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Laparoscopic Beger procedure with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy
This is the case of a 49-year-old male patient presenting with recurrent intractable abdominal pain. The patient had a history of obstructive jaundice and underwent biliary decompression provided by a percutaneous cholecystostomy. CT-scan showed signs of chronic pancreatitis, multiple stones in the pancreatic parenchyma, a compressed portal vein and biliary obstruction. The patient underwent a laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) – a technique known as the Beger procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain, combined with portal and biliary compression caused by severe chronic pancreatitis. The surgical procedure preserves the stomach, the duodenum, and the biliary tree unlike standard duodenopancreatectomy (Whipple procedure), which is the other option for these patients. As Beger himself stated: “Preservation of the duodenum and the biliary system has major advantages for patients regarding short- and long-term outcome as compared to the Kausch-Whipple resection and pylorus-preserving resection”.
In this case, after completing the pancreatic head resection and fashioning the distal and proximal pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, a hepaticojejunostomy was performed. It was necessary due to the stenosis of the intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that the laparoscopic Beger procedure is safe and feasible, and provides all the well-known advantages of the minimally invasive approach, particularly lower postoperative pain, earlier functional recovery, and shorter hospital stay.
P Agami, A Andrianov, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1544 views
12 likes
3 comments
17:23
Laparoscopic Beger procedure with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy
This is the case of a 49-year-old male patient presenting with recurrent intractable abdominal pain. The patient had a history of obstructive jaundice and underwent biliary decompression provided by a percutaneous cholecystostomy. CT-scan showed signs of chronic pancreatitis, multiple stones in the pancreatic parenchyma, a compressed portal vein and biliary obstruction. The patient underwent a laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) – a technique known as the Beger procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain, combined with portal and biliary compression caused by severe chronic pancreatitis. The surgical procedure preserves the stomach, the duodenum, and the biliary tree unlike standard duodenopancreatectomy (Whipple procedure), which is the other option for these patients. As Beger himself stated: “Preservation of the duodenum and the biliary system has major advantages for patients regarding short- and long-term outcome as compared to the Kausch-Whipple resection and pylorus-preserving resection”.
In this case, after completing the pancreatic head resection and fashioning the distal and proximal pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, a hepaticojejunostomy was performed. It was necessary due to the stenosis of the intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that the laparoscopic Beger procedure is safe and feasible, and provides all the well-known advantages of the minimally invasive approach, particularly lower postoperative pain, earlier functional recovery, and shorter hospital stay.
Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration using a disposable fiber-optic bonchoscope (Ambu® aScope™)
Background: Laparoscopic common bile duct (CBD) exploration can be performed following choledochotomy or via the trancystic approach. Laparoscopic CBD exploration is limited in some benign upper gastrointestinal units due to the cost of sterilization of the reusable choledochoscope.
We have recently published a case series confirming the safety and efficacy of the 5mm reusable bronchoscope for CBD exploration. This case series evaluates a single-use bronchochoscope (Ambu® aScope™) for laparoscopic CBD exploration.
Method: A retrospective study was conducted from January 2015 to December 2016. Data was collected from electronic records of the patients. All cases confirmed the presence of CBD stones using USS and MRCP. The disposable bronchoscope is introduced via an epigastric port. Choledochotomy is performed using a choledochotome, and a transcystic approach is used after cystic duct dilatation, if required. The Ambu® aScope™ 2 (Ambu UK Ltd, Cambridgeshire) is a sterile and single-use flexible bronchoscope, which is normally used by anesthesiologists for difficult tracheal intubation. A disposable bronchoscope is available in two sizes (3.8mm and 5mm). It is a one-piece unit with a single dimensional flexible tip manipulated with a handpiece (150-degree flex in the 5mm model and 130-degree flex in the 3.8mm model). There is a single instrument channel with a 2.2mm diameter, which allows for the passage of standard endoscopic baskets for CBD stone retrieval. The image is projected to a high-resolution 6.5” LCD screen with a resolution of 640x480 pixels. The bronchoscope handpiece includes a suction port, which is used as an irrigation source for CBD dilatation. It requires the use of a standard 3-way connector.
Results: Twenty nine patients had CBD exploration using the disposable bronchochoscope. There were 10 male and 19 female patients (median age: 42). Ten procedures were performed as emergencies and 19 were performed electively. All cases were managed laparoscopically except one, which was planned as an open procedure due to previous extensive open surgery.
Twenty eight patients had their CBD cleared using a disposable bronchoscope and two needed subsequent ERCP. Choledochotomy was performed in 15 patients and a transcystic approach was used in 6 patients. No T-tube was used in the laparoscopic cases. Two cases were performed as day case surgery. Median postoperative hospital stay was 2.5 days.
Conclusion: The disposable bronchoscope is a safe and effective instrument for CBD exploration, with results comparable to our previously published case series. It has guaranteed sterility and is cost-effective compared to the reusable bronchoscope, especially when initial capital outlay, sterile processing and maintenance costs are considered.
Y Aawsaj, I Ibrahim, A Mitchell, A Gilliam
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
659 views
10 likes
1 comment
10:08
Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration using a disposable fiber-optic bonchoscope (Ambu® aScope™)
Background: Laparoscopic common bile duct (CBD) exploration can be performed following choledochotomy or via the trancystic approach. Laparoscopic CBD exploration is limited in some benign upper gastrointestinal units due to the cost of sterilization of the reusable choledochoscope.
We have recently published a case series confirming the safety and efficacy of the 5mm reusable bronchoscope for CBD exploration. This case series evaluates a single-use bronchochoscope (Ambu® aScope™) for laparoscopic CBD exploration.
Method: A retrospective study was conducted from January 2015 to December 2016. Data was collected from electronic records of the patients. All cases confirmed the presence of CBD stones using USS and MRCP. The disposable bronchoscope is introduced via an epigastric port. Choledochotomy is performed using a choledochotome, and a transcystic approach is used after cystic duct dilatation, if required. The Ambu® aScope™ 2 (Ambu UK Ltd, Cambridgeshire) is a sterile and single-use flexible bronchoscope, which is normally used by anesthesiologists for difficult tracheal intubation. A disposable bronchoscope is available in two sizes (3.8mm and 5mm). It is a one-piece unit with a single dimensional flexible tip manipulated with a handpiece (150-degree flex in the 5mm model and 130-degree flex in the 3.8mm model). There is a single instrument channel with a 2.2mm diameter, which allows for the passage of standard endoscopic baskets for CBD stone retrieval. The image is projected to a high-resolution 6.5” LCD screen with a resolution of 640x480 pixels. The bronchoscope handpiece includes a suction port, which is used as an irrigation source for CBD dilatation. It requires the use of a standard 3-way connector.
Results: Twenty nine patients had CBD exploration using the disposable bronchochoscope. There were 10 male and 19 female patients (median age: 42). Ten procedures were performed as emergencies and 19 were performed electively. All cases were managed laparoscopically except one, which was planned as an open procedure due to previous extensive open surgery.
Twenty eight patients had their CBD cleared using a disposable bronchoscope and two needed subsequent ERCP. Choledochotomy was performed in 15 patients and a transcystic approach was used in 6 patients. No T-tube was used in the laparoscopic cases. Two cases were performed as day case surgery. Median postoperative hospital stay was 2.5 days.
Conclusion: The disposable bronchoscope is a safe and effective instrument for CBD exploration, with results comparable to our previously published case series. It has guaranteed sterility and is cost-effective compared to the reusable bronchoscope, especially when initial capital outlay, sterile processing and maintenance costs are considered.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy - Basic rules - Bile duct injury
There is twice as much risk of incidental biliary injuries in laparoscopic cholecystectomy than in open cholecystectomy.
About half of surgeons will cause a bile duct injury during their careers. In this lecture, Dr. Dallemagne provides key national data of bile duct injury and explains that the lack of surgical experience or visual misperception leads to an increase in the rate of incidental injuries, mentioning his own cases. Dr. Dallemagne also outlines the fundamental techniques to prevent injuries and use bailout procedures (partial and subtotal cholecystectomy) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, according to the latest version of the Tokyo guidelines.
B Dallemagne
Lecture
7 months ago
5210 views
45 likes
2 comments
22:02
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy - Basic rules - Bile duct injury
There is twice as much risk of incidental biliary injuries in laparoscopic cholecystectomy than in open cholecystectomy.
About half of surgeons will cause a bile duct injury during their careers. In this lecture, Dr. Dallemagne provides key national data of bile duct injury and explains that the lack of surgical experience or visual misperception leads to an increase in the rate of incidental injuries, mentioning his own cases. Dr. Dallemagne also outlines the fundamental techniques to prevent injuries and use bailout procedures (partial and subtotal cholecystectomy) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, according to the latest version of the Tokyo guidelines.
Bile duct injury: what to do?
In this key lecture, Dr. Soubrane outlines the various types of bile duct injuries and demonstrates how to manage them, classifying them into bile duct injuries during or after index surgery. When injuries are detected during index surgery, surgeons either have to add stitches combined with drainage in case of minor injuries or create an anastomosis in case of complete common bile duct division. When injuries are detected after index surgery, surgeons may either solve them with endoscopic stenting in case of minor injuries or have to wait at least 2 months in case of complete common bile duct division. As an example of major liver resection for severe bile duct injuries, Dr. Soubrane also shows a case of right liver resection for severe bile duct injury with concomitant arterial interruption and massive portal vein thrombosis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
O Soubrane
Lecture
7 months ago
2216 views
18 likes
1 comment
31:48
Bile duct injury: what to do?
In this key lecture, Dr. Soubrane outlines the various types of bile duct injuries and demonstrates how to manage them, classifying them into bile duct injuries during or after index surgery. When injuries are detected during index surgery, surgeons either have to add stitches combined with drainage in case of minor injuries or create an anastomosis in case of complete common bile duct division. When injuries are detected after index surgery, surgeons may either solve them with endoscopic stenting in case of minor injuries or have to wait at least 2 months in case of complete common bile duct division. As an example of major liver resection for severe bile duct injuries, Dr. Soubrane also shows a case of right liver resection for severe bile duct injury with concomitant arterial interruption and massive portal vein thrombosis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Minimal access surgery approach to benign biliary disease
The laparoscopic biliary approach for benign diseases has been discussed for a quarter of a century. However, there were few articles in the literature about laparoscopic bilioenteric anastomoses, such as choledochoduodenostomy and hepatico/choledochojejunostomy which require advanced laparoscopic skills and experience. In this key lecture, Dr. Asbun demonstrates his own laparoscopic techniques for bilioenteric anastomoses. For choledochal cysts representative of benign biliary diseases, cyst excision is required. The difficulty lies in the fact that the cyst extends towards the intrapancreatic portion. Dr. Asbun demonstrates the techniques for complete exposure of the intrapancreatic bile duct portion in such cases. Finally, Dr. Asbun shows bile duct injury cases managed using a hepaticojejunostomy.
HJ Asbun
Lecture
7 months ago
948 views
7 likes
2 comments
24:34
Minimal access surgery approach to benign biliary disease
The laparoscopic biliary approach for benign diseases has been discussed for a quarter of a century. However, there were few articles in the literature about laparoscopic bilioenteric anastomoses, such as choledochoduodenostomy and hepatico/choledochojejunostomy which require advanced laparoscopic skills and experience. In this key lecture, Dr. Asbun demonstrates his own laparoscopic techniques for bilioenteric anastomoses. For choledochal cysts representative of benign biliary diseases, cyst excision is required. The difficulty lies in the fact that the cyst extends towards the intrapancreatic portion. Dr. Asbun demonstrates the techniques for complete exposure of the intrapancreatic bile duct portion in such cases. Finally, Dr. Asbun shows bile duct injury cases managed using a hepaticojejunostomy.
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
R Adjerid, F Sebaa, N Otsmane, A Khelifaoui
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1711 views
9 likes
1 comment
05:13
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
Morbid obesity surgery, which induces a rapid weight loss, is a predisposing factor for the onset of gallstones. There are treatments which help to reduce this risk. However, the observance is poor and lithogenicity brings about risks of complications such as cholecystitis, stone migration, and acute pancreatitis.
This video demonstrates the case of a patient who underwent a sleeve gastrectomy with a substantial weight loss. Stone migration was found along with a less serious pancreatic response. During a blood test analysis, thrombocytopenia was found and investigated by hematologists. Besides a low platelet count, a qualitative anomaly was observed increasing the risk of bleeding. Despite of this, cholecystectomy was necessary to prevent any new stone migration.
The operator was skilled and used a conventional laparoscopic approach. The patient’s liver is the site of a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), making the procedure even more complex. Four ports were placed to allow for an adequate gallbladder retraction and for a minute dissection. Calot’s triangle was classically approached first as soon as the adhesions between the omentum and the gallbladder were taken down. Due to a thickened and inflammatory cystic duct, the entire gallbladder was dissected before ligating the cystic duct with two ligatures, one of them being reinforced by means of a surgical loop.
M Vix, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
901 views
2 likes
0 comments
13:25
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
Morbid obesity surgery, which induces a rapid weight loss, is a predisposing factor for the onset of gallstones. There are treatments which help to reduce this risk. However, the observance is poor and lithogenicity brings about risks of complications such as cholecystitis, stone migration, and acute pancreatitis.
This video demonstrates the case of a patient who underwent a sleeve gastrectomy with a substantial weight loss. Stone migration was found along with a less serious pancreatic response. During a blood test analysis, thrombocytopenia was found and investigated by hematologists. Besides a low platelet count, a qualitative anomaly was observed increasing the risk of bleeding. Despite of this, cholecystectomy was necessary to prevent any new stone migration.
The operator was skilled and used a conventional laparoscopic approach. The patient’s liver is the site of a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), making the procedure even more complex. Four ports were placed to allow for an adequate gallbladder retraction and for a minute dissection. Calot’s triangle was classically approached first as soon as the adhesions between the omentum and the gallbladder were taken down. Due to a thickened and inflammatory cystic duct, the entire gallbladder was dissected before ligating the cystic duct with two ligatures, one of them being reinforced by means of a surgical loop.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: cystic duct stone management
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 69-year-old woman who had multiple episodes of biliary colic. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the presence of multiple gallbladder stones. MRI also showed a folded gallbladder infundibulum over the cystic duct, which is enlarged and contains a stone. The common bile duct is otherwise perfectly thin and free of stones. In this video, one can observe a stepwise cholecystectomy technique, with exposure, dissection of the serosa and of Calot’s triangle. Cystic artery division is first performed in order to allow complete cystic duct dissection obtaining the critical view of safety. The dissection of the dilated cystic duct is thoroughly demonstrated. A small stone is pushed back into the gallbladder; the cystic duct is opened and checked for residual stones, and the cystic duct convergence with the common bile duct is evidenced prior to clip positioning and duct division.
M Ignat, M Wehr, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
3111 views
12 likes
0 comments
10:44
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: cystic duct stone management
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 69-year-old woman who had multiple episodes of biliary colic. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the presence of multiple gallbladder stones. MRI also showed a folded gallbladder infundibulum over the cystic duct, which is enlarged and contains a stone. The common bile duct is otherwise perfectly thin and free of stones. In this video, one can observe a stepwise cholecystectomy technique, with exposure, dissection of the serosa and of Calot’s triangle. Cystic artery division is first performed in order to allow complete cystic duct dissection obtaining the critical view of safety. The dissection of the dilated cystic duct is thoroughly demonstrated. A small stone is pushed back into the gallbladder; the cystic duct is opened and checked for residual stones, and the cystic duct convergence with the common bile duct is evidenced prior to clip positioning and duct division.
Laparoscopic repair of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
Eligibility criteria for the thoracoscopic approach in case of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) in infants were jointly addressed at the ESPES/IPEG-ESPU Masterclass in March 2017 held at IRCAD, and also published on WeBSurg.
This video aims to show a series of technical details in case of thoracoscopy for CDH grade B according to the currently accepted international classification. At the beginning of the procedure, short intrathoracic low pressure carbon dioxide insufflation at 4mmHg and 1.5 Liter per minute was performed during hernia reduction. The posterior diaphragmatic border was then freed and a diaphragmatic suture was performed using non-absorbable separate 2/0 stitches. A GoreTex DualMesh® patch was used to complete the external suturing of the diaphragm and to achieve fixation stitches.
I Kauffmann, F Becmeur
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3073 views
14 likes
0 comments
04:17
Laparoscopic repair of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
Eligibility criteria for the thoracoscopic approach in case of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) in infants were jointly addressed at the ESPES/IPEG-ESPU Masterclass in March 2017 held at IRCAD, and also published on WeBSurg.
This video aims to show a series of technical details in case of thoracoscopy for CDH grade B according to the currently accepted international classification. At the beginning of the procedure, short intrathoracic low pressure carbon dioxide insufflation at 4mmHg and 1.5 Liter per minute was performed during hernia reduction. The posterior diaphragmatic border was then freed and a diaphragmatic suture was performed using non-absorbable separate 2/0 stitches. A GoreTex DualMesh® patch was used to complete the external suturing of the diaphragm and to achieve fixation stitches.
Inanimate model to train for the thoracoscopic repair of all varieties of left congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
We present a new low-cost model designed for training skills and strategies for the thoracoscopic repair of left congenital diaphragmatic defects. We will present guidelines to make this type of models, the educational strategy that we use in our advanced training models, the defects that can be trained, and the scope of this model. Advanced training, learning tips and tricks from experts, and the use of innovative ideas from other authors used in our model are outlined. This educational tool was developed for pediatric surgeons requiring advanced training. It reinforces the concept of advanced and continuous training, in a safe environment, and it is assisted by experienced surgeons. This model shows a scenario where dimensions and anatomical repairs are carefully preserved.
We share our vision of continuous endosurgical education to encourage all enthusiastic surgeons to train in safe and controlled environments.
Materials and methods: The model consists in a plastic 3D printed left rib cage, extracted from a 6-month-old baby CT-scan combined with simulated mediastinal structures, diaphragm, bowel, lung, and spleen made of latex, silicone, and polyester sponge respectively. A self-adhesive film is used as parietal pleura. A removable part (spare part) represents the last three ribs where the diaphragm is partially inserted, and a base as the upper abdomen is assembled to the left rib cage (ribs 1 to 9). Abdominal viscera (plastic or animal) are placed in this base. The cost of materials is 150 US$.
The model is meant to simulate the most frequent diaphragmatic defects such as type A, B, and C, with or without sac. However, other rare defects can also be simulated. Live animal tissues such as diaphragm or intestine also can be used, as it was already published by other authors. However, the main characteristic of this model is to be inanimate, portable, and easily reloadable to be reused.
The video shows a junior surgeon in his advanced training process. In the model, we perform the reduction of the viscera slid to the thorax. In this case, it is the rabbit intestine, but we usually use latex simulated intestine. The spleen is completely synthetic and bleeds if the instruments damage it during the reduction.
We use 3mm regular instruments. The repair of the defect is made with separate stitches of 2/0 or 3/0 braided polyester as usual, and we encourage trainees to practice the intracorporeal sliding knot and running suture. We collect the performance data in a specially prepared form and carry out the debriefing.
Conclusions: With this model, we can reinforce the concept of low cost, but with a high precision environment simulation, included within a standardized training program in minimally invasive neonatal surgery. We believe that it is a very useful tool. In addition, this type of models allows the use of new surgical techniques, tips and tricks given by experienced surgeons who assist in the training process.
M Maricic, M Bailez
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1510 views
8 likes
1 comment
08:14
Inanimate model to train for the thoracoscopic repair of all varieties of left congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)
We present a new low-cost model designed for training skills and strategies for the thoracoscopic repair of left congenital diaphragmatic defects. We will present guidelines to make this type of models, the educational strategy that we use in our advanced training models, the defects that can be trained, and the scope of this model. Advanced training, learning tips and tricks from experts, and the use of innovative ideas from other authors used in our model are outlined. This educational tool was developed for pediatric surgeons requiring advanced training. It reinforces the concept of advanced and continuous training, in a safe environment, and it is assisted by experienced surgeons. This model shows a scenario where dimensions and anatomical repairs are carefully preserved.
We share our vision of continuous endosurgical education to encourage all enthusiastic surgeons to train in safe and controlled environments.
Materials and methods: The model consists in a plastic 3D printed left rib cage, extracted from a 6-month-old baby CT-scan combined with simulated mediastinal structures, diaphragm, bowel, lung, and spleen made of latex, silicone, and polyester sponge respectively. A self-adhesive film is used as parietal pleura. A removable part (spare part) represents the last three ribs where the diaphragm is partially inserted, and a base as the upper abdomen is assembled to the left rib cage (ribs 1 to 9). Abdominal viscera (plastic or animal) are placed in this base. The cost of materials is 150 US$.
The model is meant to simulate the most frequent diaphragmatic defects such as type A, B, and C, with or without sac. However, other rare defects can also be simulated. Live animal tissues such as diaphragm or intestine also can be used, as it was already published by other authors. However, the main characteristic of this model is to be inanimate, portable, and easily reloadable to be reused.
The video shows a junior surgeon in his advanced training process. In the model, we perform the reduction of the viscera slid to the thorax. In this case, it is the rabbit intestine, but we usually use latex simulated intestine. The spleen is completely synthetic and bleeds if the instruments damage it during the reduction.
We use 3mm regular instruments. The repair of the defect is made with separate stitches of 2/0 or 3/0 braided polyester as usual, and we encourage trainees to practice the intracorporeal sliding knot and running suture. We collect the performance data in a specially prepared form and carry out the debriefing.
Conclusions: With this model, we can reinforce the concept of low cost, but with a high precision environment simulation, included within a standardized training program in minimally invasive neonatal surgery. We believe that it is a very useful tool. In addition, this type of models allows the use of new surgical techniques, tips and tricks given by experienced surgeons who assist in the training process.
Transhepatic percutaneous biliary tract drainage
Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an effective method for the primary or palliative treatment of many biliary strictures. It is a procedure which includes the cannulation of an intrahepatic biliary tree using image-guided wire and catheter manipulation, and placement of a tube or stent for external and/or internal drainage. This video shows this technique applied in a patient with a pancreatic tumor.
This is the case of an 80-year-old male patient with signs of jaundice and a diagnosis of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation and pancreatic tumor.
A transhepatic percutaneous biliary tract drainage was the therapeutic strategy.
F Davrieux, ME Gimenez, EJ Houghton, M Palermo, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3707 views
593 likes
0 comments
20:25
Transhepatic percutaneous biliary tract drainage
Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an effective method for the primary or palliative treatment of many biliary strictures. It is a procedure which includes the cannulation of an intrahepatic biliary tree using image-guided wire and catheter manipulation, and placement of a tube or stent for external and/or internal drainage. This video shows this technique applied in a patient with a pancreatic tumor.
This is the case of an 80-year-old male patient with signs of jaundice and a diagnosis of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation and pancreatic tumor.
A transhepatic percutaneous biliary tract drainage was the therapeutic strategy.
Thoracoscopic repair of pure esophageal atresia
A full-term baby weighing 2.8 kg was diagnosed with pure esophageal atresia. No other associated anomalies were found by abdominal sonography and echocardiography. The primary anastomosis was completed thoracoscopically after mobilization of both esophageal pouches. The patient was placed in a prone position at the edge of the operating table. A 5mm, 30-degree angled scope was introduced one fingerbreadth below the lower angle of the scapula. Two 3mm working ports were also inserted; the first in the same costal space as the camera port 3cm from the middle line and the second as high as possible in the axilla. A thin fibrous strand was found connecting both ends of the esophagus. The azygos vein was left intact. Blunt dissection was used throughout the whole procedure to preserve the aortic branches to the lower pouch, dissecting in between them. Without traction, the distance between both pouches was approximately 4cm or 4 vertebral bodies. No tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was identified. Nine polyglactin 5/0 sliding tumble square knots were used to complete the anastomosis. The operative time was 85 minutes. The postoperative period was uneventful. Nasogatric tube feeding started on postoperative day 2, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6 after performing a contrast swallow test ensuring that there is no leakage.
MM Elbarbary, KHK Bahaaeldin, AE Fares, H Seleim, A Shalaby, M Elseoudi, MM Ragab
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2359 views
236 likes
0 comments
18:13
Thoracoscopic repair of pure esophageal atresia
A full-term baby weighing 2.8 kg was diagnosed with pure esophageal atresia. No other associated anomalies were found by abdominal sonography and echocardiography. The primary anastomosis was completed thoracoscopically after mobilization of both esophageal pouches. The patient was placed in a prone position at the edge of the operating table. A 5mm, 30-degree angled scope was introduced one fingerbreadth below the lower angle of the scapula. Two 3mm working ports were also inserted; the first in the same costal space as the camera port 3cm from the middle line and the second as high as possible in the axilla. A thin fibrous strand was found connecting both ends of the esophagus. The azygos vein was left intact. Blunt dissection was used throughout the whole procedure to preserve the aortic branches to the lower pouch, dissecting in between them. Without traction, the distance between both pouches was approximately 4cm or 4 vertebral bodies. No tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was identified. Nine polyglactin 5/0 sliding tumble square knots were used to complete the anastomosis. The operative time was 85 minutes. The postoperative period was uneventful. Nasogatric tube feeding started on postoperative day 2, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6 after performing a contrast swallow test ensuring that there is no leakage.
Laparoscopic Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation in an 18-month-old boy
Performing Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation using a laparoscopic approach can be confusing and challenging. This can be attributed to the small working space in children as compared to the length of small and large bowel to be handled. The procedure also requires some understanding of the overall anatomical disorder in order to separate it into smaller steps of correction. The first step is to confirm the diagnosis. The operator has to identify the ligament of Treitz and the presence of Ladd’s bands stretching between the colon and the right abdomen. The bands are divided first to the left of the duodenum, and then between the duodenum and the colon. As a result, the mesentery is widened. Bowel derotation is then started placing the small bowel in the right side and the colon in the left side of the abdomen. The procedure is concluded with an appendectomy.
TA Wafa, S Abdelmaksoud
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
994 views
144 likes
0 comments
06:00
Laparoscopic Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation in an 18-month-old boy
Performing Ladd’s procedure for intestinal malrotation using a laparoscopic approach can be confusing and challenging. This can be attributed to the small working space in children as compared to the length of small and large bowel to be handled. The procedure also requires some understanding of the overall anatomical disorder in order to separate it into smaller steps of correction. The first step is to confirm the diagnosis. The operator has to identify the ligament of Treitz and the presence of Ladd’s bands stretching between the colon and the right abdomen. The bands are divided first to the left of the duodenum, and then between the duodenum and the colon. As a result, the mesentery is widened. Bowel derotation is then started placing the small bowel in the right side and the colon in the left side of the abdomen. The procedure is concluded with an appendectomy.
Pediatric laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication
Surgical therapy is well-established in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is known that the laparoscopic approach is safe and effective. We tailored our surgical strategy based on two main studies which we conducted: one observational long-term follow-up and the other one related to the effect of Thal fundoplication on pulmonary affections. Our conclusions are summarized as follows:
- no surgery in the first 12 months,
- indications determined together with the consent of parents,
- a radiological contrast study should always be performed preoperatively,
- history taking and at least two positive objective diagnoses leading to indication,
- for neurologically impaired patients, a Nissen fundoplication is selected,
- first-line treatment: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) implantation, second step: fundoplication if necessary,
- for neurologically healthy patients without inborn anatomical diseases, a Thal fundoplication is selected,
- postoperative diagnoses in the follow-up period are only performed if necessary.
For this personal experience and in comparison with the established approach in the current literature, we have only poor evidence. It is due to the lack of prospective studies available and to an inadequate number of patients, which is typical in pediatric studies.
S Holland-Cunz
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
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03:54
Pediatric laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication
Surgical therapy is well-established in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is known that the laparoscopic approach is safe and effective. We tailored our surgical strategy based on two main studies which we conducted: one observational long-term follow-up and the other one related to the effect of Thal fundoplication on pulmonary affections. Our conclusions are summarized as follows:
- no surgery in the first 12 months,
- indications determined together with the consent of parents,
- a radiological contrast study should always be performed preoperatively,
- history taking and at least two positive objective diagnoses leading to indication,
- for neurologically impaired patients, a Nissen fundoplication is selected,
- first-line treatment: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) implantation, second step: fundoplication if necessary,
- for neurologically healthy patients without inborn anatomical diseases, a Thal fundoplication is selected,
- postoperative diagnoses in the follow-up period are only performed if necessary.
For this personal experience and in comparison with the established approach in the current literature, we have only poor evidence. It is due to the lack of prospective studies available and to an inadequate number of patients, which is typical in pediatric studies.