We use cookies to offer you an optimal experience on our website. By browsing our website, you accept the use of cookies.
Filter by
Specialty
View more
Technologies
View more
Clear filter Media type
View more
Clear filter Category
View more
Publication date
Sort by:
Successful closure of iatrogenic colonic perforation with Over-The-Scope Clip™ system (OVESCO™) after failed attempt with standard endoscopic clips
Iatrogenic colonic perforation is a rare complication which has been reported in 0.03%-0.8% of cases during diagnostic colonoscopy. The sigmoid colon and the rectosigmoid junction are the most common sites of perforation during diagnostic examination. Successful endoscopic closure of the defect has been reported using standard clips. However, in case of large defects, standard clips are often ineffective. OTSC™ clips are devices which are successfully used to close wall defects up to 25mm. They make it possible to continue the endoscopic procedure after wall defect closure. In this video, we show the successful closure of a sigmoid colonic iatrogenic perforation in a 50-year-old woman by means of the Over The Scope Clip™ system (OVESCO® Endoscopy, Germany) (11/6 t) after failed attempt with standard clips. OVESCO™ was applied with a standard gastroscope using the suction technique by pushing the cap against the edges of the defect. In order to prevent incarceration of adjacent structures a soft aspiration of the omentum was applied and the OVESCO™ was carefully deployed. Carbon dioxide insufflation was used. Antibiotic therapy was started and the patient was discharged 5 days later. In conclusion, the Over The Scope Clip™ (OTSC™) is a safe surgery-sparing tool which allows for a successful iatrogenic perforation closure of the GI tract, performing omentoplasty by means of a suction technique.
Gf Donatelli
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1348 views
31 likes
0 comments
02:28
Successful closure of iatrogenic colonic perforation with Over-The-Scope Clip™ system (OVESCO™) after failed attempt with standard endoscopic clips
Iatrogenic colonic perforation is a rare complication which has been reported in 0.03%-0.8% of cases during diagnostic colonoscopy. The sigmoid colon and the rectosigmoid junction are the most common sites of perforation during diagnostic examination. Successful endoscopic closure of the defect has been reported using standard clips. However, in case of large defects, standard clips are often ineffective. OTSC™ clips are devices which are successfully used to close wall defects up to 25mm. They make it possible to continue the endoscopic procedure after wall defect closure. In this video, we show the successful closure of a sigmoid colonic iatrogenic perforation in a 50-year-old woman by means of the Over The Scope Clip™ system (OVESCO® Endoscopy, Germany) (11/6 t) after failed attempt with standard clips. OVESCO™ was applied with a standard gastroscope using the suction technique by pushing the cap against the edges of the defect. In order to prevent incarceration of adjacent structures a soft aspiration of the omentum was applied and the OVESCO™ was carefully deployed. Carbon dioxide insufflation was used. Antibiotic therapy was started and the patient was discharged 5 days later. In conclusion, the Over The Scope Clip™ (OTSC™) is a safe surgery-sparing tool which allows for a successful iatrogenic perforation closure of the GI tract, performing omentoplasty by means of a suction technique.
Repair of distal esophageal perforation (Boerhaave’s syndrome) by left thoracoscopy with the patient in prone position
Background: Boerhaave’s syndrome is an emergency disease related to a high risk of mortality and morbidity. Surgical treatment is usually performed by thoracotomy or thoracoscopy with the patient in lateral position. The authors report a patient with a distal esophageal perforation treated by left thoracoscopy in prone position.

Clinical case: A 44-year-old man was admitted to our emergency room following a 14-hour episode of vomiting and hematemesis. Preoperative work-up evidenced a perforation of the distal esophagus on the left side, associated with a pneumomediastinum. The patient underwent a left thoracoscopy in a prone position, after induction of general anesthesia using a Carlens-type double lumen tube. Three trocars of 5mm, 10mm, and 5mm, were placed in the 5th, 7th, and 10th intercostal spaces respectively. Exploration of the chest cavity revealed the presence of free liquid and fibrin, with no evidence of esophageal perforation. However, the esophageal perforation was demonstrated after dissection of the mediastinal pleura, and appeared to be 2cm in length. A nasogastric tube was advanced into the stomach under visual control, and an additional trocarless grasper was placed in the 10th intercostal space to improve exposure. The esophagus perforation was closed using 2/0 silk interrupted sutures, with a reinforcement patch using the inferior pulmonary ligament. The cavity was cleansed and the 5mm trocar was replaced with a chest tube in the 10th intercostal space, with its tip close to the suture.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and no significant operative bleeding was noted. The patient was admitted to hospital in the Intensive Care Unit and extubated after 24 hours. A chest tube was placed in the right chest after 10 days for a pleural effusion, and a pericardial drain was placed after 16 days for pericardial tamponade. A gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 10 revealed a residual sinus at the site of the perforation. Another gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 20 was negative for leakage. The patient was discharged after 32 days.

Conclusions: Esophageal perforation can be treated by thoracoscopy with the patient placed in a prone position as access is facilitated by the effect of gravity on the cardiopulmonary organs. The success of the primary suture depends on the timing between the incident and the treatment; however, morbidity remains high.
G Dapri, S Carandina, L Gerard, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
3028 views
59 likes
0 comments
07:11
Repair of distal esophageal perforation (Boerhaave’s syndrome) by left thoracoscopy with the patient in prone position
Background: Boerhaave’s syndrome is an emergency disease related to a high risk of mortality and morbidity. Surgical treatment is usually performed by thoracotomy or thoracoscopy with the patient in lateral position. The authors report a patient with a distal esophageal perforation treated by left thoracoscopy in prone position.

Clinical case: A 44-year-old man was admitted to our emergency room following a 14-hour episode of vomiting and hematemesis. Preoperative work-up evidenced a perforation of the distal esophagus on the left side, associated with a pneumomediastinum. The patient underwent a left thoracoscopy in a prone position, after induction of general anesthesia using a Carlens-type double lumen tube. Three trocars of 5mm, 10mm, and 5mm, were placed in the 5th, 7th, and 10th intercostal spaces respectively. Exploration of the chest cavity revealed the presence of free liquid and fibrin, with no evidence of esophageal perforation. However, the esophageal perforation was demonstrated after dissection of the mediastinal pleura, and appeared to be 2cm in length. A nasogastric tube was advanced into the stomach under visual control, and an additional trocarless grasper was placed in the 10th intercostal space to improve exposure. The esophagus perforation was closed using 2/0 silk interrupted sutures, with a reinforcement patch using the inferior pulmonary ligament. The cavity was cleansed and the 5mm trocar was replaced with a chest tube in the 10th intercostal space, with its tip close to the suture.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and no significant operative bleeding was noted. The patient was admitted to hospital in the Intensive Care Unit and extubated after 24 hours. A chest tube was placed in the right chest after 10 days for a pleural effusion, and a pericardial drain was placed after 16 days for pericardial tamponade. A gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 10 revealed a residual sinus at the site of the perforation. Another gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 20 was negative for leakage. The patient was discharged after 32 days.

Conclusions: Esophageal perforation can be treated by thoracoscopy with the patient placed in a prone position as access is facilitated by the effect of gravity on the cardiopulmonary organs. The success of the primary suture depends on the timing between the incident and the treatment; however, morbidity remains high.
Laparoscopic management of sealed gallbladder perforation
This video features a 62-year-old diabetic male patient who is not undergoing any treatment. He has sufferont from vague upper abdominal pain for one month. He has a past history of acute upper abdominal pain which was managed conservatively.
Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrates cholelithiasis with signs of chronic cholecystitis. Blood examination reveals hyperglycemia with normal liver function tests.
After controlling the hyperglycemic status, the patient is subjected to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There is evidence of gallbladder perforation, as the gallbladder is sealed off by the omentum. The gallbladder presents a large amount of calculi which are visible through the thin wall of the gallbladder, and some calculi almost protruding out through the wall.
The laparoscopic cholecystectomy is performed successfully with caution not to soil the peritoneum.
E Khiangte, I Newme, P Phukan
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
4042 views
52 likes
0 comments
06:39
Laparoscopic management of sealed gallbladder perforation
This video features a 62-year-old diabetic male patient who is not undergoing any treatment. He has sufferont from vague upper abdominal pain for one month. He has a past history of acute upper abdominal pain which was managed conservatively.
Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrates cholelithiasis with signs of chronic cholecystitis. Blood examination reveals hyperglycemia with normal liver function tests.
After controlling the hyperglycemic status, the patient is subjected to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There is evidence of gallbladder perforation, as the gallbladder is sealed off by the omentum. The gallbladder presents a large amount of calculi which are visible through the thin wall of the gallbladder, and some calculi almost protruding out through the wall.
The laparoscopic cholecystectomy is performed successfully with caution not to soil the peritoneum.
Laparoscopic management of small bowel perforation induced by foreign body
Ingested foreign bodies are a common cause for emergency hospital admission. A precise interview of the patient often allows to establish the diagnosis. In 90% of cases, the foreign body is spontaneously eliminated without inducing any particular symptoms. In less than 10% of cases, it requires non-surgical extraction maneuvers (enemas, endoscopy). Only 1% of cases are treated surgically. Modern imaging frequently allows to establish a precise topographic diagnosis based on aspect, size and density. Coupled with laparoscopic surgery, it allows for an early, targeted and minimally invasive management. In this video, we show the case of a patient presenting with typical signs of peritonitis along with the incidental discovery of an intraluminal foreign body in the small bowel which brought about a micro-perforation.
L Marx, M Raharimanantsoa, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1840 views
12 likes
0 comments
10:15
Laparoscopic management of small bowel perforation induced by foreign body
Ingested foreign bodies are a common cause for emergency hospital admission. A precise interview of the patient often allows to establish the diagnosis. In 90% of cases, the foreign body is spontaneously eliminated without inducing any particular symptoms. In less than 10% of cases, it requires non-surgical extraction maneuvers (enemas, endoscopy). Only 1% of cases are treated surgically. Modern imaging frequently allows to establish a precise topographic diagnosis based on aspect, size and density. Coupled with laparoscopic surgery, it allows for an early, targeted and minimally invasive management. In this video, we show the case of a patient presenting with typical signs of peritonitis along with the incidental discovery of an intraluminal foreign body in the small bowel which brought about a micro-perforation.
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
X Untereiner, M Pizzicannella, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
5485 views
16 likes
2 comments
06:55
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
Heller's cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Achalasia stems from Greek and means “a” (not) and “khálasis” (relaxation).
Idiopathic megaesophagus (achalasia) is an esophageal primary motor irregularity. It is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis, together with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter after swallowing.
Differential diagnosis must be made between Chagas disease and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate ranges from 0.5 to 1 per 100,000 persons-years of study. Although there are several theories, the etiology remains unknown.
The first clinical description was made by Sir Thomas Wills (1672). He used to treat the disease via dilation with a sponge attached to a whalebone. Arthur Hertz was the first to name the disease “achalasia”. Ernest Heller performed the first successful esophagectomy in 1913. Zaaijer was the first to describe the anterior myotomy in 1923.
Other therapeutic procedures include botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter. It has transient effects and patients can develop tolerance to the injections. Another option is endoscopic hydropneumatic dilation, which should be fluoroscopically-guided. When it fails, the efficacy of other therapeutic options decreases. The most serious complication is esophageal perforation.
The diagnostic criteria are based on endoscopic findings. Endoscopy reveals there are food remains as well as esophageal dilation, and decreased motility. X-ray exams show esophageal dilation and narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric findings show decreased esophageal motility, increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
The patient was operated on. Since there was no hiatal hernia, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication was chosen, based on its efficacy in preventing reflux, as well as in keeping the myotomy free of a wrap.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres, NS Gómez Peña-Alfaro
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
5301 views
25 likes
4 comments
12:40
Heller's cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Achalasia stems from Greek and means “a” (not) and “khálasis” (relaxation).
Idiopathic megaesophagus (achalasia) is an esophageal primary motor irregularity. It is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis, together with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter after swallowing.
Differential diagnosis must be made between Chagas disease and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate ranges from 0.5 to 1 per 100,000 persons-years of study. Although there are several theories, the etiology remains unknown.
The first clinical description was made by Sir Thomas Wills (1672). He used to treat the disease via dilation with a sponge attached to a whalebone. Arthur Hertz was the first to name the disease “achalasia”. Ernest Heller performed the first successful esophagectomy in 1913. Zaaijer was the first to describe the anterior myotomy in 1923.
Other therapeutic procedures include botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter. It has transient effects and patients can develop tolerance to the injections. Another option is endoscopic hydropneumatic dilation, which should be fluoroscopically-guided. When it fails, the efficacy of other therapeutic options decreases. The most serious complication is esophageal perforation.
The diagnostic criteria are based on endoscopic findings. Endoscopy reveals there are food remains as well as esophageal dilation, and decreased motility. X-ray exams show esophageal dilation and narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric findings show decreased esophageal motility, increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
The patient was operated on. Since there was no hiatal hernia, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication was chosen, based on its efficacy in preventing reflux, as well as in keeping the myotomy free of a wrap.
Arthroscopic reconstruction of the TFCC using a free tendon graft
Instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) results from injury or laxity of the ligaments responsible for stabilizing the joint. Of note, the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) plays a crucial role in maintaining DRUJ stability. Sometimes, it may be impossible to repair the TFCC due to degenerative changes in the TFCC. In such cases, DRUJ reconstruction is possible provided that there are no arthritic changes in the DRUJ with the use of tendon graft. The aim of this procedure is to reconstruct the ligament and restore function, thus providing multidirectional stability. This procedure uses a tendon graft, preferably the Palmaris Longus (PL), which is woven through trans-osseous tunnels in the distal radius, converging at the fovea through a distal ulnar trans-osseous tunnel.
C Mathoulin
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
336 views
3 likes
0 comments
12:20
Arthroscopic reconstruction of the TFCC using a free tendon graft
Instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) results from injury or laxity of the ligaments responsible for stabilizing the joint. Of note, the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) plays a crucial role in maintaining DRUJ stability. Sometimes, it may be impossible to repair the TFCC due to degenerative changes in the TFCC. In such cases, DRUJ reconstruction is possible provided that there are no arthritic changes in the DRUJ with the use of tendon graft. The aim of this procedure is to reconstruct the ligament and restore function, thus providing multidirectional stability. This procedure uses a tendon graft, preferably the Palmaris Longus (PL), which is woven through trans-osseous tunnels in the distal radius, converging at the fovea through a distal ulnar trans-osseous tunnel.
Robotic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for esophageal achalasia
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by an incomplete or absent esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation associated with loss of peristalsis or uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal body in response to swallowing. All available treatments for achalasia are palliative, directed towards the elimination of the outflow resistance caused by abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function and aiming to improve the symptoms related to esophageal stasis, such as dysphagia and regurgitation. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is the current standard of care for the treatment of achalasia. It is associated with symptom improvement or relief in about 90% of patients. However, it is a challenging procedure with the potential risk of esophageal perforation reported in up to 10% of cases. Interestingly, laparoscopic myotomy has some limitations which depend on the laparoscopic technique (bidimensional vision, poor range of movement) and on the surgeon’s experience. Recently, the use of the robotic technology has been proposed claiming that it might reduce intraoperative esophageal perforation rates and improve postoperative quality of life after Heller myotomy, mainly due to the 3D view and enhanced dexterity of the surgeon. Despite significant improvements in surgical treatment, the length of myotomy is still a matter of debate to date. Substantially, although some authors proposed a limited myotomy on the lower esophagus preserving a small portion of the LES to prevent postoperative reflux, most authors recommended a myotomy extending 4 to 6cm on the esophagus and 1 to 2cm on the gastric side. In this video, we performed a 6cm long esophagogastric myotomy, with a 2.5cm proximal extension above the Z-line (endoscopically recognized) and a 3.5cm distal extension below the same landmark. In a previous experimental study with intraoperative computerized manometry, we observed that myotomy of the esophageal portion of the LES (without dissection of the gastric fibers) did not lead to any significant variation in sphincteric pressure. Instead, the dissection of the gastric fibers for at least 2 to 2.5cm on the anterior gastric wall created a significant modification of the LES pressure profile. This may be due to the interruption of the anterior portion of gastric semicircular clasp and sling fibers, with consequent loss of their hook properties on the LES pressure profile.
L Marano, A Spaziani, G Castagnoli
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1720 views
7 likes
0 comments
08:13
Robotic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for esophageal achalasia
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by an incomplete or absent esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation associated with loss of peristalsis or uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal body in response to swallowing. All available treatments for achalasia are palliative, directed towards the elimination of the outflow resistance caused by abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function and aiming to improve the symptoms related to esophageal stasis, such as dysphagia and regurgitation. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is the current standard of care for the treatment of achalasia. It is associated with symptom improvement or relief in about 90% of patients. However, it is a challenging procedure with the potential risk of esophageal perforation reported in up to 10% of cases. Interestingly, laparoscopic myotomy has some limitations which depend on the laparoscopic technique (bidimensional vision, poor range of movement) and on the surgeon’s experience. Recently, the use of the robotic technology has been proposed claiming that it might reduce intraoperative esophageal perforation rates and improve postoperative quality of life after Heller myotomy, mainly due to the 3D view and enhanced dexterity of the surgeon. Despite significant improvements in surgical treatment, the length of myotomy is still a matter of debate to date. Substantially, although some authors proposed a limited myotomy on the lower esophagus preserving a small portion of the LES to prevent postoperative reflux, most authors recommended a myotomy extending 4 to 6cm on the esophagus and 1 to 2cm on the gastric side. In this video, we performed a 6cm long esophagogastric myotomy, with a 2.5cm proximal extension above the Z-line (endoscopically recognized) and a 3.5cm distal extension below the same landmark. In a previous experimental study with intraoperative computerized manometry, we observed that myotomy of the esophageal portion of the LES (without dissection of the gastric fibers) did not lead to any significant variation in sphincteric pressure. Instead, the dissection of the gastric fibers for at least 2 to 2.5cm on the anterior gastric wall created a significant modification of the LES pressure profile. This may be due to the interruption of the anterior portion of gastric semicircular clasp and sling fibers, with consequent loss of their hook properties on the LES pressure profile.
Arthroscopic capsuloligamentous suture with anchor for scapholunate dissociation EWAS stage 4
An anatomical and biomechanical study has recently shown that detachment of the scapholunate (SL) ligament from the dorsal capsuloligamentous scapholunate septum (DCSS) and dorsal intercarpal ligament (DIC) worsens scapholunate dissociation. This knowledge has revolutionized the treatment of scapholunate dissociation and formed the basis of the arthroscopic repair of the scapholunate ligament complex. In some large dissociation, we can use a trick, catching a largest part of the dorsal capsule, proximally and distally, in order to help scapholunate reduction when the knot is tightened. Sometimes, the scapholunate ligament is avulsed from the dorsal proximal pole of the scaphoid, and it is necessary to put an anchor at the exact location of the scapholunate attachment into the dorsal scaphoid to allow a dorsal capsuloligamentous repair as for a classical scapholunate tear.
C Mathoulin
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
169 views
3 likes
0 comments
09:08
Arthroscopic capsuloligamentous suture with anchor for scapholunate dissociation EWAS stage 4
An anatomical and biomechanical study has recently shown that detachment of the scapholunate (SL) ligament from the dorsal capsuloligamentous scapholunate septum (DCSS) and dorsal intercarpal ligament (DIC) worsens scapholunate dissociation. This knowledge has revolutionized the treatment of scapholunate dissociation and formed the basis of the arthroscopic repair of the scapholunate ligament complex. In some large dissociation, we can use a trick, catching a largest part of the dorsal capsule, proximally and distally, in order to help scapholunate reduction when the knot is tightened. Sometimes, the scapholunate ligament is avulsed from the dorsal proximal pole of the scaphoid, and it is necessary to put an anchor at the exact location of the scapholunate attachment into the dorsal scaphoid to allow a dorsal capsuloligamentous repair as for a classical scapholunate tear.
Arthroscopic Wafer procedure for ulnar carpal abutment
Ulnocarpal abutment is the inversion of the distal radio ulnar index with a positive ulnar variance (long ulna) and is most frequently secondary to distal radius fractures. The relative ‘shortening of the radius’ leads to a conflict between the ulnar head and the proximal lunatum. The natural evolution of this condition is usually a central perforation of the TFCC complex. This arthrogenic lesion eventually leads to arthritis of the medial proximal lunate as well as the ulnar head. Persistence of the abutment may further lead to lunotriquetral dissociation. There are many management options for the distal radioulnar component of distal radius malunions and the therapeutic choice depends on clinical evaluation and imaging of this joint. In this video, we present the arthroscopic treatment, which remains the simplest and best solution for the patients.
C Mathoulin
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
280 views
6 likes
1 comment
06:03
Arthroscopic Wafer procedure for ulnar carpal abutment
Ulnocarpal abutment is the inversion of the distal radio ulnar index with a positive ulnar variance (long ulna) and is most frequently secondary to distal radius fractures. The relative ‘shortening of the radius’ leads to a conflict between the ulnar head and the proximal lunatum. The natural evolution of this condition is usually a central perforation of the TFCC complex. This arthrogenic lesion eventually leads to arthritis of the medial proximal lunate as well as the ulnar head. Persistence of the abutment may further lead to lunotriquetral dissociation. There are many management options for the distal radioulnar component of distal radius malunions and the therapeutic choice depends on clinical evaluation and imaging of this joint. In this video, we present the arthroscopic treatment, which remains the simplest and best solution for the patients.
Transanal minimally invasive full-thickness middle rectum polyp resection with the patient in a prone position
Background: Nowadays, rectal preservation has gained popularity when it comes to the management of degenerated rectal polyps or early rectal cancer (1, 2). Tis/T1 rectal lesions can be safely treated without chemoradiation (3). Treatment via transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) offers more advantages than endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (4). The authors report the case of a 60-year-old woman who underwent a TAMIS procedure for a large polyp located anteriorly in the middle rectum, which was 7cm away from the pectineal line and staged as uTisN0M0 preoperatively.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone position with a split-leg kneeling position. A reusable transanal D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was introduced into the anus together with DAPRI monocurved instruments (Figure 1). The polyp was put in evidence (Figure 2) and resection margins were defined circumferentially using the monocurved coagulating hook. A full-thickness resection was performed with a complete removal of the rectal serosa and exposure of the peritoneal cavity, due to the anatomical polyp positioning (Figure 3). The rectal opening was subsequently closed using two converging full-thickness running sutures using 3/0 V-loc™ sutures (Figure 4a). The two sutures were started laterally and joined together medially (Figure 4b).
Results: Total operative time was 60 minutes whereas suturing time was 35 minutes. There was no perioperative bleeding. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 2 days. The pathological report showed a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and clear margins.
Conclusions: In the presence of degenerated rectal polyps, full-thickness TAMIS is oncologically safe and feasible. The final rectal flap can be safely closed by means of laparoscopic endoluminal sutures.
G Dapri, L Qin Yi, A Wong, P Tan Enjiu, S Hsien Lin, D Lee, T Kok Yang, S Mantoo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
985 views
198 likes
0 comments
05:53
Transanal minimally invasive full-thickness middle rectum polyp resection with the patient in a prone position
Background: Nowadays, rectal preservation has gained popularity when it comes to the management of degenerated rectal polyps or early rectal cancer (1, 2). Tis/T1 rectal lesions can be safely treated without chemoradiation (3). Treatment via transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) offers more advantages than endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (4). The authors report the case of a 60-year-old woman who underwent a TAMIS procedure for a large polyp located anteriorly in the middle rectum, which was 7cm away from the pectineal line and staged as uTisN0M0 preoperatively.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone position with a split-leg kneeling position. A reusable transanal D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was introduced into the anus together with DAPRI monocurved instruments (Figure 1). The polyp was put in evidence (Figure 2) and resection margins were defined circumferentially using the monocurved coagulating hook. A full-thickness resection was performed with a complete removal of the rectal serosa and exposure of the peritoneal cavity, due to the anatomical polyp positioning (Figure 3). The rectal opening was subsequently closed using two converging full-thickness running sutures using 3/0 V-loc™ sutures (Figure 4a). The two sutures were started laterally and joined together medially (Figure 4b).
Results: Total operative time was 60 minutes whereas suturing time was 35 minutes. There was no perioperative bleeding. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 2 days. The pathological report showed a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and clear margins.
Conclusions: In the presence of degenerated rectal polyps, full-thickness TAMIS is oncologically safe and feasible. The final rectal flap can be safely closed by means of laparoscopic endoluminal sutures.
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3481 views
389 likes
0 comments
06:01
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
JB Dubuisson
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5043 views
587 likes
0 comments
08:01
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
A Trovão, L Costa, M Costa, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
667 views
106 likes
0 comments
09:55
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
Anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation
Biliary stricture is the most frequent complication after liver transplantation, and ranges from 5 to 32%. Biliary strictures in transplanted patients can be anastomotic and non-anastomotic. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first-line treatment modality for anastomotic biliary strictures and in selected cases of non-anastomotic biliary strictures. Anastomotic biliary strictures arise at the site of the choledocho-choledochostomy. ERCP with multiple plastic stent placements is the first-line treatment of anastomotic biliary strictures, with long-term success rates ranging from 90 to 100%. Also covered self-expandable metal stents can be used for dilation of these strictures, but not routinely.
I Boškoski, RA Ciurezu, I Crisan, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1498 views
68 likes
0 comments
09:31
Anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation
Biliary stricture is the most frequent complication after liver transplantation, and ranges from 5 to 32%. Biliary strictures in transplanted patients can be anastomotic and non-anastomotic. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first-line treatment modality for anastomotic biliary strictures and in selected cases of non-anastomotic biliary strictures. Anastomotic biliary strictures arise at the site of the choledocho-choledochostomy. ERCP with multiple plastic stent placements is the first-line treatment of anastomotic biliary strictures, with long-term success rates ranging from 90 to 100%. Also covered self-expandable metal stents can be used for dilation of these strictures, but not routinely.
Common bile duct stricture due to an inoperable pancreatic head cancer: metal stent placement
There are several major indications for the endoscopic drainage of malignant common bile duct obstruction. There are several types of drainage: a preoperative biliary drainage, which is performed in selected cases (delayed surgery, high bilirubin levels, itching, cholangitis), a biliary drainage before neo-adjuvant therapies, and a biliary drainage for palliation. According to the ESGE guidelines, palliative biliary drainage should be performed according to life expectancy. If less than 4 months, plastic stent placement is recommended; if longer than 4 months, a self-expandable metal stent should be placed. In any case, every single patient should be evaluated for the best treatment. In particular, since uncovered self-expandable metal stents are impossible to remove, malignancy must be evidenced before placement of these stents.
I Boškoski, M Morar, I Crisan, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
879 views
83 likes
0 comments
18:14
Common bile duct stricture due to an inoperable pancreatic head cancer: metal stent placement
There are several major indications for the endoscopic drainage of malignant common bile duct obstruction. There are several types of drainage: a preoperative biliary drainage, which is performed in selected cases (delayed surgery, high bilirubin levels, itching, cholangitis), a biliary drainage before neo-adjuvant therapies, and a biliary drainage for palliation. According to the ESGE guidelines, palliative biliary drainage should be performed according to life expectancy. If less than 4 months, plastic stent placement is recommended; if longer than 4 months, a self-expandable metal stent should be placed. In any case, every single patient should be evaluated for the best treatment. In particular, since uncovered self-expandable metal stents are impossible to remove, malignancy must be evidenced before placement of these stents.
Laparoscopic appendectomy after appendicular phlegmon
Appendicitis is one of the main reasons for consultation and surgical interventions in the emergency departments around the world. If it is not diagnosed and treated timely, it can evolve towards an appendicular perforation, and as a result, it can become a peritonitis or an appendicular phlegmon. This latter case may occur in approximately 10% of cases.
Currently, the management of the appendicular phlegmon is controversial. Some authors prefer to perform an appendectomy immediately, and others are in favor of medical treatment using antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainage if possible and delay appendectomy.
In this case, we present a patient presenting with an appendicular phlegmon in which a conservative management with percutaneous drainage and delayed surgery were decided upon.
P Saleg, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
8864 views
519 likes
0 comments
04:17
Laparoscopic appendectomy after appendicular phlegmon
Appendicitis is one of the main reasons for consultation and surgical interventions in the emergency departments around the world. If it is not diagnosed and treated timely, it can evolve towards an appendicular perforation, and as a result, it can become a peritonitis or an appendicular phlegmon. This latter case may occur in approximately 10% of cases.
Currently, the management of the appendicular phlegmon is controversial. Some authors prefer to perform an appendectomy immediately, and others are in favor of medical treatment using antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainage if possible and delay appendectomy.
In this case, we present a patient presenting with an appendicular phlegmon in which a conservative management with percutaneous drainage and delayed surgery were decided upon.
Minimally invasive surgical approach to small bowel obstruction
Due to the lack of laparoscopic experience to work in a small space (small bowel distension), small bowel obstruction seems to be a relative contraindication for a minimally invasive approach. In other hands, many patients have co-morbidities, and consequently it is key to work with a low intra-abdominal pressure to prevent any conversion for pneumoperitoneum intolerance. Small bowel obstruction must be resolved by experts in order to prevent any excessive mobilization and iatrogenic perforation.

Critical comments:
This video presents the laparoscopic management of bowel obstruction. It demonstrates the feasibility of the identification and management of mechanical bowel obstruction. Several parts of the video can be discussed:
1. In their comments, the authors report that the whole bowel has to be explored in order to prevent the presence of a secondary band at the origin of the obstruction. This is absolutely mandatory. Usually, the recommendation is to start the exploration at the level of the caecum and to mobilize the whole non-dilated bowel in order to prevent a risk of bowel injury during this manipulation. Exploration of the dilated bowel is much more risky. The authors did not show this extensive and systematic exploration.
2. The authors reported that they used 5 to 10 liters of warm saline for abdominal lavage. Today, there is no evidence of the benefit of this major abdominal lavage including 5 to 10 liters. Selective lavage can be recommended in case of significant bacterial contamination.
3. The authors consider the potential benefit of irrigation of the ischemic bowel with hot water after band division. This indication can be considered as potentially efficient regarding the recommendations in open surgery. However, laparoscopy has a significant advantage to keep the internal temperature of 37°C at a minimum, and certainly hot lavage, which cannot be over 39°C to 40°C, will probably also have limited impact.
Despite these minor remarks, this video has a scientific value in demonstrating a safe approach to a small bowel obstruction related to a single band, which is, in this case, very safely resected.
One can also focus on the value of working with a high quality camera, which gives the surgeon the possibility to clearly evaluate the vitality of the small bowel after an ischemic period, which is well demonstrated in this video.
S Rua, F Silveira, P Mira
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1329 views
61 likes
0 comments
06:59
Minimally invasive surgical approach to small bowel obstruction
Due to the lack of laparoscopic experience to work in a small space (small bowel distension), small bowel obstruction seems to be a relative contraindication for a minimally invasive approach. In other hands, many patients have co-morbidities, and consequently it is key to work with a low intra-abdominal pressure to prevent any conversion for pneumoperitoneum intolerance. Small bowel obstruction must be resolved by experts in order to prevent any excessive mobilization and iatrogenic perforation.

Critical comments:
This video presents the laparoscopic management of bowel obstruction. It demonstrates the feasibility of the identification and management of mechanical bowel obstruction. Several parts of the video can be discussed:
1. In their comments, the authors report that the whole bowel has to be explored in order to prevent the presence of a secondary band at the origin of the obstruction. This is absolutely mandatory. Usually, the recommendation is to start the exploration at the level of the caecum and to mobilize the whole non-dilated bowel in order to prevent a risk of bowel injury during this manipulation. Exploration of the dilated bowel is much more risky. The authors did not show this extensive and systematic exploration.
2. The authors reported that they used 5 to 10 liters of warm saline for abdominal lavage. Today, there is no evidence of the benefit of this major abdominal lavage including 5 to 10 liters. Selective lavage can be recommended in case of significant bacterial contamination.
3. The authors consider the potential benefit of irrigation of the ischemic bowel with hot water after band division. This indication can be considered as potentially efficient regarding the recommendations in open surgery. However, laparoscopy has a significant advantage to keep the internal temperature of 37°C at a minimum, and certainly hot lavage, which cannot be over 39°C to 40°C, will probably also have limited impact.
Despite these minor remarks, this video has a scientific value in demonstrating a safe approach to a small bowel obstruction related to a single band, which is, in this case, very safely resected.
One can also focus on the value of working with a high quality camera, which gives the surgeon the possibility to clearly evaluate the vitality of the small bowel after an ischemic period, which is well demonstrated in this video.