We use cookies to offer you an optimal experience on our website. By browsing our website, you accept the use of cookies.
Filter by
Specialty
View more
Technologies
View more
Clear filter Media type
View more
Clear filter Category
View more
Publication date
Sort by:
Colorectal resection in deep endometriosis: multidisciplinary laparoscopic approach (colorectal and gynecologic surgical teams)
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 42-year-old woman with deep pelvic endometriosis with rectal infiltration. After hormone therapy, the patient was operated on due to chronic pain. A laparoscopic approach was performed by a multidisciplinary team including colorectal and gynecologic surgeons having a wide experience in this field.
A CT-scan, MRI, and colonoscopy were performed before the surgery showing a deep infiltrating endometriosis with anterior rectal bowel involvement in the images and normal colorectal mucosa in the endoscopy.
Under general anesthesia, the laparoscopic approach was performed with 4 trocars. Deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) required a hysterectomy and rectal resection to clean all the pelvic space. An end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed and the extraction of the specimen (uterus and rectum) was carried out transvaginally. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4 without complications.
JF Noguera, MD, PhD, J Gilabert-Estelles, J Aguirrezabalaga, B López, J Dolz
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3122 views
303 likes
0 comments
09:55
Colorectal resection in deep endometriosis: multidisciplinary laparoscopic approach (colorectal and gynecologic surgical teams)
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 42-year-old woman with deep pelvic endometriosis with rectal infiltration. After hormone therapy, the patient was operated on due to chronic pain. A laparoscopic approach was performed by a multidisciplinary team including colorectal and gynecologic surgeons having a wide experience in this field.
A CT-scan, MRI, and colonoscopy were performed before the surgery showing a deep infiltrating endometriosis with anterior rectal bowel involvement in the images and normal colorectal mucosa in the endoscopy.
Under general anesthesia, the laparoscopic approach was performed with 4 trocars. Deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) required a hysterectomy and rectal resection to clean all the pelvic space. An end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed and the extraction of the specimen (uterus and rectum) was carried out transvaginally. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4 without complications.
Laparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
Endometriosis is an enigmatic disorder, which affects women in their reproductive age. Failure of recent clinical trials on non-surgical management of endometriosis confirms the role of surgery as a viable treatment of choice. However, recurrence after surgery is common. Recurrence rate varies according to the surgeon’s skills, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and to the postoperative intervention outcome. In patients with severe endometriosis, lesions usually involve the posterior cul-de-sac, anterior rectum, one or both pelvic sidewalls, involving the ureters, the rectosigmoid, and less commonly the anterior bladder, the appendix, and the small bowel. Ureteral retroperitoneal dissection becomes mandatory in extensive endometriosis due to pelvic anatomical distortion. It also leaves the bowel intact without injuring it as the pseudo-peritoneum is lifted along with the inflamed bowel. Consequently, in the surgical practice of benign pathologies, a proper knowledge of the retroperitoneal anatomy ensures complete clearance in cases of advanced endometriosis and frozen pelvis. Here, we present a very interesting case of bladder endometriosis associated with hematuria during menstruation. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with bladder endometriosis in most cases. Provided surgeons are skilled and lesions require no ureteral reimplantation, operative laparoscopy is a valid alternative to laparotomy for partial cystectomy.
D Limbachiya
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2165 views
65 likes
0 comments
06:56
Laparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
Endometriosis is an enigmatic disorder, which affects women in their reproductive age. Failure of recent clinical trials on non-surgical management of endometriosis confirms the role of surgery as a viable treatment of choice. However, recurrence after surgery is common. Recurrence rate varies according to the surgeon’s skills, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and to the postoperative intervention outcome. In patients with severe endometriosis, lesions usually involve the posterior cul-de-sac, anterior rectum, one or both pelvic sidewalls, involving the ureters, the rectosigmoid, and less commonly the anterior bladder, the appendix, and the small bowel. Ureteral retroperitoneal dissection becomes mandatory in extensive endometriosis due to pelvic anatomical distortion. It also leaves the bowel intact without injuring it as the pseudo-peritoneum is lifted along with the inflamed bowel. Consequently, in the surgical practice of benign pathologies, a proper knowledge of the retroperitoneal anatomy ensures complete clearance in cases of advanced endometriosis and frozen pelvis. Here, we present a very interesting case of bladder endometriosis associated with hematuria during menstruation. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with bladder endometriosis in most cases. Provided surgeons are skilled and lesions require no ureteral reimplantation, operative laparoscopy is a valid alternative to laparotomy for partial cystectomy.
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, A Host
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3980 views
162 likes
0 comments
31:22
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, C Meza Paul, K Afors, J Castellano, G Centini, R Fernandes, R Murtada
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1918 views
46 likes
0 comments
38:15
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
Laparoscopic rectal shaving for rectocervical endometriotic nodule
This is the case of a 32-year-old G0P0 woman presenting with severe dysmenorrhea, severe dyspareunia, and constipation. Pelvic examination showed a normal vagina, a fixed uterus, and mobile adnexae. Transvaginal ultrasonography (TvUSG) showed that the uterus and both ovaries were normal. A left parasalpingeal endometrioma (15mm), an obliterated Douglas pouch, as well as rectocervical and infiltrated rectal nodules (18mm and 0.6mm respectively) were also evidenced. Since bilateral ovaries were fixed to the pelvic sidewall, the operative strategy included bilateral ureterolysis and dissection of the hypogastric nerve and the pararectal fossa. Finally, the rectocervical nodule was mobilized by performing cervical and rectal shaving. The rectum was controlled by means of a methylene blue test. The final pathology was endometriosis.
H Altuntaş
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5432 views
488 likes
0 comments
06:58
Laparoscopic rectal shaving for rectocervical endometriotic nodule
This is the case of a 32-year-old G0P0 woman presenting with severe dysmenorrhea, severe dyspareunia, and constipation. Pelvic examination showed a normal vagina, a fixed uterus, and mobile adnexae. Transvaginal ultrasonography (TvUSG) showed that the uterus and both ovaries were normal. A left parasalpingeal endometrioma (15mm), an obliterated Douglas pouch, as well as rectocervical and infiltrated rectal nodules (18mm and 0.6mm respectively) were also evidenced. Since bilateral ovaries were fixed to the pelvic sidewall, the operative strategy included bilateral ureterolysis and dissection of the hypogastric nerve and the pararectal fossa. Finally, the rectocervical nodule was mobilized by performing cervical and rectal shaving. The rectum was controlled by means of a methylene blue test. The final pathology was endometriosis.
Management of a severe bleeding during laparoscopy for recurrent rectovaginal endometriosis
This case demonstrates the potential danger of a repetitive surgery after an incomplete resection of rectovaginal endometriosis. A severe bleeding occurred during the dissection of the recurrent nodule. It was managed through multiple coagulations, which could only be performed safely and effectively because important landmarks had been identified and retracted prior to resecting the nodule. A key point in the surgery was also circumventing the nodule in order to pass in sano as the bleeding came from vessels entrapped in fibrosis and scarring tissue which could not be effectively coagulated.
A Wattiez, R Murtada, G Centini, R Fernandes, K Afors, C Meza Paul, J Castellano
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
3216 views
59 likes
0 comments
08:06
Management of a severe bleeding during laparoscopy for recurrent rectovaginal endometriosis
This case demonstrates the potential danger of a repetitive surgery after an incomplete resection of rectovaginal endometriosis. A severe bleeding occurred during the dissection of the recurrent nodule. It was managed through multiple coagulations, which could only be performed safely and effectively because important landmarks had been identified and retracted prior to resecting the nodule. A key point in the surgery was also circumventing the nodule in order to pass in sano as the bleeding came from vessels entrapped in fibrosis and scarring tissue which could not be effectively coagulated.
Laparoscopic segmental resection in a patient with deep infiltrating endometriosis
We present the case of a 33-year-old-woman suffering from deep infiltrating endometriosis. In her previous history, three laparoscopies had been performed due to endometriosis. In the first two laparoscopies, bilateral ovarian cystectomies had been carried out while the third laparoscopy had been indicated to puncture the ovaries after hormonal stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF), due to the impossibility of reaching follicles transvaginally.
The patient presented with dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and dyschezia, as well as rectorrhagia and diarrhea. The patient’s physical examination demonstrated the presence of a retrouterine mass suggestive of adhesions. Preoperative work-up included MRI and colonoscopy. MRI showed an endometriotic nodule affecting the rectosigmoid junction and infiltrating its wall. A colonoscopy was performed and allowed to visualize the endometriotic nodule.
A Wattiez, C Redondo Guisasola, M Puga, J Alves, R Fernandes
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2664 views
31 likes
0 comments
18:50
Laparoscopic segmental resection in a patient with deep infiltrating endometriosis
We present the case of a 33-year-old-woman suffering from deep infiltrating endometriosis. In her previous history, three laparoscopies had been performed due to endometriosis. In the first two laparoscopies, bilateral ovarian cystectomies had been carried out while the third laparoscopy had been indicated to puncture the ovaries after hormonal stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF), due to the impossibility of reaching follicles transvaginally.
The patient presented with dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and dyschezia, as well as rectorrhagia and diarrhea. The patient’s physical examination demonstrated the presence of a retrouterine mass suggestive of adhesions. Preoperative work-up included MRI and colonoscopy. MRI showed an endometriotic nodule affecting the rectosigmoid junction and infiltrating its wall. A colonoscopy was performed and allowed to visualize the endometriotic nodule.
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, I Argay
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5310 views
312 likes
1 comment
42:42
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.