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Minimally invasive surgical approach to small bowel obstruction
Due to the lack of laparoscopic experience to work in a small space (small bowel distension), small bowel obstruction seems to be a relative contraindication for a minimally invasive approach. In other hands, many patients have co-morbidities, and consequently it is key to work with a low intra-abdominal pressure to prevent any conversion for pneumoperitoneum intolerance. Small bowel obstruction must be resolved by experts in order to prevent any excessive mobilization and iatrogenic perforation.

Critical comments:
This video presents the laparoscopic management of bowel obstruction. It demonstrates the feasibility of the identification and management of mechanical bowel obstruction. Several parts of the video can be discussed:
1. In their comments, the authors report that the whole bowel has to be explored in order to prevent the presence of a secondary band at the origin of the obstruction. This is absolutely mandatory. Usually, the recommendation is to start the exploration at the level of the caecum and to mobilize the whole non-dilated bowel in order to prevent a risk of bowel injury during this manipulation. Exploration of the dilated bowel is much more risky. The authors did not show this extensive and systematic exploration.
2. The authors reported that they used 5 to 10 liters of warm saline for abdominal lavage. Today, there is no evidence of the benefit of this major abdominal lavage including 5 to 10 liters. Selective lavage can be recommended in case of significant bacterial contamination.
3. The authors consider the potential benefit of irrigation of the ischemic bowel with hot water after band division. This indication can be considered as potentially efficient regarding the recommendations in open surgery. However, laparoscopy has a significant advantage to keep the internal temperature of 37°C at a minimum, and certainly hot lavage, which cannot be over 39°C to 40°C, will probably also have limited impact.
Despite these minor remarks, this video has a scientific value in demonstrating a safe approach to a small bowel obstruction related to a single band, which is, in this case, very safely resected.
One can also focus on the value of working with a high quality camera, which gives the surgeon the possibility to clearly evaluate the vitality of the small bowel after an ischemic period, which is well demonstrated in this video.
S Rua, F Silveira, P Mira
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1314 views
60 likes
0 comments
06:59
Minimally invasive surgical approach to small bowel obstruction
Due to the lack of laparoscopic experience to work in a small space (small bowel distension), small bowel obstruction seems to be a relative contraindication for a minimally invasive approach. In other hands, many patients have co-morbidities, and consequently it is key to work with a low intra-abdominal pressure to prevent any conversion for pneumoperitoneum intolerance. Small bowel obstruction must be resolved by experts in order to prevent any excessive mobilization and iatrogenic perforation.

Critical comments:
This video presents the laparoscopic management of bowel obstruction. It demonstrates the feasibility of the identification and management of mechanical bowel obstruction. Several parts of the video can be discussed:
1. In their comments, the authors report that the whole bowel has to be explored in order to prevent the presence of a secondary band at the origin of the obstruction. This is absolutely mandatory. Usually, the recommendation is to start the exploration at the level of the caecum and to mobilize the whole non-dilated bowel in order to prevent a risk of bowel injury during this manipulation. Exploration of the dilated bowel is much more risky. The authors did not show this extensive and systematic exploration.
2. The authors reported that they used 5 to 10 liters of warm saline for abdominal lavage. Today, there is no evidence of the benefit of this major abdominal lavage including 5 to 10 liters. Selective lavage can be recommended in case of significant bacterial contamination.
3. The authors consider the potential benefit of irrigation of the ischemic bowel with hot water after band division. This indication can be considered as potentially efficient regarding the recommendations in open surgery. However, laparoscopy has a significant advantage to keep the internal temperature of 37°C at a minimum, and certainly hot lavage, which cannot be over 39°C to 40°C, will probably also have limited impact.
Despite these minor remarks, this video has a scientific value in demonstrating a safe approach to a small bowel obstruction related to a single band, which is, in this case, very safely resected.
One can also focus on the value of working with a high quality camera, which gives the surgeon the possibility to clearly evaluate the vitality of the small bowel after an ischemic period, which is well demonstrated in this video.
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
D Kadoche, M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
584 views
4 likes
0 comments
08:22
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Acute small bowel obstruction two months after laparoscopic rectal prolapse surgery: laparoscopic management
Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an ever-increasing clinical problem. In this video, the authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of acute small bowel obstruction. Its successful management depends on a comprehensive knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of obstruction, familiarity with imaging methods, good clinical judgment, and sound technical skills. The adoption of laparoscopy in the treatment of SBO has been slow because of concerns for iatrogenic bowel injury and working space issues related to bowel distension.
In this film, the authors demonstrate that it is essential to rapidly manage the patient after the first acute attack.
Although there is an inherent appeal for laparoscopy in its potential to minimize short- and long-term wound complications and perioperative laparotomy-related morbidity and to theoretically induce fewer subsequent adhesions than a traditional laparotomy incision would.

Small bowel obstruction is a pathology commonly found in the current practice of surgical emergencies. The main cause stems from surgical history with a variable onset of symptoms. The introduction of laparoscopic surgery helped to slightly reduce the number of patients presenting with occlusive syndromes. The rapid management of occlusive patients is one of the keys to success. Consequently, once diagnosis has been evoked, imaging studies must be performed, and especially CT-scan, in order to determine the type of obstruction, its mechanism and its severity. After work-up, either a conservative medical treatment or surgery will be decided upon.
L Marx, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2981 views
20 likes
0 comments
04:19
Acute small bowel obstruction two months after laparoscopic rectal prolapse surgery: laparoscopic management
Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an ever-increasing clinical problem. In this video, the authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of acute small bowel obstruction. Its successful management depends on a comprehensive knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of obstruction, familiarity with imaging methods, good clinical judgment, and sound technical skills. The adoption of laparoscopy in the treatment of SBO has been slow because of concerns for iatrogenic bowel injury and working space issues related to bowel distension.
In this film, the authors demonstrate that it is essential to rapidly manage the patient after the first acute attack.
Although there is an inherent appeal for laparoscopy in its potential to minimize short- and long-term wound complications and perioperative laparotomy-related morbidity and to theoretically induce fewer subsequent adhesions than a traditional laparotomy incision would.

Small bowel obstruction is a pathology commonly found in the current practice of surgical emergencies. The main cause stems from surgical history with a variable onset of symptoms. The introduction of laparoscopic surgery helped to slightly reduce the number of patients presenting with occlusive syndromes. The rapid management of occlusive patients is one of the keys to success. Consequently, once diagnosis has been evoked, imaging studies must be performed, and especially CT-scan, in order to determine the type of obstruction, its mechanism and its severity. After work-up, either a conservative medical treatment or surgery will be decided upon.
Small bowel obstruction and ileal strangulation by adhesions: role of laparoscopy in early diagnosis and treatment
Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a common surgical emergency, most frequently caused by adhesions. In the absence of signs of strangulations or CT-scan evidence (free fluid mesenteric edema, “small bowel faeces” sign, devascularization), a large portion of ASBO can be resolved using non-operative methods even if a significant number of patients will require an emergency surgery.
Laparoscopy in acute care surgery continues to expand even in cases of small bowel obstruction which were conventionally managed by means of laparotomy.
The authors report a case of a 45-year-old woman, completely laparoscopically treated, with a history of previous appendectomy with pelvic abscess, cholecystectomy and removal of right ovarian cysts. She was admitted to the emergency room five hours before surgery with severe acute abdominal pain which appeared 24 hours before.
CT-scan with oral administration of gastrografin showed signs of intestinal obstruction and adhesions were suspected. The exploratory laparoscopy revealed adhesive small bowel obstruction with ileal strangulation. The intestine was viable and resection was unnecessary.
The role of diagnostic imaging modalities is relevant to decrease ASBO-related morbidity and mortality. However, because of the lack of specific radiological signs and laboratory findings of bowel strangulation, the diagnosis requires, when it is not contraindicated, a timely laparoscopic exploration with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
V Guarino, A Cappiello, N Perrotta, A Scotti, F Mastellone, D Loffredo
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1899 views
87 likes
0 comments
08:20
Small bowel obstruction and ileal strangulation by adhesions: role of laparoscopy in early diagnosis and treatment
Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a common surgical emergency, most frequently caused by adhesions. In the absence of signs of strangulations or CT-scan evidence (free fluid mesenteric edema, “small bowel faeces” sign, devascularization), a large portion of ASBO can be resolved using non-operative methods even if a significant number of patients will require an emergency surgery.
Laparoscopy in acute care surgery continues to expand even in cases of small bowel obstruction which were conventionally managed by means of laparotomy.
The authors report a case of a 45-year-old woman, completely laparoscopically treated, with a history of previous appendectomy with pelvic abscess, cholecystectomy and removal of right ovarian cysts. She was admitted to the emergency room five hours before surgery with severe acute abdominal pain which appeared 24 hours before.
CT-scan with oral administration of gastrografin showed signs of intestinal obstruction and adhesions were suspected. The exploratory laparoscopy revealed adhesive small bowel obstruction with ileal strangulation. The intestine was viable and resection was unnecessary.
The role of diagnostic imaging modalities is relevant to decrease ASBO-related morbidity and mortality. However, because of the lack of specific radiological signs and laboratory findings of bowel strangulation, the diagnosis requires, when it is not contraindicated, a timely laparoscopic exploration with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
Laparoscopic treatment of acute small bowel obstruction: multiple cases of laparoscopic adhesiolysis
The video shows the laparoscopic management of three separate cases of acute small bowel obstruction secondary to adhesions. The difficulties and advantages of such an approach in this emergency scenario are discussed.
The author begins by inserting a trocar in the umbilicus. Upon exploration of the abdominal cavity, intestinal obstruction becomes clearly evident from the presence of dilated loops and flattened, collapsed loops. The author follows the collapsed loops until the transition zone is identified. The adhesions appear between the greater omentum and the mesentery. This band is divided. Further exploration leads to the finding of a second adhesion. This area shows no signs of occlusion. The author divides this adhesion. Exploration of the remainder of the small bowel continues to rule out further adhesions.
F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
11 years ago
3946 views
45 likes
0 comments
09:41
Laparoscopic treatment of acute small bowel obstruction: multiple cases of laparoscopic adhesiolysis
The video shows the laparoscopic management of three separate cases of acute small bowel obstruction secondary to adhesions. The difficulties and advantages of such an approach in this emergency scenario are discussed.
The author begins by inserting a trocar in the umbilicus. Upon exploration of the abdominal cavity, intestinal obstruction becomes clearly evident from the presence of dilated loops and flattened, collapsed loops. The author follows the collapsed loops until the transition zone is identified. The adhesions appear between the greater omentum and the mesentery. This band is divided. Further exploration leads to the finding of a second adhesion. This area shows no signs of occlusion. The author divides this adhesion. Exploration of the remainder of the small bowel continues to rule out further adhesions.
Acute small bowel ischemia: laparoscopic exploration and treatment
We present the case of a 63-year-old male patient admitted to the emergency department with severe acute abdominal pain unresponsive to symptomatic treatment. The clinical examination revealed a generalized peritoneal reaction. The diagnosis of small bowel ischemia with free peritoneal fluid without occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) or the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) was established by means of a contrast injected CT-scan.
A laparoscopic exploration allowed to discover a segmental small bowel ischemic necrosis with severe hemorrhagic congestion of the bowel wall. After verifying that the rest of the small bowel and the colon were viable, a laparoscopic resection was performed with an intracorporeal side-to-side anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful with patient discharge on day 4.
Pathological examination confirmed that the resected segment of 92cm had ischemia of the mucosa and of the serosa with intensive congestion and hemorrhagic effusion. The patient’s one-month follow-up was uneventful. A programmed cardiological, hematological and immunological consultation and work-up to look for thrombotic risk factors was negative.
Acute small bowel ischemia is an unusual cause of acute abdomen that is difficult to diagnose due to its non-specific clinical signs. Clinical suspicion is warranted in patients with a past history of cardiovascular thrombotic conditions or hypercoagulable states. In 50% of cases, it is caused by arterial obstruction, in 20 to 30% of cases by non-occlusive arterial ischemia, and by venous occlusion [1] in 5 to 15% of cases. It has a high mortality rate of 59 to 93% and patient survival is highly dependent on a timely diagnosis and treatment. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) consensus for the laparoscopic approach to the acute abdomen states that there is no published data demonstrating advantages in the diagnosis and treatment of acute bowel ischemia by laparoscopy [2]. However, laparoscopy may prove beneficial in confirming the diagnosis in doubtful cases, calculate the extension of the ischemic small bowel segment, and offer a treatment option in cases of segmental necrosis.
1. Brandt LJ, Boley SJ. AGA technical review on intestinal ischemia. American Gastrointestinal Association. Gastroenterology 2000;118:954-68.
2. Agresta F, Ansaloni L, Baiocchi GL, Bergamini C, Campanile FC, Carlucci M, Cocorullo G, Corradi A, Franzato B, Lupo M, Mandalà V, Mirabella A, Pernazza G, Piccoli M, Staudacher C, Vettoretto N, Zago M, Lettieri E, Levati A, Pietrini D, Scaglione M, De Masi S, De Placido G, Francucci M, Rasi M, Fingerhut A, Uranüs S, Garattini S. Laparoscopic approach to acute abdomen from the Consensus Development Conference of the Società Italiana di Chirurgia Endoscopica e nuove tecnologie (SICE), Associazione Chirurghi Ospedalieri Italiani (ACOI), Società Italiana di Chirurgia (SIC), Società Italiana di Chirurgia d'Urgenza e del Trauma (SICUT), Società Italiana di Chirurgia nell'Ospedalità Privata (SICOP), and the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES). Surg Endosc 2012;26:2134-64.
D Ntourakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2311 views
68 likes
0 comments
19:57
Acute small bowel ischemia: laparoscopic exploration and treatment
We present the case of a 63-year-old male patient admitted to the emergency department with severe acute abdominal pain unresponsive to symptomatic treatment. The clinical examination revealed a generalized peritoneal reaction. The diagnosis of small bowel ischemia with free peritoneal fluid without occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) or the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) was established by means of a contrast injected CT-scan.
A laparoscopic exploration allowed to discover a segmental small bowel ischemic necrosis with severe hemorrhagic congestion of the bowel wall. After verifying that the rest of the small bowel and the colon were viable, a laparoscopic resection was performed with an intracorporeal side-to-side anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful with patient discharge on day 4.
Pathological examination confirmed that the resected segment of 92cm had ischemia of the mucosa and of the serosa with intensive congestion and hemorrhagic effusion. The patient’s one-month follow-up was uneventful. A programmed cardiological, hematological and immunological consultation and work-up to look for thrombotic risk factors was negative.
Acute small bowel ischemia is an unusual cause of acute abdomen that is difficult to diagnose due to its non-specific clinical signs. Clinical suspicion is warranted in patients with a past history of cardiovascular thrombotic conditions or hypercoagulable states. In 50% of cases, it is caused by arterial obstruction, in 20 to 30% of cases by non-occlusive arterial ischemia, and by venous occlusion [1] in 5 to 15% of cases. It has a high mortality rate of 59 to 93% and patient survival is highly dependent on a timely diagnosis and treatment. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) consensus for the laparoscopic approach to the acute abdomen states that there is no published data demonstrating advantages in the diagnosis and treatment of acute bowel ischemia by laparoscopy [2]. However, laparoscopy may prove beneficial in confirming the diagnosis in doubtful cases, calculate the extension of the ischemic small bowel segment, and offer a treatment option in cases of segmental necrosis.
1. Brandt LJ, Boley SJ. AGA technical review on intestinal ischemia. American Gastrointestinal Association. Gastroenterology 2000;118:954-68.
2. Agresta F, Ansaloni L, Baiocchi GL, Bergamini C, Campanile FC, Carlucci M, Cocorullo G, Corradi A, Franzato B, Lupo M, Mandalà V, Mirabella A, Pernazza G, Piccoli M, Staudacher C, Vettoretto N, Zago M, Lettieri E, Levati A, Pietrini D, Scaglione M, De Masi S, De Placido G, Francucci M, Rasi M, Fingerhut A, Uranüs S, Garattini S. Laparoscopic approach to acute abdomen from the Consensus Development Conference of the Società Italiana di Chirurgia Endoscopica e nuove tecnologie (SICE), Associazione Chirurghi Ospedalieri Italiani (ACOI), Società Italiana di Chirurgia (SIC), Società Italiana di Chirurgia d'Urgenza e del Trauma (SICUT), Società Italiana di Chirurgia nell'Ospedalità Privata (SICOP), and the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES). Surg Endosc 2012;26:2134-64.
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic segmental small bowel resection including 3 different intracorporeal anastomoses
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) can be offered to young ladies presenting with malignant digestive tumors since they can undergo surgery through a suprapubic access, with a final non-visible result because it is under the bikini line.
Video: A 40-year-old woman presenting with an unknown anemia was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up evidenced an adenocarcinoma of the small bowel at 120cm from the pylorus. A suprapubic SIL segmental small bowel resection was proposed to the patient. The procedure was performed with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs, using three reusable ports placed above the pubic bone. Curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) allowed surgeons to work in good ergonomic conditions, maintaining a low cost for SIL. For the insertion of the linear stapler, a temporary 5mm scope was used and the intestinal continuity was established by a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-end anastomosis. Another option is to perform a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-side anastomosis (especially in case of obstructive tumor) or a linear mechanical side-to-side anastomosis. The mesenteric window was closed. The specimen was extracted suprapubically with a wound protection once the three windows of the ports have been joined together.
Results: Laparoscopy took 160 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No postoperative complications were noted and the use of minimal pain killers allowed for patient discharge after four days. Pathological findings demonstrated a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the jejunum, with 17 negative nodes (pT3N0Mx). The postoperative follow-up, including blood tests and PET-scan, did not show any recurrence at 12 months.
Conclusions: In addition to the known advantages of conventional multiport laparoscopy, the SIL technique allows to offer satisfying oncological results in addition to a non-visible surgical scar, because it is localized under the bikini line. Additionally, abdominal trauma and the final scar length can be reduced, since they are related to the tumor’s size.
G Dapri, K Grozdev, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
893 views
23 likes
0 comments
11:21
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic segmental small bowel resection including 3 different intracorporeal anastomoses
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) can be offered to young ladies presenting with malignant digestive tumors since they can undergo surgery through a suprapubic access, with a final non-visible result because it is under the bikini line.
Video: A 40-year-old woman presenting with an unknown anemia was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up evidenced an adenocarcinoma of the small bowel at 120cm from the pylorus. A suprapubic SIL segmental small bowel resection was proposed to the patient. The procedure was performed with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs, using three reusable ports placed above the pubic bone. Curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) allowed surgeons to work in good ergonomic conditions, maintaining a low cost for SIL. For the insertion of the linear stapler, a temporary 5mm scope was used and the intestinal continuity was established by a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-end anastomosis. Another option is to perform a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-side anastomosis (especially in case of obstructive tumor) or a linear mechanical side-to-side anastomosis. The mesenteric window was closed. The specimen was extracted suprapubically with a wound protection once the three windows of the ports have been joined together.
Results: Laparoscopy took 160 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No postoperative complications were noted and the use of minimal pain killers allowed for patient discharge after four days. Pathological findings demonstrated a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the jejunum, with 17 negative nodes (pT3N0Mx). The postoperative follow-up, including blood tests and PET-scan, did not show any recurrence at 12 months.
Conclusions: In addition to the known advantages of conventional multiport laparoscopy, the SIL technique allows to offer satisfying oncological results in addition to a non-visible surgical scar, because it is localized under the bikini line. Additionally, abdominal trauma and the final scar length can be reduced, since they are related to the tumor’s size.
Upper GI obstruction due to incarcerated recurrent hiatal hernia with mesh repair
This is the case of a 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 43 who presented to our clinic complaining of aphasia. Her past medical history is significant for a hiatal hernia repair and a diaphragmatic mesh reinforcement performed in July 2013. After surgery, she complained of dysphagia even after the three postoperative months, and the upper GI series showed a recurrence of her hiatal hernia. The dysphagia got worse, and in January 2015, a CT-scan showed a complete blockage of the gastroesophageal junction due to the herniation of the stomach. A 5-trocar technique was used, very similar to what we would use for a Nissen fundoplication.
S Perretta, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
952 views
32 likes
0 comments
12:26
Upper GI obstruction due to incarcerated recurrent hiatal hernia with mesh repair
This is the case of a 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 43 who presented to our clinic complaining of aphasia. Her past medical history is significant for a hiatal hernia repair and a diaphragmatic mesh reinforcement performed in July 2013. After surgery, she complained of dysphagia even after the three postoperative months, and the upper GI series showed a recurrence of her hiatal hernia. The dysphagia got worse, and in January 2015, a CT-scan showed a complete blockage of the gastroesophageal junction due to the herniation of the stomach. A 5-trocar technique was used, very similar to what we would use for a Nissen fundoplication.
Gastric bypass: jejunal obstruction and stenosis
Small bowel obstruction at or near the jejuno-jejunal anastomosis is a rare complication after gastric bypass, occurring in less than 1% of patients. Obstruction at the distal anastomosis is different from stricture at the proximal anastomosis, in that it is not caused by hypertrophic scarring. Rather, obstruction occurs due to either abnormal folding (kinking) of the anastomosis or narrowing of the anastomosis at the site of the enterotomy closure due to technical error. Since the distal anastomosis includes both the alimentary and the biliopancreatic limbs of the bypass, obstruction at this location may present with very different symptoms. Obstruction of the alimentary limb will result in nausea and vomiting, while obstruction of the biliopancreatic limb results in gastric remnant dilatation. Diagnosis is best accomplished with CT imaging, as plain X-rays will not show a dilated gastric remnant or biliopancreatic limb. Treatment of obstruction at the jejunojejunostomy often requires surgical intervention, although blockage due to edema may resolve with conservative management, sometimes requiring percutaneous decompression of the excluded stomach. It should also be remembered that bariatric patients may also suffer from obstruction caused by adhesions and may require lysis of such adhesions like any general surgical patient.
D Herron
Lecture
7 years ago
1213 views
8 likes
0 comments
10:10
Gastric bypass: jejunal obstruction and stenosis
Small bowel obstruction at or near the jejuno-jejunal anastomosis is a rare complication after gastric bypass, occurring in less than 1% of patients. Obstruction at the distal anastomosis is different from stricture at the proximal anastomosis, in that it is not caused by hypertrophic scarring. Rather, obstruction occurs due to either abnormal folding (kinking) of the anastomosis or narrowing of the anastomosis at the site of the enterotomy closure due to technical error. Since the distal anastomosis includes both the alimentary and the biliopancreatic limbs of the bypass, obstruction at this location may present with very different symptoms. Obstruction of the alimentary limb will result in nausea and vomiting, while obstruction of the biliopancreatic limb results in gastric remnant dilatation. Diagnosis is best accomplished with CT imaging, as plain X-rays will not show a dilated gastric remnant or biliopancreatic limb. Treatment of obstruction at the jejunojejunostomy often requires surgical intervention, although blockage due to edema may resolve with conservative management, sometimes requiring percutaneous decompression of the excluded stomach. It should also be remembered that bariatric patients may also suffer from obstruction caused by adhesions and may require lysis of such adhesions like any general surgical patient.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2518 views
8 likes
0 comments
10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
M Lotti, E Poiasina, G Panyor, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2748 views
443 likes
0 comments
11:18
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
JB Dubuisson
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4703 views
586 likes
0 comments
08:01
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
Laparoscopic gastric bypass with unexpected intestinal malrotation
There are only a few descriptions of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in the setting of intestinal malrotation and these are limited to clinical case reports. Intestinal malrotations usually present in the first months of life with symptoms of bowel obstruction. However, in rare cases, it can persist undetected into adulthood when it could be incidentally identified. The anatomical abnormalities which should alert us to this possibility are an absent duodenojejunal angle, the small bowel on the right side of the abdomen, the caecum on the left, and the absence of a transverse colon crossing the abdomen. Identification and adjustment of the surgical technique at the time of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is crucial to prevent a very distal RYGB or avoid confusion between the Roux limb and the common channel. The construction of the laparoscopic Roux limb can be safely performed with adjustments to the standard technique.
We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a long history of morbid obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The patient had no complaints and presented a normal preoperative evaluation. After a multidisciplinary evaluation, she was elected to undergo a LRYGB. We report an intestinal malrotation discovered at the time of LRYGB, and detail the incidental findings and the technical aspects which require to be incorporated in order to complete the operation safely.
A Laranjeira, S Silva, M Amaro, M Carvalho, J Caravana
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1950 views
418 likes
0 comments
08:33
Laparoscopic gastric bypass with unexpected intestinal malrotation
There are only a few descriptions of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in the setting of intestinal malrotation and these are limited to clinical case reports. Intestinal malrotations usually present in the first months of life with symptoms of bowel obstruction. However, in rare cases, it can persist undetected into adulthood when it could be incidentally identified. The anatomical abnormalities which should alert us to this possibility are an absent duodenojejunal angle, the small bowel on the right side of the abdomen, the caecum on the left, and the absence of a transverse colon crossing the abdomen. Identification and adjustment of the surgical technique at the time of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is crucial to prevent a very distal RYGB or avoid confusion between the Roux limb and the common channel. The construction of the laparoscopic Roux limb can be safely performed with adjustments to the standard technique.
We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a long history of morbid obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The patient had no complaints and presented a normal preoperative evaluation. After a multidisciplinary evaluation, she was elected to undergo a LRYGB. We report an intestinal malrotation discovered at the time of LRYGB, and detail the incidental findings and the technical aspects which require to be incorporated in order to complete the operation safely.
A stepwise personal technique of RYGB with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy
With more than 25 years of experience, we have created a unique laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass technique with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy and several additional steps which offer our patients a safe and reliable procedure.
We routinely use 5 bladeless 12mm trocars. The procedure begins with the creation of a 15-20mL gastric pouch with a tilted orientation for the first stapling (not horizontal), and staple lines are oversewn for both gastric pouch and gastric remnant. A blue dye test is always performed at this stage. The second stage of the procedure includes the creation of a 75cm biliopancreatic limb with division of the mesentery and creation of a mechanical jejunojejunostomy with a 100cm alimentary limb, and hand-sewn closure of the enterotomy. Anti-torsion stitches are mandatory at this point. Closure of mesenteric defects (intermesenteric space and Petersen's space) is accomplished with non-absorbable sutures performed in a routine manner. The third and final stage of the procedure involves the creation of the hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy with an interposed limb and 4 layers of absorbable sutures over a 28-30 French bougie.
Closure of all trocar defects is performed in every patient.
L Zorrilla-Nunez, P Zorrilla
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1429 views
219 likes
0 comments
10:05
A stepwise personal technique of RYGB with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy
With more than 25 years of experience, we have created a unique laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass technique with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy and several additional steps which offer our patients a safe and reliable procedure.
We routinely use 5 bladeless 12mm trocars. The procedure begins with the creation of a 15-20mL gastric pouch with a tilted orientation for the first stapling (not horizontal), and staple lines are oversewn for both gastric pouch and gastric remnant. A blue dye test is always performed at this stage. The second stage of the procedure includes the creation of a 75cm biliopancreatic limb with division of the mesentery and creation of a mechanical jejunojejunostomy with a 100cm alimentary limb, and hand-sewn closure of the enterotomy. Anti-torsion stitches are mandatory at this point. Closure of mesenteric defects (intermesenteric space and Petersen's space) is accomplished with non-absorbable sutures performed in a routine manner. The third and final stage of the procedure involves the creation of the hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy with an interposed limb and 4 layers of absorbable sutures over a 28-30 French bougie.
Closure of all trocar defects is performed in every patient.
Laparoscopic exploration after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass following intestinal obstruction
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic exploration in a female patient who had undergone a gastric bypass in 2002. Her BMI was 58 at that time. Now it is 20. She had been operated on for an incisional hernia that occurred at the level of the former umbilical optical port site. She suffered from several episodes of proven mechanical bowel obstruction and benefited from medical treatment.
However, despite a thorough preoperative work-up, including gastroscopy, colonoscopy and repeat CT-scan studies performed over 6 months, the mechanical origin of the bowel obstruction was difficult to demonstrate. Since the patient had chronic, cramp-like abdominal pain, the exploration of the abdominal cavity using the former port entry sites is decided upon.
F Costantino, M Vix, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
188 views
2 likes
0 comments
06:17
Laparoscopic exploration after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass following intestinal obstruction
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic exploration in a female patient who had undergone a gastric bypass in 2002. Her BMI was 58 at that time. Now it is 20. She had been operated on for an incisional hernia that occurred at the level of the former umbilical optical port site. She suffered from several episodes of proven mechanical bowel obstruction and benefited from medical treatment.
However, despite a thorough preoperative work-up, including gastroscopy, colonoscopy and repeat CT-scan studies performed over 6 months, the mechanical origin of the bowel obstruction was difficult to demonstrate. Since the patient had chronic, cramp-like abdominal pain, the exploration of the abdominal cavity using the former port entry sites is decided upon.
Four different intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. Suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of extended scar due to a large tumor. Intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory through a suprapubic access, because it prevents traction on the mesentery and on the transverse mesocolon.
Video: This video shows four different types of intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses.
1) Linear mechanical side-to-side
2) Completely manual side-to-side
3) Completely manual end-to-side
4) Completely manual end-to-end
At the end of each type of anastomosis, mesenteric defect closure is mandatory, to prevent intestinal obstruction caused by internal hernia.
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform linear mechanical anastomosis is 25 minutes and manual anastomosis takes 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different ileocolic anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire right hemicolectomy, please click here.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3823 views
178 likes
0 comments
07:58
Four different intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. Suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of extended scar due to a large tumor. Intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory through a suprapubic access, because it prevents traction on the mesentery and on the transverse mesocolon.
Video: This video shows four different types of intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses.
1) Linear mechanical side-to-side
2) Completely manual side-to-side
3) Completely manual end-to-side
4) Completely manual end-to-end
At the end of each type of anastomosis, mesenteric defect closure is mandatory, to prevent intestinal obstruction caused by internal hernia.
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform linear mechanical anastomosis is 25 minutes and manual anastomosis takes 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different ileocolic anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire right hemicolectomy, please click here.
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, A Host
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3925 views
162 likes
0 comments
31:22
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, C Meza Paul, K Afors, J Castellano, G Centini, R Fernandes, R Murtada
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1909 views
46 likes
0 comments
38:15
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
Onset of internal hernia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: laparoscopic management
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) represents the gold standard of treatment for morbidly obese patients. While the laparoscopic approach offers many advantages in terms of fewer wound complications, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased postoperative pain, certain complications of this operation present difficult clinical problems. The most challenging complication to determine is internal hernia through one of the mesenteric defects.

Internal hernias occur more frequently in LRYGB than in the open procedure. This is a significant clinical problem since internal hernia is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction (SBO) after LRYGB, which can result in ischemia or infarction and often requires a reoperation.

The incidence of SBO after LGBP is reported to be between 1.8 and 9.7%. The most common site of internal hernia after LGBP is at Petersen’s space.
In this video, we present the laparoscopic management of a complete small bowel herniation at Petersen’s space.
A D'Urso, S Perretta, M Vix, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1289 views
17 likes
0 comments
11:25
Onset of internal hernia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: laparoscopic management
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) represents the gold standard of treatment for morbidly obese patients. While the laparoscopic approach offers many advantages in terms of fewer wound complications, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased postoperative pain, certain complications of this operation present difficult clinical problems. The most challenging complication to determine is internal hernia through one of the mesenteric defects.

Internal hernias occur more frequently in LRYGB than in the open procedure. This is a significant clinical problem since internal hernia is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction (SBO) after LRYGB, which can result in ischemia or infarction and often requires a reoperation.

The incidence of SBO after LGBP is reported to be between 1.8 and 9.7%. The most common site of internal hernia after LGBP is at Petersen’s space.
In this video, we present the laparoscopic management of a complete small bowel herniation at Petersen’s space.
Laparoscopic internal hernia repair after mini gastric bypass
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LGBP) has been shown to be an effective treatment for morbid obesity, both in terms of weight loss and improvement in multiple comorbidities. While the laparoscopic approach offers many advantages to patients in terms of fewer wound complications, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased postoperative pain, some complications of this operation continue to pose difficult clinical problems as the number of procedures performed increases. One such complication is internal hernia through one of the mesenteric defects, which can result in small bowel obstruction (SBO), ischemia, or infarction, and often requires emergency reoperation.
Internal hernias is a significant clinical problem, since it is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction after LGBP. Retrospective reviews have found the incidence of SBO after LGBP to be between 1.8 and 9.7%. The creation of a potential space as a result of weight loss may also be a contributing factor in the etiology of internal hernias, which often present in a delayed fashion. In addition, the particular case of pregnancy (with the mass effect of an enlarging uterus) may predispose to this condition.
An internal hernia can potentially occur through either two or three defects, depending on whether a retrocolic or antecolic technique is used for the Roux limb. Petersen’s defect is defined as the space between the Roux limb and the transverse mesocolon. A defect is also present between the biliopancreatic and Roux limbs at the jejunojejunostomy. If a retrocolic approach is used, a third defect in the transverse mesocolon is created. This is the most common site of internal hernia in most reports, which has prompted many surgeons to adopt an antecolic technique in order to rule out this defect.
G Sojod, L Marx, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1573 views
18 likes
0 comments
05:08
Laparoscopic internal hernia repair after mini gastric bypass
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LGBP) has been shown to be an effective treatment for morbid obesity, both in terms of weight loss and improvement in multiple comorbidities. While the laparoscopic approach offers many advantages to patients in terms of fewer wound complications, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased postoperative pain, some complications of this operation continue to pose difficult clinical problems as the number of procedures performed increases. One such complication is internal hernia through one of the mesenteric defects, which can result in small bowel obstruction (SBO), ischemia, or infarction, and often requires emergency reoperation.
Internal hernias is a significant clinical problem, since it is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction after LGBP. Retrospective reviews have found the incidence of SBO after LGBP to be between 1.8 and 9.7%. The creation of a potential space as a result of weight loss may also be a contributing factor in the etiology of internal hernias, which often present in a delayed fashion. In addition, the particular case of pregnancy (with the mass effect of an enlarging uterus) may predispose to this condition.
An internal hernia can potentially occur through either two or three defects, depending on whether a retrocolic or antecolic technique is used for the Roux limb. Petersen’s defect is defined as the space between the Roux limb and the transverse mesocolon. A defect is also present between the biliopancreatic and Roux limbs at the jejunojejunostomy. If a retrocolic approach is used, a third defect in the transverse mesocolon is created. This is the most common site of internal hernia in most reports, which has prompted many surgeons to adopt an antecolic technique in order to rule out this defect.