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Minimally invasive management of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and related anomalies
Operative indications in case of vesicorenal reflux in children have become increasingly rare. The true minimally invasive spirit first necessitates an endoscopic treatment, also called the STING procedure. A ureterovesical reimplantation is required in the presence of clinical or anatomical circumstances. Dr. Paul Philippe describes the operative pneumovesicoscopy developed by CK Yeung and Jeff Valla more than 15 years ago. Despite brilliant presentations, this technique has remained very confidential, probably because of the difficulties come across by the operators when performing the procedure. It is undoubtedly a very demanding technique as far as manual expertise is concerned.
The scarcity of operative indications and the difficulties met in the realization of this surgery render the acquisition of an expertise in the field difficult. However, the technique and the tricks described by Paul Philippe are absolutely remarkable and postoperative outcomes are particularly interesting. We are truly in the context which was initially described 25 years ago when laparoscopic surgery barely started to develop. It is key to reproduce exactly what was previously performed in open surgery in a laparoscopic fashion (or in the present case using pneumovesicoscopy).
P Philippe
Lecture
4 years ago
466 views
21 likes
0 comments
15:24
Minimally invasive management of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and related anomalies
Operative indications in case of vesicorenal reflux in children have become increasingly rare. The true minimally invasive spirit first necessitates an endoscopic treatment, also called the STING procedure. A ureterovesical reimplantation is required in the presence of clinical or anatomical circumstances. Dr. Paul Philippe describes the operative pneumovesicoscopy developed by CK Yeung and Jeff Valla more than 15 years ago. Despite brilliant presentations, this technique has remained very confidential, probably because of the difficulties come across by the operators when performing the procedure. It is undoubtedly a very demanding technique as far as manual expertise is concerned.
The scarcity of operative indications and the difficulties met in the realization of this surgery render the acquisition of an expertise in the field difficult. However, the technique and the tricks described by Paul Philippe are absolutely remarkable and postoperative outcomes are particularly interesting. We are truly in the context which was initially described 25 years ago when laparoscopic surgery barely started to develop. It is key to reproduce exactly what was previously performed in open surgery in a laparoscopic fashion (or in the present case using pneumovesicoscopy).
Transperitoneal ureteric reimplantation Lich-Gregoir technique for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children
The Lich-Gregoir technique, still currently used in prominent Northern American centers in the nineties, had more or less fallen into disuse. Currently, the scarcity of operative indications for ureterovesical reimplantation, with the advent of the STING procedure, the real technical difficulties found during pneumovesicoscopy for Cohen procedure, the debates on long-term difficulties (e.g., in adult life) to undergo a ureteral endoluminal surgery after a previous Cohen procedure, all these reasons have led to vested and renewed interest in performing the Lich-Gregoir technique laparoscopically. The rigorous evaluation of potential functional vesical disorders is indispensable in case of bilateral surgery.
F Varlet
Lecture
4 years ago
847 views
50 likes
0 comments
14:58
Transperitoneal ureteric reimplantation Lich-Gregoir technique for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children
The Lich-Gregoir technique, still currently used in prominent Northern American centers in the nineties, had more or less fallen into disuse. Currently, the scarcity of operative indications for ureterovesical reimplantation, with the advent of the STING procedure, the real technical difficulties found during pneumovesicoscopy for Cohen procedure, the debates on long-term difficulties (e.g., in adult life) to undergo a ureteral endoluminal surgery after a previous Cohen procedure, all these reasons have led to vested and renewed interest in performing the Lich-Gregoir technique laparoscopically. The rigorous evaluation of potential functional vesical disorders is indispensable in case of bilateral surgery.
Winslow's hiatal hernia: laparoscopic treatment
Less than 200 cases of internal hernia have been described through the hiatus of Winslow, usually related to congenital or acquired anatomical defects. The most frequent affectation corresponds to the colon, small intestine and, rarely, to the gallbladder. There is usually occlusion with variable grade ischemia, but it can also occur as obstructive jaundice, biliary colic, secondary pancreatitis and non-symptomatic herniation.
The association of Winslow’s hiatus hernia with various anatomical abnormalities (high or subhepatic caecum, mobile ascending colon, large and long colonic mesentery, etc.) may actually correspond to different degrees of intestinal malrotation and, although the diagnosis of “malrotation” is not usually specified, we believe that this could underlie part of Winslow’s hiatus hernia associated with non-acquired anatomical defects.
Hiatal hernia corresponds to 0.2-0.9% of all cases of intestinal obstruction, of which 8% are from Winslow’s hiatus. If pre-surgical diagnosis is difficult, it occurs in less than 10% of cases.
Mortality is around 50% when it has vascular implication. We have not thought of applying the omentum to seal the defect because we did not have adequate surgical anchor sites since we were working millimeters from the vena cava, extrahepatic bile duct, duodenum, and perirenal area. We decided to fix the colon from the hepatic flexure to the right iliac fossa with continuous stitches, from the colonic serosa to Toldt’s fascia, as it is from the embryonic stage.
JL Limon Aguilar, CO Castillo Cabrera
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
1648 views
17 likes
2 comments
09:56
Winslow's hiatal hernia: laparoscopic treatment
Less than 200 cases of internal hernia have been described through the hiatus of Winslow, usually related to congenital or acquired anatomical defects. The most frequent affectation corresponds to the colon, small intestine and, rarely, to the gallbladder. There is usually occlusion with variable grade ischemia, but it can also occur as obstructive jaundice, biliary colic, secondary pancreatitis and non-symptomatic herniation.
The association of Winslow’s hiatus hernia with various anatomical abnormalities (high or subhepatic caecum, mobile ascending colon, large and long colonic mesentery, etc.) may actually correspond to different degrees of intestinal malrotation and, although the diagnosis of “malrotation” is not usually specified, we believe that this could underlie part of Winslow’s hiatus hernia associated with non-acquired anatomical defects.
Hiatal hernia corresponds to 0.2-0.9% of all cases of intestinal obstruction, of which 8% are from Winslow’s hiatus. If pre-surgical diagnosis is difficult, it occurs in less than 10% of cases.
Mortality is around 50% when it has vascular implication. We have not thought of applying the omentum to seal the defect because we did not have adequate surgical anchor sites since we were working millimeters from the vena cava, extrahepatic bile duct, duodenum, and perirenal area. We decided to fix the colon from the hepatic flexure to the right iliac fossa with continuous stitches, from the colonic serosa to Toldt’s fascia, as it is from the embryonic stage.
Robotic Nissen fundoplication with the da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system
For a long time, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has been used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The main challenges of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication involve the 2-dimensional visualization, exposure of complex gastroesophageal anatomy, and suturing of the wrap fundoplication. In 1999, robotic Nissen fundoplication, a completely new technique, was introduced, demonstrating advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery due to improved manual dexterity, ergonomics, and 3-dimensional visualization. However, time spent on robotic platform docking and arm clashing during the procedure are factors that surgeons often find cumbersome and time-consuming. The newest surgical platform, the da Vinci Xi surgical robotic system, can help to overcome such problems. This video shows a stepwise approach of the da Vinci Xi docking process and surgical technique demonstrating fundoplication according to the Nissen technique.
L Marano, A Spaziani, G Castagnoli
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2258 views
17 likes
0 comments
07:00
Robotic Nissen fundoplication with the da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system
For a long time, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has been used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The main challenges of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication involve the 2-dimensional visualization, exposure of complex gastroesophageal anatomy, and suturing of the wrap fundoplication. In 1999, robotic Nissen fundoplication, a completely new technique, was introduced, demonstrating advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery due to improved manual dexterity, ergonomics, and 3-dimensional visualization. However, time spent on robotic platform docking and arm clashing during the procedure are factors that surgeons often find cumbersome and time-consuming. The newest surgical platform, the da Vinci Xi surgical robotic system, can help to overcome such problems. This video shows a stepwise approach of the da Vinci Xi docking process and surgical technique demonstrating fundoplication according to the Nissen technique.
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
C Viana, M Lozano, D Poletto, T Moreno, C Varela, A Toscano
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4493 views
14 likes
1 comment
15:27
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
Fourth antireflux procedure in a patient with a BMI of 35: esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy
We present an esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy as the fourth antireflux procedure in an obese patient with recurrent severe GERD despite high-dose PPI therapy. After previous Nissen fundoplications and a redo procedure with a partial posterior fundoplication, the patient now presented with an intrathoracic migration of the posterior fundoplication. In these complex redo scenarios in conjunction with a high BMI, the strategy of esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y reconstruction similarly to obesity surgery is increasingly being used.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1113 views
352 likes
0 comments
21:18
Fourth antireflux procedure in a patient with a BMI of 35: esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy
We present an esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy as the fourth antireflux procedure in an obese patient with recurrent severe GERD despite high-dose PPI therapy. After previous Nissen fundoplications and a redo procedure with a partial posterior fundoplication, the patient now presented with an intrathoracic migration of the posterior fundoplication. In these complex redo scenarios in conjunction with a high BMI, the strategy of esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y reconstruction similarly to obesity surgery is increasingly being used.
Pediatric laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication
Surgical therapy is well-established in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is known that the laparoscopic approach is safe and effective. We tailored our surgical strategy based on two main studies which we conducted: one observational long-term follow-up and the other one related to the effect of Thal fundoplication on pulmonary affections. Our conclusions are summarized as follows:
- no surgery in the first 12 months,
- indications determined together with the consent of parents,
- a radiological contrast study should always be performed preoperatively,
- history taking and at least two positive objective diagnoses leading to indication,
- for neurologically impaired patients, a Nissen fundoplication is selected,
- first-line treatment: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) implantation, second step: fundoplication if necessary,
- for neurologically healthy patients without inborn anatomical diseases, a Thal fundoplication is selected,
- postoperative diagnoses in the follow-up period are only performed if necessary.
For this personal experience and in comparison with the established approach in the current literature, we have only poor evidence. It is due to the lack of prospective studies available and to an inadequate number of patients, which is typical in pediatric studies.
S Holland-Cunz
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2530 views
213 likes
0 comments
03:54
Pediatric laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication
Surgical therapy is well-established in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is known that the laparoscopic approach is safe and effective. We tailored our surgical strategy based on two main studies which we conducted: one observational long-term follow-up and the other one related to the effect of Thal fundoplication on pulmonary affections. Our conclusions are summarized as follows:
- no surgery in the first 12 months,
- indications determined together with the consent of parents,
- a radiological contrast study should always be performed preoperatively,
- history taking and at least two positive objective diagnoses leading to indication,
- for neurologically impaired patients, a Nissen fundoplication is selected,
- first-line treatment: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) implantation, second step: fundoplication if necessary,
- for neurologically healthy patients without inborn anatomical diseases, a Thal fundoplication is selected,
- postoperative diagnoses in the follow-up period are only performed if necessary.
For this personal experience and in comparison with the established approach in the current literature, we have only poor evidence. It is due to the lack of prospective studies available and to an inadequate number of patients, which is typical in pediatric studies.