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Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
R Adjerid, F Sebaa, N Otsmane, A Khelifaoui
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1866 views
10 likes
1 comment
05:13
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
AM Benaired
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1272 views
142 likes
0 comments
04:03
Thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cyst in children
Introduction: The hydatid cyst is an anthropozoonosis caused by the development of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm larva in humans. It is endemic in the Mediterranean, South America, Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, and India. Lung localization is ranked second in order of frequency for all age groups after liver localization.
Treatment is mainly surgical and consists in the resection of the protruding dome after cyst puncture, suction, and sterilization using a Scolicide solution followed by proligerous membrane extraction and bronchial fistulas obstruction. This surgery can be performed through a thoracotomy or a thoracoscopy.
We report the highlights of a thoracoscopic surgical management of a bilateral pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 6-year-old boy. The cyst was discovered following exploration for chest pain associated with a dry cough, as demonstrated by chest CT-scan findings and confirmed by serum chemistries positive for pulmonary hydatid cyst.
Materials and methods: The patient was first operated on for his two hydatid cysts of the right lung, followed by another left-side intervention a month later. Intubation was selective and was performed with a standard intubation cannula.
The patient was placed in a strict lateral decubitus position.
Four ports (10, 5, 5, and 5mm in size) were used for the right lung and three ports (10, 5, and 5mm) were used for the left lung, making sure to respect the rule of triangulation.
After partial filling of the pleural cavity with a 10% hypertonic saline solution, the surgical principles of the thoracoscopic treatment of pulmonary hydatid cysts are performed as follows: puncture of the cyst at its dome using a Veress needle, suction, and sterilization with a 10% hypertonic saline solution for 15 minutes; resection of the protruding dome; extraction of the proligerous membrane through an Endobag®; closure of bronchial fistulas by means of intracorporeal stitches; no padding necessary; double chest drainage (anterior and posterior).
Results: Immediate postoperative outcomes were uneventful. Paracetamol was sufficient to manage postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. Chest drains were removed on postoperative day 3, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
After 5 years, late postoperative outcomes were extremely favorable clinically, radiologically, and cosmetically speaking.
Conclusion: The thoracoscopic approach to the management of pulmonary hydatid cysts is feasible. It completely changed the postoperative evolution of thoracotomy, which causes pain and parietal sequelae in children.
Laparoscopic pericystectomy for an 8cm hepatic hydatid cyst with 3D reconstruction
This is the case of a female patient presenting with epigastric pain. An 8cm liver cyst is identified on the examination. Given her previous medical and clinical history, the patient has a hydatid cyst. Serologic tests remain negative. This hydatid cyst is no longer active. Surgery is indicated given the symptomatology and the patient’s strong desire for the intervention. Indications for the surgical resection of non-active hydatid cysts remain rare. They mainly concern big cysts that may generate typical clinical signs of pain, heaviness and epigastric impairment. A standard pericystectomy performed in a stepwise manner should allow to resect this cyst without any resection of the liver parenchyma.
D Mutter, L Soler, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
20374 views
94 likes
0 comments
08:03
Laparoscopic pericystectomy for an 8cm hepatic hydatid cyst with 3D reconstruction
This is the case of a female patient presenting with epigastric pain. An 8cm liver cyst is identified on the examination. Given her previous medical and clinical history, the patient has a hydatid cyst. Serologic tests remain negative. This hydatid cyst is no longer active. Surgery is indicated given the symptomatology and the patient’s strong desire for the intervention. Indications for the surgical resection of non-active hydatid cysts remain rare. They mainly concern big cysts that may generate typical clinical signs of pain, heaviness and epigastric impairment. A standard pericystectomy performed in a stepwise manner should allow to resect this cyst without any resection of the liver parenchyma.
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver
This video demonstrates the surgical approach to a large hydatid cyst in the right lobe of the liver. The surgeon uses a 3D reconstruction of the liver and the cyst to create a virtual image of the diseased area and to preplan the surgical approach. The surgeon starts by performing a cholecystectomy to gain better approach to the liver cyst. Then the cyst is aspirated and hypertonic saline is inserted for twenty minutes. Through a small opening in the cyst wall the contents are aspirated. Repeat instillation of hypertonic saline helps aspirate the contents. Once completed the cyst wall is opened wider and the cavity is fully inspected. The cyst is deroofed and the anterior cyst wall removed. The edges of the liver is covered with fibrin glue and a piece of omentum is brought up and sutured to it. A drain is left in place.
J Leroy
Surgical intervention
16 years ago
4188 views
38 likes
0 comments
01:54
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver
This video demonstrates the surgical approach to a large hydatid cyst in the right lobe of the liver. The surgeon uses a 3D reconstruction of the liver and the cyst to create a virtual image of the diseased area and to preplan the surgical approach. The surgeon starts by performing a cholecystectomy to gain better approach to the liver cyst. Then the cyst is aspirated and hypertonic saline is inserted for twenty minutes. Through a small opening in the cyst wall the contents are aspirated. Repeat instillation of hypertonic saline helps aspirate the contents. Once completed the cyst wall is opened wider and the cavity is fully inspected. The cyst is deroofed and the anterior cyst wall removed. The edges of the liver is covered with fibrin glue and a piece of omentum is brought up and sutured to it. A drain is left in place.
Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pericystectomy of liver segment 7
Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy has recently sparked interest mainly to improve cosmetic outcomes, while other potential advantages are currently under evaluation. This video presents a pericystectomy of liver segment 7 performed in a patient with a hydatic cyst.

Clinical case: A 26-year-old female, without any surgical history but with a body mass index of 20.6 kg/m2 consulted for a hepatic lesion. Preoperative work-up showed a hydatic cyst of liver segment 7 with renal adhesions. The procedure was performed using an 11mm reusable port to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree standard length scope, reusable curved instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope), and a straight Ligasure™ V (Covidien). Intraoperative ultrasonography allowed to identify the edges of pericystectomy. The specimen was retrieved through the umbilicus in a custom-made plastic bag, and morcellated at that level.

Results: No conversion to open surgery nor insertion of additional ports were necessary. Laparoscopy took 160 minutes, and the final umbilical incision length was 16mm. Pathologic data confirmed the presence of a hydatic cyst. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy is beneficial in liver surgery for benign lesions, due to minimal final scar length, which has cosmetic as well as additional potential advantages that need to be further investigated.
G Dapri, V Donckier
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2858 views
66 likes
0 comments
05:40
Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pericystectomy of liver segment 7
Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy has recently sparked interest mainly to improve cosmetic outcomes, while other potential advantages are currently under evaluation. This video presents a pericystectomy of liver segment 7 performed in a patient with a hydatic cyst.

Clinical case: A 26-year-old female, without any surgical history but with a body mass index of 20.6 kg/m2 consulted for a hepatic lesion. Preoperative work-up showed a hydatic cyst of liver segment 7 with renal adhesions. The procedure was performed using an 11mm reusable port to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree standard length scope, reusable curved instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope), and a straight Ligasure™ V (Covidien). Intraoperative ultrasonography allowed to identify the edges of pericystectomy. The specimen was retrieved through the umbilicus in a custom-made plastic bag, and morcellated at that level.

Results: No conversion to open surgery nor insertion of additional ports were necessary. Laparoscopy took 160 minutes, and the final umbilical incision length was 16mm. Pathologic data confirmed the presence of a hydatic cyst. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy is beneficial in liver surgery for benign lesions, due to minimal final scar length, which has cosmetic as well as additional potential advantages that need to be further investigated.
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
O Soubrane, P Pessaux, E Felli, T Urade, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
2388 views
5 likes
0 comments
34:11
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
Robotic assisted ovary preserving excision of a benign serous cystadenoma in a prepubertal symptomatic girl
Symptomatic ovarian cysts or larger incidentally diagnosed ovarian cysts require treatment. If features of malignancy can be reasonably ruled out, minimally invasive procedures can be offered to not only excise the lesion but also preserve the ovary at the same time.
A 10-year-old female child was referred to our department with complaints of right lower abdominal pain which lasted for 6 months. She had no history of vomiting. On examination, her abdomen was soft, non-tender, with no palpable mass, and not distended. Abdominal sonography revealed a 5 by 4.5cm simple cyst in the right adnexa with a 1.7mm wall thickness, with no solid component or septation. Her right ovary was not seen separately. Her left ovary and uterus showed no abnormalities. Malignancy work-up revealed nothing suspicious (Beta-HCG: 2.9 IU/L, AFP: 1.3ng/mL, CA125: 10.9, all within normal range). A robotic-assisted complete cyst excision with preservation of the ovary was performed using 3 arms of the Da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system. The patient resumed oral food intake the same evening. He was discharged the following day within 24 hours of the procedure on paracetamol only. The patient was healthy and well. The biopsy reported a benign serous cystadenoma. At a 1-year follow-up, the child is asymptomatic and ovarian preservation was confirmed on postoperative ultrasound. While oophorectomy is eminently feasible with a minimally invasive approach, ovary preservation in benign lesions is quite challenging using pure laparoscopy. Robotic assistance, with its 3D binocular high-definition vision, articulating instruments, and availability of simultaneous energy in both arms, provides better precision and a maximum range of movements. It also helps to preserve the ovary while removing the cyst completely. The case report with a stepwise video of the procedure is demonstrated.
S Kumaravel, A Shenoy
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
536 views
8 likes
1 comment
05:24
Robotic assisted ovary preserving excision of a benign serous cystadenoma in a prepubertal symptomatic girl
Symptomatic ovarian cysts or larger incidentally diagnosed ovarian cysts require treatment. If features of malignancy can be reasonably ruled out, minimally invasive procedures can be offered to not only excise the lesion but also preserve the ovary at the same time.
A 10-year-old female child was referred to our department with complaints of right lower abdominal pain which lasted for 6 months. She had no history of vomiting. On examination, her abdomen was soft, non-tender, with no palpable mass, and not distended. Abdominal sonography revealed a 5 by 4.5cm simple cyst in the right adnexa with a 1.7mm wall thickness, with no solid component or septation. Her right ovary was not seen separately. Her left ovary and uterus showed no abnormalities. Malignancy work-up revealed nothing suspicious (Beta-HCG: 2.9 IU/L, AFP: 1.3ng/mL, CA125: 10.9, all within normal range). A robotic-assisted complete cyst excision with preservation of the ovary was performed using 3 arms of the Da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system. The patient resumed oral food intake the same evening. He was discharged the following day within 24 hours of the procedure on paracetamol only. The patient was healthy and well. The biopsy reported a benign serous cystadenoma. At a 1-year follow-up, the child is asymptomatic and ovarian preservation was confirmed on postoperative ultrasound. While oophorectomy is eminently feasible with a minimally invasive approach, ovary preservation in benign lesions is quite challenging using pure laparoscopy. Robotic assistance, with its 3D binocular high-definition vision, articulating instruments, and availability of simultaneous energy in both arms, provides better precision and a maximum range of movements. It also helps to preserve the ovary while removing the cyst completely. The case report with a stepwise video of the procedure is demonstrated.
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
A Tojal, AR Loureiro, B Prata, R Patrão, N Carrilho, C Casimiro
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1148 views
5 likes
0 comments
10:34
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
F Freire Lisboa Junior, R de Lima França, A de Araujo Lima Liguori, AC de Medeiros Junior, M HSMP Tavares, F Medeiros de Azevedo, D Myller Barros Lima
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1204 views
5 likes
0 comments
14:36
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
Incidental finding of a voluminous bronchogenic cyst in a 13-year-old child
This rare case of a giant bronchogenic cyst in the lower right hemithorax allows to provide the following tips: patient positioning and port placement should allow for a 180-degree reversal of the screen and free movement of the surgical team; use of a LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device used as a dissection instrument in lung surgery is helpful but does not guarantee perfect aerostasis, which should be controlled by taking enough time at the end of the procedure when reventilating an excluded lobe intraoperatively; along with low intrathoracic carbon dioxide insufflation, the use of a blocker in pediatric thoracoscopic surgery is an unconditional factor, which contributes to a satisfactory operating field.
F Becmeur, L Donato
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
913 views
0 likes
0 comments
05:31
Incidental finding of a voluminous bronchogenic cyst in a 13-year-old child
This rare case of a giant bronchogenic cyst in the lower right hemithorax allows to provide the following tips: patient positioning and port placement should allow for a 180-degree reversal of the screen and free movement of the surgical team; use of a LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device used as a dissection instrument in lung surgery is helpful but does not guarantee perfect aerostasis, which should be controlled by taking enough time at the end of the procedure when reventilating an excluded lobe intraoperatively; along with low intrathoracic carbon dioxide insufflation, the use of a blocker in pediatric thoracoscopic surgery is an unconditional factor, which contributes to a satisfactory operating field.
Laparoscopic appendectomy and fenestration of hemorrhagic ovarian cyst
This is the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted to the emergency department for lower abdominal pain going on for 24 hours. No abdominal guarding was noted. Biological findings showed an inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 112. CT-scan showed the presence of an enlarged appendix (9mm thick) along with a voluminous adnexal cyst, which may be suggestive of a tubo-ovarian abscess. Laparoscopic exploration is performed. Congestive appendicitis is confirmed, as well as the presence of a hemorrhagic right ovarian cyst. Laparoscopic appendectomy is performed and the hemorrhagic ovarian cyst is fenestrated.
M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4713 views
413 likes
0 comments
04:57
Laparoscopic appendectomy and fenestration of hemorrhagic ovarian cyst
This is the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted to the emergency department for lower abdominal pain going on for 24 hours. No abdominal guarding was noted. Biological findings showed an inflammation with leukocytes at 16,000 and CRP levels at 112. CT-scan showed the presence of an enlarged appendix (9mm thick) along with a voluminous adnexal cyst, which may be suggestive of a tubo-ovarian abscess. Laparoscopic exploration is performed. Congestive appendicitis is confirmed, as well as the presence of a hemorrhagic right ovarian cyst. Laparoscopic appendectomy is performed and the hemorrhagic ovarian cyst is fenestrated.
Laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy
A laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy was performed for a gastric liver metastasis. After the dissection of the anatomical structure of the hepatic pedicle and an ultrasound examination, the right portal vein and the right branch of the hepatic artery were clamped, hence allowing to skeletonize the demarcation between the right liver and the left liver. The devascularization line was subsequently marked by means of electrocautery. The right hepatic branch and the right branch of the portal vein were divided between locked clips. The hepatotomy was started. The first very superficial centimeters were dissected using the Sonicision® Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device. No pedicular clamping was performed. The dissection followed the ischemic demarcation line between the right liver and the left liver. Hemostasis and biliostasis were completed using the Aquamantys® Bipolar Sealers. Once the first centimeters had been dissected, dissection was carried on using the CUSA™ ultrasonic dissector (Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator). Liver segment I was divided in order to open the posterior aspect of the hilar plate. The dissection was performed on the right border of the vena cava. The hilar plate was dissected, making it possible to control the right branch of the biliary tract intraparenchymally. The right hepatic vein was dissected and divided with an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Makuuchi’s ligament was subsequently dissected and divided by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler, white cartridge. Mobilization of the right liver was completed by dividing the triangular ligament’s attachments at the level of the diaphragm. The right hepatectomy specimen was introduced into a bag, which was extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pneumoperitoneum pressure was diminished in order to control hemostasis and biliostasis.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, J Hallet, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
7557 views
944 likes
0 comments
32:12
Laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy
A laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy was performed for a gastric liver metastasis. After the dissection of the anatomical structure of the hepatic pedicle and an ultrasound examination, the right portal vein and the right branch of the hepatic artery were clamped, hence allowing to skeletonize the demarcation between the right liver and the left liver. The devascularization line was subsequently marked by means of electrocautery. The right hepatic branch and the right branch of the portal vein were divided between locked clips. The hepatotomy was started. The first very superficial centimeters were dissected using the Sonicision® Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device. No pedicular clamping was performed. The dissection followed the ischemic demarcation line between the right liver and the left liver. Hemostasis and biliostasis were completed using the Aquamantys® Bipolar Sealers. Once the first centimeters had been dissected, dissection was carried on using the CUSA™ ultrasonic dissector (Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator). Liver segment I was divided in order to open the posterior aspect of the hilar plate. The dissection was performed on the right border of the vena cava. The hilar plate was dissected, making it possible to control the right branch of the biliary tract intraparenchymally. The right hepatic vein was dissected and divided with an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Makuuchi’s ligament was subsequently dissected and divided by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler, white cartridge. Mobilization of the right liver was completed by dividing the triangular ligament’s attachments at the level of the diaphragm. The right hepatectomy specimen was introduced into a bag, which was extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pneumoperitoneum pressure was diminished in order to control hemostasis and biliostasis.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: laparoscopic right hepatectomy in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome
In this live interactive video, Professor Luc Soler provided a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling for precise tumor localization and future liver remnant before and after chemoembolization and right portal vein embolization. Dr. Soubrane briefly described the main principles, key steps, and preoperative planning in a 62-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome. He demonstrated the main technical aspects of port placement, hepatic pedicle dissection, exploration and dissection of vessels, and transection of liver parenchyma.
O Soubrane, P Pessaux, R Memeo, L Soler, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
4984 views
571 likes
0 comments
51:19
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: laparoscopic right hepatectomy in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome
In this live interactive video, Professor Luc Soler provided a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling for precise tumor localization and future liver remnant before and after chemoembolization and right portal vein embolization. Dr. Soubrane briefly described the main principles, key steps, and preoperative planning in a 62-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome. He demonstrated the main technical aspects of port placement, hepatic pedicle dissection, exploration and dissection of vessels, and transection of liver parenchyma.
Subtotal cystectomy with laparoscopic splenic preservation
Non-parasitic splenic lesions are a rare entity. Since they can generate signs and abdominal symptoms and cause many complications, their detection requires some form of treatment. The possibility of post-splenectomy fatal sepsis has led to the search for new therapeutic alternatives which simultaneously ensure the healing process and preserve the splenic tissue. The preservation of at least 25% of splenic tissue provides protection against pneumococcal bacteremia. One of the techniques used is partial cyst decapsulation with splenic preservation.
We report the case of a 17-year-old woman who was incidentally diagnosed with a 4cm splenic cystic with negative serological studies and tumor markers suggestive of an epidermal cyst. Radiological monitoring of the lesion is performed and a cystic growth of 7cm is observed. As a result, surgery is decided upon.
At laparoscopy, a splenic cyst of 7cm in diameter is found. However, it does not affect the splenic vessels. Lancing and draining the cyst is made and partial cyst decapsulation is performed with splenic preservation. The patient made an uneventful recovery.
Partial decapsulation of the cyst’s wall offers several advantages: it is technically easier to perform, involves minimal blood loss, it preserves the entire splenic tissue and has a high cure rate. It is an excellent therapeutic alternative for young people with splenic cysts because it eliminates the disease process without loss of splenic tissue and it is minimally invasive for the patient.
FE Viamontes Ugalde, A Abascal Amo, I García Sanz
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
913 views
30 likes
0 comments
09:32
Subtotal cystectomy with laparoscopic splenic preservation
Non-parasitic splenic lesions are a rare entity. Since they can generate signs and abdominal symptoms and cause many complications, their detection requires some form of treatment. The possibility of post-splenectomy fatal sepsis has led to the search for new therapeutic alternatives which simultaneously ensure the healing process and preserve the splenic tissue. The preservation of at least 25% of splenic tissue provides protection against pneumococcal bacteremia. One of the techniques used is partial cyst decapsulation with splenic preservation.
We report the case of a 17-year-old woman who was incidentally diagnosed with a 4cm splenic cystic with negative serological studies and tumor markers suggestive of an epidermal cyst. Radiological monitoring of the lesion is performed and a cystic growth of 7cm is observed. As a result, surgery is decided upon.
At laparoscopy, a splenic cyst of 7cm in diameter is found. However, it does not affect the splenic vessels. Lancing and draining the cyst is made and partial cyst decapsulation is performed with splenic preservation. The patient made an uneventful recovery.
Partial decapsulation of the cyst’s wall offers several advantages: it is technically easier to perform, involves minimal blood loss, it preserves the entire splenic tissue and has a high cure rate. It is an excellent therapeutic alternative for young people with splenic cysts because it eliminates the disease process without loss of splenic tissue and it is minimally invasive for the patient.
Laparoscopic closed cystopericystectomy in liver hydatidosis
A 54-year-old woman presented to our Department with epigastric pain. Abdominal ultrasound and MRI showed a cystic lesion of 30 x 36 x 37mm located in segment III of the liver. The left portal trunk, which divides into branches, can be found close to the lesion. Serological test of hydatidosis was positive (1/2560). The surgical intervention was decided upon. In our opinion, radical surgery (total cystectomy or liver resection) should be the technique of choice in liver hydatidosis, since better results are obtained, especially in terms of morbidity, relapse and hospital stay. Totally laparoscopic closed cystopericystectomy, when feasible, could be done, but it is more technically demanding than conservative techniques.
JM Ramia, JE Quiñones, R de la Plaza, J García-Parreño
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
2801 views
88 likes
0 comments
10:03
Laparoscopic closed cystopericystectomy in liver hydatidosis
A 54-year-old woman presented to our Department with epigastric pain. Abdominal ultrasound and MRI showed a cystic lesion of 30 x 36 x 37mm located in segment III of the liver. The left portal trunk, which divides into branches, can be found close to the lesion. Serological test of hydatidosis was positive (1/2560). The surgical intervention was decided upon. In our opinion, radical surgery (total cystectomy or liver resection) should be the technique of choice in liver hydatidosis, since better results are obtained, especially in terms of morbidity, relapse and hospital stay. Totally laparoscopic closed cystopericystectomy, when feasible, could be done, but it is more technically demanding than conservative techniques.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy for a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas
This video shows a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.
This is the case of a woman with a cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas, diagnosed in the study of an abdominal pain.
She was submitted to a CT-scan which showed a regular, well-defined 45mm cystic lesion in the pancreatic body, with voluminous hepatic hemangiomas. The findings of endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy were inconclusive, with a CEA of 653ng/dL.
The patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.
There were no postoperative complications. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Histological findings demonstrated the presence of a mucinous cystic neoplasm.
L Ferreira, N Vilela, O Oliveira, J Miranda
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2570 views
150 likes
0 comments
10:35
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy for a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas
This video shows a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.
This is the case of a woman with a cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas, diagnosed in the study of an abdominal pain.
She was submitted to a CT-scan which showed a regular, well-defined 45mm cystic lesion in the pancreatic body, with voluminous hepatic hemangiomas. The findings of endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy were inconclusive, with a CEA of 653ng/dL.
The patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.
There were no postoperative complications. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Histological findings demonstrated the presence of a mucinous cystic neoplasm.
Laparoscopic treatment of a giant mesenteric cyst
Mesenteric cysts are very rare entities (annually worldwide estimated incidence of 1/140 000 inhabitants). They do not have pathognomonic features and require a differential diagnosis with lymphangiomas, sarcomas, adenocarcinomas, and intestinal duplications. They typically appear more in women (twice the incidence) and are mostly benign swellings (malignancy rate of about 3%). The gold standard treatment is laparoscopic surgical resection.
The case is that of a 49-year-old female patient referred for an abdominal swelling in the periumbilical region, which was uncomfortable for the patient, namely in the contraction of the abdominals. She did not describe any changes in intestinal transit, anorexia, asthenia or associated weight loss. The imaging study by computer tomography documented a "cystic lesion of 13cm in the root of the mesentery in contact with great vessels and duodenum". The patient was resected laparoscopically in March 2016, discharged on the second postoperative day, without intercurrences. The video of the mesenteric cyst excision surgery demonstrates some of the risks of the laparoscopic approach of the mesentery and underlines the possibility of dissection of these cysts even when they are giant cysts and in close relation with vital structures such as the vena cava and the iliac arteries.
P Leão, H Cristino, JP Pinto
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1426 views
95 likes
0 comments
04:09
Laparoscopic treatment of a giant mesenteric cyst
Mesenteric cysts are very rare entities (annually worldwide estimated incidence of 1/140 000 inhabitants). They do not have pathognomonic features and require a differential diagnosis with lymphangiomas, sarcomas, adenocarcinomas, and intestinal duplications. They typically appear more in women (twice the incidence) and are mostly benign swellings (malignancy rate of about 3%). The gold standard treatment is laparoscopic surgical resection.
The case is that of a 49-year-old female patient referred for an abdominal swelling in the periumbilical region, which was uncomfortable for the patient, namely in the contraction of the abdominals. She did not describe any changes in intestinal transit, anorexia, asthenia or associated weight loss. The imaging study by computer tomography documented a "cystic lesion of 13cm in the root of the mesentery in contact with great vessels and duodenum". The patient was resected laparoscopically in March 2016, discharged on the second postoperative day, without intercurrences. The video of the mesenteric cyst excision surgery demonstrates some of the risks of the laparoscopic approach of the mesentery and underlines the possibility of dissection of these cysts even when they are giant cysts and in close relation with vital structures such as the vena cava and the iliac arteries.
Laparoscopic excision of a gastric duplication cyst
Duplication cysts are rare benign congenital anomalies, located predominantly at the proximal small intestine, emerging in the stomach in about 2 to 4% of all cases. Usually diagnosed in the pediatric age, they are commonly asymptomatic in adulthood and found incidentally on endoscopic or radiological exams. The therapeutic management of asymptomatic cysts is usually expectant. However, a surgical resection is recommended based on the potential risk of complications, such as malignant transformation.
Clinical case: This is the case of a 44-year-old woman, who had an incidental diagnosis of an intra-abdominal cyst on ultrasound examination. CT-scan and MRI revealed the presence of a 6x4cm cystic mass located between the posterior wall of the stomach and the anterior wall of the pancreas, assuming the differential diagnosis of enteric duplication cyst or pancreatic cystic lesion. A laparoscopic exploration is decided upon. She underwent a laparoscopic excision of cystic lesion of the gastric wall, without complications. The patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day. The pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of enteric duplication cyst. Histology showed a cystic lesion composed of smooth muscle tissue and partially covered by gastric antral-type mucosa.
C Branco, C Viana, H Cristino, S Vilaça, J Falcão
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
881 views
32 likes
0 comments
06:07
Laparoscopic excision of a gastric duplication cyst
Duplication cysts are rare benign congenital anomalies, located predominantly at the proximal small intestine, emerging in the stomach in about 2 to 4% of all cases. Usually diagnosed in the pediatric age, they are commonly asymptomatic in adulthood and found incidentally on endoscopic or radiological exams. The therapeutic management of asymptomatic cysts is usually expectant. However, a surgical resection is recommended based on the potential risk of complications, such as malignant transformation.
Clinical case: This is the case of a 44-year-old woman, who had an incidental diagnosis of an intra-abdominal cyst on ultrasound examination. CT-scan and MRI revealed the presence of a 6x4cm cystic mass located between the posterior wall of the stomach and the anterior wall of the pancreas, assuming the differential diagnosis of enteric duplication cyst or pancreatic cystic lesion. A laparoscopic exploration is decided upon. She underwent a laparoscopic excision of cystic lesion of the gastric wall, without complications. The patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day. The pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of enteric duplication cyst. Histology showed a cystic lesion composed of smooth muscle tissue and partially covered by gastric antral-type mucosa.
Robot-assisted ultrasound-guided transgastric cystogastrostomy
We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with a voluminous pseudocyst in the lesser sac after several episodes of acute pancreatitis of biliary origin managed by a robot-assisted transgastric cystogastrostomy. The patient is lying supine, legs apart. Five ports are positioned. The intervention is begun with an anterior gastrotomy, which allows to introduce a balloon-tipped trocar transgastrically. A second gastrotomy is performed in the prepyloric region. It allows to introduce a second transgastric trocar. Finally, a third gastrotomy is performed at the level of the fundus to introduce a third transgastric balloon-tipped trocar. After transgastric insufflation, the trocars are connected to the robot, which is positioned at the patient’s head. A transgastric ultrasonography is performed to visualize the pseudocyst, which has a heterogeneous content, with fibrotic debris. The gastrotomy is initiated with Ultracision™ at the posterior aspect of the stomach. The cyst is multilocular. The gastric wall is controlled by means of a Doppler ultrasound in order not to pass through the gastric varices, which had been identified on endoscopic ultrasound. A second cavity with some more heterogeneous content is subsequently opened. This cavity presents some pancreatic necrosis. The cystogastrostomy is enlarged at its most. Trocars are then removed to proceed intraperitoneally. The three anterior gastrotomy incisions are then sutured using the robot. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, O Perotto, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1277 views
54 likes
0 comments
06:04
Robot-assisted ultrasound-guided transgastric cystogastrostomy
We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with a voluminous pseudocyst in the lesser sac after several episodes of acute pancreatitis of biliary origin managed by a robot-assisted transgastric cystogastrostomy. The patient is lying supine, legs apart. Five ports are positioned. The intervention is begun with an anterior gastrotomy, which allows to introduce a balloon-tipped trocar transgastrically. A second gastrotomy is performed in the prepyloric region. It allows to introduce a second transgastric trocar. Finally, a third gastrotomy is performed at the level of the fundus to introduce a third transgastric balloon-tipped trocar. After transgastric insufflation, the trocars are connected to the robot, which is positioned at the patient’s head. A transgastric ultrasonography is performed to visualize the pseudocyst, which has a heterogeneous content, with fibrotic debris. The gastrotomy is initiated with Ultracision™ at the posterior aspect of the stomach. The cyst is multilocular. The gastric wall is controlled by means of a Doppler ultrasound in order not to pass through the gastric varices, which had been identified on endoscopic ultrasound. A second cavity with some more heterogeneous content is subsequently opened. This cavity presents some pancreatic necrosis. The cystogastrostomy is enlarged at its most. Trocars are then removed to proceed intraperitoneally. The three anterior gastrotomy incisions are then sutured using the robot. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
Robotic partial splenectomy for cystic lesion of the spleen
We report the case of a 21-year-old woman with a cystic lesion of the spleen treated with a robotic partial splenectomy. The patient is placed in a right lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced into the left hypochondrium. The robot is placed at the level of the patient’s left shoulder. The intervention is begun with a lowering of the splenic flexure. Dissection is initiated at the upper pole of the spleen by retracting the stomach and by progressively dividing the different short vessels. It is decided to start the parenchymotomy approximately 1cm from the devascularized area. Transection is begun using an ultrasonic dissector. Hemostasis is subsequently achieved progressively. Transection is completed by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Hemostasis is further completed using the Aquamantys® system and bipolar sealers. The specimen is fully mobilized and placed in a bag. It is extracted by means of a small suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pathological findings demonstrate the presence of an epidermoid cyst. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, N Ferreira, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1900 views
71 likes
1 comment
09:14
Robotic partial splenectomy for cystic lesion of the spleen
We report the case of a 21-year-old woman with a cystic lesion of the spleen treated with a robotic partial splenectomy. The patient is placed in a right lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced into the left hypochondrium. The robot is placed at the level of the patient’s left shoulder. The intervention is begun with a lowering of the splenic flexure. Dissection is initiated at the upper pole of the spleen by retracting the stomach and by progressively dividing the different short vessels. It is decided to start the parenchymotomy approximately 1cm from the devascularized area. Transection is begun using an ultrasonic dissector. Hemostasis is subsequently achieved progressively. Transection is completed by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Hemostasis is further completed using the Aquamantys® system and bipolar sealers. The specimen is fully mobilized and placed in a bag. It is extracted by means of a small suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pathological findings demonstrate the presence of an epidermoid cyst. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
Laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision with intraoperative cholangiogram, hepatic duct cholangioscopy, extracorporeal Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy and closure of mesenteric defects
The laparoscopic treatment of a choledochal cyst begins with a careful preoperative understanding of the anatomy, including bile ducts, as well as the presence of any abnormal pancreatobiliary anatomy. If a hepaticojejunostomy using a Roux-en-Y anastomosis is performed, we prefer an extracorporeal, transumbilical anastomosis, with a retrocolic approach. A series of interrupted or continuous absorbable sutures can be used for the bilioenteric anastomosis. For the last part of the procedure, we emphasize the importance of closure of mesenteric defects with non-absorbable sutures, including both the retrocolic space and Petersen’s defect to prevent future internal herniations.
GA Villalona, D Ozgediz
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1810 views
76 likes
0 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision with intraoperative cholangiogram, hepatic duct cholangioscopy, extracorporeal Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy and closure of mesenteric defects
The laparoscopic treatment of a choledochal cyst begins with a careful preoperative understanding of the anatomy, including bile ducts, as well as the presence of any abnormal pancreatobiliary anatomy. If a hepaticojejunostomy using a Roux-en-Y anastomosis is performed, we prefer an extracorporeal, transumbilical anastomosis, with a retrocolic approach. A series of interrupted or continuous absorbable sutures can be used for the bilioenteric anastomosis. For the last part of the procedure, we emphasize the importance of closure of mesenteric defects with non-absorbable sutures, including both the retrocolic space and Petersen’s defect to prevent future internal herniations.
Laparoscopic enucleation of a cystic tumor of the pancreas in a child
This short video describes the laparoscopic enucleation of a benign congenital excretory cyst of the pancreas in a 13-year-old girl.
No prenatal diagnosis had been envisaged and this teen girl was admitted in an emergency setting, with iterative abdominal pain followed by vomiting and weight loss (3Kg) over the last two months.
The entire work-up allowed to rule out the presence of parenchymal tumor involvement and the perfectly regular isolated and apparently normal nature of a cyst situated on the posterior aspect of the pancreatic head, which is totally separate from the biliary tract and from the duodenum.
In these conditions, the diagnosis of Frantz tumor was ruled out and the most probable hypothesis was that of a congenital cystic pancreatic tumor which had recently increased in size. The specificity of the technique used consisted in a pancreatic detachment using a Kocher’s maneuver. The posterior aspect of the pancreatic head was then detached in order to "plicate" or fold the pancreas upon itself.
Once turned over 180 degrees to the left, the posterior aspect of the pancreatic head was perfectly exposed. In addition, after puncture of the cyst, the clear fluid content of the cyst was replaced by a blue dye in order to perfectly identify it through a thin layer of pancreatic parenchyma.
The cyst’s enucleation was subsequently facilitated. No adhesion impaired its detachment from the remainder of the pancreatic tissue. Since the pericystic area was preserved, the risk of secondary pancreatic fistula was prevented, especially because the cyst had been previously opacified, which allowed to rule out any potential communication with the excretory ducts of the pancreas.
I Kauffmann, F Becmeur
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
674 views
13 likes
0 comments
02:59
Laparoscopic enucleation of a cystic tumor of the pancreas in a child
This short video describes the laparoscopic enucleation of a benign congenital excretory cyst of the pancreas in a 13-year-old girl.
No prenatal diagnosis had been envisaged and this teen girl was admitted in an emergency setting, with iterative abdominal pain followed by vomiting and weight loss (3Kg) over the last two months.
The entire work-up allowed to rule out the presence of parenchymal tumor involvement and the perfectly regular isolated and apparently normal nature of a cyst situated on the posterior aspect of the pancreatic head, which is totally separate from the biliary tract and from the duodenum.
In these conditions, the diagnosis of Frantz tumor was ruled out and the most probable hypothesis was that of a congenital cystic pancreatic tumor which had recently increased in size. The specificity of the technique used consisted in a pancreatic detachment using a Kocher’s maneuver. The posterior aspect of the pancreatic head was then detached in order to "plicate" or fold the pancreas upon itself.
Once turned over 180 degrees to the left, the posterior aspect of the pancreatic head was perfectly exposed. In addition, after puncture of the cyst, the clear fluid content of the cyst was replaced by a blue dye in order to perfectly identify it through a thin layer of pancreatic parenchyma.
The cyst’s enucleation was subsequently facilitated. No adhesion impaired its detachment from the remainder of the pancreatic tissue. Since the pericystic area was preserved, the risk of secondary pancreatic fistula was prevented, especially because the cyst had been previously opacified, which allowed to rule out any potential communication with the excretory ducts of the pancreas.
Laparoscopic management of a pediatric bronchogenic cyst in a 6-year-old boy
We report the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with an infectious bronchopulmonary episode during which a plain anterior chest X-ray was performed. The X-ray showed an opacity at the right apex. A thoracic CT-scan allowed to demonstrate the presence of a right superior and posterior mediastinal cystic structure, which could be either a non-communicating cystic duplication of the esophagus, or a bronchogenic cyst.
The 3D CT-scan image modeling analysis allowed the surgeon to become familiar with a benign superior mediastinal cystic tumor including its surrounding anatomical structures. The tumor was immediately found above the arch of the azygos vein laterally to the superior vena cava and to the right phrenic nerve, and anteriorly to the right vagus nerve.
The resection was performed thoracoscopically, without any difficulty after a small opening of the mediastinal pleura in order to provide direct access to the paramedian cyst.
Pathological findings demonstrated the presence of a bronchogenic cyst without any communication with the airway tree or the esophagus. Postoperative outcomes were uneventful and the patient was rapidly discharged from hospital.
F Becmeur, C Boff
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
884 views
44 likes
0 comments
04:49
Laparoscopic management of a pediatric bronchogenic cyst in a 6-year-old boy
We report the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with an infectious bronchopulmonary episode during which a plain anterior chest X-ray was performed. The X-ray showed an opacity at the right apex. A thoracic CT-scan allowed to demonstrate the presence of a right superior and posterior mediastinal cystic structure, which could be either a non-communicating cystic duplication of the esophagus, or a bronchogenic cyst.
The 3D CT-scan image modeling analysis allowed the surgeon to become familiar with a benign superior mediastinal cystic tumor including its surrounding anatomical structures. The tumor was immediately found above the arch of the azygos vein laterally to the superior vena cava and to the right phrenic nerve, and anteriorly to the right vagus nerve.
The resection was performed thoracoscopically, without any difficulty after a small opening of the mediastinal pleura in order to provide direct access to the paramedian cyst.
Pathological findings demonstrated the presence of a bronchogenic cyst without any communication with the airway tree or the esophagus. Postoperative outcomes were uneventful and the patient was rapidly discharged from hospital.
Laparoscopic retroperitoneal access to ovarian cysts fixed by severe pelvic adhesions: a case report
Left cystectomy or left adnexectomy can be difficult in cases of frozen pelvis, with an adnexa entirely covered with the sigmoid colon and stuck to the pelvic sidewall.
This video clearly demonstrates the advantages of the left retroperitoneal access to the adnexa, limiting the risks of injury of the ureter and the perforation of the sigmoid colon. The different steps of the operation are as follows: 1) Lysis of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the left pelvic sidewall to visualize the tube. 2) Division of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the uterus to visualize the left ovary. 3) Left retroperitoneal access to the ovary with a longitudinal incision of the peritoneum, laterally. 4) Division of the utero-ovarian pedicle. 5) Retroperitoneal dissection of the ureter to completely release the ovary from the ureter. 6) Lysis of the upper surface of the ovary from the sigmoid colon.
JB Dubuisson, J Dubuisson
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
5683 views
298 likes
0 comments
08:20
Laparoscopic retroperitoneal access to ovarian cysts fixed by severe pelvic adhesions: a case report
Left cystectomy or left adnexectomy can be difficult in cases of frozen pelvis, with an adnexa entirely covered with the sigmoid colon and stuck to the pelvic sidewall.
This video clearly demonstrates the advantages of the left retroperitoneal access to the adnexa, limiting the risks of injury of the ureter and the perforation of the sigmoid colon. The different steps of the operation are as follows: 1) Lysis of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the left pelvic sidewall to visualize the tube. 2) Division of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the uterus to visualize the left ovary. 3) Left retroperitoneal access to the ovary with a longitudinal incision of the peritoneum, laterally. 4) Division of the utero-ovarian pedicle. 5) Retroperitoneal dissection of the ureter to completely release the ovary from the ureter. 6) Lysis of the upper surface of the ovary from the sigmoid colon.
Laparoscopic resection of colorectal liver metastasis in segment VII with transthoracic port-site insertion using ultrasonography and augmented reality
We report the case of a laparoscopic resection in a patient presenting with a colorectal liver metastasis in segment VII of the liver, with transthoracic trocar insertion. The patient is placed in a lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced. After exploration of the peritoneal cavity and ultrasound examination, the intervention is begun with the control of the hepatic pedicle. The right liver is mobilized. As the position of the scope is not ideal, an improved vision is searched for using simulation tools. The subcostal port allows for an optimal view. The 5mm port is switched to a 12mm port, allowing for the placement of the scope. A 5mm port is then placed transthoracically in order to start the hepatotomy. The hepatotomy is performed under a full pedicular clamping, which takes 20 minutes. Dissection is started 2cm around the lesion. The specimen is placed in a bag and extracted through a slightly enlarged 12mm port. After hemostatic control, the tape around the pedicle is removed. The cavity is extensively cleansed. The pneumoperitoneum is reduced and one can observe that there is no bleeding. A thoracic drain is positioned at the level of the 5mm port placed transthoracically. The diaphragmatic port opening site is closed.
P Pessaux, J Hallet, R Memeo, S Tzedakis, V De Blasi, D Mutter, J Marescaux, L Soler
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1761 views
59 likes
0 comments
13:06
Laparoscopic resection of colorectal liver metastasis in segment VII with transthoracic port-site insertion using ultrasonography and augmented reality
We report the case of a laparoscopic resection in a patient presenting with a colorectal liver metastasis in segment VII of the liver, with transthoracic trocar insertion. The patient is placed in a lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced. After exploration of the peritoneal cavity and ultrasound examination, the intervention is begun with the control of the hepatic pedicle. The right liver is mobilized. As the position of the scope is not ideal, an improved vision is searched for using simulation tools. The subcostal port allows for an optimal view. The 5mm port is switched to a 12mm port, allowing for the placement of the scope. A 5mm port is then placed transthoracically in order to start the hepatotomy. The hepatotomy is performed under a full pedicular clamping, which takes 20 minutes. Dissection is started 2cm around the lesion. The specimen is placed in a bag and extracted through a slightly enlarged 12mm port. After hemostatic control, the tape around the pedicle is removed. The cavity is extensively cleansed. The pneumoperitoneum is reduced and one can observe that there is no bleeding. A thoracic drain is positioned at the level of the 5mm port placed transthoracically. The diaphragmatic port opening site is closed.
Laparoscopic right hepatectomy on cirrhotic liver after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and portal vein embolization (PVE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
We reported the case of a 70-year-old man in whom an F4 cirrhosis and a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma were evidenced and managed by a laparoscopic right hepatectomy after transarterial chemoembolization and portal vein embolization. The operation starts with the control of the hepatic pedicle. A Doppler ultrasound is performed. It will reveal the relation of the lesion with the vein. The different right hepatic structures are identified, clipped and divided. Mobilization of the right liver is then initiated. The gallbladder, which is kept in place, is used for traction purposes. Parenchymal transection is begun with the assistance of Ultracision®, Aquamantys®, and Dissectron®. The portal structure and the hepatic vein are identified. The parenchymotomy is carried on and the identification of the right hepatic vein is going to be achieved. The origin of the right hepatic vein is dissected at its upper part and its lower part, in order to encircle it with a tape and divide it with a stapler. Once completed, the medial part of the right triangular ligament is further divided. Mobilization is continued on the same part from both sides, changing traction. The right liver is placed in a bag and removed. The cavity is cleansed. The hemostasis and biliostasis are controlled on the transection.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, J Hargat, S Tzedakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux, L Soler
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2109 views
42 likes
0 comments
08:07
Laparoscopic right hepatectomy on cirrhotic liver after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and portal vein embolization (PVE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
We reported the case of a 70-year-old man in whom an F4 cirrhosis and a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma were evidenced and managed by a laparoscopic right hepatectomy after transarterial chemoembolization and portal vein embolization. The operation starts with the control of the hepatic pedicle. A Doppler ultrasound is performed. It will reveal the relation of the lesion with the vein. The different right hepatic structures are identified, clipped and divided. Mobilization of the right liver is then initiated. The gallbladder, which is kept in place, is used for traction purposes. Parenchymal transection is begun with the assistance of Ultracision®, Aquamantys®, and Dissectron®. The portal structure and the hepatic vein are identified. The parenchymotomy is carried on and the identification of the right hepatic vein is going to be achieved. The origin of the right hepatic vein is dissected at its upper part and its lower part, in order to encircle it with a tape and divide it with a stapler. Once completed, the medial part of the right triangular ligament is further divided. Mobilization is continued on the same part from both sides, changing traction. The right liver is placed in a bag and removed. The cavity is cleansed. The hemostasis and biliostasis are controlled on the transection.
Totally laparoscopic liver resection, very low anterior resection and excision of common iliac artery lymph nodes in a patient with rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases
This is the case of a 62-year-old lady who presented with rectal bleeding four months earlier. Rectosigmoidoscopy, contrast enhanced thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, and pelvic MRI were obtained. A T3 N2 rectal adenocarcinoma 6cm proximal to the dentate line was detected. CT-scan showed that the patient had two liver metastases: one was a 4cm mass located in liver segment II and the other one 1.5cm in liver segment V. Due to the presence of suspected common iliac artery lymph nodes as determined by CT-scan, PET-CT was also obtained, which demonstrated an 18F FDG uptake in the corresponding lymph nodes. A simultaneous resection of all malignant structures was decided upon. With the patient placed in a modified lithotomy position, five trocars were inserted in the upper quadrants to start with liver resection. Left lateral sectionectomy was performed first. After resection of the lesion situated in liver segment V, which was completed without a cholecystectomy, attention was turned towards the rectal procedure. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position with the left side tilted upwards. Two additional trocars were placed to facilitate handling. After IMA and IMV division, a standard total mesorectal excision procedure was completed. Common iliac artery lymph nodes were then harvested. The anastomosis was performed using a double-stapling technique. A diverting ileostomy was also fashioned.
MF Can
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1393 views
39 likes
0 comments
16:08
Totally laparoscopic liver resection, very low anterior resection and excision of common iliac artery lymph nodes in a patient with rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases
This is the case of a 62-year-old lady who presented with rectal bleeding four months earlier. Rectosigmoidoscopy, contrast enhanced thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, and pelvic MRI were obtained. A T3 N2 rectal adenocarcinoma 6cm proximal to the dentate line was detected. CT-scan showed that the patient had two liver metastases: one was a 4cm mass located in liver segment II and the other one 1.5cm in liver segment V. Due to the presence of suspected common iliac artery lymph nodes as determined by CT-scan, PET-CT was also obtained, which demonstrated an 18F FDG uptake in the corresponding lymph nodes. A simultaneous resection of all malignant structures was decided upon. With the patient placed in a modified lithotomy position, five trocars were inserted in the upper quadrants to start with liver resection. Left lateral sectionectomy was performed first. After resection of the lesion situated in liver segment V, which was completed without a cholecystectomy, attention was turned towards the rectal procedure. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position with the left side tilted upwards. Two additional trocars were placed to facilitate handling. After IMA and IMV division, a standard total mesorectal excision procedure was completed. Common iliac artery lymph nodes were then harvested. The anastomosis was performed using a double-stapling technique. A diverting ileostomy was also fashioned.