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LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for echinococcosis alveolaris
Human alveolar echinococcosis is a fatal, chronically progressive hepatic infestation. It has a long asymptomatic period. The lesions are invasive, tumor-like, multivesiculated with exogenous budding containing mucoid material with surrounding fibrous stroma. The lesions vary in size from a pin point to a hen’s egg size and are never huge. There are no daughter cysts and scolices are never present. The liver is the most common site for the alveolar form.
Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver behaves like a slow-growing liver cancer.
Differential diagnoses of alveolar echinococcosis include several hepatic tumors such as cystadenoma, cystadenocarcinoma, peripheral cholangiocarcinoma, and metastasis. These tumors can be differentiated from alveolar echinococcosis because they are usually enhanced and rarely calcified.
Lack of enhancement is a characteristic feature of alveolar echinococcosis lesions and might aid in the differential diagnosis of hepatic lesions.
The mainstay of treatment is surgical in localized lesions. Medical therapy only stabilizes the lesions in some cases. Liver transplantation may be required in advanced cases. Metastasis of the disease occurs in advanced cases resulting in lesions in the lung and the brain.
Radical surgical procedures are the best chance of definite cure of the disease because the cyst is removed from the patient's body as a whole, leaving no chance for recurrence.
Recurrence after primary treatment of echinococcosis multilocularis liver disease is an important issue. The major hepatic resection, which is a radical procedure is a safe and effective option for treatment of liver echinococcosis multilocularis.
Non-anatomic hepatic resections should be performed for cysts of a relatively small size and subcapsular location whereas anatomical resections should be performed for cysts impairing most of liver segments.
A Prado de Resende
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1700 views
66 likes
0 comments
26:34
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for echinococcosis alveolaris
Human alveolar echinococcosis is a fatal, chronically progressive hepatic infestation. It has a long asymptomatic period. The lesions are invasive, tumor-like, multivesiculated with exogenous budding containing mucoid material with surrounding fibrous stroma. The lesions vary in size from a pin point to a hen’s egg size and are never huge. There are no daughter cysts and scolices are never present. The liver is the most common site for the alveolar form.
Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver behaves like a slow-growing liver cancer.
Differential diagnoses of alveolar echinococcosis include several hepatic tumors such as cystadenoma, cystadenocarcinoma, peripheral cholangiocarcinoma, and metastasis. These tumors can be differentiated from alveolar echinococcosis because they are usually enhanced and rarely calcified.
Lack of enhancement is a characteristic feature of alveolar echinococcosis lesions and might aid in the differential diagnosis of hepatic lesions.
The mainstay of treatment is surgical in localized lesions. Medical therapy only stabilizes the lesions in some cases. Liver transplantation may be required in advanced cases. Metastasis of the disease occurs in advanced cases resulting in lesions in the lung and the brain.
Radical surgical procedures are the best chance of definite cure of the disease because the cyst is removed from the patient's body as a whole, leaving no chance for recurrence.
Recurrence after primary treatment of echinococcosis multilocularis liver disease is an important issue. The major hepatic resection, which is a radical procedure is a safe and effective option for treatment of liver echinococcosis multilocularis.
Non-anatomic hepatic resections should be performed for cysts of a relatively small size and subcapsular location whereas anatomical resections should be performed for cysts impairing most of liver segments.
Robotic partial splenectomy for cystic lesion of the spleen
We report the case of a 21-year-old woman with a cystic lesion of the spleen treated with a robotic partial splenectomy. The patient is placed in a right lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced into the left hypochondrium. The robot is placed at the level of the patient’s left shoulder. The intervention is begun with a lowering of the splenic flexure. Dissection is initiated at the upper pole of the spleen by retracting the stomach and by progressively dividing the different short vessels. It is decided to start the parenchymotomy approximately 1cm from the devascularized area. Transection is begun using an ultrasonic dissector. Hemostasis is subsequently achieved progressively. Transection is completed by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Hemostasis is further completed using the Aquamantys® system and bipolar sealers. The specimen is fully mobilized and placed in a bag. It is extracted by means of a small suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pathological findings demonstrate the presence of an epidermoid cyst. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, N Ferreira, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1918 views
71 likes
1 comment
09:14
Robotic partial splenectomy for cystic lesion of the spleen
We report the case of a 21-year-old woman with a cystic lesion of the spleen treated with a robotic partial splenectomy. The patient is placed in a right lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced into the left hypochondrium. The robot is placed at the level of the patient’s left shoulder. The intervention is begun with a lowering of the splenic flexure. Dissection is initiated at the upper pole of the spleen by retracting the stomach and by progressively dividing the different short vessels. It is decided to start the parenchymotomy approximately 1cm from the devascularized area. Transection is begun using an ultrasonic dissector. Hemostasis is subsequently achieved progressively. Transection is completed by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Hemostasis is further completed using the Aquamantys® system and bipolar sealers. The specimen is fully mobilized and placed in a bag. It is extracted by means of a small suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pathological findings demonstrate the presence of an epidermoid cyst. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.