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Robot-assisted left video thoracoscopic partial thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma
This film presents the case of an 85-year-old man who suffered from primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed on a pathological cervical fracture and elevated laboratory values for parathyroid hormone and calcium. Preoperative localizing studies showed no anomalies on the parathyroid gland. However, a left anterior mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma was found on 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenomas can be resected in a minimally invasive fashion via a conventional transcervical approach, or using a video-assisted thoracoscopic resection, allowing for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) also allows for a better visualization and less instrument crowding, with no difference in clinical results.
Considering the good efficacy and the better chances not to leave tumor tissue missed out during surgery, and the impossibility to install the patient with cervical hyperextension, we decided to perform a robot-assisted thoracoscopy through a left-sided approach, instead of the conventional transcervical approach.
During the intraoperative period, the adenoma was identified, and we did not feel the need to perform PTH assay. There were no complications in the postoperative period. PTH levels reached a normal range after adenoma removal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He remains asymptomatic at 3 months after the intervention.
The robotic resection of an intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional transcervical approach.
JM Baste, M Dazza, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1075 views
29 likes
1 comment
06:54
Robot-assisted left video thoracoscopic partial thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma
This film presents the case of an 85-year-old man who suffered from primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed on a pathological cervical fracture and elevated laboratory values for parathyroid hormone and calcium. Preoperative localizing studies showed no anomalies on the parathyroid gland. However, a left anterior mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma was found on 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenomas can be resected in a minimally invasive fashion via a conventional transcervical approach, or using a video-assisted thoracoscopic resection, allowing for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) also allows for a better visualization and less instrument crowding, with no difference in clinical results.
Considering the good efficacy and the better chances not to leave tumor tissue missed out during surgery, and the impossibility to install the patient with cervical hyperextension, we decided to perform a robot-assisted thoracoscopy through a left-sided approach, instead of the conventional transcervical approach.
During the intraoperative period, the adenoma was identified, and we did not feel the need to perform PTH assay. There were no complications in the postoperative period. PTH levels reached a normal range after adenoma removal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He remains asymptomatic at 3 months after the intervention.
The robotic resection of an intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional transcervical approach.
Video-assisted exploration of the four parathyroid lobes for primary hyperparathyroidism
Background:
The presence of a single parathyroid adenoma accurately located using preoperative imaging is the best indication for minimally invasive surgery when dealing with primary hyperparathyroidism. It is certainly possible to search for several glands that may be suspicious of adenoma, but an extensive experience in video-assisted cervical surgery is required to find the anatomical structures allowing to explore the four parathyroid locations.
Patient and methods:
A 75-year-old obese woman is diagnosed with hypercalcemia, hypophosphoremia, and a high level of PTH during a work-up for joint pain.

Preoperative imaging includes a 3D-reconstructed cervico-mediastinal CT-scan —a computer program developed at the IRCAD-Strasbourg, named VrAnat™, Vr planning™, is used for that purpose. This 3D virtual reconstruction demonstrates three suspicious images respectively located at the right superior parathyroid territory, at the right latero-esophageal area, and at the left inferior parathyroid territory. A video-assisted cervical exploration, guided by this reconstruction, is decided upon. The objective is to find the three suspicious images and to explore the four parathyroid glands.

A 3cm median incision is carried out 2cm above the sternal notch. The right thyrotracheal groove is reached through a dissection performed laterally to the strap muscles and medially to the omohyoid muscle. A complete dissection of the lateral aspect of the thyroid lobe is obtained using blunt dissection and small instruments under endoscopic vision, which is provided by a 30-degree, 5mm scope (Storz, Tüttlingen, Germany). The recurrent laryngeal nerve is identified.

Dissection is now carried on above the inferior thyroid artery. It allows to rapidly identify a superior parathyroid adenoma, which will be resected. It exactly matches with one of the suspicious images.

Dissection is pursued anterior to the intersection between the artery and the nerve so as to find the right inferior parathyroid, which is healthy, underneath the capsule. The latero-esophageal image is now searched for. It is nothing but an anthracosic lymph node.

The left side is approached by dissecting the left jugulocarotid gutter. The left recurrent nerve is identified. The left inferior parathyroid is identified and looks healthy. The suspected image is nothing else but a nodule of the apex of the thyrothymic ligament. The left superior parathyroid, which is healthy, can be finally identified in a strictly orthotopic position, although partially hidden behind a Zuckerkandl’s nodule.

Conclusion:
This cervical exploration has led to the dissection and visualization of the four parathyroid lobes in compliance with classical parathyroid surgery principles.
References:
Berti P, Materazzi G, Picone A, Miccoli P. Limits and drawbacks of video-assisted parathyroidectomy. Br J Surg 2003;90:743-7.

Miccoli P, Materazzi G, Baggiani A, Miccoli M. Mini-invasive video-assisted surgery of the thyroid and parathyroid glands: a 2011 update. J Endocrinol Invest 2011;34:473-80.
M Vix, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
707 views
71 likes
0 comments
09:39
Video-assisted exploration of the four parathyroid lobes for primary hyperparathyroidism
Background:
The presence of a single parathyroid adenoma accurately located using preoperative imaging is the best indication for minimally invasive surgery when dealing with primary hyperparathyroidism. It is certainly possible to search for several glands that may be suspicious of adenoma, but an extensive experience in video-assisted cervical surgery is required to find the anatomical structures allowing to explore the four parathyroid locations.
Patient and methods:
A 75-year-old obese woman is diagnosed with hypercalcemia, hypophosphoremia, and a high level of PTH during a work-up for joint pain.

Preoperative imaging includes a 3D-reconstructed cervico-mediastinal CT-scan —a computer program developed at the IRCAD-Strasbourg, named VrAnat™, Vr planning™, is used for that purpose. This 3D virtual reconstruction demonstrates three suspicious images respectively located at the right superior parathyroid territory, at the right latero-esophageal area, and at the left inferior parathyroid territory. A video-assisted cervical exploration, guided by this reconstruction, is decided upon. The objective is to find the three suspicious images and to explore the four parathyroid glands.

A 3cm median incision is carried out 2cm above the sternal notch. The right thyrotracheal groove is reached through a dissection performed laterally to the strap muscles and medially to the omohyoid muscle. A complete dissection of the lateral aspect of the thyroid lobe is obtained using blunt dissection and small instruments under endoscopic vision, which is provided by a 30-degree, 5mm scope (Storz, Tüttlingen, Germany). The recurrent laryngeal nerve is identified.

Dissection is now carried on above the inferior thyroid artery. It allows to rapidly identify a superior parathyroid adenoma, which will be resected. It exactly matches with one of the suspicious images.

Dissection is pursued anterior to the intersection between the artery and the nerve so as to find the right inferior parathyroid, which is healthy, underneath the capsule. The latero-esophageal image is now searched for. It is nothing but an anthracosic lymph node.

The left side is approached by dissecting the left jugulocarotid gutter. The left recurrent nerve is identified. The left inferior parathyroid is identified and looks healthy. The suspected image is nothing else but a nodule of the apex of the thyrothymic ligament. The left superior parathyroid, which is healthy, can be finally identified in a strictly orthotopic position, although partially hidden behind a Zuckerkandl’s nodule.

Conclusion:
This cervical exploration has led to the dissection and visualization of the four parathyroid lobes in compliance with classical parathyroid surgery principles.
References:
Berti P, Materazzi G, Picone A, Miccoli P. Limits and drawbacks of video-assisted parathyroidectomy. Br J Surg 2003;90:743-7.

Miccoli P, Materazzi G, Baggiani A, Miccoli M. Mini-invasive video-assisted surgery of the thyroid and parathyroid glands: a 2011 update. J Endocrinol Invest 2011;34:473-80.
Minimally invasive right superior parathyroidectomy (MIVAP) for symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism
This video presents the case of a 62 year-old patient with primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by a PTH which is inconsistent with calcium levels. The diagnosis is confirmed by biological findings before searching for the adenoma inducing this hypersecretion. With the use of current precision imaging techniques, in most cases, the adenoma can be identified and managed surgically. In our team, we perform a 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy and a CT-scan allowing for a 3D reconstruction according to the IRCAD protocol. This 3D reconstruction shows the relationships between the adenoma, the inferior thyroid artery, the thyroid gland, and the esophagus, making it possible to perform a video-assisted approach using a scar inferior to 2cm.
M Vix, HA Mercoli, S Tzedakis, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1333 views
121 likes
1 comment
08:28
Minimally invasive right superior parathyroidectomy (MIVAP) for symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism
This video presents the case of a 62 year-old patient with primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by a PTH which is inconsistent with calcium levels. The diagnosis is confirmed by biological findings before searching for the adenoma inducing this hypersecretion. With the use of current precision imaging techniques, in most cases, the adenoma can be identified and managed surgically. In our team, we perform a 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy and a CT-scan allowing for a 3D reconstruction according to the IRCAD protocol. This 3D reconstruction shows the relationships between the adenoma, the inferior thyroid artery, the thyroid gland, and the esophagus, making it possible to perform a video-assisted approach using a scar inferior to 2cm.
Laparoscopic partial liver resection for hepatocellular adenoma
We report a laparoscopic partial liver resection for a large hepatocellular adenoma. This is the case of a 34-year-old patient with several small hepatic nodules. One out of three nodules was a 13cm hepatocellular adenoma, which was found to be located in Couinaud’s segments V and VI. After clamping via blood flow occlusion, parenchymal transection was performed along the outer edge of the tumor using a Sonicision™ Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device and an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. After liver resection, cholecystectomy was performed. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of an inflammatory type of hepatocellular adenoma.
P Pessaux, T Urade, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2203 views
7 likes
0 comments
05:51
Laparoscopic partial liver resection for hepatocellular adenoma
We report a laparoscopic partial liver resection for a large hepatocellular adenoma. This is the case of a 34-year-old patient with several small hepatic nodules. One out of three nodules was a 13cm hepatocellular adenoma, which was found to be located in Couinaud’s segments V and VI. After clamping via blood flow occlusion, parenchymal transection was performed along the outer edge of the tumor using a Sonicision™ Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device and an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. After liver resection, cholecystectomy was performed. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of an inflammatory type of hepatocellular adenoma.
Laparoscopic central hepatectomy using a Glissonian approach for hepatocellular adenoma
A 32-year-old asymptomatic female patient presented an incidental finding of a liver mass during pregnancy. The mass grew during pregnancy, and a biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma. On MRI, a hypodense 7 by 6.1cm mass with adipose infiltration was identified. Previously, it was a 5.8 by 5.1cm mass, located in liver segments IV, V, and VIII inferiorly.
The cystic duct and its artery were ligated. However, the gallbladder was kept in place for traction. After dissection of the anterior pedicle, a linear stapler was applied. The right lobe was mobilized and the right transection line was made according to the ischemia line of the anterior sector.
During the liver transection of segment IVB, the pedicle was identified, and linear stapling helped to control it. The parenchymal transection was performed with an ultrasonic scalpel and bipolar cautery. The liver surface of the anterior sector was demarcated and transected. Both the left and the right plane of transection were inferiorly joined. The middle and right hepatic vein branches were stapled.
The specimen was mobilized. Argon beam and bipolar forceps provided the hemostasis. The specimen was removed via a Pfannenstiel’s incision and a drain was placed. The duration of the procedure was 345 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 1200mL.
The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit on postoperative day 1 and from hospital on postoperative day 4. No complication was noted in 90 days. Pathological findings showed a mass of 10.7 by 8.4 by 4.8cm. The lesion represented a hepatocellular adenoma with negative margins.
R Araujo, D Burgardt, V Vazquez, F Felippe, MA Sanctis, D Wohnrath
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1202 views
5 likes
0 comments
09:00
Laparoscopic central hepatectomy using a Glissonian approach for hepatocellular adenoma
A 32-year-old asymptomatic female patient presented an incidental finding of a liver mass during pregnancy. The mass grew during pregnancy, and a biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma. On MRI, a hypodense 7 by 6.1cm mass with adipose infiltration was identified. Previously, it was a 5.8 by 5.1cm mass, located in liver segments IV, V, and VIII inferiorly.
The cystic duct and its artery were ligated. However, the gallbladder was kept in place for traction. After dissection of the anterior pedicle, a linear stapler was applied. The right lobe was mobilized and the right transection line was made according to the ischemia line of the anterior sector.
During the liver transection of segment IVB, the pedicle was identified, and linear stapling helped to control it. The parenchymal transection was performed with an ultrasonic scalpel and bipolar cautery. The liver surface of the anterior sector was demarcated and transected. Both the left and the right plane of transection were inferiorly joined. The middle and right hepatic vein branches were stapled.
The specimen was mobilized. Argon beam and bipolar forceps provided the hemostasis. The specimen was removed via a Pfannenstiel’s incision and a drain was placed. The duration of the procedure was 345 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 1200mL.
The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit on postoperative day 1 and from hospital on postoperative day 4. No complication was noted in 90 days. Pathological findings showed a mass of 10.7 by 8.4 by 4.8cm. The lesion represented a hepatocellular adenoma with negative margins.
Video-assisted parathyroidectomy using augmented reality
The effectiveness of preoperative imaging to detect parathyroid adenomas allows for a targeted minimally invasive video-assisted approach. In our department, at the IRCAD, special software is used to virtually reconstruct the neck and its structures from mere CT-scan images of the cervicomediastinal region. This virtual reconstruction helps to precisely define the location of the parathyroid adenoma in relation to the superior part of the sternum, to the inferior thyroid artery and to the thyroid gland, hence guiding the surgeon in the proper identification of anatomical landmarks.
The reconstruction also helps to control the absence of "non-recurrent" recurrent nerves showing the presence of a right brachiocephalic arterial trunk.
M Vix, HA Mercoli, L Soler, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1337 views
17 likes
0 comments
06:14
Video-assisted parathyroidectomy using augmented reality
The effectiveness of preoperative imaging to detect parathyroid adenomas allows for a targeted minimally invasive video-assisted approach. In our department, at the IRCAD, special software is used to virtually reconstruct the neck and its structures from mere CT-scan images of the cervicomediastinal region. This virtual reconstruction helps to precisely define the location of the parathyroid adenoma in relation to the superior part of the sternum, to the inferior thyroid artery and to the thyroid gland, hence guiding the surgeon in the proper identification of anatomical landmarks.
The reconstruction also helps to control the absence of "non-recurrent" recurrent nerves showing the presence of a right brachiocephalic arterial trunk.
Primary hyperparathyroidism cure using 3D CT-scan reconstruction
Parathyroid surgery has largely benefited from advances in preoperative imaging modalities allowing to determine potential adenomas. Conventionally, ultrasonography and scintigraphy with 99mTc-sestamibi (MIBI) provide sufficient information to guide the surgical procedure. Specific software has been developed at the IRCAD to allow for the 3D reconstruction of the entire cervical structures. The handling of such reconstruction helps to perform a precise preoperative assessment. Arterial reconstruction allows to predict the existence of an arteria lusoria and of a non-recurrent recurrent nerve. In this case, the position of a potential adenoma in relation to the inferior thyroid artery allows to anticipate that it is not an adenoma but a thyroid nodule. A second potential target is visualized inferiorly. These two potential locations will be explored during the video-assisted surgical intervention.
M Vix, J D'Agostino, L Soler, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
4880 views
6 likes
1 comment
05:46
Primary hyperparathyroidism cure using 3D CT-scan reconstruction
Parathyroid surgery has largely benefited from advances in preoperative imaging modalities allowing to determine potential adenomas. Conventionally, ultrasonography and scintigraphy with 99mTc-sestamibi (MIBI) provide sufficient information to guide the surgical procedure. Specific software has been developed at the IRCAD to allow for the 3D reconstruction of the entire cervical structures. The handling of such reconstruction helps to perform a precise preoperative assessment. Arterial reconstruction allows to predict the existence of an arteria lusoria and of a non-recurrent recurrent nerve. In this case, the position of a potential adenoma in relation to the inferior thyroid artery allows to anticipate that it is not an adenoma but a thyroid nodule. A second potential target is visualized inferiorly. These two potential locations will be explored during the video-assisted surgical intervention.
Robotic adrenalectomy for left adrenal Conn’s adenoma: live broadcast
According to recent studies, robotic adrenalectomy has proven to be superior to laparoscopic adrenalectomy, with a reduction of blood loss during procedure and a reduced operative time.
The robotic system provides an intraoperative stability to the surgeon, allowing for a perfect handling of sensitive functional adrenal tumors. The main advantage of robotics lies in the ease of dissection, aided by improved visualization, the EndoWrist®, articulated instruments, and reduction of tremors, allowing for more accurate movements.

Indications: hormone-secreting tumors, adrenal masses >5cm, smaller lesions suspicious for malignancy, and lesions increasing in size on serial imaging.
Contraindications: infiltrative adrenal masses and tumors of extremely large size, because the size of adrenal lesions correlates with the potential for adrenal carcinoma.
The da Vinci Robotic Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) and the following robotic instruments are used:30-degree scope, ProGrasp™ forceps, Hot Shears (monopolar curved scissors or a hook), and a Robotic Clip Applier. A monopolar cautery hook and Harmonic ACE® curved shears can also be used when deemed helpful by the surgeon.
Laparoscopic instruments that can be handled by the bedside assistant, a clip applier and a suction device are also used.
CN Tang
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2062 views
133 likes
0 comments
24:47
Robotic adrenalectomy for left adrenal Conn’s adenoma: live broadcast
According to recent studies, robotic adrenalectomy has proven to be superior to laparoscopic adrenalectomy, with a reduction of blood loss during procedure and a reduced operative time.
The robotic system provides an intraoperative stability to the surgeon, allowing for a perfect handling of sensitive functional adrenal tumors. The main advantage of robotics lies in the ease of dissection, aided by improved visualization, the EndoWrist®, articulated instruments, and reduction of tremors, allowing for more accurate movements.

Indications: hormone-secreting tumors, adrenal masses >5cm, smaller lesions suspicious for malignancy, and lesions increasing in size on serial imaging.
Contraindications: infiltrative adrenal masses and tumors of extremely large size, because the size of adrenal lesions correlates with the potential for adrenal carcinoma.
The da Vinci Robotic Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) and the following robotic instruments are used:30-degree scope, ProGrasp™ forceps, Hot Shears (monopolar curved scissors or a hook), and a Robotic Clip Applier. A monopolar cautery hook and Harmonic ACE® curved shears can also be used when deemed helpful by the surgeon.
Laparoscopic instruments that can be handled by the bedside assistant, a clip applier and a suction device are also used.