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Thoracoscopic repair of pure esophageal atresia
A full-term baby weighing 2.8 kg was diagnosed with pure esophageal atresia. No other associated anomalies were found by abdominal sonography and echocardiography. The primary anastomosis was completed thoracoscopically after mobilization of both esophageal pouches. The patient was placed in a prone position at the edge of the operating table. A 5mm, 30-degree angled scope was introduced one fingerbreadth below the lower angle of the scapula. Two 3mm working ports were also inserted; the first in the same costal space as the camera port 3cm from the middle line and the second as high as possible in the axilla. A thin fibrous strand was found connecting both ends of the esophagus. The azygos vein was left intact. Blunt dissection was used throughout the whole procedure to preserve the aortic branches to the lower pouch, dissecting in between them. Without traction, the distance between both pouches was approximately 4cm or 4 vertebral bodies. No tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was identified. Nine polyglactin 5/0 sliding tumble square knots were used to complete the anastomosis. The operative time was 85 minutes. The postoperative period was uneventful. Nasogatric tube feeding started on postoperative day 2, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6 after performing a contrast swallow test ensuring that there is no leakage.
MM Elbarbary, KHK Bahaaeldin, AE Fares, H Seleim, A Shalaby, M Elseoudi, MM Ragab
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2249 views
234 likes
0 comments
18:13
Thoracoscopic repair of pure esophageal atresia
A full-term baby weighing 2.8 kg was diagnosed with pure esophageal atresia. No other associated anomalies were found by abdominal sonography and echocardiography. The primary anastomosis was completed thoracoscopically after mobilization of both esophageal pouches. The patient was placed in a prone position at the edge of the operating table. A 5mm, 30-degree angled scope was introduced one fingerbreadth below the lower angle of the scapula. Two 3mm working ports were also inserted; the first in the same costal space as the camera port 3cm from the middle line and the second as high as possible in the axilla. A thin fibrous strand was found connecting both ends of the esophagus. The azygos vein was left intact. Blunt dissection was used throughout the whole procedure to preserve the aortic branches to the lower pouch, dissecting in between them. Without traction, the distance between both pouches was approximately 4cm or 4 vertebral bodies. No tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was identified. Nine polyglactin 5/0 sliding tumble square knots were used to complete the anastomosis. The operative time was 85 minutes. The postoperative period was uneventful. Nasogatric tube feeding started on postoperative day 2, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6 after performing a contrast swallow test ensuring that there is no leakage.
Laparoscopic gastric pull-up in long-gap esophageal atresia
This is the case of a 2-year-old male preschooler, diagnosed with type III esophageal atresia. During the neonatal period, the patient had a right thoracotomy. Ligation of a tracheo-esophageal fistula and an esophago-esophagostomy were carried out, but failed because there was a long gap atresia. The measured gap of four vertebrae confirmed the diagnosis of long gap esophageal atresia; upon its evaluation by a multidisciplinary team, a laparoscopic gastric pull-up was carried out using 4 trocars: one 12mm, two 5mm and one 3mm trocar. The 6-hour duration of surgery was due to a firm adhesion of the esophagus to the posterior mediastinum. The patient had a favorable outcome without major complications. He remained in PICU for 72 hours and was extubated 48 hours after surgery. This is the sixth case of this particular pediatric surgeon and although our follow-up is still underway, we believe that laparoscopic pediatric surgeons with a certain degree of experience would be able to reproduce this technique, which is an excellent therapeutic option for the management of long gap esophageal atresia with good postoperative results.
A Parilli, W Garcia, I Galdon, G Contreras
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2234 views
24 likes
0 comments
10:54
Laparoscopic gastric pull-up in long-gap esophageal atresia
This is the case of a 2-year-old male preschooler, diagnosed with type III esophageal atresia. During the neonatal period, the patient had a right thoracotomy. Ligation of a tracheo-esophageal fistula and an esophago-esophagostomy were carried out, but failed because there was a long gap atresia. The measured gap of four vertebrae confirmed the diagnosis of long gap esophageal atresia; upon its evaluation by a multidisciplinary team, a laparoscopic gastric pull-up was carried out using 4 trocars: one 12mm, two 5mm and one 3mm trocar. The 6-hour duration of surgery was due to a firm adhesion of the esophagus to the posterior mediastinum. The patient had a favorable outcome without major complications. He remained in PICU for 72 hours and was extubated 48 hours after surgery. This is the sixth case of this particular pediatric surgeon and although our follow-up is still underway, we believe that laparoscopic pediatric surgeons with a certain degree of experience would be able to reproduce this technique, which is an excellent therapeutic option for the management of long gap esophageal atresia with good postoperative results.
Laparoscopic management of a pediatric bronchogenic cyst in a 6-year-old boy
We report the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with an infectious bronchopulmonary episode during which a plain anterior chest X-ray was performed. The X-ray showed an opacity at the right apex. A thoracic CT-scan allowed to demonstrate the presence of a right superior and posterior mediastinal cystic structure, which could be either a non-communicating cystic duplication of the esophagus, or a bronchogenic cyst.
The 3D CT-scan image modeling analysis allowed the surgeon to become familiar with a benign superior mediastinal cystic tumor including its surrounding anatomical structures. The tumor was immediately found above the arch of the azygos vein laterally to the superior vena cava and to the right phrenic nerve, and anteriorly to the right vagus nerve.
The resection was performed thoracoscopically, without any difficulty after a small opening of the mediastinal pleura in order to provide direct access to the paramedian cyst.
Pathological findings demonstrated the presence of a bronchogenic cyst without any communication with the airway tree or the esophagus. Postoperative outcomes were uneventful and the patient was rapidly discharged from hospital.
F Becmeur, C Boff
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
837 views
43 likes
0 comments
04:49
Laparoscopic management of a pediatric bronchogenic cyst in a 6-year-old boy
We report the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with an infectious bronchopulmonary episode during which a plain anterior chest X-ray was performed. The X-ray showed an opacity at the right apex. A thoracic CT-scan allowed to demonstrate the presence of a right superior and posterior mediastinal cystic structure, which could be either a non-communicating cystic duplication of the esophagus, or a bronchogenic cyst.
The 3D CT-scan image modeling analysis allowed the surgeon to become familiar with a benign superior mediastinal cystic tumor including its surrounding anatomical structures. The tumor was immediately found above the arch of the azygos vein laterally to the superior vena cava and to the right phrenic nerve, and anteriorly to the right vagus nerve.
The resection was performed thoracoscopically, without any difficulty after a small opening of the mediastinal pleura in order to provide direct access to the paramedian cyst.
Pathological findings demonstrated the presence of a bronchogenic cyst without any communication with the airway tree or the esophagus. Postoperative outcomes were uneventful and the patient was rapidly discharged from hospital.