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Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
R Adjerid, F Sebaa, N Otsmane, A Khelifaoui
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
1714 views
9 likes
1 comment
05:13
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
AM Benaired
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1196 views
142 likes
0 comments
04:03
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
Laparoscopic pericystectomy for an 8cm hepatic hydatid cyst with 3D reconstruction
This is the case of a female patient presenting with epigastric pain. An 8cm liver cyst is identified on the examination. Given her previous medical and clinical history, the patient has a hydatid cyst. Serologic tests remain negative. This hydatid cyst is no longer active. Surgery is indicated given the symptomatology and the patient’s strong desire for the intervention. Indications for the surgical resection of non-active hydatid cysts remain rare. They mainly concern big cysts that may generate typical clinical signs of pain, heaviness and epigastric impairment. A standard pericystectomy performed in a stepwise manner should allow to resect this cyst without any resection of the liver parenchyma.
D Mutter, L Soler, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
20349 views
94 likes
0 comments
08:03
Laparoscopic pericystectomy for an 8cm hepatic hydatid cyst with 3D reconstruction
This is the case of a female patient presenting with epigastric pain. An 8cm liver cyst is identified on the examination. Given her previous medical and clinical history, the patient has a hydatid cyst. Serologic tests remain negative. This hydatid cyst is no longer active. Surgery is indicated given the symptomatology and the patient’s strong desire for the intervention. Indications for the surgical resection of non-active hydatid cysts remain rare. They mainly concern big cysts that may generate typical clinical signs of pain, heaviness and epigastric impairment. A standard pericystectomy performed in a stepwise manner should allow to resect this cyst without any resection of the liver parenchyma.
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver
This video demonstrates the surgical approach to a large hydatid cyst in the right lobe of the liver. The surgeon uses a 3D reconstruction of the liver and the cyst to create a virtual image of the diseased area and to preplan the surgical approach. The surgeon starts by performing a cholecystectomy to gain better approach to the liver cyst. Then the cyst is aspirated and hypertonic saline is inserted for twenty minutes. Through a small opening in the cyst wall the contents are aspirated. Repeat instillation of hypertonic saline helps aspirate the contents. Once completed the cyst wall is opened wider and the cavity is fully inspected. The cyst is deroofed and the anterior cyst wall removed. The edges of the liver is covered with fibrin glue and a piece of omentum is brought up and sutured to it. A drain is left in place.
J Leroy
Surgical intervention
16 years ago
4167 views
38 likes
0 comments
01:54
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver
This video demonstrates the surgical approach to a large hydatid cyst in the right lobe of the liver. The surgeon uses a 3D reconstruction of the liver and the cyst to create a virtual image of the diseased area and to preplan the surgical approach. The surgeon starts by performing a cholecystectomy to gain better approach to the liver cyst. Then the cyst is aspirated and hypertonic saline is inserted for twenty minutes. Through a small opening in the cyst wall the contents are aspirated. Repeat instillation of hypertonic saline helps aspirate the contents. Once completed the cyst wall is opened wider and the cavity is fully inspected. The cyst is deroofed and the anterior cyst wall removed. The edges of the liver is covered with fibrin glue and a piece of omentum is brought up and sutured to it. A drain is left in place.
Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pericystectomy of liver segment 7
Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy has recently sparked interest mainly to improve cosmetic outcomes, while other potential advantages are currently under evaluation. This video presents a pericystectomy of liver segment 7 performed in a patient with a hydatic cyst.

Clinical case: A 26-year-old female, without any surgical history but with a body mass index of 20.6 kg/m2 consulted for a hepatic lesion. Preoperative work-up showed a hydatic cyst of liver segment 7 with renal adhesions. The procedure was performed using an 11mm reusable port to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree standard length scope, reusable curved instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope), and a straight Ligasure™ V (Covidien). Intraoperative ultrasonography allowed to identify the edges of pericystectomy. The specimen was retrieved through the umbilicus in a custom-made plastic bag, and morcellated at that level.

Results: No conversion to open surgery nor insertion of additional ports were necessary. Laparoscopy took 160 minutes, and the final umbilical incision length was 16mm. Pathologic data confirmed the presence of a hydatic cyst. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy is beneficial in liver surgery for benign lesions, due to minimal final scar length, which has cosmetic as well as additional potential advantages that need to be further investigated.
G Dapri, V Donckier
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2835 views
66 likes
0 comments
05:40
Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pericystectomy of liver segment 7
Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy has recently sparked interest mainly to improve cosmetic outcomes, while other potential advantages are currently under evaluation. This video presents a pericystectomy of liver segment 7 performed in a patient with a hydatic cyst.

Clinical case: A 26-year-old female, without any surgical history but with a body mass index of 20.6 kg/m2 consulted for a hepatic lesion. Preoperative work-up showed a hydatic cyst of liver segment 7 with renal adhesions. The procedure was performed using an 11mm reusable port to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree standard length scope, reusable curved instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope), and a straight Ligasure™ V (Covidien). Intraoperative ultrasonography allowed to identify the edges of pericystectomy. The specimen was retrieved through the umbilicus in a custom-made plastic bag, and morcellated at that level.

Results: No conversion to open surgery nor insertion of additional ports were necessary. Laparoscopy took 160 minutes, and the final umbilical incision length was 16mm. Pathologic data confirmed the presence of a hydatic cyst. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy is beneficial in liver surgery for benign lesions, due to minimal final scar length, which has cosmetic as well as additional potential advantages that need to be further investigated.
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
O Soubrane, P Pessaux, E Felli, T Urade, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
2108 views
4 likes
0 comments
34:11
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
Single incision transumbilical laparoscopic left hepatic lobectomy
Background: Single-incision laparoscopy (SIL) recently gained interest mainly to improve the cosmetic outcomes. This video shows a patient submitted to left hepatic lobectomy by transumbilical SIL.

Video: A 24 year-old woman with a BMI of 24.4 kg/m2 consulted for a hydatid cyst of the II-III hepatic segments. Preoperative work-up showed a hepatic hydatid cyst of the segment III, partially involving the segment II. A transumbilical SIL was performed using an 11mm trocar for a 10mm, standard length, 30-degree scope, and a curved grasping forceps, and Ligasure V. At the end of the resection, a custom-made plastic bag was inserted in the abdomen through the 11mm trocar, and the specimen was morcellated at the umbilicus inside it without tearing.

Results: No conversion to open surgery or additional trocars were necessary. Total operative time was 114 minutes and laparoscopic time 96 minutes. Final umbilical incision length was 20mm. The patient’s pain medication could be kept low and the patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. After 6 months, the patient was well with no visible scar.

Conclusion: Left hepatic lobectomy for benign lesions can safely be performed through transumbilical SIL. In the absence of malignancy, the final incision length can be kept minimal.
G Dapri, V Donckier, J Himpens, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2719 views
25 likes
0 comments
05:12
Single incision transumbilical laparoscopic left hepatic lobectomy
Background: Single-incision laparoscopy (SIL) recently gained interest mainly to improve the cosmetic outcomes. This video shows a patient submitted to left hepatic lobectomy by transumbilical SIL.

Video: A 24 year-old woman with a BMI of 24.4 kg/m2 consulted for a hydatid cyst of the II-III hepatic segments. Preoperative work-up showed a hepatic hydatid cyst of the segment III, partially involving the segment II. A transumbilical SIL was performed using an 11mm trocar for a 10mm, standard length, 30-degree scope, and a curved grasping forceps, and Ligasure V. At the end of the resection, a custom-made plastic bag was inserted in the abdomen through the 11mm trocar, and the specimen was morcellated at the umbilicus inside it without tearing.

Results: No conversion to open surgery or additional trocars were necessary. Total operative time was 114 minutes and laparoscopic time 96 minutes. Final umbilical incision length was 20mm. The patient’s pain medication could be kept low and the patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. After 6 months, the patient was well with no visible scar.

Conclusion: Left hepatic lobectomy for benign lesions can safely be performed through transumbilical SIL. In the absence of malignancy, the final incision length can be kept minimal.