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Laparoscopic tubo-cornual anastomosis for reversal of sterilization
This video shows a case of tubo-cornual anastomosis for reversal after tubal sterilization. A 43-year-old patient has requested a reversal of sterilization. She already had 4 deliveries. On the hysterosalpingography, one can see that Hulka clips are really near the uterine horns.
The video demonstrates the removal of Hulka clips, the dissection of the interstitial part of the tube, the catheterization of a guide through the ostium in the proximal, then distal part of the tube hysteroscopically, and finally a tubo-cornual anastomosis. In our opinion, the quality of the anastomosis directly depends on the complete congruence of the two tubal stumps. Different prognostic factors have been discussed in previous studies (e.g., age, type of sterilization (clips or coagulation), length of remaining tube, and site of anastomosis). According to the literature, the best anastomotic site, in terms of successful pregnancy, would be the isthmic-isthmic position. In our experience, the use of a tubal hysteroscopic guide seems the best aid to obtain a luminal alignment and it is more comfortable for the suture.
O Garbin, L Schwartz
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2833 views
108 likes
0 comments
08:01
Laparoscopic tubo-cornual anastomosis for reversal of sterilization
This video shows a case of tubo-cornual anastomosis for reversal after tubal sterilization. A 43-year-old patient has requested a reversal of sterilization. She already had 4 deliveries. On the hysterosalpingography, one can see that Hulka clips are really near the uterine horns.
The video demonstrates the removal of Hulka clips, the dissection of the interstitial part of the tube, the catheterization of a guide through the ostium in the proximal, then distal part of the tube hysteroscopically, and finally a tubo-cornual anastomosis. In our opinion, the quality of the anastomosis directly depends on the complete congruence of the two tubal stumps. Different prognostic factors have been discussed in previous studies (e.g., age, type of sterilization (clips or coagulation), length of remaining tube, and site of anastomosis). According to the literature, the best anastomotic site, in terms of successful pregnancy, would be the isthmic-isthmic position. In our experience, the use of a tubal hysteroscopic guide seems the best aid to obtain a luminal alignment and it is more comfortable for the suture.
Pure NOTES: Transvaginal tubal sterilization with flexible endoscope
Tubal sterilization is a permanent method of contraception, performed using several current approaches, including laparotomy, mini-laparotomy, colpotomy, laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. Two new approaches, LESS and transgastric or transvaginal NOTES, are being used today. This video shows our surgical technique for pure NOTES transvaginal sterilization. Tubal sterilization is a permanent method of contraception, performed using several current approaches, including laparotomy, mini-laparotomy, colpotomy, laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. Two new approaches, LESS and transgastric or transvaginal NOTES, are being used today. This video shows our surgical technique for pure NOTES transvaginal sterilization. The patient is 32 years old with a history of one previous vaginal delivery and one previous cesarean delivery. Her BMI is 20. The procedure was fully explained to the patient and written consent was obtained.
J Mejías, H Almau, P Rosales, R de la Fuente, N García, C Bravo
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
446 views
13 likes
0 comments
07:05
Pure NOTES: Transvaginal tubal sterilization with flexible endoscope
Tubal sterilization is a permanent method of contraception, performed using several current approaches, including laparotomy, mini-laparotomy, colpotomy, laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. Two new approaches, LESS and transgastric or transvaginal NOTES, are being used today. This video shows our surgical technique for pure NOTES transvaginal sterilization. Tubal sterilization is a permanent method of contraception, performed using several current approaches, including laparotomy, mini-laparotomy, colpotomy, laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. Two new approaches, LESS and transgastric or transvaginal NOTES, are being used today. This video shows our surgical technique for pure NOTES transvaginal sterilization. The patient is 32 years old with a history of one previous vaginal delivery and one previous cesarean delivery. Her BMI is 20. The procedure was fully explained to the patient and written consent was obtained.
Surgical technique of tubal reanastomosis
Many women who undergo tubal ligation surgery later decide to have children again. One option available to these women is tubal ligation reversal, or tubal reanastomosis. In this microsurgery, the two separated parts of a uterine tube are surgically reunited. It is ideally performed in younger women under 39 years of age with good ovarian reserve. Depending on the previously used tubal ligation method, it may be necessary to first perform a diagnostic laparoscopy to check the condition of the uterus, the uterine tubes, and the ovaries and to make sure that the tubal length is sufficient for reversal. Following the proper principles of microsurgery, this procedure can yield very good results and offer a more economical option to women desirous of childbearing if the tubal pathology related to tubal sterilization is the only cause of infertility.
H Grover, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2339 views
15 likes
0 comments
08:48
Surgical technique of tubal reanastomosis
Many women who undergo tubal ligation surgery later decide to have children again. One option available to these women is tubal ligation reversal, or tubal reanastomosis. In this microsurgery, the two separated parts of a uterine tube are surgically reunited. It is ideally performed in younger women under 39 years of age with good ovarian reserve. Depending on the previously used tubal ligation method, it may be necessary to first perform a diagnostic laparoscopy to check the condition of the uterus, the uterine tubes, and the ovaries and to make sure that the tubal length is sufficient for reversal. Following the proper principles of microsurgery, this procedure can yield very good results and offer a more economical option to women desirous of childbearing if the tubal pathology related to tubal sterilization is the only cause of infertility.
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
R Adjerid, F Sebaa, N Otsmane, A Khelifaoui
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
1625 views
8 likes
0 comments
05:13
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration using a disposable fiber-optic bonchoscope (Ambu® aScope™)
Background: Laparoscopic common bile duct (CBD) exploration can be performed following choledochotomy or via the trancystic approach. Laparoscopic CBD exploration is limited in some benign upper gastrointestinal units due to the cost of sterilization of the reusable choledochoscope.
We have recently published a case series confirming the safety and efficacy of the 5mm reusable bronchoscope for CBD exploration. This case series evaluates a single-use bronchochoscope (Ambu® aScope™) for laparoscopic CBD exploration.
Method: A retrospective study was conducted from January 2015 to December 2016. Data was collected from electronic records of the patients. All cases confirmed the presence of CBD stones using USS and MRCP. The disposable bronchoscope is introduced via an epigastric port. Choledochotomy is performed using a choledochotome, and a transcystic approach is used after cystic duct dilatation, if required. The Ambu® aScope™ 2 (Ambu UK Ltd, Cambridgeshire) is a sterile and single-use flexible bronchoscope, which is normally used by anesthesiologists for difficult tracheal intubation. A disposable bronchoscope is available in two sizes (3.8mm and 5mm). It is a one-piece unit with a single dimensional flexible tip manipulated with a handpiece (150-degree flex in the 5mm model and 130-degree flex in the 3.8mm model). There is a single instrument channel with a 2.2mm diameter, which allows for the passage of standard endoscopic baskets for CBD stone retrieval. The image is projected to a high-resolution 6.5” LCD screen with a resolution of 640x480 pixels. The bronchoscope handpiece includes a suction port, which is used as an irrigation source for CBD dilatation. It requires the use of a standard 3-way connector.
Results: Twenty nine patients had CBD exploration using the disposable bronchochoscope. There were 10 male and 19 female patients (median age: 42). Ten procedures were performed as emergencies and 19 were performed electively. All cases were managed laparoscopically except one, which was planned as an open procedure due to previous extensive open surgery.
Twenty eight patients had their CBD cleared using a disposable bronchoscope and two needed subsequent ERCP. Choledochotomy was performed in 15 patients and a transcystic approach was used in 6 patients. No T-tube was used in the laparoscopic cases. Two cases were performed as day case surgery. Median postoperative hospital stay was 2.5 days.
Conclusion: The disposable bronchoscope is a safe and effective instrument for CBD exploration, with results comparable to our previously published case series. It has guaranteed sterility and is cost-effective compared to the reusable bronchoscope, especially when initial capital outlay, sterile processing and maintenance costs are considered.
Y Aawsaj, I Ibrahim, A Mitchell, A Gilliam
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
302 views
6 likes
1 comment
10:08
Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration using a disposable fiber-optic bonchoscope (Ambu® aScope™)
Background: Laparoscopic common bile duct (CBD) exploration can be performed following choledochotomy or via the trancystic approach. Laparoscopic CBD exploration is limited in some benign upper gastrointestinal units due to the cost of sterilization of the reusable choledochoscope.
We have recently published a case series confirming the safety and efficacy of the 5mm reusable bronchoscope for CBD exploration. This case series evaluates a single-use bronchochoscope (Ambu® aScope™) for laparoscopic CBD exploration.
Method: A retrospective study was conducted from January 2015 to December 2016. Data was collected from electronic records of the patients. All cases confirmed the presence of CBD stones using USS and MRCP. The disposable bronchoscope is introduced via an epigastric port. Choledochotomy is performed using a choledochotome, and a transcystic approach is used after cystic duct dilatation, if required. The Ambu® aScope™ 2 (Ambu UK Ltd, Cambridgeshire) is a sterile and single-use flexible bronchoscope, which is normally used by anesthesiologists for difficult tracheal intubation. A disposable bronchoscope is available in two sizes (3.8mm and 5mm). It is a one-piece unit with a single dimensional flexible tip manipulated with a handpiece (150-degree flex in the 5mm model and 130-degree flex in the 3.8mm model). There is a single instrument channel with a 2.2mm diameter, which allows for the passage of standard endoscopic baskets for CBD stone retrieval. The image is projected to a high-resolution 6.5” LCD screen with a resolution of 640x480 pixels. The bronchoscope handpiece includes a suction port, which is used as an irrigation source for CBD dilatation. It requires the use of a standard 3-way connector.
Results: Twenty nine patients had CBD exploration using the disposable bronchochoscope. There were 10 male and 19 female patients (median age: 42). Ten procedures were performed as emergencies and 19 were performed electively. All cases were managed laparoscopically except one, which was planned as an open procedure due to previous extensive open surgery.
Twenty eight patients had their CBD cleared using a disposable bronchoscope and two needed subsequent ERCP. Choledochotomy was performed in 15 patients and a transcystic approach was used in 6 patients. No T-tube was used in the laparoscopic cases. Two cases were performed as day case surgery. Median postoperative hospital stay was 2.5 days.
Conclusion: The disposable bronchoscope is a safe and effective instrument for CBD exploration, with results comparable to our previously published case series. It has guaranteed sterility and is cost-effective compared to the reusable bronchoscope, especially when initial capital outlay, sterile processing and maintenance costs are considered.
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
AM Benaired
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1173 views
142 likes
0 comments
04:03
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
Tubal reversal
In several countries, tubal sterilization is frequently used as a definitive form of anti-conception. However, 2 to 13% of women come to express regret and 1 to 3% will have a reversal. Regret is frequently due to change of partner, dead of infant or for psychological reasons. As for laparotomy and also laparoscopy, tubal reversal should always be performed using the principles of microsurgery and gentle tissue handling.
Depending upon the place of tubal ligation, tubal anastomosis can be isthmo-isthmic, isthmo-ampullary, ampullo-ampullary, ampullo-cornual, and isthmo-cornual.
Mean pregnancy rate after tubal reversal is reported to be between 60 and 85%. Additionally, in patients older than 39, an intrauterine pregnancy rate of 40 to 50% can be achieved.
S Gordts
Lecture
5 years ago
958 views
30 likes
0 comments
17:55
Tubal reversal
In several countries, tubal sterilization is frequently used as a definitive form of anti-conception. However, 2 to 13% of women come to express regret and 1 to 3% will have a reversal. Regret is frequently due to change of partner, dead of infant or for psychological reasons. As for laparotomy and also laparoscopy, tubal reversal should always be performed using the principles of microsurgery and gentle tissue handling.
Depending upon the place of tubal ligation, tubal anastomosis can be isthmo-isthmic, isthmo-ampullary, ampullo-ampullary, ampullo-cornual, and isthmo-cornual.
Mean pregnancy rate after tubal reversal is reported to be between 60 and 85%. Additionally, in patients older than 39, an intrauterine pregnancy rate of 40 to 50% can be achieved.
Fertility enhancing surgery
Professor David Adamson focuses on the role of laparoscopy in subfertile patients. Laparoscopy helps to diagnose and manage many gynecologic conditions that may induce spontaneous pregnancy and enhance Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) results. In endometriosis, laparoscopy is required to establish the diagnosis and provide a better vision: it is first recommended in stage I-II by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). It should be considered in stage III-IV if the patient is young and after several IVF failures. Laparoscopic cystectomy is suitable if endometrioma is larger than 4cm prior to IVF. Myomas have to be removed when they distort the cavity or when they are intramural and voluminous. Laparoscopic myomectomy must be carried out by skilled surgeons. Adnexal masses should be removed if they exceed 5cm and persist for more than 3 months. Concerning polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), ovarian drilling is indicated in case of failure of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH). Laparoscopy is very useful for distal tubal occlusion to assess the quality of the tube and perform fimbrioplasty. It is also useful for ectopic pregnancy and sterilization reversal. As a conclusion, laparoscopy in subfertile patients must be performed in young women, without other infertility factors. Laparoscopy should also be envisaged when the disease is treatable and when the patients agree to have a 9 to 15 months’ interval prior to IVF.
D Adamson
Lecture
7 years ago
2405 views
16 likes
0 comments
26:49
Fertility enhancing surgery
Professor David Adamson focuses on the role of laparoscopy in subfertile patients. Laparoscopy helps to diagnose and manage many gynecologic conditions that may induce spontaneous pregnancy and enhance Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) results. In endometriosis, laparoscopy is required to establish the diagnosis and provide a better vision: it is first recommended in stage I-II by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). It should be considered in stage III-IV if the patient is young and after several IVF failures. Laparoscopic cystectomy is suitable if endometrioma is larger than 4cm prior to IVF. Myomas have to be removed when they distort the cavity or when they are intramural and voluminous. Laparoscopic myomectomy must be carried out by skilled surgeons. Adnexal masses should be removed if they exceed 5cm and persist for more than 3 months. Concerning polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), ovarian drilling is indicated in case of failure of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH). Laparoscopy is very useful for distal tubal occlusion to assess the quality of the tube and perform fimbrioplasty. It is also useful for ectopic pregnancy and sterilization reversal. As a conclusion, laparoscopy in subfertile patients must be performed in young women, without other infertility factors. Laparoscopy should also be envisaged when the disease is treatable and when the patients agree to have a 9 to 15 months’ interval prior to IVF.