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Three trocar laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for diffuse diverticulosis with transanal specimen extraction: tips and tricks
The video demonstrates the case of a woman with recurrent diverticulitis, BMI 30. She has a background of a previous hysterectomy via a Pfannenstiel incision. A three-port sigmoidectomy with transanal excision was carried out.
Methods
The set up consisted of a 12mm umbilical optical port, a 12mm port in the right iliac fossa, and a 5mm operating port in the right flank. After initial peritoneoscopy, any abnormal adhesions were divided. The sigmoid colon mesentery was divided high, near the sigmoid colon in order to preserve the mesenteric vasculature. The mesentery was divided to the level of the rectum, which was then skeletonized. The proximal colon was mobilized free up to the level of the splenic flexure. The rectum was then ligated, washed out with betadine and transected. A Vicryl Loop was attached to the proximal stump which was then removed transanally. A colotomy was created above the level of the diverticula and the anvil of a circular stapler introduced into the proximal colon. The proximal sigmoid colon mesentery was divided and the sigmoid transected with a linear stapler. The specimen was then fully removed transanally. The anvil was then delivered through the colon via the fishing technique. The rectal stump was closed with a linear stapler. A colorectal anastomosis was fashioned with a circular stapler. After verifying that the colon was not twisted, an air test was performed.
Conclusion
The video demonstrates a three-port technique for laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE).
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2736 views
15 likes
0 comments
16:52
Three trocar laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for diffuse diverticulosis with transanal specimen extraction: tips and tricks
The video demonstrates the case of a woman with recurrent diverticulitis, BMI 30. She has a background of a previous hysterectomy via a Pfannenstiel incision. A three-port sigmoidectomy with transanal excision was carried out.
Methods
The set up consisted of a 12mm umbilical optical port, a 12mm port in the right iliac fossa, and a 5mm operating port in the right flank. After initial peritoneoscopy, any abnormal adhesions were divided. The sigmoid colon mesentery was divided high, near the sigmoid colon in order to preserve the mesenteric vasculature. The mesentery was divided to the level of the rectum, which was then skeletonized. The proximal colon was mobilized free up to the level of the splenic flexure. The rectum was then ligated, washed out with betadine and transected. A Vicryl Loop was attached to the proximal stump which was then removed transanally. A colotomy was created above the level of the diverticula and the anvil of a circular stapler introduced into the proximal colon. The proximal sigmoid colon mesentery was divided and the sigmoid transected with a linear stapler. The specimen was then fully removed transanally. The anvil was then delivered through the colon via the fishing technique. The rectal stump was closed with a linear stapler. A colorectal anastomosis was fashioned with a circular stapler. After verifying that the colon was not twisted, an air test was performed.
Conclusion
The video demonstrates a three-port technique for laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE).
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
S Morales-Conde, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6071 views
13 likes
0 comments
43:25
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, I Argay
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5552 views
315 likes
2 comments
42:42
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
Laparoscopic anterior resection for locally advanced sigmoid cancer with 'en bloc' excision of bladder cuff
We present an operative video of a 61-year-old Chinese gentleman with locally advanced sigmoid carcinoma. Preoperative histology from endoscopy revealed an adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic anterior resection. Intraoperatively, the sigmoid tumor was adherent to the bladder with surrounding inflammation and edema. The colectomy had to be performed with an ‘en bloc’ excision of a bladder cuff. The bladder defect was repaired laparoscopically in two layers. Operative time was 4 hours 15 minutes and total blood loss was less than 100mL. The patient was discharged in good health conditions, four days after the operation with an outpatient cystogram performed before subsequent successful removal of the indwelling catheter. Final histology was pT4bN0 (0/31 lymph nodes) with clear margins. This case demonstrates that laparoscopic colectomy with ‘en bloc’ bladder cuff excision and subsequent laparoscopic repair of bladder defect are both feasible and safe.
S Mantoo, E Yong
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3467 views
144 likes
0 comments
07:26
Laparoscopic anterior resection for locally advanced sigmoid cancer with 'en bloc' excision of bladder cuff
We present an operative video of a 61-year-old Chinese gentleman with locally advanced sigmoid carcinoma. Preoperative histology from endoscopy revealed an adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic anterior resection. Intraoperatively, the sigmoid tumor was adherent to the bladder with surrounding inflammation and edema. The colectomy had to be performed with an ‘en bloc’ excision of a bladder cuff. The bladder defect was repaired laparoscopically in two layers. Operative time was 4 hours 15 minutes and total blood loss was less than 100mL. The patient was discharged in good health conditions, four days after the operation with an outpatient cystogram performed before subsequent successful removal of the indwelling catheter. Final histology was pT4bN0 (0/31 lymph nodes) with clear margins. This case demonstrates that laparoscopic colectomy with ‘en bloc’ bladder cuff excision and subsequent laparoscopic repair of bladder defect are both feasible and safe.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Colonoscopy and resection of large pedunculated sigmoid colon polyp
An intestinal polyp is a mass of tissue, which arises from the bowel wall and protrudes into the lumen. Polyps may be sessile or pedunculated. The incidence of polyps ranges from 7 to 50%. Polyps are most commonly found in the rectum and sigmoid colon and decrease in frequency towards the caecum.
Symptoms and signs:
Polyps are usually asymptomatic. The most frequent complaint is rectal bleeding, which is usually occult. Abdominal pain and obstruction occur with large polyps. The main concern with polyps is the risk of malignant transformation.
Complications of polypectomy: Common complications following polypectomy are bleeding and infection. The risk of bleeding ranges from 0.2 to 1.2%. When patients are on blood thinners, the risk of bleeding increases to 6.8%.
Advantages and disadvantages of use of prophylactic clips:
Clips can be applied during the procedure itself. They are easy to deploy. No scarring can be observed.
Disadvantages:
They are expensive, and present a risk of perforation and further bleeding.
R Dumas, S Leblanc
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1139 views
39 likes
0 comments
11:52
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Colonoscopy and resection of large pedunculated sigmoid colon polyp
An intestinal polyp is a mass of tissue, which arises from the bowel wall and protrudes into the lumen. Polyps may be sessile or pedunculated. The incidence of polyps ranges from 7 to 50%. Polyps are most commonly found in the rectum and sigmoid colon and decrease in frequency towards the caecum.
Symptoms and signs:
Polyps are usually asymptomatic. The most frequent complaint is rectal bleeding, which is usually occult. Abdominal pain and obstruction occur with large polyps. The main concern with polyps is the risk of malignant transformation.
Complications of polypectomy: Common complications following polypectomy are bleeding and infection. The risk of bleeding ranges from 0.2 to 1.2%. When patients are on blood thinners, the risk of bleeding increases to 6.8%.
Advantages and disadvantages of use of prophylactic clips:
Clips can be applied during the procedure itself. They are easy to deploy. No scarring can be observed.
Disadvantages:
They are expensive, and present a risk of perforation and further bleeding.
Chronic sigmoidovesical fistula: laparoscopic management
The most frequent underlying cause of sigmoidovesical fistula is complicated diverticular disease in 60% of cases followed by colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. It occurs in about 2 to 22% of patients with known diverticular disease. In diverticular sigmoid vesical chronic fistula, the preferred therapeutic management is represented by primary resection with anastomosis performed as a one-stage procedure. It is particularly true when the fistula is located between the vesical dome and the sigmoid colon distally from the trigone vesical. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a chronic sigmoidovesical fistula after acute sigmoid diverticulitis as a one-stage procedure.
J Leroy, A D'Urso, H Jeddou, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2085 views
62 likes
0 comments
07:01
Chronic sigmoidovesical fistula: laparoscopic management
The most frequent underlying cause of sigmoidovesical fistula is complicated diverticular disease in 60% of cases followed by colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. It occurs in about 2 to 22% of patients with known diverticular disease. In diverticular sigmoid vesical chronic fistula, the preferred therapeutic management is represented by primary resection with anastomosis performed as a one-stage procedure. It is particularly true when the fistula is located between the vesical dome and the sigmoid colon distally from the trigone vesical. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a chronic sigmoidovesical fistula after acute sigmoid diverticulitis as a one-stage procedure.
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, C Meza Paul, K Afors, J Castellano, G Centini, R Fernandes, R Murtada
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1956 views
46 likes
0 comments
38:15
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for benign diverticular disease
Dr. Armando Melani beautifully demonstrates a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy technique for a benign diverticular condition. He provides tips and tricks to perfectly expose the operating field and recommends an extensive approach to the left colon with primary mobilization of the splenic flexure using a posterior medial approach with a late vascular approach. The technique and its performance is amply discussed by the panel of experts present, hence providing a very instructive demonstration.
The operator also discusses the different types of energy devices available as well as the tricks to safely perform an upper colorectal anastomosis. This film provides plenty of detailed information for beginners and experts alike to allow them to perform a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a perfect fashion.
J Leroy, A Melani, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
6123 views
140 likes
0 comments
33:07
Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for benign diverticular disease
Dr. Armando Melani beautifully demonstrates a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy technique for a benign diverticular condition. He provides tips and tricks to perfectly expose the operating field and recommends an extensive approach to the left colon with primary mobilization of the splenic flexure using a posterior medial approach with a late vascular approach. The technique and its performance is amply discussed by the panel of experts present, hence providing a very instructive demonstration.
The operator also discusses the different types of energy devices available as well as the tricks to safely perform an upper colorectal anastomosis. This film provides plenty of detailed information for beginners and experts alike to allow them to perform a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a perfect fashion.
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis
The best surgical approach for splenic flexure tumors is not well defined yet.
The distal third of the transverse colon has an embryological origin in the hindgut, and the splenic flexure classically shows a dual lymphatic drainage, the proximal retropancreatic and the distal to the lymphatic pedicle of both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV). Nakagoe et al. showed that the majority of positive nodes have distal lymphatic spread to the paracolic archway and up to the origin of the left colic artery. Lymph nodes of the middle colic artery and its left branch are positive in a small percentage (0 and 4.2% respectively).
As a result, a left segmental colectomy is a valid option for splenic flexure and distal transverse colon tumors because it allows vascular ligation at the root of the vessels, dissection along the embryological planes, and adequate bowel margins from the tumor. The preservation of the IMV should reduce impaired venous drainage of the sigmoid colon, which can be associated with anastomotic leakage, without compromising complete mesocolic excision.
An intracorporeal anastomosis for left colonic resection may have the same advantages as for a right hemicolectomy, but can be technically more challenging.
This video shows a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis and preservation of the IMV for a tumor of the distal transverse colon.
A Canaveira Manso, M Rosete, R Nemésio, M Fernandes
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1357 views
11 likes
0 comments
16:43
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis
The best surgical approach for splenic flexure tumors is not well defined yet.
The distal third of the transverse colon has an embryological origin in the hindgut, and the splenic flexure classically shows a dual lymphatic drainage, the proximal retropancreatic and the distal to the lymphatic pedicle of both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV). Nakagoe et al. showed that the majority of positive nodes have distal lymphatic spread to the paracolic archway and up to the origin of the left colic artery. Lymph nodes of the middle colic artery and its left branch are positive in a small percentage (0 and 4.2% respectively).
As a result, a left segmental colectomy is a valid option for splenic flexure and distal transverse colon tumors because it allows vascular ligation at the root of the vessels, dissection along the embryological planes, and adequate bowel margins from the tumor. The preservation of the IMV should reduce impaired venous drainage of the sigmoid colon, which can be associated with anastomotic leakage, without compromising complete mesocolic excision.
An intracorporeal anastomosis for left colonic resection may have the same advantages as for a right hemicolectomy, but can be technically more challenging.
This video shows a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis and preservation of the IMV for a tumor of the distal transverse colon.
Vascular anatomy of left and right colon: standard vs. variations
The vascular anatomy of the colon has some anatomical variations [1]. In this video, starting from the normal surgical anatomy of the colon, authors show many vascular anomalies of surgical interest, which should be known in order to avoid intraoperative complications. In the right colon, the ileocolic artery and the middle colic artery are constantly present in all patients as they arise from the superior mesenteric vessels [2]. Right colic vessels are present only in 80% of cases. The position of ileocolic vessels related to the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) is a key landmark. In this video, starting from the normal surgical anatomy of the right colon, authors show variant ileocolic vessels position defined type A pattern, with ileocolic artery (ICA) which lies in the anterior position in respect to the ileocolic vein (ICV). Authors also show an anomalous origin of the ileocolic vessels, which are more upper in respect to their standard position. Commonly, the ileocolic artery (ICA) lies posterior to the SMV (83%, type B). However, the ICA sometimes lies anteriorly to the SMV (17%, type A) [1]. The vascular system of the left colon has fewer variations in terms of position and origin, contrarily to the right colon. The most frequent variations of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) supply involve the division of the sigmoid arteries, as classified by Latarjet in two different types, depending on the anatomical relationship between the left colic and sigmoid arteries [3]. However, in this video authors show a rare case of IMA arising from the superior mesenteric artery [4].
References:
1. Milsom JW, Böhm B, Nakajima K. Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery 2006, Springer.
2. Wu C, Ye K, Wu Y, Chen Q, Xu J, Lin J, Kang W. Variations in right colic vascular anatomy observed during laparoscopic right colectomy. World J Surg Oncol 2019;17:16.
3. Patroni A, Bonnet S, Bourillon C, Bruzzi M, Zinzindohoue F, Chevallier JM, Douard R, Berger A. Technical difficulties of left colic artery preservation during left colectomy for colon cancer. Surg Radiol Anat 2016;38:477-84.
4. Yoo SJ, Ku MJ, Cho SS, Yoon SP. A case of the inferior mesenteric artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery in a Korean woman. J Korean Med Sci 2011;26:1382-5.
F Corcione, E Pontecorvi, V Silvestri, G Merola, U Bracale
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1766 views
19 likes
0 comments
21:44
Vascular anatomy of left and right colon: standard vs. variations
The vascular anatomy of the colon has some anatomical variations [1]. In this video, starting from the normal surgical anatomy of the colon, authors show many vascular anomalies of surgical interest, which should be known in order to avoid intraoperative complications. In the right colon, the ileocolic artery and the middle colic artery are constantly present in all patients as they arise from the superior mesenteric vessels [2]. Right colic vessels are present only in 80% of cases. The position of ileocolic vessels related to the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) is a key landmark. In this video, starting from the normal surgical anatomy of the right colon, authors show variant ileocolic vessels position defined type A pattern, with ileocolic artery (ICA) which lies in the anterior position in respect to the ileocolic vein (ICV). Authors also show an anomalous origin of the ileocolic vessels, which are more upper in respect to their standard position. Commonly, the ileocolic artery (ICA) lies posterior to the SMV (83%, type B). However, the ICA sometimes lies anteriorly to the SMV (17%, type A) [1]. The vascular system of the left colon has fewer variations in terms of position and origin, contrarily to the right colon. The most frequent variations of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) supply involve the division of the sigmoid arteries, as classified by Latarjet in two different types, depending on the anatomical relationship between the left colic and sigmoid arteries [3]. However, in this video authors show a rare case of IMA arising from the superior mesenteric artery [4].
References:
1. Milsom JW, Böhm B, Nakajima K. Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery 2006, Springer.
2. Wu C, Ye K, Wu Y, Chen Q, Xu J, Lin J, Kang W. Variations in right colic vascular anatomy observed during laparoscopic right colectomy. World J Surg Oncol 2019;17:16.
3. Patroni A, Bonnet S, Bourillon C, Bruzzi M, Zinzindohoue F, Chevallier JM, Douard R, Berger A. Technical difficulties of left colic artery preservation during left colectomy for colon cancer. Surg Radiol Anat 2016;38:477-84.
4. Yoo SJ, Ku MJ, Cho SS, Yoon SP. A case of the inferior mesenteric artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery in a Korean woman. J Korean Med Sci 2011;26:1382-5.
Redo laparoscopic anterior resection
The reported incidence rates of regional recurrence for colorectal cancer after oncologic resection ranged between 5% and 19%. Locoregional recurrence occurs in the anastomotic site, the remnant colon, the peritoneal surface (nodal or soft tissue), or the retroperitoneum. As reported in the literature, in colorectal cancers, mucinous differentiation, lymphovascular invasion and anastomotic leakage are independent risk factors for anastomotic recurrence.
We present the case of an 86 year-old female patient. In 2014, the patient underwent a laparoscopic left colectomy for a Haggitt level 4 sigmoid polyp. The definitive histologic features showed a T2N0M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma. During the postoperative follow-up, 46 months after the left colectomy, an anastomotic recurrence was found. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colorectal resection for anastomotic recurrence. The operative time was 220 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. No complications occurred intraoperatively and postoperatively.
References:
1. Gopalan S, Bose JC, Periasamy S (2015) Anastomotic Recurrence of Colon Cancer-is it a Local Recurrence, a Second Primary, or a Metastatic Disease (Local Manifestation of Systemic Disease)? Indian J Surg 77:232-236.
2. Ramphal W, Boeding JRE, Gobardhan PD, Rutten HJT, de Winter L, Crolla R, Schreinemakers JMJ (2018) Oncologic outcome and recurrence rate following anastomotic leakage after curative resection for colorectal cancer. Surg Oncol 27:730-736.
3. Jung WB, Yu CS, Lim SB, Park IJ, Yoon YS, Kim JC (2017) Anastomotic Recurrence After Curative Resection for Colorectal Cancer. World J Surg 41:285-294.
F Corcione, M D'Ambra, U Bracale, S Dilillo, G Luglio
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
2932 views
3 likes
1 comment
23:20
Redo laparoscopic anterior resection
The reported incidence rates of regional recurrence for colorectal cancer after oncologic resection ranged between 5% and 19%. Locoregional recurrence occurs in the anastomotic site, the remnant colon, the peritoneal surface (nodal or soft tissue), or the retroperitoneum. As reported in the literature, in colorectal cancers, mucinous differentiation, lymphovascular invasion and anastomotic leakage are independent risk factors for anastomotic recurrence.
We present the case of an 86 year-old female patient. In 2014, the patient underwent a laparoscopic left colectomy for a Haggitt level 4 sigmoid polyp. The definitive histologic features showed a T2N0M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma. During the postoperative follow-up, 46 months after the left colectomy, an anastomotic recurrence was found. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colorectal resection for anastomotic recurrence. The operative time was 220 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. No complications occurred intraoperatively and postoperatively.
References:
1. Gopalan S, Bose JC, Periasamy S (2015) Anastomotic Recurrence of Colon Cancer-is it a Local Recurrence, a Second Primary, or a Metastatic Disease (Local Manifestation of Systemic Disease)? Indian J Surg 77:232-236.
2. Ramphal W, Boeding JRE, Gobardhan PD, Rutten HJT, de Winter L, Crolla R, Schreinemakers JMJ (2018) Oncologic outcome and recurrence rate following anastomotic leakage after curative resection for colorectal cancer. Surg Oncol 27:730-736.
3. Jung WB, Yu CS, Lim SB, Park IJ, Yoon YS, Kim JC (2017) Anastomotic Recurrence After Curative Resection for Colorectal Cancer. World J Surg 41:285-294.
Suprapubic single-incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection with hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomosis
Background: The authors report the case of a 30-year-old woman who consulted for episodes of diverticulitis due to segmental diverticulosis of the splenic flexure. The patient was scheduled for a suprapubic single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection.

Video: A right suprapubic incision was performed and allowed for the introduction of three abdominal trocars (11mm, and two 6mm ones). DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were used, in addition to a 10mm, 30-degree regular length scope. The mobilization of the left mesocolon as well as of the transverse mesocolon was performed. After having completely freed the splenic flexure from its attachments, the transverse colon and the left colon were divided using an articulating linear stapler, introduced into the abdomen under a 5mm, 30-degree long scope. An intracorporeal end-to-end transverse sigmoid anastomosis was performed using two converging running sutures. The mesocolic defect was closed. The specimen was removed through a single access and final scar appeared to be 4cm.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 165 minutes and time to perform the anastomosis was 60 minutes. Operative bleeding was 10cc. The patient was discharged after 4 days, and at visit consultations, the symptoms were resolved.

Conclusion: Single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection can be safely performed using a suprapubic access, which enhances cosmetic outcomes, in addition to the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. A laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory and can be performed using a hand-sewn method.
G Dapri, L Cardinali, A Cadenas Febres, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1726 views
93 likes
0 comments
07:12
Suprapubic single-incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection with hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomosis
Background: The authors report the case of a 30-year-old woman who consulted for episodes of diverticulitis due to segmental diverticulosis of the splenic flexure. The patient was scheduled for a suprapubic single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection.

Video: A right suprapubic incision was performed and allowed for the introduction of three abdominal trocars (11mm, and two 6mm ones). DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were used, in addition to a 10mm, 30-degree regular length scope. The mobilization of the left mesocolon as well as of the transverse mesocolon was performed. After having completely freed the splenic flexure from its attachments, the transverse colon and the left colon were divided using an articulating linear stapler, introduced into the abdomen under a 5mm, 30-degree long scope. An intracorporeal end-to-end transverse sigmoid anastomosis was performed using two converging running sutures. The mesocolic defect was closed. The specimen was removed through a single access and final scar appeared to be 4cm.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 165 minutes and time to perform the anastomosis was 60 minutes. Operative bleeding was 10cc. The patient was discharged after 4 days, and at visit consultations, the symptoms were resolved.

Conclusion: Single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection can be safely performed using a suprapubic access, which enhances cosmetic outcomes, in addition to the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. A laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory and can be performed using a hand-sewn method.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
E Parra-Davila, M Ignat, L Soler, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1837 views
3 likes
0 comments
32:48
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2862 views
9 likes
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10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.