We use cookies to offer you an optimal experience on our website. By browsing our website, you accept the use of cookies.
Filter by
Specialty
View more
Technologies
View more
Clear filter Media type
View more
Clear filter Category
View more
Publication date
Sort by:
Laparoscopic anatomy of the pelvic floor involved in laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence
In this key lecture, Professor Jean-Bernard Dubuisson delineates the laparoscopic pelvic floor anatomy involved in surgical procedures for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Traditional anatomy considers three levels: pelvic and perineal muscles, ligaments, and the space between all fascias covering the organs. Visceral ligaments occupy an anteroposterior axis (pubovesical ligaments, bladder pillars, and uterosacral ligaments) and a transverse axis (lateral bladder ligaments, cardinal ligaments, paracervix and rectal pillars). The four attachment sites which may be used by the surgeon for fascia and pelvic organ attachment in POP surgery are discussed-- Cooper’s ligament, white line, ischial spine, and sacral promontory. Approximately 90 laparoscopic anatomy pictures are presented in this authoritative lecture. The dissection planes and the different pelvic spaces used for surgery are explained, insisting on the main vessels, nerves, plexus, ureters which are obstacles to bear in mind and to avoid.
JB Dubuisson
Lecture
1 year ago
4759 views
612 likes
0 comments
24:09
Laparoscopic anatomy of the pelvic floor involved in laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence
In this key lecture, Professor Jean-Bernard Dubuisson delineates the laparoscopic pelvic floor anatomy involved in surgical procedures for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Traditional anatomy considers three levels: pelvic and perineal muscles, ligaments, and the space between all fascias covering the organs. Visceral ligaments occupy an anteroposterior axis (pubovesical ligaments, bladder pillars, and uterosacral ligaments) and a transverse axis (lateral bladder ligaments, cardinal ligaments, paracervix and rectal pillars). The four attachment sites which may be used by the surgeon for fascia and pelvic organ attachment in POP surgery are discussed-- Cooper’s ligament, white line, ischial spine, and sacral promontory. Approximately 90 laparoscopic anatomy pictures are presented in this authoritative lecture. The dissection planes and the different pelvic spaces used for surgery are explained, insisting on the main vessels, nerves, plexus, ureters which are obstacles to bear in mind and to avoid.
Stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia treatment using laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair
Introduction: Prolapse stands for one of the most common complications of colostomy (>10%). Parastomal incisional hernia also represents 10 to 50% of complications. When both are present, the Sugarbaker technique represents a good indication due to mesh repair and pseudo-subperitonization, which can manage both prolapse and hernia. The laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker technique can be performed laparoscopically even in case of multiple previous laparotomies.
Clinical case: We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient presenting with parastomal incisional hernia and stomal prolapse after multiple abdominal procedures for ulcerative colitis, including rectosigmoidectomy, Hartmann procedure for anastomotic leak, left extended colectomy and stomal transposition for ischemic necrosis. An intra-abdominal proctectomy was attempted to manage the recurrence of colitis on the rectal stump. However, this attempt proved unsuccessful, and a local abdominoperineal resection was performed. Due to symptomatic hernia and prolapse, the laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified surgical technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair is performed to manage prolapse by pseudo-subperitonization and to manage hernia using an IPOM repair. As shown in this video, this technique is safe, reproducible, and effective.
J Leroy, HA Mercoli, S Tzedakis, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2334 views
99 likes
0 comments
10:54
Stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia treatment using laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair
Introduction: Prolapse stands for one of the most common complications of colostomy (>10%). Parastomal incisional hernia also represents 10 to 50% of complications. When both are present, the Sugarbaker technique represents a good indication due to mesh repair and pseudo-subperitonization, which can manage both prolapse and hernia. The laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker technique can be performed laparoscopically even in case of multiple previous laparotomies.
Clinical case: We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient presenting with parastomal incisional hernia and stomal prolapse after multiple abdominal procedures for ulcerative colitis, including rectosigmoidectomy, Hartmann procedure for anastomotic leak, left extended colectomy and stomal transposition for ischemic necrosis. An intra-abdominal proctectomy was attempted to manage the recurrence of colitis on the rectal stump. However, this attempt proved unsuccessful, and a local abdominoperineal resection was performed. Due to symptomatic hernia and prolapse, the laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified surgical technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair is performed to manage prolapse by pseudo-subperitonization and to manage hernia using an IPOM repair. As shown in this video, this technique is safe, reproducible, and effective.
Colonic stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia: laparoscopic Sugarbaker repair procedure
The objective of this film is to demonstrate stoma prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia repair according to the technique described by Sugarbaker in open surgery, reproduced here with a laparoscopic approach.
Mesh placement into the abdominal cavity presents a risk that seems minimized by the development of dual-sided composite meshes, with one collagen coating that will be in contact with the digestive tract, hence limiting the risk of adhesions.
The principle of the Sugarbaker technique is to create a colonic zigzag route and to fix it on the non-absorbable side of the mesh, thereby preventing colonic prolapse. The mesh is also used as an obstacle to the passage of small bowel loops into the parastomal defect.
Here, the difficulty lies in the combined presence of an incisional hernia and prolapse on a diverting transverse colostomy. The risk of vascular injury is all the more important. Here, authors highlight pitfalls as well as tips and tricks to overcome them.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
4169 views
108 likes
0 comments
11:09
Colonic stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia: laparoscopic Sugarbaker repair procedure
The objective of this film is to demonstrate stoma prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia repair according to the technique described by Sugarbaker in open surgery, reproduced here with a laparoscopic approach.
Mesh placement into the abdominal cavity presents a risk that seems minimized by the development of dual-sided composite meshes, with one collagen coating that will be in contact with the digestive tract, hence limiting the risk of adhesions.
The principle of the Sugarbaker technique is to create a colonic zigzag route and to fix it on the non-absorbable side of the mesh, thereby preventing colonic prolapse. The mesh is also used as an obstacle to the passage of small bowel loops into the parastomal defect.
Here, the difficulty lies in the combined presence of an incisional hernia and prolapse on a diverting transverse colostomy. The risk of vascular injury is all the more important. Here, authors highlight pitfalls as well as tips and tricks to overcome them.
Acute small bowel obstruction two months after laparoscopic rectal prolapse surgery: laparoscopic management
Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an ever-increasing clinical problem. In this video, the authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of acute small bowel obstruction. Its successful management depends on a comprehensive knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of obstruction, familiarity with imaging methods, good clinical judgment, and sound technical skills. The adoption of laparoscopy in the treatment of SBO has been slow because of concerns for iatrogenic bowel injury and working space issues related to bowel distension.
In this film, the authors demonstrate that it is essential to rapidly manage the patient after the first acute attack.
Although there is an inherent appeal for laparoscopy in its potential to minimize short- and long-term wound complications and perioperative laparotomy-related morbidity and to theoretically induce fewer subsequent adhesions than a traditional laparotomy incision would.

Small bowel obstruction is a pathology commonly found in the current practice of surgical emergencies. The main cause stems from surgical history with a variable onset of symptoms. The introduction of laparoscopic surgery helped to slightly reduce the number of patients presenting with occlusive syndromes. The rapid management of occlusive patients is one of the keys to success. Consequently, once diagnosis has been evoked, imaging studies must be performed, and especially CT-scan, in order to determine the type of obstruction, its mechanism and its severity. After work-up, either a conservative medical treatment or surgery will be decided upon.
L Marx, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2984 views
20 likes
0 comments
04:19
Acute small bowel obstruction two months after laparoscopic rectal prolapse surgery: laparoscopic management
Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an ever-increasing clinical problem. In this video, the authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of acute small bowel obstruction. Its successful management depends on a comprehensive knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of obstruction, familiarity with imaging methods, good clinical judgment, and sound technical skills. The adoption of laparoscopy in the treatment of SBO has been slow because of concerns for iatrogenic bowel injury and working space issues related to bowel distension.
In this film, the authors demonstrate that it is essential to rapidly manage the patient after the first acute attack.
Although there is an inherent appeal for laparoscopy in its potential to minimize short- and long-term wound complications and perioperative laparotomy-related morbidity and to theoretically induce fewer subsequent adhesions than a traditional laparotomy incision would.

Small bowel obstruction is a pathology commonly found in the current practice of surgical emergencies. The main cause stems from surgical history with a variable onset of symptoms. The introduction of laparoscopic surgery helped to slightly reduce the number of patients presenting with occlusive syndromes. The rapid management of occlusive patients is one of the keys to success. Consequently, once diagnosis has been evoked, imaging studies must be performed, and especially CT-scan, in order to determine the type of obstruction, its mechanism and its severity. After work-up, either a conservative medical treatment or surgery will be decided upon.
Laparoscopic anterior rectopexy for rectal prolapse
This video demonstrates the technique and steps required to perform a laparoscopic anterior rectopexy for the successful treatment of rectal prolapse. The treatment of rectal prolapse with a laparoscopic trans-abdominal approach is well-established and has resulted in reduced morbidity and shorter hospital stay. It is also well-tolerated in the elderly and shows an improvement in incontinence and a low recurrence rate. This procedure can be enhanced by using a purely anterior (ventral) approach. The dissection is kept anterior to the rectum, by opening the rectovaginal septum and then continuing down to the pelvic floor where a mesh rectopexy is then performed. This avoids posterior rectal dissection and spares the autonomic pelvic nerves; it keeps morbidity low and improves constipation.
J Saunders, P Thomas, K Badrinath
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
13647 views
230 likes
0 comments
06:56
Laparoscopic anterior rectopexy for rectal prolapse
This video demonstrates the technique and steps required to perform a laparoscopic anterior rectopexy for the successful treatment of rectal prolapse. The treatment of rectal prolapse with a laparoscopic trans-abdominal approach is well-established and has resulted in reduced morbidity and shorter hospital stay. It is also well-tolerated in the elderly and shows an improvement in incontinence and a low recurrence rate. This procedure can be enhanced by using a purely anterior (ventral) approach. The dissection is kept anterior to the rectum, by opening the rectovaginal septum and then continuing down to the pelvic floor where a mesh rectopexy is then performed. This avoids posterior rectal dissection and spares the autonomic pelvic nerves; it keeps morbidity low and improves constipation.
Surgical tutorial: laparoscopic prolapse repair
In this lecture, Dr. Ted Lee, MD, director of the department of minimally invasive gynecologic surgery in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, focuses on the sacrocolpopexy procedure in relation to his experience in the treatment of genital organ prolapse. He highlights some important key steps of the procedure, together with some tips and tricks on optimizing exposure, facilitating dissection, suturing of the mesh and how to minimize complications.
The first step of the procedure is an adequate exposure with bowel retraction in order to have sufficient space to work in the sacral promontory area.
The next step is the rectovaginal dissection, with caution to keep the dissection close to the vagina, leave enough adipose tissue to the rectum, and dissect the pararectal spaces until the levator ani muscles. Dr. Lee stresses the fact that the depth of the dissection depends on the posterior wall defect. So in patients with a posterior defect not protruding outside the hymen, the dissection should stop at the level of the midvagina. This is in order to avoid future constipation with deep dissection. Only in patients with large posterior wall defects, the dissection should be performed at the level of the levator ani. Dr. Lee indicates some surgical instruments, such as the rectal probes and retractors, that are useful for the dissection of the rectovaginal space.
Next step is the vesicovaginal dissection, which can be very challenging, especially in patients with previous hysterectomy. Some tips and tricks such as the use of a Foley catheter or the use of a large probe to distend the vagina in order to facilitate dissection are demonstrated.
Next is the presacral dissection with skeletonization of the fibrofatty tissue, dissection from right to left to preserve the hypogastric nerve, and identification of a good plane of dissection to avoid bleeding, especially from the left common iliac vein, but also from sacral vessels, which can be dissected.
The last step is the suturing of the mesh. He explains that there is no longer the need to use non-absorbable sutures together with the use of tackers in order to secure the mesh to the sacrum without complications. A nice technique of suturing and knotting is demonstrated during mesh peritonization.
Finally, in patients where the uterus needs to be preserved for fertility purposes (sacrohysteropexy), Dr. Lee explains an alternative method to place the mesh medial to the uterine vessels in order to perform, if need be, a hysterectomy more easily later on. He also demonstrates a nice uterosacral suspension technique used in patients who do not wish to be treated with a mesh for their prolapse.
T Lee
Lecture
8 years ago
2668 views
65 likes
0 comments
25:34
Surgical tutorial: laparoscopic prolapse repair
In this lecture, Dr. Ted Lee, MD, director of the department of minimally invasive gynecologic surgery in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, focuses on the sacrocolpopexy procedure in relation to his experience in the treatment of genital organ prolapse. He highlights some important key steps of the procedure, together with some tips and tricks on optimizing exposure, facilitating dissection, suturing of the mesh and how to minimize complications.
The first step of the procedure is an adequate exposure with bowel retraction in order to have sufficient space to work in the sacral promontory area.
The next step is the rectovaginal dissection, with caution to keep the dissection close to the vagina, leave enough adipose tissue to the rectum, and dissect the pararectal spaces until the levator ani muscles. Dr. Lee stresses the fact that the depth of the dissection depends on the posterior wall defect. So in patients with a posterior defect not protruding outside the hymen, the dissection should stop at the level of the midvagina. This is in order to avoid future constipation with deep dissection. Only in patients with large posterior wall defects, the dissection should be performed at the level of the levator ani. Dr. Lee indicates some surgical instruments, such as the rectal probes and retractors, that are useful for the dissection of the rectovaginal space.
Next step is the vesicovaginal dissection, which can be very challenging, especially in patients with previous hysterectomy. Some tips and tricks such as the use of a Foley catheter or the use of a large probe to distend the vagina in order to facilitate dissection are demonstrated.
Next is the presacral dissection with skeletonization of the fibrofatty tissue, dissection from right to left to preserve the hypogastric nerve, and identification of a good plane of dissection to avoid bleeding, especially from the left common iliac vein, but also from sacral vessels, which can be dissected.
The last step is the suturing of the mesh. He explains that there is no longer the need to use non-absorbable sutures together with the use of tackers in order to secure the mesh to the sacrum without complications. A nice technique of suturing and knotting is demonstrated during mesh peritonization.
Finally, in patients where the uterus needs to be preserved for fertility purposes (sacrohysteropexy), Dr. Lee explains an alternative method to place the mesh medial to the uterine vessels in order to perform, if need be, a hysterectomy more easily later on. He also demonstrates a nice uterosacral suspension technique used in patients who do not wish to be treated with a mesh for their prolapse.
Laparoscopic indirect ventral rectopexy with sigmoidectomy for rectal prolapse in a young female patient
The aim of surgical treatment of rectal prolapse is to anatomically restore prolapse and functionally remedy fecal incontinence and disorder of rectal emptying. There is not yet sufficient evidence-based knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of various surgical methods. In practice, trans-abdominal surgery is recommended for patients in good conditions and perineal surgery for elderly and frail patients suffering from associated diseases. The progress of laparoscopic surgery has, however, made the trans-abdominal operation possible also for those in increasingly poor condition. With this procedure a significant improvement of defecation disorder is achieved in over 80% of patients. This video demonstrates the laparoscopic management of a rectal prolapse associated with constipation and a posterior enterocele.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
3369 views
140 likes
0 comments
15:44
Laparoscopic indirect ventral rectopexy with sigmoidectomy for rectal prolapse in a young female patient
The aim of surgical treatment of rectal prolapse is to anatomically restore prolapse and functionally remedy fecal incontinence and disorder of rectal emptying. There is not yet sufficient evidence-based knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of various surgical methods. In practice, trans-abdominal surgery is recommended for patients in good conditions and perineal surgery for elderly and frail patients suffering from associated diseases. The progress of laparoscopic surgery has, however, made the trans-abdominal operation possible also for those in increasingly poor condition. With this procedure a significant improvement of defecation disorder is achieved in over 80% of patients. This video demonstrates the laparoscopic management of a rectal prolapse associated with constipation and a posterior enterocele.
Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with ventral and posterior indirect rectopexy for rectal prolapse in a female patient
Rectal prolapse is an uncommon disease mainly seen in patients of advanced age.
In the last few years, the laparoscopic route has been shown to be feasible and has the advantage of being a minimally invasive technique. The objective of this film is to demonstrate a technique for the repair of rectal prolapse with sigmoidectomy. This is the case of a 72-year-old woman with a previous history of hysterectomy presenting also with dyschezia and moderate incontinence and a grade III rectal prolapse. Defecography showed a prolapse of the upper rectum with an enterocele without any associated rectocele in spite of the hysterectomy.
J Leroy, D Mutter, F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
2542 views
135 likes
0 comments
10:26
Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with ventral and posterior indirect rectopexy for rectal prolapse in a female patient
Rectal prolapse is an uncommon disease mainly seen in patients of advanced age.
In the last few years, the laparoscopic route has been shown to be feasible and has the advantage of being a minimally invasive technique. The objective of this film is to demonstrate a technique for the repair of rectal prolapse with sigmoidectomy. This is the case of a 72-year-old woman with a previous history of hysterectomy presenting also with dyschezia and moderate incontinence and a grade III rectal prolapse. Defecography showed a prolapse of the upper rectum with an enterocele without any associated rectocele in spite of the hysterectomy.
Laparoscopic treatment of a recurrent colostomy prolapse
The creation of a colostomy is a frequent procedure in visceral surgery. Despite new operative techniques, the stoma formation remains an often necessary surgical procedure, which results in a dramatic change in the patients' life. Many complications, such as stoma necrosis, stoma retraction or stoma prolapse can occur.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate the various ways in which a laparoscopic subperitoneal colostomy can be performed. This is the case of a female patient presenting a mental handicap and a chronic renal insufficiency with hemodialysis 3 times a week. She has had a definite colostomy for the treatment of anal incontinence, with complete sphincteric destruction.
The colostomy was associated with recurrent episodes of prolapse. A laparoscopic approach is worth performing here in order to have a preperitoneal, subperitoneal tunnel between the right hypochondrium and the left subcostal area where the colostomy is located.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
738 views
72 likes
0 comments
06:59
Laparoscopic treatment of a recurrent colostomy prolapse
The creation of a colostomy is a frequent procedure in visceral surgery. Despite new operative techniques, the stoma formation remains an often necessary surgical procedure, which results in a dramatic change in the patients' life. Many complications, such as stoma necrosis, stoma retraction or stoma prolapse can occur.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate the various ways in which a laparoscopic subperitoneal colostomy can be performed. This is the case of a female patient presenting a mental handicap and a chronic renal insufficiency with hemodialysis 3 times a week. She has had a definite colostomy for the treatment of anal incontinence, with complete sphincteric destruction.
The colostomy was associated with recurrent episodes of prolapse. A laparoscopic approach is worth performing here in order to have a preperitoneal, subperitoneal tunnel between the right hypochondrium and the left subcostal area where the colostomy is located.
Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy in a male patient
Introduction
Ventral rectopexy, with or without mesh, has a lower recurrence rate than a perineal approach for rectal prolapse treatment. One of the techniques which are gaining a wider acceptance is the laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy, also called D'Hoore rectopexy. The unique feature of this technique is that it avoids any posterolateral dissection of the rectum. Clinical outcomes demonstrate that this technique present good results in terms of recurrence, a low rate of constipation induced by the procedure, as well a low risk of sexual dysfunction.

Clinical case
A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a one-year evolution of rectal prolapse with complaints of sporadic rectal bleeding and soiling. He reports daily bowel movements with a necessity of manual prolapse reduction. His past medical history includes follicular lymphoma. He has no history of previous surgeries.
After preoperative investigation with colonoscopy, a barium enema and anorectal function tests, a laparoscopic D’Hoore rectopexy was proposed to the patient.
In this video, we present the critical steps of the procedure with special attention to the preservation of the hypogastric nerves.
The postoperative outcome was uneventful. In the follow-up period, the patient reports a significant improvement of symptoms, without rectal prolapse at defecation, no constipation, and no change in sexual function.
M Manzanera Díaz, C Moreno Sanz, J De Pedro Conal, A Goulart, F Cortina Oliva
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
4637 views
247 likes
0 comments
07:35
Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy in a male patient
Introduction
Ventral rectopexy, with or without mesh, has a lower recurrence rate than a perineal approach for rectal prolapse treatment. One of the techniques which are gaining a wider acceptance is the laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy, also called D'Hoore rectopexy. The unique feature of this technique is that it avoids any posterolateral dissection of the rectum. Clinical outcomes demonstrate that this technique present good results in terms of recurrence, a low rate of constipation induced by the procedure, as well a low risk of sexual dysfunction.

Clinical case
A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a one-year evolution of rectal prolapse with complaints of sporadic rectal bleeding and soiling. He reports daily bowel movements with a necessity of manual prolapse reduction. His past medical history includes follicular lymphoma. He has no history of previous surgeries.
After preoperative investigation with colonoscopy, a barium enema and anorectal function tests, a laparoscopic D’Hoore rectopexy was proposed to the patient.
In this video, we present the critical steps of the procedure with special attention to the preservation of the hypogastric nerves.
The postoperative outcome was uneventful. In the follow-up period, the patient reports a significant improvement of symptoms, without rectal prolapse at defecation, no constipation, and no change in sexual function.
Laparoscopic dissection of sacral promontory for sacrocolpopexy
Objective: To describe the laparoscopic dissection of the sacral promontory during a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, with a special focus on anatomical landmarks and surgical traps.
Setting: Department of Gynecology, CMCO, Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
Patients: Women with invalidating genital prolapse
Interventions: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is performed using three operative ports (one midline, suprapubic port and two lateral ports) and a 0-degree umbilical Karl Storz optical port. In order to suture a polypropylene mesh to the anterior vertebral ligament, the promontory area must be dissected. To improve sacral promontory exposure, the rectum is usually suspended to the left anterior abdominal wall by means of T’Lift™ tissue retraction systems. By palpating the area under the aortic bifurcation and the confluence of iliac veins, the sacral promontory is identified. The right ureter is also identified. Using two duck jaw fenestrated forceps, the peritoneum is lifted --retroperitoneal vessels are fixed to the vertebral elements, and widely opened. The promontory is carefully dissected until the anterior vertebral ligament becomes visible. As the presacral space is rich in blood vessels and nerve elements, surgeons are advised to preserve it.
However, the surgical approach to the vertebral ligament is sometimes difficult in obese women, when patients present anatomical variations such as a low iliac venous circulation confluence, a duplicity of middle sacral vessels, periosteal perforators, a winding right common iliac artery, or in the presence of lymph nodes.
Discussion: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy complications rates such as bleeding originating from the promontory varying from 0 to 4.7%, which sometimes require conversion to open abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Described by radiologists at almost 3cm from the sacral promontory, the right ureter can also be injured during reperitonization.
Conclusion: Laparoscopic dissection of the promontory requires specific and careful attention to be paid to non-infrequent anatomical variations.
V Gabriele, AJ Carin, K Afors, O Garbin
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
5387 views
227 likes
1 comment
07:24
Laparoscopic dissection of sacral promontory for sacrocolpopexy
Objective: To describe the laparoscopic dissection of the sacral promontory during a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, with a special focus on anatomical landmarks and surgical traps.
Setting: Department of Gynecology, CMCO, Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
Patients: Women with invalidating genital prolapse
Interventions: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is performed using three operative ports (one midline, suprapubic port and two lateral ports) and a 0-degree umbilical Karl Storz optical port. In order to suture a polypropylene mesh to the anterior vertebral ligament, the promontory area must be dissected. To improve sacral promontory exposure, the rectum is usually suspended to the left anterior abdominal wall by means of T’Lift™ tissue retraction systems. By palpating the area under the aortic bifurcation and the confluence of iliac veins, the sacral promontory is identified. The right ureter is also identified. Using two duck jaw fenestrated forceps, the peritoneum is lifted --retroperitoneal vessels are fixed to the vertebral elements, and widely opened. The promontory is carefully dissected until the anterior vertebral ligament becomes visible. As the presacral space is rich in blood vessels and nerve elements, surgeons are advised to preserve it.
However, the surgical approach to the vertebral ligament is sometimes difficult in obese women, when patients present anatomical variations such as a low iliac venous circulation confluence, a duplicity of middle sacral vessels, periosteal perforators, a winding right common iliac artery, or in the presence of lymph nodes.
Discussion: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy complications rates such as bleeding originating from the promontory varying from 0 to 4.7%, which sometimes require conversion to open abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Described by radiologists at almost 3cm from the sacral promontory, the right ureter can also be injured during reperitonization.
Conclusion: Laparoscopic dissection of the promontory requires specific and careful attention to be paid to non-infrequent anatomical variations.