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Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
C Peillon, G Philouze, JM Baste
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
617 views
14 likes
0 comments
09:09
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
Type III hiatal hernia: stepwise laparoscopic treatment
The surgical treatment of type III hiatal hernia has been thoroughly standardized in the following order: extrasaccular approach, reduction of the entire sac, and esophageal mobilization in order to restore the esophagogastric anatomy. Although it is recommended to combine this with a fundoplication as most authors do, there is still controversy concerning the closure technique of the diaphragmatic defect. Some experts recommend the reinforcement of this closure by means of a synthetic mesh. It is, however, a method which does not prevent recurrence and which can also bring about complications, which can at times be disastrous. As a result, we privilege reinforcement using an absorbable mesh.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, S Tzedakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
8519 views
291 likes
0 comments
16:21
Type III hiatal hernia: stepwise laparoscopic treatment
The surgical treatment of type III hiatal hernia has been thoroughly standardized in the following order: extrasaccular approach, reduction of the entire sac, and esophageal mobilization in order to restore the esophagogastric anatomy. Although it is recommended to combine this with a fundoplication as most authors do, there is still controversy concerning the closure technique of the diaphragmatic defect. Some experts recommend the reinforcement of this closure by means of a synthetic mesh. It is, however, a method which does not prevent recurrence and which can also bring about complications, which can at times be disastrous. As a result, we privilege reinforcement using an absorbable mesh.
Laparoscopic redo after failed Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
This video shows a reintervention after laparoscopic bypass in a 44-year-old woman presenting with a history of dysphagia which began shortly after surgery.
First, a dissection between the inferior surface of the left hepatic lobe and the gastrojejunal anastomosis is performed. The gastrojejunal anastomosis is then dissected on its posterior side and a scarry and stenotic anastomosis becomes visible with a chronic fistula to the excluded stomach.
After resection of the “old” anastomosis, a new gastrojejunostomy is performed using the OrVil™ orogastric tube and the DST Series™ EEA™ 25mm circular stapling device.
P Vorwald, M Posada, D Cortés, S Ayora González, E Bernal, C Ferrero
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
936 views
22 likes
0 comments
14:04
Laparoscopic redo after failed Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
This video shows a reintervention after laparoscopic bypass in a 44-year-old woman presenting with a history of dysphagia which began shortly after surgery.
First, a dissection between the inferior surface of the left hepatic lobe and the gastrojejunal anastomosis is performed. The gastrojejunal anastomosis is then dissected on its posterior side and a scarry and stenotic anastomosis becomes visible with a chronic fistula to the excluded stomach.
After resection of the “old” anastomosis, a new gastrojejunostomy is performed using the OrVil™ orogastric tube and the DST Series™ EEA™ 25mm circular stapling device.
Laparoscopic transhiatal resection of giant esophageal leiomyoma
This is the case of a 36-year-old male patient who had slowly progressing symptoms for 10 years. These symptoms were the following: hiccups, progressive dysphagia, first for solids, and then for liquids, and gastro-esophageal reflux. In 2003, the patient was first evaluated in a private clinic and diagnosed with esophageal wall hernia. In 2010, his symptoms were still present and he was evaluated by a physician who performed a new endoscopy, which demonstrated a 90% obstruction of the esophageal lumen. A biopsy was also performed. It was negative for malignancy, hence providing the diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma.
In December 2011, a CT-scan and endoscopic ultrasound were performed leading to the conclusion of an esophageal leiomyoma. A laparoscopic transhiatal resection of the esophageal leiomyoma was decided upon in July 2012.
This case is essential because it shows the usefulness of a hook clamp to facilitate traction of the leiomyoma. Additionally, it shows an intraoperative complication consisting in a perforation of the esophageal mucosa, which was sutured by means of Vicryl 4/0.
DU Castro Nuñez, L Bao Romero, L Belloni Caceres
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
526 views
4 likes
0 comments
09:57
Laparoscopic transhiatal resection of giant esophageal leiomyoma
This is the case of a 36-year-old male patient who had slowly progressing symptoms for 10 years. These symptoms were the following: hiccups, progressive dysphagia, first for solids, and then for liquids, and gastro-esophageal reflux. In 2003, the patient was first evaluated in a private clinic and diagnosed with esophageal wall hernia. In 2010, his symptoms were still present and he was evaluated by a physician who performed a new endoscopy, which demonstrated a 90% obstruction of the esophageal lumen. A biopsy was also performed. It was negative for malignancy, hence providing the diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma.
In December 2011, a CT-scan and endoscopic ultrasound were performed leading to the conclusion of an esophageal leiomyoma. A laparoscopic transhiatal resection of the esophageal leiomyoma was decided upon in July 2012.
This case is essential because it shows the usefulness of a hook clamp to facilitate traction of the leiomyoma. Additionally, it shows an intraoperative complication consisting in a perforation of the esophageal mucosa, which was sutured by means of Vicryl 4/0.
Collis Nissen procedure after lung transplantation and laparoscopic management of mediastinal hematoma
After lung transplantation, GERD causes inflammatory reactions, increasing risks for obliterating bronchiolitis and dysfunctioning graft. Authors first present a laparoscopic Collis Nissen procedure for hiatal hernia and severe esophagitis in a grafted patient. Because of a short esophagus despite extended dissection, a Collis gastroplasty is required. After stapling, cruroplasty is performed, finally followed by a Nissen fundoplication. In case of severe esophagitis, a difficult dissection and inflammatory tissues can lead to more complications such as leak, hemorrhage, slippage, and abscess. Mediastinal hematoma is diagnosed on postoperative day 9, mandating a redo emergency intervention. This rare complication will be managed laparoscopically.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, HA Mercoli, L Marx, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1739 views
58 likes
0 comments
21:07
Collis Nissen procedure after lung transplantation and laparoscopic management of mediastinal hematoma
After lung transplantation, GERD causes inflammatory reactions, increasing risks for obliterating bronchiolitis and dysfunctioning graft. Authors first present a laparoscopic Collis Nissen procedure for hiatal hernia and severe esophagitis in a grafted patient. Because of a short esophagus despite extended dissection, a Collis gastroplasty is required. After stapling, cruroplasty is performed, finally followed by a Nissen fundoplication. In case of severe esophagitis, a difficult dissection and inflammatory tissues can lead to more complications such as leak, hemorrhage, slippage, and abscess. Mediastinal hematoma is diagnosed on postoperative day 9, mandating a redo emergency intervention. This rare complication will be managed laparoscopically.
Endoscope-guided Nissen fundoplication
Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is a common and almost endemic problem in the Western world. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery is an effective and durable treatment for GERD in patients who are well-selected. Selection depends on a careful assessment of symptoms and a thorough physiologic evaluation with endoscopy, pH-monitoring and esophageal manometry. In more advanced and difficult cases, additional tests may be indicated. Cases encountered in practice range from straight forward and "everyday" to extremely complex and difficult; both in the decision-making, the operation, and the patient management. The common thread between all cases of anti-reflux surgery, complex or simple, is a stepwise and organized approach that takes into consideration the individual patient's disease and physiology. We present a case in this video that is not complex but which provides a good illustration of the technical steps required to recreate an effective gastroesophageal valve. We emphasize an atraumatic and efficient approach to the operation that ensures optimal outcomes and will minimize intraoperative complications. We discuss the characteristics of a properly formed fundoplication and debate with other experts some of the minor technical details such as suture patterns and materials. We also show how intraoperative endoscopy can serve as a powerful tool for quality control and postulate that surgeons can improve their results if they adopt routine interoperative control by endoscopy. We hope that you will enjoy and benefit from this case…
LL Swanström, A D'Urso, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2600 views
124 likes
0 comments
36:15
Endoscope-guided Nissen fundoplication
Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is a common and almost endemic problem in the Western world. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery is an effective and durable treatment for GERD in patients who are well-selected. Selection depends on a careful assessment of symptoms and a thorough physiologic evaluation with endoscopy, pH-monitoring and esophageal manometry. In more advanced and difficult cases, additional tests may be indicated. Cases encountered in practice range from straight forward and "everyday" to extremely complex and difficult; both in the decision-making, the operation, and the patient management. The common thread between all cases of anti-reflux surgery, complex or simple, is a stepwise and organized approach that takes into consideration the individual patient's disease and physiology. We present a case in this video that is not complex but which provides a good illustration of the technical steps required to recreate an effective gastroesophageal valve. We emphasize an atraumatic and efficient approach to the operation that ensures optimal outcomes and will minimize intraoperative complications. We discuss the characteristics of a properly formed fundoplication and debate with other experts some of the minor technical details such as suture patterns and materials. We also show how intraoperative endoscopy can serve as a powerful tool for quality control and postulate that surgeons can improve their results if they adopt routine interoperative control by endoscopy. We hope that you will enjoy and benefit from this case…
Thoracoscopic enucleation of a middle esophagus leiomyoma
Leiomyoma is the most frequent esophageal benign tumor. It represents 70% of these tumors and 1 to 8% of all esophageal tumors. The most frequent location is the distal esophagus. The majority of cases are asymptomatic and are discovered by chance in endoscopic or radiologic examinations. An endoscopic or surgical treatment can be applied in symptomatic cases (mainly dysphagia), basically depending on its size.
We present a thoracoscopic enucleation of a milddle esophagus leiomyoma in a 41-year-old woman. The operation was performed using a thoracoscopic approach. The patient was placed in a prone decubitus position. The tumor was enucleated by myotomy with subsequent suturing of the muscular gap through three trocars. There were no complications. After 48 hours postoperatively, a water-soluble contrast gastroduodenal study revealed normal passage through the esophageal lumen. The pathologist's diagnosis was esophageal leiomyoma.
F Ochando Cerdan, JM Fernandez Cebrian, L Vega Lopez
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1286 views
17 likes
0 comments
16:15
Thoracoscopic enucleation of a middle esophagus leiomyoma
Leiomyoma is the most frequent esophageal benign tumor. It represents 70% of these tumors and 1 to 8% of all esophageal tumors. The most frequent location is the distal esophagus. The majority of cases are asymptomatic and are discovered by chance in endoscopic or radiologic examinations. An endoscopic or surgical treatment can be applied in symptomatic cases (mainly dysphagia), basically depending on its size.
We present a thoracoscopic enucleation of a milddle esophagus leiomyoma in a 41-year-old woman. The operation was performed using a thoracoscopic approach. The patient was placed in a prone decubitus position. The tumor was enucleated by myotomy with subsequent suturing of the muscular gap through three trocars. There were no complications. After 48 hours postoperatively, a water-soluble contrast gastroduodenal study revealed normal passage through the esophageal lumen. The pathologist's diagnosis was esophageal leiomyoma.
Laparoscopic redo Nissen posterior fundoplication
This video shows a reintervention after laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti due to failure of the technique in a 70-year-old woman presenting with a history of dysphagia and weight loss beginning short after surgery.
First, dissection of the fundic wrap and esophageal hiatus are completed in order to expose specific anatomical landmarks that would help us understand the possible causes for the failure of the first procedure.
The original fundoplication is then unwrapped, rearranging it to the original anatomical position. This maneuver allows us to understand the causes for the technique’s failure, which can be accounted for by the asymmetrical position of the fundoplication caused by a series of elements. First, the short gastric vessels were not dissected during the first surgery, this probably contributed to the malposition of the right flap, which emerges from the posterior mid-stomach wall, distal to the fundus. On the other hand, the right flap emerges from the para-esophageal proximal edge of the lesser curvature; this causes the “valve” to be angulated and rotated clockwise, “hiding” the fundoplication on the posterior gastric wall.
To complete the procedure, a Toupet fundoplication is performed as a substituting anti-reflux technique.
P Vorwald, E York Pineda, E Bernal, M Posada, S Ayora González, R Restrepo
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
3706 views
74 likes
0 comments
10:37
Laparoscopic redo Nissen posterior fundoplication
This video shows a reintervention after laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti due to failure of the technique in a 70-year-old woman presenting with a history of dysphagia and weight loss beginning short after surgery.
First, dissection of the fundic wrap and esophageal hiatus are completed in order to expose specific anatomical landmarks that would help us understand the possible causes for the failure of the first procedure.
The original fundoplication is then unwrapped, rearranging it to the original anatomical position. This maneuver allows us to understand the causes for the technique’s failure, which can be accounted for by the asymmetrical position of the fundoplication caused by a series of elements. First, the short gastric vessels were not dissected during the first surgery, this probably contributed to the malposition of the right flap, which emerges from the posterior mid-stomach wall, distal to the fundus. On the other hand, the right flap emerges from the para-esophageal proximal edge of the lesser curvature; this causes the “valve” to be angulated and rotated clockwise, “hiding” the fundoplication on the posterior gastric wall.
To complete the procedure, a Toupet fundoplication is performed as a substituting anti-reflux technique.
Laparoscopic partial fundoplication in a patient with scleroderma and severe GERD
Scleroderma is associated with severe esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Results after antireflux surgery have been suboptimal due to the profound esophageal dysmotility observed in this disease.

Here, we show the case of a 54-year-old patient with scleroderma and severe GERD. The patient presented with both typical GERD symptoms, persistent cough unresponsive to high dose of PPIs, and dysphagia to solids. Preoperative work-up included high-resolution (HR) manometry, which showed a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter and severely impaired peristalsis as well as impedance pH monitoring, which confirmed the presence of pathological reflux, mainly acid, occurring mostly at night in a recumbent position.
S Perretta, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
3429 views
36 likes
0 comments
09:11
Laparoscopic partial fundoplication in a patient with scleroderma and severe GERD
Scleroderma is associated with severe esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Results after antireflux surgery have been suboptimal due to the profound esophageal dysmotility observed in this disease.

Here, we show the case of a 54-year-old patient with scleroderma and severe GERD. The patient presented with both typical GERD symptoms, persistent cough unresponsive to high dose of PPIs, and dysphagia to solids. Preoperative work-up included high-resolution (HR) manometry, which showed a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter and severely impaired peristalsis as well as impedance pH monitoring, which confirmed the presence of pathological reflux, mainly acid, occurring mostly at night in a recumbent position.
Laparoscopic enucleation of horseshoe-shaped esophageal leiomyoma: use of mini-instruments
Introduction:
Leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor of the esophagus, usually arising in the inner circular muscle layer of the distal esophagus. Middle-aged men are most frequently affected. Most patients remain asymptomatic and when they become symptomatic, the main signs are usually dysphagia and epigastric pain, but they are not specific to the disease. Malignization is rare but should not be ignored.
The minimally invasive approach to these tumors allows for complete extirpation with minimal morbidity and provides excellent results.

Materials and methods:
We present the case of a 31-year-old woman with no medical history, who underwent a CT-scan for other reasons, namely for urinary symptoms. A 3cm homogeneous, low attenuated mass was found at the gastroesophageal junction. Endoscopic ultrasound is performed and showed a 50mm horseshoe-shaped tumor affecting three quarters of the esophageal circumference. Because of clinical deterioration, and mainly of dysphagia, elective surgery was decided upon.

Results:
In this video, it is possible to appreciate the laparoscopic enucleation of this horseshoe-shaped tumor, which depends on the distal esophageal wall, mainly using blunt dissection. The intervention is completed with a Toupet fundoplication. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient is discharged on the third postoperative day, and symptoms are resolved.

Conclusions:
Minimally invasive laparoscopic resection of distal esophageal benign tumors is technically safe and provides the well-known advantages of laparoscopic access, achieving quick patient recovery and a short hospital stay.
Some authors recommend to perform an anti-reflux procedure in order to protect the surgical resection area and therefore prevent complications due to the weakening of the lower esophageal sphincter, such as reflux symptoms.
C Rodríguez-Otero Luppi, EM Targarona Soler, C Balagué Ponz, JL Pallarés Segura, M Trías Folch
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
781 views
4 likes
0 comments
08:45
Laparoscopic enucleation of horseshoe-shaped esophageal leiomyoma: use of mini-instruments
Introduction:
Leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor of the esophagus, usually arising in the inner circular muscle layer of the distal esophagus. Middle-aged men are most frequently affected. Most patients remain asymptomatic and when they become symptomatic, the main signs are usually dysphagia and epigastric pain, but they are not specific to the disease. Malignization is rare but should not be ignored.
The minimally invasive approach to these tumors allows for complete extirpation with minimal morbidity and provides excellent results.

Materials and methods:
We present the case of a 31-year-old woman with no medical history, who underwent a CT-scan for other reasons, namely for urinary symptoms. A 3cm homogeneous, low attenuated mass was found at the gastroesophageal junction. Endoscopic ultrasound is performed and showed a 50mm horseshoe-shaped tumor affecting three quarters of the esophageal circumference. Because of clinical deterioration, and mainly of dysphagia, elective surgery was decided upon.

Results:
In this video, it is possible to appreciate the laparoscopic enucleation of this horseshoe-shaped tumor, which depends on the distal esophageal wall, mainly using blunt dissection. The intervention is completed with a Toupet fundoplication. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient is discharged on the third postoperative day, and symptoms are resolved.

Conclusions:
Minimally invasive laparoscopic resection of distal esophageal benign tumors is technically safe and provides the well-known advantages of laparoscopic access, achieving quick patient recovery and a short hospital stay.
Some authors recommend to perform an anti-reflux procedure in order to protect the surgical resection area and therefore prevent complications due to the weakening of the lower esophageal sphincter, such as reflux symptoms.
Laparoscopic resection of an esophageal leiomyoma
Leiomyomas represent a hyperproliferation of interlacing bundles of smooth muscle cells that are well demarcated by adjacent tissue or by a smooth connective tissue capsule. They usually arise as intramural growths and rarely cause symptoms when they are smaller than 5cm in diameter. In the distal esophagus, they may reach large proportions and may encroach on the cardia of the stomach. The majority of leiomyomas have been discovered during evaluation for dysphagia.
The traditional open thoracotomy for the enucleation of larger symptomatic esophageal leiomyomas has been gradually replaced by thoracoscopic or laparoscopic approaches. The video demonstrates the laparoscopic resection of a leiomyoma in a 50-year-old woman with a history of reflux esophagitis presenting with dysphagia.
J Torres Bermúdez, FC Becerra García, S del Valle Ruiz , AA Carrillo Sánchez, G Sánchez de la Villa
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1245 views
8 likes
0 comments
09:13
Laparoscopic resection of an esophageal leiomyoma
Leiomyomas represent a hyperproliferation of interlacing bundles of smooth muscle cells that are well demarcated by adjacent tissue or by a smooth connective tissue capsule. They usually arise as intramural growths and rarely cause symptoms when they are smaller than 5cm in diameter. In the distal esophagus, they may reach large proportions and may encroach on the cardia of the stomach. The majority of leiomyomas have been discovered during evaluation for dysphagia.
The traditional open thoracotomy for the enucleation of larger symptomatic esophageal leiomyomas has been gradually replaced by thoracoscopic or laparoscopic approaches. The video demonstrates the laparoscopic resection of a leiomyoma in a 50-year-old woman with a history of reflux esophagitis presenting with dysphagia.
POEM endoscopic treatment of achalasia using the EndoFLIP® (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) imaging system
This is the case of a 75-year-old lady who presented with recurrent symptoms of dysphagia and regurgitation associated with a significant weight loss due to recurrent achalasia. She developed progressive recurrence after a first surgical treatment by an open Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication back in 1974. This first operation was complicated by an esophageal perforation which required a thoracotomy to be controlled. Several dilatations were attempted with no significant symptoms improvement. One of the most important aspects of POEM is to ensure that the submucosal tunnel adequately extends into the gastric cardia in order to perform a complete and adequate myotomy. To this aim, proper orientation is key but may be difficult even to the experienced eye of the interventional endoscopist familiar with ESD techniques and dissection planes. Six endoscopic cues that assist with this determination have been identified so far. The most useful cue was deemed to be the characteristic appearance of the submucosal space of the cardia of a slightly different color with a somewhat yellowish hue, more capacious than the esophageal submucosal space with more and larger vessels. Identification of the thick, cord-like circular muscle fibers of the lower esophageal sphincter was deemed as the second most useful cue, and noting a bluish coloration of the cardial mucosa from the colored submucosal injection via a retroflexed luminal view was the third most useful cue. Endoscope insertion length within the submucosal tunnel and the palisading mucosal vessels marking the gastroesophageal junction and visible also from inside the submucosal tunnel were deemed helpful but to a lesser degree. Nevertheless, identification of these endoscopic landmarks is not easy nor always reproducible. Creation of the submucosal tunnel is very sensitive to case difficulty and accounts for the large fluctuations in procedure time. Another area of technique variability involves the orientation of the myotomy. In order to improve the recognition of the essential landmarks, we developed a myotomy technique guided by the EndoFLIP® catheter. EndoFLIP® is a unique physiology test that uses both volumetric assessment and pressure readings to calculate compliance and high pressure zones as well as distensibility changes at the gastroesophageal junction. It allows intraoperative assessment of myotomy completion. The use of this device provides a direct immediate feedback with regards to the efficacy of the myotomy. The EndoFLIP® catheter used in this case (EF-325L) has been specifically modified for the POEM procedure. It differs from the standard EndoFLIP® catheter in that it contains an integrated illuminating LED adjacent to the centre measurement electrode. When the catheter is positioned intraluminally at the gastroesophageal junction and secured to this position taping the distal end to the endothracheal tube, it allows to direct dissection towards the cardia.
S Perretta, LL Swanström, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2801 views
38 likes
0 comments
07:08
POEM endoscopic treatment of achalasia using the EndoFLIP® (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) imaging system
This is the case of a 75-year-old lady who presented with recurrent symptoms of dysphagia and regurgitation associated with a significant weight loss due to recurrent achalasia. She developed progressive recurrence after a first surgical treatment by an open Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication back in 1974. This first operation was complicated by an esophageal perforation which required a thoracotomy to be controlled. Several dilatations were attempted with no significant symptoms improvement. One of the most important aspects of POEM is to ensure that the submucosal tunnel adequately extends into the gastric cardia in order to perform a complete and adequate myotomy. To this aim, proper orientation is key but may be difficult even to the experienced eye of the interventional endoscopist familiar with ESD techniques and dissection planes. Six endoscopic cues that assist with this determination have been identified so far. The most useful cue was deemed to be the characteristic appearance of the submucosal space of the cardia of a slightly different color with a somewhat yellowish hue, more capacious than the esophageal submucosal space with more and larger vessels. Identification of the thick, cord-like circular muscle fibers of the lower esophageal sphincter was deemed as the second most useful cue, and noting a bluish coloration of the cardial mucosa from the colored submucosal injection via a retroflexed luminal view was the third most useful cue. Endoscope insertion length within the submucosal tunnel and the palisading mucosal vessels marking the gastroesophageal junction and visible also from inside the submucosal tunnel were deemed helpful but to a lesser degree. Nevertheless, identification of these endoscopic landmarks is not easy nor always reproducible. Creation of the submucosal tunnel is very sensitive to case difficulty and accounts for the large fluctuations in procedure time. Another area of technique variability involves the orientation of the myotomy. In order to improve the recognition of the essential landmarks, we developed a myotomy technique guided by the EndoFLIP® catheter. EndoFLIP® is a unique physiology test that uses both volumetric assessment and pressure readings to calculate compliance and high pressure zones as well as distensibility changes at the gastroesophageal junction. It allows intraoperative assessment of myotomy completion. The use of this device provides a direct immediate feedback with regards to the efficacy of the myotomy. The EndoFLIP® catheter used in this case (EF-325L) has been specifically modified for the POEM procedure. It differs from the standard EndoFLIP® catheter in that it contains an integrated illuminating LED adjacent to the centre measurement electrode. When the catheter is positioned intraluminally at the gastroesophageal junction and secured to this position taping the distal end to the endothracheal tube, it allows to direct dissection towards the cardia.
Robot-assisted revision of stenotic gastrojejunostomy after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
This video presents the case of a 37-year-old woman who benefited from a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with circular gastrojejunal anastomosis one year ago. An anastomotic stenosis rapidly occurred. It was managed conventionally by several endoscopic balloon dilatations without any stable results. It was found legitimate to offer the patient a revision of the gastrojejunostomy. Prior to performing the reintervention, a nasojejunal tube was placed in order to improve the patient’s enteral nutrition. Surgery consisted in the resection of the existing gastrojejunostomy and in the tailoring of a new manual anastomosis using the da Vinci™ robotic Surgical System. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. The patient no longer reports any dysphagia 3 months postoperatively.
M Vix, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1183 views
9 likes
0 comments
15:12
Robot-assisted revision of stenotic gastrojejunostomy after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
This video presents the case of a 37-year-old woman who benefited from a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with circular gastrojejunal anastomosis one year ago. An anastomotic stenosis rapidly occurred. It was managed conventionally by several endoscopic balloon dilatations without any stable results. It was found legitimate to offer the patient a revision of the gastrojejunostomy. Prior to performing the reintervention, a nasojejunal tube was placed in order to improve the patient’s enteral nutrition. Surgery consisted in the resection of the existing gastrojejunostomy and in the tailoring of a new manual anastomosis using the da Vinci™ robotic Surgical System. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. The patient no longer reports any dysphagia 3 months postoperatively.
Laparoscopic hand-sewn re-gastrojejunostomy for complicated Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a popular bariatric procedure associated with potential risk of late complications such as anastomotic stricture, marginal ulceration, fistula formation, weight gain, and nutritional deficiencies. A 48-year-old woman submitted to LRYGB 1.5 year before, presented a marginal ulcer of the gastrojejunostomy, non-responsive to medical therapy, associated with total dysphagia and cachexia. At the time of LRYGB, a linear stapled side-to-side gastrojejunostomy has been performed.

Video: The revision was completed using 4 abdominal trocars and consisted in these successive steps: adhesiolysis between the left liver lobe, gastrojejunostomy and gastric pouch; identification of right crus and lower esophagus; mobilization of the stoma and gastric pouch from both crura, transverse colon and gastric remnant; division of the gastric pouch above the stoma with preservation of the left gastric vessels; division of the proximal alimentary limb under the stoma; new double-layer hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy (PDS 1 externally, PDS 2/0 internally); hiatoplasty; leak test; specimen’s removal through trocar enlargement.

Results: No perioperative complications or additional trocars were registered. Operative time was 157 minutes and estimated blood loss 20 cc. The postoperative course was uneventful and patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. After 1 year, the patient is well and tolerates a regular diet.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications after LRYGB, such as marginal ulcer, can be safely treated by laparoscopy. New hand-sewn anastomosis permits to control the stoma openings and to calibrate the anastomosis size, especially in case of small gastric pouch.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1392 views
15 likes
0 comments
09:18
Laparoscopic hand-sewn re-gastrojejunostomy for complicated Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a popular bariatric procedure associated with potential risk of late complications such as anastomotic stricture, marginal ulceration, fistula formation, weight gain, and nutritional deficiencies. A 48-year-old woman submitted to LRYGB 1.5 year before, presented a marginal ulcer of the gastrojejunostomy, non-responsive to medical therapy, associated with total dysphagia and cachexia. At the time of LRYGB, a linear stapled side-to-side gastrojejunostomy has been performed.

Video: The revision was completed using 4 abdominal trocars and consisted in these successive steps: adhesiolysis between the left liver lobe, gastrojejunostomy and gastric pouch; identification of right crus and lower esophagus; mobilization of the stoma and gastric pouch from both crura, transverse colon and gastric remnant; division of the gastric pouch above the stoma with preservation of the left gastric vessels; division of the proximal alimentary limb under the stoma; new double-layer hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy (PDS 1 externally, PDS 2/0 internally); hiatoplasty; leak test; specimen’s removal through trocar enlargement.

Results: No perioperative complications or additional trocars were registered. Operative time was 157 minutes and estimated blood loss 20 cc. The postoperative course was uneventful and patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. After 1 year, the patient is well and tolerates a regular diet.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications after LRYGB, such as marginal ulcer, can be safely treated by laparoscopy. New hand-sewn anastomosis permits to control the stoma openings and to calibrate the anastomosis size, especially in case of small gastric pouch.
Laparoscopic gastroesophageal resection after mesh migration
In this video, we describe a laparoscopic gastroesophageal resection after a mesh migration in a 47-year-old woman diagnosed with a giant paraesophageal hernia. Preoperatively, a barium esophagogram, an upper endoscopy and an esophageal manometry were performed to define the anatomy of the esophagus, stomach and gastroesophageal junction, the esophageal peristalsis and the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to confirm the diagnosis of paraesophageal hernia. Additionally, a 24-hour pH-monitoring was performed to determine the magnitude of gastroesophageal reflux.
Five months after the first operation, the patient presented with fever and dysphagia for solids with a 15 Kg weight loss.
She underwent a CT-scan of the thorax and the abdomen, a gastrografin X-ray examination and an upper endoscopy, which showed the presence of a mediastinal fistula secondary to mesh migration.
For that reason, the patient received a second surgical treatment consisting in a laparoscopic gastroesophageal resection.
F Corcione, F Pirozzi, L Barra, V Cimmino, E Minona
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2188 views
8 likes
0 comments
16:00
Laparoscopic gastroesophageal resection after mesh migration
In this video, we describe a laparoscopic gastroesophageal resection after a mesh migration in a 47-year-old woman diagnosed with a giant paraesophageal hernia. Preoperatively, a barium esophagogram, an upper endoscopy and an esophageal manometry were performed to define the anatomy of the esophagus, stomach and gastroesophageal junction, the esophageal peristalsis and the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to confirm the diagnosis of paraesophageal hernia. Additionally, a 24-hour pH-monitoring was performed to determine the magnitude of gastroesophageal reflux.
Five months after the first operation, the patient presented with fever and dysphagia for solids with a 15 Kg weight loss.
She underwent a CT-scan of the thorax and the abdomen, a gastrografin X-ray examination and an upper endoscopy, which showed the presence of a mediastinal fistula secondary to mesh migration.
For that reason, the patient received a second surgical treatment consisting in a laparoscopic gastroesophageal resection.
Second reoperative antireflux procedure for valve slippage
Redo surgery is technically more demanding than primary fundoplication. In addition, anatomical defects that caused failure may increase technical difficulties. A recent review found that the average success rate after laparoscopic redo operations ranged from 65 to 100 per cent (van Beek D, Auyang E, Soper N. A comprehensive review of laparoscopic redo fundoplication. Surgical Endoscopy: Springer New York; 2010. p 1-7). However, our recent study showed that the failure rate after re-operation is increasing with time, and highlighted the need for accurate preoperative and intraoperative assessment of the causes of failure (Dallemagne B, Arenas Sanchez M, Francart D, Perretta S, Weerts J, Markiewicz S, et al. Long-term results after laparoscopic reoperation for failed antireflux procedures. Br J Surg 2011;98:1581-7). This video shows a third antireflux procedure in a patient presenting with slippage of the fundoplication.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J D'Agostino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1422 views
15 likes
0 comments
29:04
Second reoperative antireflux procedure for valve slippage
Redo surgery is technically more demanding than primary fundoplication. In addition, anatomical defects that caused failure may increase technical difficulties. A recent review found that the average success rate after laparoscopic redo operations ranged from 65 to 100 per cent (van Beek D, Auyang E, Soper N. A comprehensive review of laparoscopic redo fundoplication. Surgical Endoscopy: Springer New York; 2010. p 1-7). However, our recent study showed that the failure rate after re-operation is increasing with time, and highlighted the need for accurate preoperative and intraoperative assessment of the causes of failure (Dallemagne B, Arenas Sanchez M, Francart D, Perretta S, Weerts J, Markiewicz S, et al. Long-term results after laparoscopic reoperation for failed antireflux procedures. Br J Surg 2011;98:1581-7). This video shows a third antireflux procedure in a patient presenting with slippage of the fundoplication.
Esophageal peptic stricture and shortened esophagus managed by a laparoscopic Collis-Nissen procedure
This video presents a laparoscopic Collis-Nissen procedure performed in a 64-year-old man presenting with long-standing reflux disease and esophageal peptic stricture. The patient underwent several (>15) endoscopic dilatations that elicit only temporary improvement of dysphagia. Two esophageal stents were placed without significant improvement after removal. The patient was then referred to surgery. The treatment alternatives were esophagectomy or anti-reflux surgery associated with postoperative dilatations. The first choice was to perform an anti-reflux procedure in order to stop a mixed pathological reflux and reduce the risk of re-stricture. Three months after the procedure, an esophageal stent was placed to dilate the stricture.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, Gf Donatelli, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
3347 views
73 likes
0 comments
24:49
Esophageal peptic stricture and shortened esophagus managed by a laparoscopic Collis-Nissen procedure
This video presents a laparoscopic Collis-Nissen procedure performed in a 64-year-old man presenting with long-standing reflux disease and esophageal peptic stricture. The patient underwent several (>15) endoscopic dilatations that elicit only temporary improvement of dysphagia. Two esophageal stents were placed without significant improvement after removal. The patient was then referred to surgery. The treatment alternatives were esophagectomy or anti-reflux surgery associated with postoperative dilatations. The first choice was to perform an anti-reflux procedure in order to stop a mixed pathological reflux and reduce the risk of re-stricture. Three months after the procedure, an esophageal stent was placed to dilate the stricture.
Endoscopic staple-assisted diverticulostomy in the treatment of Zenker’s diverticulum
Zenker’s diverticulum (ZD) is an acquired pulsion pouch that was first described by Ludlow in 1769. It develops within a natural anatomic dehiscence zone (Killian’s triangle), which is located between the cricopharyngeal and the inferior constrictor muscles, and is due to failure of the cricopharyngeus to relax with swallowing.
The principles of treatment include division of the obstructing cricopharyngeal muscle and adequate drainage of the pouch. This can be achieved successfully with an endoscopic per-oral technique using an endoscopic stapler, as described by Collard in 1993.
Adequate cervical extension and opening of the mouth are a prerequisite for the procedure, which is otherwise indicated for all patients having a symptomatic ZD larger than 2.0cm. Very small diverticula (< 1.0cm), make it difficult to achieve adequate exposure and a complete myotomy; in contrast, very large diverticula leave behind a residual pouch which may be responsible for postoperative dysphagia.
ESD provides short inpatient and operating times, along with a short anesthesia time (mean of 10 to 30 minutes duration). Also, it only causes a mild postoperative discomfort and the patient is able to resume a diet on the same day. It is therefore cost-effective. The most common encountered complications are chipped teeth, postoperative fever and aspiration pneumonia.
Overall, results of this technique in appropriately selected patients are excellent, with a success rate well above 90%.
Needed equipment for this procedure includes:
- Weerda’s diverticuloscope
- Endopath™ articulating endoscopic stapler ATB 45
- Standard cartridges 45mm/3.5mm
- Endo Stitch™ with 2/0 silk sutures
- Closed-end esophageal suction
- 4mm, 0-degree rigid endoscope, 30cm long
References
Ludlow A. A case of obstructed deglutition from a preternatural dilation of and bag formed in the pharynx. Medical Observations Inquiries 1769;3:85-101.
Chang CY, Payyapilli RJ, Scher RL.Endoscopic staple diverticulostomy for Zenker's diverticulum: review of literature and experience in 159 consecutive cases. Laryngoscope. 2003 Jun;113(6):957-65.
Leporrier J, Salamé E, Gignoux M, Ségol P. Zenker's diverticulum: diverticulopexy versus diverticulectomy. Ann Chir. 2001 Feb;126(1):42-5.
Wasserzug O, Zikk D, Raziel A, Cavel O, Fleece D, Szold A. Endoscopically stapled diverticulostomy for Zenker's diverticulum: results of a multidisciplinary team approach. SurgEndosc. 2010 Mar;24(3):637-41. Epub 2009 Aug 18.
Feeley MA, Righi PD, Weisberger EC, Hamaker RC, Spahn TJ, Radpour S, Wynne MK.
Zenker's diverticulum: analysis of surgical complications from diverticulectomy and cricopharyngealmyotomy. Laryngoscope. 1999 Jun;109(6):858-61.
Cook RD, Huang PC, Richstmeier WJ, Scher RL.Endoscopic staple-assisted esophagodiverticulostomy: an excellent treatment of choice for Zenker's diverticulum. Laryngoscope. 2000 Dec;110(12):2020-5.
Cummings CW, Haughey BH, Thomas JR, Harker LA, Flint PW. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. Chapter 74.
S Bouhabel, J Bolduc-Bégin, G Rakovich, A Rahal
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1225 views
5 likes
0 comments
03:34
Endoscopic staple-assisted diverticulostomy in the treatment of Zenker’s diverticulum
Zenker’s diverticulum (ZD) is an acquired pulsion pouch that was first described by Ludlow in 1769. It develops within a natural anatomic dehiscence zone (Killian’s triangle), which is located between the cricopharyngeal and the inferior constrictor muscles, and is due to failure of the cricopharyngeus to relax with swallowing.
The principles of treatment include division of the obstructing cricopharyngeal muscle and adequate drainage of the pouch. This can be achieved successfully with an endoscopic per-oral technique using an endoscopic stapler, as described by Collard in 1993.
Adequate cervical extension and opening of the mouth are a prerequisite for the procedure, which is otherwise indicated for all patients having a symptomatic ZD larger than 2.0cm. Very small diverticula (< 1.0cm), make it difficult to achieve adequate exposure and a complete myotomy; in contrast, very large diverticula leave behind a residual pouch which may be responsible for postoperative dysphagia.
ESD provides short inpatient and operating times, along with a short anesthesia time (mean of 10 to 30 minutes duration). Also, it only causes a mild postoperative discomfort and the patient is able to resume a diet on the same day. It is therefore cost-effective. The most common encountered complications are chipped teeth, postoperative fever and aspiration pneumonia.
Overall, results of this technique in appropriately selected patients are excellent, with a success rate well above 90%.
Needed equipment for this procedure includes:
- Weerda’s diverticuloscope
- Endopath™ articulating endoscopic stapler ATB 45
- Standard cartridges 45mm/3.5mm
- Endo Stitch™ with 2/0 silk sutures
- Closed-end esophageal suction
- 4mm, 0-degree rigid endoscope, 30cm long
References
Ludlow A. A case of obstructed deglutition from a preternatural dilation of and bag formed in the pharynx. Medical Observations Inquiries 1769;3:85-101.
Chang CY, Payyapilli RJ, Scher RL.Endoscopic staple diverticulostomy for Zenker's diverticulum: review of literature and experience in 159 consecutive cases. Laryngoscope. 2003 Jun;113(6):957-65.
Leporrier J, Salamé E, Gignoux M, Ségol P. Zenker's diverticulum: diverticulopexy versus diverticulectomy. Ann Chir. 2001 Feb;126(1):42-5.
Wasserzug O, Zikk D, Raziel A, Cavel O, Fleece D, Szold A. Endoscopically stapled diverticulostomy for Zenker's diverticulum: results of a multidisciplinary team approach. SurgEndosc. 2010 Mar;24(3):637-41. Epub 2009 Aug 18.
Feeley MA, Righi PD, Weisberger EC, Hamaker RC, Spahn TJ, Radpour S, Wynne MK.
Zenker's diverticulum: analysis of surgical complications from diverticulectomy and cricopharyngealmyotomy. Laryngoscope. 1999 Jun;109(6):858-61.
Cook RD, Huang PC, Richstmeier WJ, Scher RL.Endoscopic staple-assisted esophagodiverticulostomy: an excellent treatment of choice for Zenker's diverticulum. Laryngoscope. 2000 Dec;110(12):2020-5.
Cummings CW, Haughey BH, Thomas JR, Harker LA, Flint PW. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. Chapter 74.
Laparoscopic redo Nissen for recurrent GERD not responding to PPIs
This video demonstrates a redo laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in a 34-year-old man with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. A first laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti procedure was performed ten years ago, and was taken down 2 months after surgery for severe dysphagia and important weight loss.
The success rate of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication depends on the proper creation of a floppy and symmetric wrap together with a suitable crural repair. Most failures and complications due to technical mistakes during antireflux surgeries are related to an incomplete or inadequate intraoperative evaluation of the wrap and crural repair. Development or persistence of dysphagia after fundoplication is among the most common complications occurring in up to 30% of patients. Surgical factors responsible for de novo dysphagia are mainly related to the degree, tightness, length of the fundoplication and technical errors leading to wrap misconstruction -below the anatomical gastroesophageal junction or by a distortion of the esophageal diameter and orientation at the level of the crural repair.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
1584 views
27 likes
0 comments
09:41
Laparoscopic redo Nissen for recurrent GERD not responding to PPIs
This video demonstrates a redo laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in a 34-year-old man with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. A first laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti procedure was performed ten years ago, and was taken down 2 months after surgery for severe dysphagia and important weight loss.
The success rate of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication depends on the proper creation of a floppy and symmetric wrap together with a suitable crural repair. Most failures and complications due to technical mistakes during antireflux surgeries are related to an incomplete or inadequate intraoperative evaluation of the wrap and crural repair. Development or persistence of dysphagia after fundoplication is among the most common complications occurring in up to 30% of patients. Surgical factors responsible for de novo dysphagia are mainly related to the degree, tightness, length of the fundoplication and technical errors leading to wrap misconstruction -below the anatomical gastroesophageal junction or by a distortion of the esophageal diameter and orientation at the level of the crural repair.