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Robotic Nissen fundoplication with the da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system
For a long time, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has been used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The main challenges of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication involve the 2-dimensional visualization, exposure of complex gastroesophageal anatomy, and suturing of the wrap fundoplication. In 1999, robotic Nissen fundoplication, a completely new technique, was introduced, demonstrating advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery due to improved manual dexterity, ergonomics, and 3-dimensional visualization. However, time spent on robotic platform docking and arm clashing during the procedure are factors that surgeons often find cumbersome and time-consuming. The newest surgical platform, the da Vinci Xi surgical robotic system, can help to overcome such problems. This video shows a stepwise approach of the da Vinci Xi docking process and surgical technique demonstrating fundoplication according to the Nissen technique.
L Marano, A Spaziani, G Castagnoli
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1450 views
3 likes
0 comments
07:00
Robotic Nissen fundoplication with the da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system
For a long time, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has been used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The main challenges of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication involve the 2-dimensional visualization, exposure of complex gastroesophageal anatomy, and suturing of the wrap fundoplication. In 1999, robotic Nissen fundoplication, a completely new technique, was introduced, demonstrating advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery due to improved manual dexterity, ergonomics, and 3-dimensional visualization. However, time spent on robotic platform docking and arm clashing during the procedure are factors that surgeons often find cumbersome and time-consuming. The newest surgical platform, the da Vinci Xi surgical robotic system, can help to overcome such problems. This video shows a stepwise approach of the da Vinci Xi docking process and surgical technique demonstrating fundoplication according to the Nissen technique.
Laparoscopic anatomy of the pelvic floor involved in laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence
In this key lecture, Professor Jean-Bernard Dubuisson delineates the laparoscopic pelvic floor anatomy involved in surgical procedures for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Traditional anatomy considers three levels: pelvic and perineal muscles, ligaments, and the space between all fascias covering the organs. Visceral ligaments occupy an anteroposterior axis (pubovesical ligaments, bladder pillars, and uterosacral ligaments) and a transverse axis (lateral bladder ligaments, cardinal ligaments, paracervix and rectal pillars). The four attachment sites which may be used by the surgeon for fascia and pelvic organ attachment in POP surgery are discussed-- Cooper’s ligament, white line, ischial spine, and sacral promontory. Approximately 90 laparoscopic anatomy pictures are presented in this authoritative lecture. The dissection planes and the different pelvic spaces used for surgery are explained, insisting on the main vessels, nerves, plexus, ureters which are obstacles to bear in mind and to avoid.
JB Dubuisson
Lecture
1 year ago
4767 views
612 likes
0 comments
24:09
Laparoscopic anatomy of the pelvic floor involved in laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence
In this key lecture, Professor Jean-Bernard Dubuisson delineates the laparoscopic pelvic floor anatomy involved in surgical procedures for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Traditional anatomy considers three levels: pelvic and perineal muscles, ligaments, and the space between all fascias covering the organs. Visceral ligaments occupy an anteroposterior axis (pubovesical ligaments, bladder pillars, and uterosacral ligaments) and a transverse axis (lateral bladder ligaments, cardinal ligaments, paracervix and rectal pillars). The four attachment sites which may be used by the surgeon for fascia and pelvic organ attachment in POP surgery are discussed-- Cooper’s ligament, white line, ischial spine, and sacral promontory. Approximately 90 laparoscopic anatomy pictures are presented in this authoritative lecture. The dissection planes and the different pelvic spaces used for surgery are explained, insisting on the main vessels, nerves, plexus, ureters which are obstacles to bear in mind and to avoid.
Endoscopic biliary stones extraction using a forward viewing standard gastroscope in a patient with altered anatomy (partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction)
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in case of altered anatomy such as partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction has a success rate of 85% due to different factors such as failure to cross the anastomosis and the presence of an important length of afferent loop with a high risk of jejunal perforation at (or near) the anastomotic site while advancing the duodenoscope. The use of a front-view scope is the safest and could be used theoretically. However, the lack of elevator, the inability to see the papilla in a direct view, and the limited number of catheters available for cannulation and therapeutic procedures in the standard gastroscope with the 2.8mm working channel, can make this kind of procedure quite challenging. In this video, we present a case of successful biliary stone extraction in a patient with Billroth II reconstruction using a standard 2.8mm working channel front-viewing scope.
Gf Donatelli, BM Vergeau, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
873 views
14 likes
0 comments
04:47
Endoscopic biliary stones extraction using a forward viewing standard gastroscope in a patient with altered anatomy (partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction)
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in case of altered anatomy such as partial gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction has a success rate of 85% due to different factors such as failure to cross the anastomosis and the presence of an important length of afferent loop with a high risk of jejunal perforation at (or near) the anastomotic site while advancing the duodenoscope. The use of a front-view scope is the safest and could be used theoretically. However, the lack of elevator, the inability to see the papilla in a direct view, and the limited number of catheters available for cannulation and therapeutic procedures in the standard gastroscope with the 2.8mm working channel, can make this kind of procedure quite challenging. In this video, we present a case of successful biliary stone extraction in a patient with Billroth II reconstruction using a standard 2.8mm working channel front-viewing scope.
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
H Grover, R Syed, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
7558 views
57 likes
23 comments
07:04
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
S Macina, L Baldari, E Cassinotti, M Ballabio, A Spota, M de Francesco, L Boni
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
3023 views
17 likes
0 comments
07:10
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
ICG fluorescent cholangiography in difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy with inflammatory biliary fusion post-cholecystitis and pancreatitis
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the presence of inflammatory billiary fusion is a technically challenging procedure associated with a 0.5% risk of injury to major extrahepatic bile ducts.
Preoperative planning and intraoperative visualization of the anatomy of the biliary tree using an intraoperative cholangiogram reduces the risk or the severity of injury to major biliary ducts.
Indocyanine green cholangiography has emerged as a promising non-invasive modality for visualization of extra-hepatic biliary ducts, having the advantage of very easy use repetitively at various stages of critical areas of dissection.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient who had an emergency admission for mild acute cholecystitis (as per Tokyo guidelines, 2018) and concomitant moderately severe acute gallstone pancreatitis (revised Atlanta classification) with a preoperative MRCP predictive of biliary inflammatory fusion between the gallbladder neck and the common hepatic duct.
Consequently, we planned and performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an indocyanine green cholangiogram as a non-invasive method to help identify the intraoperative anatomy of the extra-hepatic biliary ducts.
The main feature of our video is the use of indocyanine green during the difficult dissection of the gallbladder neck and exposure of the critical view of safety in Calot’s triangle as cased with clear features of significant biliary inflammatory fusion between the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.
ICG fluorescent demonstration of the extra-hepatic biliary tree is used in real time and with ease repeatedly at several stages of this difficult dissection, facilitating a safe completion of a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may become a standard practice.
G Kumar, S Ramachandran, M Paraoan
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
276 views
5 likes
1 comment
13:21
ICG fluorescent cholangiography in difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy with inflammatory biliary fusion post-cholecystitis and pancreatitis
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the presence of inflammatory billiary fusion is a technically challenging procedure associated with a 0.5% risk of injury to major extrahepatic bile ducts.
Preoperative planning and intraoperative visualization of the anatomy of the biliary tree using an intraoperative cholangiogram reduces the risk or the severity of injury to major biliary ducts.
Indocyanine green cholangiography has emerged as a promising non-invasive modality for visualization of extra-hepatic biliary ducts, having the advantage of very easy use repetitively at various stages of critical areas of dissection.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient who had an emergency admission for mild acute cholecystitis (as per Tokyo guidelines, 2018) and concomitant moderately severe acute gallstone pancreatitis (revised Atlanta classification) with a preoperative MRCP predictive of biliary inflammatory fusion between the gallbladder neck and the common hepatic duct.
Consequently, we planned and performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an indocyanine green cholangiogram as a non-invasive method to help identify the intraoperative anatomy of the extra-hepatic biliary ducts.
The main feature of our video is the use of indocyanine green during the difficult dissection of the gallbladder neck and exposure of the critical view of safety in Calot’s triangle as cased with clear features of significant biliary inflammatory fusion between the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.
ICG fluorescent demonstration of the extra-hepatic biliary tree is used in real time and with ease repeatedly at several stages of this difficult dissection, facilitating a safe completion of a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may become a standard practice.
Laparoscopic Beger procedure with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy
This is the case of a 49-year-old male patient presenting with recurrent intractable abdominal pain. The patient had a history of obstructive jaundice and underwent biliary decompression provided by a percutaneous cholecystostomy. CT-scan showed signs of chronic pancreatitis, multiple stones in the pancreatic parenchyma, a compressed portal vein and biliary obstruction. The patient underwent a laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) – a technique known as the Beger procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain, combined with portal and biliary compression caused by severe chronic pancreatitis. The surgical procedure preserves the stomach, the duodenum, and the biliary tree unlike standard duodenopancreatectomy (Whipple procedure), which is the other option for these patients. As Beger himself stated: “Preservation of the duodenum and the biliary system has major advantages for patients regarding short- and long-term outcome as compared to the Kausch-Whipple resection and pylorus-preserving resection”.
In this case, after completing the pancreatic head resection and fashioning the distal and proximal pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, a hepaticojejunostomy was performed. It was necessary due to the stenosis of the intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that the laparoscopic Beger procedure is safe and feasible, and provides all the well-known advantages of the minimally invasive approach, particularly lower postoperative pain, earlier functional recovery, and shorter hospital stay.
P Agami, A Andrianov, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
669 views
7 likes
2 comments
17:23
Laparoscopic Beger procedure with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy
This is the case of a 49-year-old male patient presenting with recurrent intractable abdominal pain. The patient had a history of obstructive jaundice and underwent biliary decompression provided by a percutaneous cholecystostomy. CT-scan showed signs of chronic pancreatitis, multiple stones in the pancreatic parenchyma, a compressed portal vein and biliary obstruction. The patient underwent a laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) – a technique known as the Beger procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain, combined with portal and biliary compression caused by severe chronic pancreatitis. The surgical procedure preserves the stomach, the duodenum, and the biliary tree unlike standard duodenopancreatectomy (Whipple procedure), which is the other option for these patients. As Beger himself stated: “Preservation of the duodenum and the biliary system has major advantages for patients regarding short- and long-term outcome as compared to the Kausch-Whipple resection and pylorus-preserving resection”.
In this case, after completing the pancreatic head resection and fashioning the distal and proximal pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, a hepaticojejunostomy was performed. It was necessary due to the stenosis of the intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that the laparoscopic Beger procedure is safe and feasible, and provides all the well-known advantages of the minimally invasive approach, particularly lower postoperative pain, earlier functional recovery, and shorter hospital stay.
Thoracoscopy for voluminous left thoracic neuroblastoma in a 2-year-old girl
Video-assisted oncological surgery should be performed in strict compliance with surgical oncology requisites: complete excision, no risk of cancer cell dissemination, and no additional operative risks. Radical surgery requirements must be respected and adjacent organs must be preserved. Our team contributed to research articles on neurogenic tumor surgery, published in international medical journals in 2007 (J Pediatr Surg, 2007; 42 (10): 1725-8 and J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2007; 17 (6): 825-9).
Our case study further demonstrates that the thoracoscopic resection of neurogenic tumors perfectly meets oncological surgery requirements, offering the parietal benefits of minimally invasive surgery. A magnified operative field is a major asset because it allows performing surgery safely. It is now possible to gain a perfect knowledge of the patient and tumor anatomy preoperatively by using a 3D modeling tool and preoperative CT-scan images of the patient.
C Klipfel, A Lachkar, F Becmeur
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
281 views
1 like
0 comments
04:32
Thoracoscopy for voluminous left thoracic neuroblastoma in a 2-year-old girl
Video-assisted oncological surgery should be performed in strict compliance with surgical oncology requisites: complete excision, no risk of cancer cell dissemination, and no additional operative risks. Radical surgery requirements must be respected and adjacent organs must be preserved. Our team contributed to research articles on neurogenic tumor surgery, published in international medical journals in 2007 (J Pediatr Surg, 2007; 42 (10): 1725-8 and J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2007; 17 (6): 825-9).
Our case study further demonstrates that the thoracoscopic resection of neurogenic tumors perfectly meets oncological surgery requirements, offering the parietal benefits of minimally invasive surgery. A magnified operative field is a major asset because it allows performing surgery safely. It is now possible to gain a perfect knowledge of the patient and tumor anatomy preoperatively by using a 3D modeling tool and preoperative CT-scan images of the patient.
A young lady with dysphagia and GIST after a complicated sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity
A 34 year-old woman was referred to us for persistent dysphagia and retrosternal chest pain, aggravated by eating. Two years earlier, she underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.
Her operation was complicated by septic shock due to an esophagogastric fistula with subphrenic abscesses, and on postoperative day 20, she underwent a laparotomy, abscess debridement and drainage, splenectomy and application of cyanoacrylate-based glue, followed by endoscopic positioning of a self-expandable partially coated prosthesis.
Three weeks afterwards, her prosthesis was replaced with a self-expandable fully coated prosthesis due to persistent leak. This prosthesis was finally removed after 7 weeks.
One year after her operation, at gastroscopy, a 25mm submucosal nodule covered with an ulcerated mucosa was found in the proximal antrum. Biopsy was negative, and endoscopic ultrasonography was suggestive of GIST.
She underwent an esophageal manometry, which was indicative of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Her barium swallow test showed a delayed esophageal emptying due to the narrowing and twisting of the proximal part of the stomach. Her abdominal MRI was normal.
An exploratory laparoscopy was indicated for adhesiolysis and removal of the antral lesion.
Total duration of the operation was 3 hours. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Her postoperative swallow study showed the easy passage of the contrast agent with no leaks. The patient completely recovered from her symptoms, and remained asymptomatic after 30 months. Final histology of her lesion evidenced a foreign body granuloma.
S Greco, M Giulii Capponi, M Lotti, M Khotcholava
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
426 views
2 likes
1 comment
14:14
A young lady with dysphagia and GIST after a complicated sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity
A 34 year-old woman was referred to us for persistent dysphagia and retrosternal chest pain, aggravated by eating. Two years earlier, she underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.
Her operation was complicated by septic shock due to an esophagogastric fistula with subphrenic abscesses, and on postoperative day 20, she underwent a laparotomy, abscess debridement and drainage, splenectomy and application of cyanoacrylate-based glue, followed by endoscopic positioning of a self-expandable partially coated prosthesis.
Three weeks afterwards, her prosthesis was replaced with a self-expandable fully coated prosthesis due to persistent leak. This prosthesis was finally removed after 7 weeks.
One year after her operation, at gastroscopy, a 25mm submucosal nodule covered with an ulcerated mucosa was found in the proximal antrum. Biopsy was negative, and endoscopic ultrasonography was suggestive of GIST.
She underwent an esophageal manometry, which was indicative of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Her barium swallow test showed a delayed esophageal emptying due to the narrowing and twisting of the proximal part of the stomach. Her abdominal MRI was normal.
An exploratory laparoscopy was indicated for adhesiolysis and removal of the antral lesion.
Total duration of the operation was 3 hours. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Her postoperative swallow study showed the easy passage of the contrast agent with no leaks. The patient completely recovered from her symptoms, and remained asymptomatic after 30 months. Final histology of her lesion evidenced a foreign body granuloma.
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
1311 views
7 likes
0 comments
13:16
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis with HOT AXIOS® stent after Whipple pancreatectomy, filling blind loop through percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage
A 67-year-old woman underwent a Whipple pancreatectomy for cancer one year earlier. She was readmitted to hospital for abdominal pain and subocclusion with jaundice. CT-scan showed a dilatation of the jejunal stump with associated biliary tree dilatation. Percutaneous biliary transhepatic drainage (PBTHD) was performed and a stenosis was diagnosed in the afferent loop, accountable for subocclusion and secondary jaundice. Two double pigtails were delivered by the interventional radiologist through PBTHD across the jejunal stricture without resolution of symptoms. Biliary drainage was left in place causing patient discomfort. EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis (GJA) using the HOT AXIOS® stent was attempted in order to bypass the stricture. EUS allows to find the jejunal stump, detected by mechanical staple line visualization. Additionally, the blind loop was detected as it was filled up with liquid and contrast through the PBTHD. The HOT AXIOS® stent was delivered without any complications (VIDEO). Afterwards, flow of bile and liquid was observed through the lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS). PBTHD was immediately removed. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on a normal diet with no pain on the following day. EUS-GJA via a LAMS is a well-described technique in experts’ hands (Technical review of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided gastroenterostomy in 2017. Itoi T, Baron TH, Khashab MA, et al. Dig Endosc 2017;29:495-502). Special skills and techniques are necessary in order to recognize the exact small bowel loop to puncture (Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience. Tyberg A, Perez-Miranda M, Sanchez-Ocaña R et al. Endosc Int Open 2016;4:E276-81). In that case, we show that filling this loop using a previous transhepatic access should be considered an alternative in case of alterated anatomy. Also direct EUS transgastric injection of contrast medium in the dilated biliary tree to fill up the jejunal stump could be considered an option to perform GJA by a single operator in a single session after safely recognizing the right loop. In addition, fluoroscopy helps to detect the exact loop puncture site. In conclusion, GJA using a LAMS is feasible, safe and useful, and transhepatic injection of liquid and contrast medium helps to adequately recognize the jejunal stump after biliopancreatic surgery.
Gf Donatelli, G Pourcher, D Fuks, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, M Pizzicannella
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
114 views
2 likes
0 comments
02:30
EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis with HOT AXIOS® stent after Whipple pancreatectomy, filling blind loop through percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage
A 67-year-old woman underwent a Whipple pancreatectomy for cancer one year earlier. She was readmitted to hospital for abdominal pain and subocclusion with jaundice. CT-scan showed a dilatation of the jejunal stump with associated biliary tree dilatation. Percutaneous biliary transhepatic drainage (PBTHD) was performed and a stenosis was diagnosed in the afferent loop, accountable for subocclusion and secondary jaundice. Two double pigtails were delivered by the interventional radiologist through PBTHD across the jejunal stricture without resolution of symptoms. Biliary drainage was left in place causing patient discomfort. EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis (GJA) using the HOT AXIOS® stent was attempted in order to bypass the stricture. EUS allows to find the jejunal stump, detected by mechanical staple line visualization. Additionally, the blind loop was detected as it was filled up with liquid and contrast through the PBTHD. The HOT AXIOS® stent was delivered without any complications (VIDEO). Afterwards, flow of bile and liquid was observed through the lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS). PBTHD was immediately removed. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on a normal diet with no pain on the following day. EUS-GJA via a LAMS is a well-described technique in experts’ hands (Technical review of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided gastroenterostomy in 2017. Itoi T, Baron TH, Khashab MA, et al. Dig Endosc 2017;29:495-502). Special skills and techniques are necessary in order to recognize the exact small bowel loop to puncture (Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience. Tyberg A, Perez-Miranda M, Sanchez-Ocaña R et al. Endosc Int Open 2016;4:E276-81). In that case, we show that filling this loop using a previous transhepatic access should be considered an alternative in case of alterated anatomy. Also direct EUS transgastric injection of contrast medium in the dilated biliary tree to fill up the jejunal stump could be considered an option to perform GJA by a single operator in a single session after safely recognizing the right loop. In addition, fluoroscopy helps to detect the exact loop puncture site. In conclusion, GJA using a LAMS is feasible, safe and useful, and transhepatic injection of liquid and contrast medium helps to adequately recognize the jejunal stump after biliopancreatic surgery.