
Addressing the challenges of a complicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholecystitis: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Professor Didier Mutter provides a precise description of the most important anatomical landmarks related to cholecystectomy performed for cholecystitis. The video features a noteworthy case of fibrotic gallbladder surrounded by inflammation managed with cholecystectomy. In spite of anatomical difficulties, Professor Mutter shows how to perform a "critical view of safety", the systematization of which should be dogmatic, with complete extraction of all gallstones, in the learning process of cholecystectomy.
The author performs an outstanding standardized surgery, explaining the techniques and maneuvers to be performed in order to obtain success.
D Mutter, R Canales Cama, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
2694 views
28 likes
17 comments
41:41
Addressing the challenges of a complicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholecystitis: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Professor Didier Mutter provides a precise description of the most important anatomical landmarks related to cholecystectomy performed for cholecystitis. The video features a noteworthy case of fibrotic gallbladder surrounded by inflammation managed with cholecystectomy. In spite of anatomical difficulties, Professor Mutter shows how to perform a "critical view of safety", the systematization of which should be dogmatic, with complete extraction of all gallstones, in the learning process of cholecystectomy.
The author performs an outstanding standardized surgery, explaining the techniques and maneuvers to be performed in order to obtain success.
A difficult case of laparoscopic cholecystectomy using a "non-lifting technique": a live educational procedure
This unabridged video of a live educational surgery performed by Dr. Dallemagne during the last advanced Hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery course at IRCAD France (November 7-9, 2019) very clearly demonstrates the stepwise execution of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the context of a chronic cholecystitis along with all its tips and tricks. This is the case of a 62-year-old man, who was admitted 2 months before surgery for an episode of acute cholecystitis. The patient was treated non-surgically and finally discharged. After multiple relapses of pain and discomfort in the right upper quadrant, surgery was planned and finally executed. Dr. Bernard Dallemagne’s surgical skills and experience and the beauty of the procedure in this challenging scenario, associated with a dynamic Questions & Answers (Q&A) and experts' comments from the auditorium, make this video a 'must see' for any surgeon who will perform a gallbladder procedure.
B Dallemagne, J Verde, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
2471 views
28 likes
15 comments
28:35
A difficult case of laparoscopic cholecystectomy using a "non-lifting technique": a live educational procedure
This unabridged video of a live educational surgery performed by Dr. Dallemagne during the last advanced Hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery course at IRCAD France (November 7-9, 2019) very clearly demonstrates the stepwise execution of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the context of a chronic cholecystitis along with all its tips and tricks. This is the case of a 62-year-old man, who was admitted 2 months before surgery for an episode of acute cholecystitis. The patient was treated non-surgically and finally discharged. After multiple relapses of pain and discomfort in the right upper quadrant, surgery was planned and finally executed. Dr. Bernard Dallemagne’s surgical skills and experience and the beauty of the procedure in this challenging scenario, associated with a dynamic Questions & Answers (Q&A) and experts' comments from the auditorium, make this video a 'must see' for any surgeon who will perform a gallbladder procedure.
Laparoscopy and appendicitis
In this key lecture, Dr. Benoît Navez outlines the use of laparoscopy for the management of appendicitis, from diagnosis to surgical treatment, and postoperative complications of acute appendicitis.
He explains the best diagnostic modalities, providing an indication for each one. While performing a complete evaluation of the leading role of laparoscopy in this common entity and the advantages in challenge scenarios such as morbid obesity and pregnancy. Surgical technical pitfalls are pointed (e.g., standard trocar placement and best localization for additional port, types of mesoappendix control and its advantages, principal stump closure techniques such as endoloop and specific indications for stapler use, evidence-based recommendations to prevent stump appendicitis and avoid the risk of bacteremia during sepsis, evidence of intraperitoneal irrigation and its correlation with intra-abdominal postoperative abscess, and non-operative options such as Wait and See and interval appendectomy).

B Navez
Lecture
2 months ago
3813 views
59 likes
9 comments
29:19
Laparoscopy and appendicitis
In this key lecture, Dr. Benoît Navez outlines the use of laparoscopy for the management of appendicitis, from diagnosis to surgical treatment, and postoperative complications of acute appendicitis.
He explains the best diagnostic modalities, providing an indication for each one. While performing a complete evaluation of the leading role of laparoscopy in this common entity and the advantages in challenge scenarios such as morbid obesity and pregnancy. Surgical technical pitfalls are pointed (e.g., standard trocar placement and best localization for additional port, types of mesoappendix control and its advantages, principal stump closure techniques such as endoloop and specific indications for stapler use, evidence-based recommendations to prevent stump appendicitis and avoid the risk of bacteremia during sepsis, evidence of intraperitoneal irrigation and its correlation with intra-abdominal postoperative abscess, and non-operative options such as Wait and See and interval appendectomy).

Laparoscopic central pancreatectomy for renal cell carcinoma metastasis
Authors present the case of a laparoscopic central pancreatectomy in a patient with a clear cell renal cell carcinoma metastatic lesion to the pancreatic neck.
A 71-year old female patient was admitted with a pancreatic neck lesion detected by abdominal ultrasound performed for mild epigastric pain she has been suffering from for 3 months prior to admission. Her past medical history is significant for right nephrectomy performed 25 years ago. The patient stated that she had an acquired cystic kidney disease, but no medical records were available to confirm that. A multidisciplinary investigation was performed. Pancreatic protocol CT-scan revealed a 2.5cm hyper-enhancing round-shaped tumor, located within the pancreatic neck. The patient had no carcinoid syndrome, and levels of PNET specific markers (Chromogranin A, NSE, Insulin, 5-HIIA) were not elevated. CA 19-9 and CEA levels were also normal. The tumor was [111In]-octreotide negative on octreotide scan. As a result, a non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor was suspected considering its CT-scan characteristics.
A laparoscopic pancreatic enucleation was planned with possible central pancreatectomy in case the enucleation would turn out to be unfeasible. The attempt to perform enucleation failed due to intensive bleeding from an intrapancreatic vessel, unclear borders of the tumor, and high risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula formation. It was decided to continue the surgery with central pancreatectomy.
The postoperative course was complicated by a postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) grade B (according to the ISGPF classification), which was managed successfully using interventional percutaneous drainage. Final histopathological examination revealed a clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastatic lesion to the pancreas. A CT-scan performed 2 years after the surgery revealed no signs of disease progression. The pancreaticojejunostomy shows no signs of obstruction. The patient has neither exocrine nor endocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
The purpose of the video is to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic central pancreatectomy, which is an organ-preserving procedure and is accompanied with better long-term results.
P Agami, M Baychorov, R Izrailov, I Khatkov
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1604 views
25 likes
0 comments
13:07
Laparoscopic central pancreatectomy for renal cell carcinoma metastasis
Authors present the case of a laparoscopic central pancreatectomy in a patient with a clear cell renal cell carcinoma metastatic lesion to the pancreatic neck.
A 71-year old female patient was admitted with a pancreatic neck lesion detected by abdominal ultrasound performed for mild epigastric pain she has been suffering from for 3 months prior to admission. Her past medical history is significant for right nephrectomy performed 25 years ago. The patient stated that she had an acquired cystic kidney disease, but no medical records were available to confirm that. A multidisciplinary investigation was performed. Pancreatic protocol CT-scan revealed a 2.5cm hyper-enhancing round-shaped tumor, located within the pancreatic neck. The patient had no carcinoid syndrome, and levels of PNET specific markers (Chromogranin A, NSE, Insulin, 5-HIIA) were not elevated. CA 19-9 and CEA levels were also normal. The tumor was [111In]-octreotide negative on octreotide scan. As a result, a non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor was suspected considering its CT-scan characteristics.
A laparoscopic pancreatic enucleation was planned with possible central pancreatectomy in case the enucleation would turn out to be unfeasible. The attempt to perform enucleation failed due to intensive bleeding from an intrapancreatic vessel, unclear borders of the tumor, and high risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula formation. It was decided to continue the surgery with central pancreatectomy.
The postoperative course was complicated by a postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) grade B (according to the ISGPF classification), which was managed successfully using interventional percutaneous drainage. Final histopathological examination revealed a clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastatic lesion to the pancreas. A CT-scan performed 2 years after the surgery revealed no signs of disease progression. The pancreaticojejunostomy shows no signs of obstruction. The patient has neither exocrine nor endocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
The purpose of the video is to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic central pancreatectomy, which is an organ-preserving procedure and is accompanied with better long-term results.
Laparoscopic Sugarbaker parastomal hernia repair
In this video, authors demonstrate a laparoscopic Sugarbaker technique for parastomal hernia repair using a Gore-Tex mesh in an 18-year-old man with a history of anal cancer status post-abdominoperineal resection with an end colostomy and known chronic parastomal hernia. His history also includes hypoplastic left heart syndrome status post-orthotopic cardiac transplant, DiGeorge syndrome, Hodgkin’s disease type post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and immune deficiency. He presented with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting secondary to small bowel obstruction at the site of his previous parastomal hernia. CT-scan showed a mesenteric swirl with a transition point. Upon laparoscopy, the parastomal hernia was identified. The bowel was reduced and hernia edges cauterized. Primary repair of the hernia defect was performed using a percutaneous technique. A Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain was left inside the hernia area and exited through a separate part of the abdomen. Following the Sugarbaker technique, a 16 by 20cm Gore-Tex dual mesh plus was used to reinforce the defect. Percutaneous sutures in the four corners secured the mesh. Once the mesh was in the desired location, absorbable tackers were used to attach the mesh to the anterior abdominal wall. Additional percutaneous sutures were added to the medial mesh. The patient recovered well. His nasogastric tube was removed on postoperative day (POD) 4. He was advanced to a regular diet and discharged on POD 7. Surveillance CT showed an intact repair with no recurrence a year after surgery. This case demonstrates a Sugarbaker technique for the closure of parastomal hernias using a Gore-Tex graft for parastomal hernias. The laparoscopic Sugarbaker technique is a safe procedure for the repair of parastomal hernias.
T Huy, A Bajinting, J Greenspon, GA Villalona
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
2229 views
27 likes
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05:01
Laparoscopic Sugarbaker parastomal hernia repair
In this video, authors demonstrate a laparoscopic Sugarbaker technique for parastomal hernia repair using a Gore-Tex mesh in an 18-year-old man with a history of anal cancer status post-abdominoperineal resection with an end colostomy and known chronic parastomal hernia. His history also includes hypoplastic left heart syndrome status post-orthotopic cardiac transplant, DiGeorge syndrome, Hodgkin’s disease type post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and immune deficiency. He presented with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting secondary to small bowel obstruction at the site of his previous parastomal hernia. CT-scan showed a mesenteric swirl with a transition point. Upon laparoscopy, the parastomal hernia was identified. The bowel was reduced and hernia edges cauterized. Primary repair of the hernia defect was performed using a percutaneous technique. A Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain was left inside the hernia area and exited through a separate part of the abdomen. Following the Sugarbaker technique, a 16 by 20cm Gore-Tex dual mesh plus was used to reinforce the defect. Percutaneous sutures in the four corners secured the mesh. Once the mesh was in the desired location, absorbable tackers were used to attach the mesh to the anterior abdominal wall. Additional percutaneous sutures were added to the medial mesh. The patient recovered well. His nasogastric tube was removed on postoperative day (POD) 4. He was advanced to a regular diet and discharged on POD 7. Surveillance CT showed an intact repair with no recurrence a year after surgery. This case demonstrates a Sugarbaker technique for the closure of parastomal hernias using a Gore-Tex graft for parastomal hernias. The laparoscopic Sugarbaker technique is a safe procedure for the repair of parastomal hernias.