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Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
O Soubrane, P Pessaux, E Felli, T Urade, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
2482 views
5 likes
0 comments
34:11
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: laparoscopic right hepatectomy in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome
In this live interactive video, Professor Luc Soler provided a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling for precise tumor localization and future liver remnant before and after chemoembolization and right portal vein embolization. Dr. Soubrane briefly described the main principles, key steps, and preoperative planning in a 62-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome. He demonstrated the main technical aspects of port placement, hepatic pedicle dissection, exploration and dissection of vessels, and transection of liver parenchyma.
O Soubrane, P Pessaux, R Memeo, L Soler, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5084 views
571 likes
0 comments
51:19
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: laparoscopic right hepatectomy in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome
In this live interactive video, Professor Luc Soler provided a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling for precise tumor localization and future liver remnant before and after chemoembolization and right portal vein embolization. Dr. Soubrane briefly described the main principles, key steps, and preoperative planning in a 62-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome. He demonstrated the main technical aspects of port placement, hepatic pedicle dissection, exploration and dissection of vessels, and transection of liver parenchyma.
Laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy
A laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy was performed for a gastric liver metastasis. After the dissection of the anatomical structure of the hepatic pedicle and an ultrasound examination, the right portal vein and the right branch of the hepatic artery were clamped, hence allowing to skeletonize the demarcation between the right liver and the left liver. The devascularization line was subsequently marked by means of electrocautery. The right hepatic branch and the right branch of the portal vein were divided between locked clips. The hepatotomy was started. The first very superficial centimeters were dissected using the Sonicision® Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device. No pedicular clamping was performed. The dissection followed the ischemic demarcation line between the right liver and the left liver. Hemostasis and biliostasis were completed using the Aquamantys® Bipolar Sealers. Once the first centimeters had been dissected, dissection was carried on using the CUSA™ ultrasonic dissector (Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator). Liver segment I was divided in order to open the posterior aspect of the hilar plate. The dissection was performed on the right border of the vena cava. The hilar plate was dissected, making it possible to control the right branch of the biliary tract intraparenchymally. The right hepatic vein was dissected and divided with an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Makuuchi’s ligament was subsequently dissected and divided by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler, white cartridge. Mobilization of the right liver was completed by dividing the triangular ligament’s attachments at the level of the diaphragm. The right hepatectomy specimen was introduced into a bag, which was extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pneumoperitoneum pressure was diminished in order to control hemostasis and biliostasis.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, J Hallet, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
7655 views
944 likes
0 comments
32:12
Laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy
A laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy was performed for a gastric liver metastasis. After the dissection of the anatomical structure of the hepatic pedicle and an ultrasound examination, the right portal vein and the right branch of the hepatic artery were clamped, hence allowing to skeletonize the demarcation between the right liver and the left liver. The devascularization line was subsequently marked by means of electrocautery. The right hepatic branch and the right branch of the portal vein were divided between locked clips. The hepatotomy was started. The first very superficial centimeters were dissected using the Sonicision® Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device. No pedicular clamping was performed. The dissection followed the ischemic demarcation line between the right liver and the left liver. Hemostasis and biliostasis were completed using the Aquamantys® Bipolar Sealers. Once the first centimeters had been dissected, dissection was carried on using the CUSA™ ultrasonic dissector (Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator). Liver segment I was divided in order to open the posterior aspect of the hilar plate. The dissection was performed on the right border of the vena cava. The hilar plate was dissected, making it possible to control the right branch of the biliary tract intraparenchymally. The right hepatic vein was dissected and divided with an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Makuuchi’s ligament was subsequently dissected and divided by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler, white cartridge. Mobilization of the right liver was completed by dividing the triangular ligament’s attachments at the level of the diaphragm. The right hepatectomy specimen was introduced into a bag, which was extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pneumoperitoneum pressure was diminished in order to control hemostasis and biliostasis.
Laparoscopic right hepatectomy on cirrhotic liver after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and portal vein embolization (PVE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
We reported the case of a 70-year-old man in whom an F4 cirrhosis and a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma were evidenced and managed by a laparoscopic right hepatectomy after transarterial chemoembolization and portal vein embolization. The operation starts with the control of the hepatic pedicle. A Doppler ultrasound is performed. It will reveal the relation of the lesion with the vein. The different right hepatic structures are identified, clipped and divided. Mobilization of the right liver is then initiated. The gallbladder, which is kept in place, is used for traction purposes. Parenchymal transection is begun with the assistance of Ultracision®, Aquamantys®, and Dissectron®. The portal structure and the hepatic vein are identified. The parenchymotomy is carried on and the identification of the right hepatic vein is going to be achieved. The origin of the right hepatic vein is dissected at its upper part and its lower part, in order to encircle it with a tape and divide it with a stapler. Once completed, the medial part of the right triangular ligament is further divided. Mobilization is continued on the same part from both sides, changing traction. The right liver is placed in a bag and removed. The cavity is cleansed. The hemostasis and biliostasis are controlled on the transection.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, J Hargat, S Tzedakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux, L Soler
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2117 views
42 likes
0 comments
08:07
Laparoscopic right hepatectomy on cirrhotic liver after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and portal vein embolization (PVE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
We reported the case of a 70-year-old man in whom an F4 cirrhosis and a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma were evidenced and managed by a laparoscopic right hepatectomy after transarterial chemoembolization and portal vein embolization. The operation starts with the control of the hepatic pedicle. A Doppler ultrasound is performed. It will reveal the relation of the lesion with the vein. The different right hepatic structures are identified, clipped and divided. Mobilization of the right liver is then initiated. The gallbladder, which is kept in place, is used for traction purposes. Parenchymal transection is begun with the assistance of Ultracision®, Aquamantys®, and Dissectron®. The portal structure and the hepatic vein are identified. The parenchymotomy is carried on and the identification of the right hepatic vein is going to be achieved. The origin of the right hepatic vein is dissected at its upper part and its lower part, in order to encircle it with a tape and divide it with a stapler. Once completed, the medial part of the right triangular ligament is further divided. Mobilization is continued on the same part from both sides, changing traction. The right liver is placed in a bag and removed. The cavity is cleansed. The hemostasis and biliostasis are controlled on the transection.
Laparoscopic resection of colorectal liver metastasis in segment VII with transthoracic port-site insertion using ultrasonography and augmented reality
We report the case of a laparoscopic resection in a patient presenting with a colorectal liver metastasis in segment VII of the liver, with transthoracic trocar insertion. The patient is placed in a lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced. After exploration of the peritoneal cavity and ultrasound examination, the intervention is begun with the control of the hepatic pedicle. The right liver is mobilized. As the position of the scope is not ideal, an improved vision is searched for using simulation tools. The subcostal port allows for an optimal view. The 5mm port is switched to a 12mm port, allowing for the placement of the scope. A 5mm port is then placed transthoracically in order to start the hepatotomy. The hepatotomy is performed under a full pedicular clamping, which takes 20 minutes. Dissection is started 2cm around the lesion. The specimen is placed in a bag and extracted through a slightly enlarged 12mm port. After hemostatic control, the tape around the pedicle is removed. The cavity is extensively cleansed. The pneumoperitoneum is reduced and one can observe that there is no bleeding. A thoracic drain is positioned at the level of the 5mm port placed transthoracically. The diaphragmatic port opening site is closed.
P Pessaux, J Hallet, R Memeo, S Tzedakis, V De Blasi, D Mutter, J Marescaux, L Soler
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1770 views
59 likes
0 comments
13:06
Laparoscopic resection of colorectal liver metastasis in segment VII with transthoracic port-site insertion using ultrasonography and augmented reality
We report the case of a laparoscopic resection in a patient presenting with a colorectal liver metastasis in segment VII of the liver, with transthoracic trocar insertion. The patient is placed in a lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced. After exploration of the peritoneal cavity and ultrasound examination, the intervention is begun with the control of the hepatic pedicle. The right liver is mobilized. As the position of the scope is not ideal, an improved vision is searched for using simulation tools. The subcostal port allows for an optimal view. The 5mm port is switched to a 12mm port, allowing for the placement of the scope. A 5mm port is then placed transthoracically in order to start the hepatotomy. The hepatotomy is performed under a full pedicular clamping, which takes 20 minutes. Dissection is started 2cm around the lesion. The specimen is placed in a bag and extracted through a slightly enlarged 12mm port. After hemostatic control, the tape around the pedicle is removed. The cavity is extensively cleansed. The pneumoperitoneum is reduced and one can observe that there is no bleeding. A thoracic drain is positioned at the level of the 5mm port placed transthoracically. The diaphragmatic port opening site is closed.
Totally laparoscopic liver resection, very low anterior resection and excision of common iliac artery lymph nodes in a patient with rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases
This is the case of a 62-year-old lady who presented with rectal bleeding four months earlier. Rectosigmoidoscopy, contrast enhanced thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, and pelvic MRI were obtained. A T3 N2 rectal adenocarcinoma 6cm proximal to the dentate line was detected. CT-scan showed that the patient had two liver metastases: one was a 4cm mass located in liver segment II and the other one 1.5cm in liver segment V. Due to the presence of suspected common iliac artery lymph nodes as determined by CT-scan, PET-CT was also obtained, which demonstrated an 18F FDG uptake in the corresponding lymph nodes. A simultaneous resection of all malignant structures was decided upon. With the patient placed in a modified lithotomy position, five trocars were inserted in the upper quadrants to start with liver resection. Left lateral sectionectomy was performed first. After resection of the lesion situated in liver segment V, which was completed without a cholecystectomy, attention was turned towards the rectal procedure. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position with the left side tilted upwards. Two additional trocars were placed to facilitate handling. After IMA and IMV division, a standard total mesorectal excision procedure was completed. Common iliac artery lymph nodes were then harvested. The anastomosis was performed using a double-stapling technique. A diverting ileostomy was also fashioned.
MF Can
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1406 views
39 likes
0 comments
16:08
Totally laparoscopic liver resection, very low anterior resection and excision of common iliac artery lymph nodes in a patient with rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases
This is the case of a 62-year-old lady who presented with rectal bleeding four months earlier. Rectosigmoidoscopy, contrast enhanced thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, and pelvic MRI were obtained. A T3 N2 rectal adenocarcinoma 6cm proximal to the dentate line was detected. CT-scan showed that the patient had two liver metastases: one was a 4cm mass located in liver segment II and the other one 1.5cm in liver segment V. Due to the presence of suspected common iliac artery lymph nodes as determined by CT-scan, PET-CT was also obtained, which demonstrated an 18F FDG uptake in the corresponding lymph nodes. A simultaneous resection of all malignant structures was decided upon. With the patient placed in a modified lithotomy position, five trocars were inserted in the upper quadrants to start with liver resection. Left lateral sectionectomy was performed first. After resection of the lesion situated in liver segment V, which was completed without a cholecystectomy, attention was turned towards the rectal procedure. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position with the left side tilted upwards. Two additional trocars were placed to facilitate handling. After IMA and IMV division, a standard total mesorectal excision procedure was completed. Common iliac artery lymph nodes were then harvested. The anastomosis was performed using a double-stapling technique. A diverting ileostomy was also fashioned.
Laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy with augmented reality
We report the case of a 42-year-old woman who underwent a laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy for a hepatic metastasis. The intervention is begun with the exploration of the entire peritoneal cavity and an intraoperative ultrasound exam of the liver. The lesion is identified by means of augmented reality. Dissection of the different vascular structures is then performed at the level of the hepatic pedicle. A clamping test of the right branches is achieved. The right branch of the hepatic artery and the right portal vein are clamped, hence creating the demarcation area, which is identified by means of the coagulating hook. Declamping of portal and arterial structures coursing towards the right liver is achieved. The right branch of the portal vein is divided between two clips. The right branch of the hepatic vein is also divided between two clips. After mobilization of the right liver, the hepatotomy is begun. The first superficial centimeters are divided using an ultrasonic dissector (Ultracision®). Dissection is then carried on by means of a Cusa® Dissectron® Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator. The largest structures are subsequently dissected intraparenchymally, and then clipped and divided. Hemostasis is completed using a radiofrequency instrument. The right biliary tract is dissected intraparenchymally, clipped and divided. The right hepatic vein is divided by means of a stapler. The specimen is placed in a bag, which is extracted by means of a small Pfannenstiel incision. Hemostasis is controlled as the pneumoperitoneum is reduced. A blade is positioned in the hepatectomy area.
P Pessaux, J Hallet, R Memeo, X Untereiner, L Soler, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2541 views
69 likes
0 comments
12:53
Laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy with augmented reality
We report the case of a 42-year-old woman who underwent a laparoscopic right hemihepatectomy for a hepatic metastasis. The intervention is begun with the exploration of the entire peritoneal cavity and an intraoperative ultrasound exam of the liver. The lesion is identified by means of augmented reality. Dissection of the different vascular structures is then performed at the level of the hepatic pedicle. A clamping test of the right branches is achieved. The right branch of the hepatic artery and the right portal vein are clamped, hence creating the demarcation area, which is identified by means of the coagulating hook. Declamping of portal and arterial structures coursing towards the right liver is achieved. The right branch of the portal vein is divided between two clips. The right branch of the hepatic vein is also divided between two clips. After mobilization of the right liver, the hepatotomy is begun. The first superficial centimeters are divided using an ultrasonic dissector (Ultracision®). Dissection is then carried on by means of a Cusa® Dissectron® Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator. The largest structures are subsequently dissected intraparenchymally, and then clipped and divided. Hemostasis is completed using a radiofrequency instrument. The right biliary tract is dissected intraparenchymally, clipped and divided. The right hepatic vein is divided by means of a stapler. The specimen is placed in a bag, which is extracted by means of a small Pfannenstiel incision. Hemostasis is controlled as the pneumoperitoneum is reduced. A blade is positioned in the hepatectomy area.
Pure laparoscopic posterior sectionectomy and wedge resections for bilobar colorectal liver metastases
We report the case of a 74-year-old gentleman who underwent a laparoscopic liver resection for bilobar colorectal liver metastases. The patient presented with newly diagnosed liver metastases one year after undergoing a right hemi-colectomy followed by six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy for a T3N1 adenocarcinoma. After six cycles of preoperative systemic therapy, a 30 percent reduction in the volume of the liver lesions is obtained. Preoperative three-dimensional reconstruction of the cross-sectional imaging is obtained to plan a laparoscopic liver resection. Virtual hepatectomy is then performed using the virtual three-dimensional model. Five trocars are used as depicted. The camera is initially positioned in a 10mm umbilical port. It will be placed in a 12mm port during parenchymal transection. The subxiphoid port is used by the assistant for liver traction and suctioning. The procedure is initiated by lyzing adhesions that resulted from the previous cholecystectomy and right hemi-colectomy. An umbilical tape is placed around the portal pedicle for eventual intermittent clamping during the resection. An intraoperative ultrasound confirms that no additional lesions are present. The transection line is drawn on the liver surface under ultrasound guidance.
The portal pedicle is clamped to begin the parenchymal transection. The liver capsule is first divided using an energy device. Deeper parenchymal transection is performed with an ultrasonic dissector. After 15 minutes, the pedicle clamping is taken down by melting and extracting the proximal clip previously placed. This procedure will be repeated throughout the parenchymal transection to obtain a posterior sectionectomy. Hemostasis of the transected liver is obtained. A non-anatomical segment III resection is then performed. Finally, the fourth lesion is resected with a non-anatomical segment IV resection. These specimens are placed in a bag and extracted through a small extension of the umbilical port.
P Pessaux, J Hallet, R Memeo, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1899 views
59 likes
0 comments
10:01
Pure laparoscopic posterior sectionectomy and wedge resections for bilobar colorectal liver metastases
We report the case of a 74-year-old gentleman who underwent a laparoscopic liver resection for bilobar colorectal liver metastases. The patient presented with newly diagnosed liver metastases one year after undergoing a right hemi-colectomy followed by six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy for a T3N1 adenocarcinoma. After six cycles of preoperative systemic therapy, a 30 percent reduction in the volume of the liver lesions is obtained. Preoperative three-dimensional reconstruction of the cross-sectional imaging is obtained to plan a laparoscopic liver resection. Virtual hepatectomy is then performed using the virtual three-dimensional model. Five trocars are used as depicted. The camera is initially positioned in a 10mm umbilical port. It will be placed in a 12mm port during parenchymal transection. The subxiphoid port is used by the assistant for liver traction and suctioning. The procedure is initiated by lyzing adhesions that resulted from the previous cholecystectomy and right hemi-colectomy. An umbilical tape is placed around the portal pedicle for eventual intermittent clamping during the resection. An intraoperative ultrasound confirms that no additional lesions are present. The transection line is drawn on the liver surface under ultrasound guidance.
The portal pedicle is clamped to begin the parenchymal transection. The liver capsule is first divided using an energy device. Deeper parenchymal transection is performed with an ultrasonic dissector. After 15 minutes, the pedicle clamping is taken down by melting and extracting the proximal clip previously placed. This procedure will be repeated throughout the parenchymal transection to obtain a posterior sectionectomy. Hemostasis of the transected liver is obtained. A non-anatomical segment III resection is then performed. Finally, the fourth lesion is resected with a non-anatomical segment IV resection. These specimens are placed in a bag and extracted through a small extension of the umbilical port.
Laparoscopic right hepatectomy using hanging maneuver and Glissonian approach
Background: In open surgery for major hepatectomies, the Glissonian approach and liver hanging maneuver have proven useful. However, these techniques are not routinely applied in a laparoscopic context due to some intrinsic difficulty. Published techniques for laparoscopic major hepatectomy generally involve hilar dissection with separate transection of vasculo-biliary elements and anatomical parenchymal transection along the demarcation line. This video demonstrates the feasibility of the Glissonian approach and liver hanging maneuver that were performed for total laparoscopic right hepatectomy.
Methods: A 57-year-old woman suffering from huge liver mass was referred for surgical treatment. A total laparoscopic right hepatectomy was performed for this lesion. The operation followed 5 distinct phases: early hanging maneuver, extrahepatic extrafascial access to the right portal pedicle, parenchymal transection, control and division of the right hepatic vein, and complete mobilization of the right liver.
Results: Operative time was 400 min. The estimated blood loss was 150mL and no need for blood transfusion. The pathological examination confirmed an 8 by 6 by 7cm HCC with clear surgical margins. Patient recovery was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Conclusions Glissonian approach and hanging maneuver have proven to be safe and useful procedures for performing precise laparoscopic right hepatectomy.
R Chanwat, C Bunchaliew
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
3158 views
68 likes
0 comments
07:27
Laparoscopic right hepatectomy using hanging maneuver and Glissonian approach
Background: In open surgery for major hepatectomies, the Glissonian approach and liver hanging maneuver have proven useful. However, these techniques are not routinely applied in a laparoscopic context due to some intrinsic difficulty. Published techniques for laparoscopic major hepatectomy generally involve hilar dissection with separate transection of vasculo-biliary elements and anatomical parenchymal transection along the demarcation line. This video demonstrates the feasibility of the Glissonian approach and liver hanging maneuver that were performed for total laparoscopic right hepatectomy.
Methods: A 57-year-old woman suffering from huge liver mass was referred for surgical treatment. A total laparoscopic right hepatectomy was performed for this lesion. The operation followed 5 distinct phases: early hanging maneuver, extrahepatic extrafascial access to the right portal pedicle, parenchymal transection, control and division of the right hepatic vein, and complete mobilization of the right liver.
Results: Operative time was 400 min. The estimated blood loss was 150mL and no need for blood transfusion. The pathological examination confirmed an 8 by 6 by 7cm HCC with clear surgical margins. Patient recovery was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Conclusions Glissonian approach and hanging maneuver have proven to be safe and useful procedures for performing precise laparoscopic right hepatectomy.
Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocarcinoma on cirrhotic liver
We report the case of a 73-year old patient presenting with a Child-Pugh class A5, post-viral B cirrhosis, with no portal hypertension in which a laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy is performed for hepatocarcinoma. Four ports are placed. Parenchymal transection is marked approximately 1cm to the left of the falciform ligament and parenchymal transection is initiated. With intermittent clamping, hepatotomy is performed painstakingly and progressively, and every vascular or biliary structure that one comes across is either clipped, or coagulated. The specimen is extracted using a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pathological findings confirm the presence of a hepatocarcinoma on a cirrhotic liver. No drainage was used. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6.
P Pessaux, D Ntourakis, M Shen, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2210 views
54 likes
0 comments
10:24
Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocarcinoma on cirrhotic liver
We report the case of a 73-year old patient presenting with a Child-Pugh class A5, post-viral B cirrhosis, with no portal hypertension in which a laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy is performed for hepatocarcinoma. Four ports are placed. Parenchymal transection is marked approximately 1cm to the left of the falciform ligament and parenchymal transection is initiated. With intermittent clamping, hepatotomy is performed painstakingly and progressively, and every vascular or biliary structure that one comes across is either clipped, or coagulated. The specimen is extracted using a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pathological findings confirm the presence of a hepatocarcinoma on a cirrhotic liver. No drainage was used. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Cystic pheochromocytoma: anatomical landmarks for laparoscopic resection
Surgery for pheochromocytoma is often considered difficult due to local anatomical conditions which are often associated with a hypervascularization and inflammatory reaction. This video demonstrates the case of a patient presenting with a 5cm pheochromocytoma with a necrotic core. Because the patient has a low BMI, the intraoperative anatomy is magnified and all anatomical landmarks are perfectly identified right before dissection. The lesion is eventually embedded in the liver. Its approach and dissection allow to determine the constraints related to adrenal surgery, and particularly regarding the impossibility to manipulate the lesion other than with soft retraction.
D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2243 views
107 likes
0 comments
15:04
Cystic pheochromocytoma: anatomical landmarks for laparoscopic resection
Surgery for pheochromocytoma is often considered difficult due to local anatomical conditions which are often associated with a hypervascularization and inflammatory reaction. This video demonstrates the case of a patient presenting with a 5cm pheochromocytoma with a necrotic core. Because the patient has a low BMI, the intraoperative anatomy is magnified and all anatomical landmarks are perfectly identified right before dissection. The lesion is eventually embedded in the liver. Its approach and dissection allow to determine the constraints related to adrenal surgery, and particularly regarding the impossibility to manipulate the lesion other than with soft retraction.
Total laparoscopic right hepatectomy for large hepatoma using the Glissonian pedicle control with anterior approach
Background: Although laparoscopic liver resection has been widely adopted, performing a total laparoscopic right hepatectomy remains a challenging procedure, especially in patients with large tumor. This video illustrates a useful technique for total laparoscopic right hepatectomy which was successfully performed in patient with large hepatoma.

Methods: We demonstrate the case of a patient with a large tumor located in the right liver who underwent a total laparoscopic right hepatectomy. An anterior approach technique combined with Glissonian approach were used. The main steps of this technique are extraparenchymal control of right Glissonian pedicle en masse without liver dissection, parenchymal transection along the demarcation line, transection of right Glissonian pedicle, separation of whole right liver parenchyma, control and division of right hepatic vein and mobilization of the right liver from surrounding ligaments. No Pringle's maneuver was used.

Results: The technique was successfully performed without complication. Operative time was 560 min. Intraoperative blood loss was 1.100mL. The length of hospital stay was 6 days. The pathological report was well-differentiated HCC and free surgical margin.

Conclusion: Total laparoscopic right hepatectomy for large hepatoma by using the Glissonian pedicle control with anterior approach is feasible and safe.
R Chanwat, C Bunchaliew, T Khuhaprema
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
6292 views
40 likes
0 comments
09:19
Total laparoscopic right hepatectomy for large hepatoma using the Glissonian pedicle control with anterior approach
Background: Although laparoscopic liver resection has been widely adopted, performing a total laparoscopic right hepatectomy remains a challenging procedure, especially in patients with large tumor. This video illustrates a useful technique for total laparoscopic right hepatectomy which was successfully performed in patient with large hepatoma.

Methods: We demonstrate the case of a patient with a large tumor located in the right liver who underwent a total laparoscopic right hepatectomy. An anterior approach technique combined with Glissonian approach were used. The main steps of this technique are extraparenchymal control of right Glissonian pedicle en masse without liver dissection, parenchymal transection along the demarcation line, transection of right Glissonian pedicle, separation of whole right liver parenchyma, control and division of right hepatic vein and mobilization of the right liver from surrounding ligaments. No Pringle's maneuver was used.

Results: The technique was successfully performed without complication. Operative time was 560 min. Intraoperative blood loss was 1.100mL. The length of hospital stay was 6 days. The pathological report was well-differentiated HCC and free surgical margin.

Conclusion: Total laparoscopic right hepatectomy for large hepatoma by using the Glissonian pedicle control with anterior approach is feasible and safe.
Totally laparoscopic single port hepatic left lobectomy and cholecystectomy for cholangiocarcinoma
Background: Single port (SP) hepatic resection presents a few examples in the recent literature which suggest a clear possibility for better cosmetic results and shorter hospital stay. This video presents a patient who has undergone totally laparoscopic SP left hepatic lobectomy for cholangiocarcinoma and cholecystectomy for cholelitiasis.

The present case shows a 70-year-old woman with a BMI of 26 kg/m2 with documented 45mm hepatic mass and irregular margins involving segment III suggesting intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. A 40mm peri-umbilical incision was performed. SP hepatic left lobectomy was performed using a 4-access OCTO™ port (High-Tech Center, Seoul, Korea), with a 30-degree scope, a curved grasping forceps, and Atlas Ligasure™ (Covidien, USA) and Vascular Endo GIA™ (Covidien, USA); specimen retrieval was performed through the right periumbilical incision.

Results: No conversion to open surgery was necessary, neither were additional trocars. Total operative time was 120 minutes and laparoscopic time 80 minutes; liver transection time was 24 minutes. Final umbilical incision length was 40mm. Blood loss was lower than 40cc, no transfusion or abdominal drainage was required. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2.

Conclusions: Left hepatic lobectomy for localized intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and associated cholecystectomy can be safely performed with a periumbilical SP procedure, with macro- and microscopically neoplasia-free margins.
U Cillo, E Gringeri, R Boetto, G Zanus
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
4022 views
31 likes
0 comments
05:20
Totally laparoscopic single port hepatic left lobectomy and cholecystectomy for cholangiocarcinoma
Background: Single port (SP) hepatic resection presents a few examples in the recent literature which suggest a clear possibility for better cosmetic results and shorter hospital stay. This video presents a patient who has undergone totally laparoscopic SP left hepatic lobectomy for cholangiocarcinoma and cholecystectomy for cholelitiasis.

The present case shows a 70-year-old woman with a BMI of 26 kg/m2 with documented 45mm hepatic mass and irregular margins involving segment III suggesting intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. A 40mm peri-umbilical incision was performed. SP hepatic left lobectomy was performed using a 4-access OCTO™ port (High-Tech Center, Seoul, Korea), with a 30-degree scope, a curved grasping forceps, and Atlas Ligasure™ (Covidien, USA) and Vascular Endo GIA™ (Covidien, USA); specimen retrieval was performed through the right periumbilical incision.

Results: No conversion to open surgery was necessary, neither were additional trocars. Total operative time was 120 minutes and laparoscopic time 80 minutes; liver transection time was 24 minutes. Final umbilical incision length was 40mm. Blood loss was lower than 40cc, no transfusion or abdominal drainage was required. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2.

Conclusions: Left hepatic lobectomy for localized intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and associated cholecystectomy can be safely performed with a periumbilical SP procedure, with macro- and microscopically neoplasia-free margins.
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis
The best surgical approach for splenic flexure tumors is not well defined yet.
The distal third of the transverse colon has an embryological origin in the hindgut, and the splenic flexure classically shows a dual lymphatic drainage, the proximal retropancreatic and the distal to the lymphatic pedicle of both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV). Nakagoe et al. showed that the majority of positive nodes have distal lymphatic spread to the paracolic archway and up to the origin of the left colic artery. Lymph nodes of the middle colic artery and its left branch are positive in a small percentage (0 and 4.2% respectively).
As a result, a left segmental colectomy is a valid option for splenic flexure and distal transverse colon tumors because it allows vascular ligation at the root of the vessels, dissection along the embryological planes, and adequate bowel margins from the tumor. The preservation of the IMV should reduce impaired venous drainage of the sigmoid colon, which can be associated with anastomotic leakage, without compromising complete mesocolic excision.
An intracorporeal anastomosis for left colonic resection may have the same advantages as for a right hemicolectomy, but can be technically more challenging.
This video shows a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis and preservation of the IMV for a tumor of the distal transverse colon.
A Canaveira Manso, M Rosete, R Nemésio, M Fernandes
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1932 views
18 likes
0 comments
16:43
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis
The best surgical approach for splenic flexure tumors is not well defined yet.
The distal third of the transverse colon has an embryological origin in the hindgut, and the splenic flexure classically shows a dual lymphatic drainage, the proximal retropancreatic and the distal to the lymphatic pedicle of both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV). Nakagoe et al. showed that the majority of positive nodes have distal lymphatic spread to the paracolic archway and up to the origin of the left colic artery. Lymph nodes of the middle colic artery and its left branch are positive in a small percentage (0 and 4.2% respectively).
As a result, a left segmental colectomy is a valid option for splenic flexure and distal transverse colon tumors because it allows vascular ligation at the root of the vessels, dissection along the embryological planes, and adequate bowel margins from the tumor. The preservation of the IMV should reduce impaired venous drainage of the sigmoid colon, which can be associated with anastomotic leakage, without compromising complete mesocolic excision.
An intracorporeal anastomosis for left colonic resection may have the same advantages as for a right hemicolectomy, but can be technically more challenging.
This video shows a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis and preservation of the IMV for a tumor of the distal transverse colon.
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with excision of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET)
Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are rare neoplasms, which account for less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors, with an incidence of 0.48 cases/100,000. They may be benign or malignant and tend to grow slower than exocrine tumors. They develop from the abnormal growth of endocrine cells in the pancreas and are either functional or nonfunctional, and may or may not cause signs or symptoms. Pancreatic NETs that have not spread outside the pancreas should be completely removed, if possible, because these tumors are more likely to be cured with surgery. This video shows a case of a pNET of the uncinate process, discovered in the study of a right colon cancer. Because of the small size of the pNET and its location, the association of a right laparoscopic hemicolectomy with a pancreatic tumor excision was deemed feasible. The mobilization of the mesenteric root allowed to identify the uncinate process and to prepare for the pNET excision. After the exposure of the duodenum and the retroperitoneal plane, the surgery continued with a right hemicolectomy and a complete mesocolic excision. An intracorporeal anastomosis was constructed and the surgical specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic incision. The pathological report revealed a T2N1 caecal adenocarcinoma and a G2 pNET.
A Canaveira Manso, M Rosete, R Nemésio, R Martins
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
560 views
6 likes
0 comments
17:16
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with excision of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET)
Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are rare neoplasms, which account for less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors, with an incidence of 0.48 cases/100,000. They may be benign or malignant and tend to grow slower than exocrine tumors. They develop from the abnormal growth of endocrine cells in the pancreas and are either functional or nonfunctional, and may or may not cause signs or symptoms. Pancreatic NETs that have not spread outside the pancreas should be completely removed, if possible, because these tumors are more likely to be cured with surgery. This video shows a case of a pNET of the uncinate process, discovered in the study of a right colon cancer. Because of the small size of the pNET and its location, the association of a right laparoscopic hemicolectomy with a pancreatic tumor excision was deemed feasible. The mobilization of the mesenteric root allowed to identify the uncinate process and to prepare for the pNET excision. After the exposure of the duodenum and the retroperitoneal plane, the surgery continued with a right hemicolectomy and a complete mesocolic excision. An intracorporeal anastomosis was constructed and the surgical specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic incision. The pathological report revealed a T2N1 caecal adenocarcinoma and a G2 pNET.
Fully laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal tumor with “vessels first’ approach
Over the last few years, laparoscopic colorectal surgery has increased exponentially worldwide. When combined with an enhanced recovery program, a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay can be achieved, coupled with an early return to normal activities for the patient.
This is the case of a 68-year-old obese woman with a BMI of 30 presenting with a caecal tumor. Her major co-morbidities are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and high blood pressure. The patient complained of chronic abdominal pain and presented a positive fecal occult blood test. Colonoscopy showed a caecal tumor. Biopsy confirmed an adenocarcinoma. CT-scan did not show any distant metastasis. A full laparoscopic approach with a medial-to-lateral and ‘vessels first’ approach is shown.
A D'Urso, M Rodriguez, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
2045 views
12 likes
0 comments
13:27
Fully laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal tumor with “vessels first’ approach
Over the last few years, laparoscopic colorectal surgery has increased exponentially worldwide. When combined with an enhanced recovery program, a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay can be achieved, coupled with an early return to normal activities for the patient.
This is the case of a 68-year-old obese woman with a BMI of 30 presenting with a caecal tumor. Her major co-morbidities are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and high blood pressure. The patient complained of chronic abdominal pain and presented a positive fecal occult blood test. Colonoscopy showed a caecal tumor. Biopsy confirmed an adenocarcinoma. CT-scan did not show any distant metastasis. A full laparoscopic approach with a medial-to-lateral and ‘vessels first’ approach is shown.
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal cancer: live procedure
This video of a live surgery performed by Professor Chen (Associate Professor, China Medical University Taichung, Taiwan) during an IRCAD Taiwan course very clearly demonstrates the stepwise execution of a laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) with all its tips and tricks.
This is the case of a 65-year-old woman, with a low rectal tumor (4cm) is operated on after a short chemoradiation course (2 weeks before) for a stage IIA cancer (cT3N0M0).
Professor Chen’s surgical skills and experience and the beauty of the procedure, associated with a dynamic Q&A and expert comments coming from the auditorium, make of this video a must see.
WTL Chen, J Verde
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
3652 views
15 likes
0 comments
47:24
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal cancer: live procedure
This video of a live surgery performed by Professor Chen (Associate Professor, China Medical University Taichung, Taiwan) during an IRCAD Taiwan course very clearly demonstrates the stepwise execution of a laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) with all its tips and tricks.
This is the case of a 65-year-old woman, with a low rectal tumor (4cm) is operated on after a short chemoradiation course (2 weeks before) for a stage IIA cancer (cT3N0M0).
Professor Chen’s surgical skills and experience and the beauty of the procedure, associated with a dynamic Q&A and expert comments coming from the auditorium, make of this video a must see.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy - Basic rules - Bile duct injury
There is twice as much risk of incidental biliary injuries in laparoscopic cholecystectomy than in open cholecystectomy.
About half of surgeons will cause a bile duct injury during their careers. In this lecture, Dr. Dallemagne provides key national data of bile duct injury and explains that the lack of surgical experience or visual misperception leads to an increase in the rate of incidental injuries, mentioning his own cases. Dr. Dallemagne also outlines the fundamental techniques to prevent injuries and use bailout procedures (partial and subtotal cholecystectomy) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, according to the latest version of the Tokyo guidelines.
B Dallemagne
Lecture
11 months ago
7108 views
56 likes
2 comments
22:02
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy - Basic rules - Bile duct injury
There is twice as much risk of incidental biliary injuries in laparoscopic cholecystectomy than in open cholecystectomy.
About half of surgeons will cause a bile duct injury during their careers. In this lecture, Dr. Dallemagne provides key national data of bile duct injury and explains that the lack of surgical experience or visual misperception leads to an increase in the rate of incidental injuries, mentioning his own cases. Dr. Dallemagne also outlines the fundamental techniques to prevent injuries and use bailout procedures (partial and subtotal cholecystectomy) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, according to the latest version of the Tokyo guidelines.
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
2963 views
6 likes
3 comments
07:01
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
R Araujo, MA Sanctis, F Felippe, D Burgardt, D Wohnrath
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
1751 views
6 likes
1 comment
08:04
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
ICG fluorescent cholangiography in difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy with inflammatory biliary fusion post-cholecystitis and pancreatitis
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the presence of inflammatory billiary fusion is a technically challenging procedure associated with a 0.5% risk of injury to major extrahepatic bile ducts.
Preoperative planning and intraoperative visualization of the anatomy of the biliary tree using an intraoperative cholangiogram reduces the risk or the severity of injury to major biliary ducts.
Indocyanine green cholangiography has emerged as a promising non-invasive modality for visualization of extra-hepatic biliary ducts, having the advantage of very easy use repetitively at various stages of critical areas of dissection.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient who had an emergency admission for mild acute cholecystitis (as per Tokyo guidelines, 2018) and concomitant moderately severe acute gallstone pancreatitis (revised Atlanta classification) with a preoperative MRCP predictive of biliary inflammatory fusion between the gallbladder neck and the common hepatic duct.
Consequently, we planned and performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an indocyanine green cholangiogram as a non-invasive method to help identify the intraoperative anatomy of the extra-hepatic biliary ducts.
The main feature of our video is the use of indocyanine green during the difficult dissection of the gallbladder neck and exposure of the critical view of safety in Calot’s triangle as cased with clear features of significant biliary inflammatory fusion between the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.
ICG fluorescent demonstration of the extra-hepatic biliary tree is used in real time and with ease repeatedly at several stages of this difficult dissection, facilitating a safe completion of a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may become a standard practice.
G Kumar, S Ramachandran, M Paraoan
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
446 views
7 likes
2 comments
13:21
ICG fluorescent cholangiography in difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy with inflammatory biliary fusion post-cholecystitis and pancreatitis
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the presence of inflammatory billiary fusion is a technically challenging procedure associated with a 0.5% risk of injury to major extrahepatic bile ducts.
Preoperative planning and intraoperative visualization of the anatomy of the biliary tree using an intraoperative cholangiogram reduces the risk or the severity of injury to major biliary ducts.
Indocyanine green cholangiography has emerged as a promising non-invasive modality for visualization of extra-hepatic biliary ducts, having the advantage of very easy use repetitively at various stages of critical areas of dissection.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient who had an emergency admission for mild acute cholecystitis (as per Tokyo guidelines, 2018) and concomitant moderately severe acute gallstone pancreatitis (revised Atlanta classification) with a preoperative MRCP predictive of biliary inflammatory fusion between the gallbladder neck and the common hepatic duct.
Consequently, we planned and performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an indocyanine green cholangiogram as a non-invasive method to help identify the intraoperative anatomy of the extra-hepatic biliary ducts.
The main feature of our video is the use of indocyanine green during the difficult dissection of the gallbladder neck and exposure of the critical view of safety in Calot’s triangle as cased with clear features of significant biliary inflammatory fusion between the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.
ICG fluorescent demonstration of the extra-hepatic biliary tree is used in real time and with ease repeatedly at several stages of this difficult dissection, facilitating a safe completion of a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may become a standard practice.
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
G Baiocchi, R Nascimbeni, N Vettoretto, N de Manzini, M Morino
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
2017 views
7 likes
0 comments
09:24
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
A Tojal, AR Loureiro, B Prata, R Patrão, N Carrilho, C Casimiro
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1198 views
5 likes
0 comments
10:34
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
F Freire Lisboa Junior, R de Lima França, A de Araujo Lima Liguori, AC de Medeiros Junior, M HSMP Tavares, F Medeiros de Azevedo, D Myller Barros Lima
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1216 views
5 likes
0 comments
14:36
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading tumor in rectum and resolution of late bleeding
The objectives of this video are manifold, namely to present the totally endoscopic treatment of a laterally spreading tumor in the upper rectum with a piecemeal technique, and how to act against one of its most frequent complications, post-polypectomy bleeding.
Methods: The procedure was performed in an advanced flexible endoscopy unit, with the patient lying supine, with anesthesia (Propofol), and insufflation of carbon dioxide. A videocolonoscope was used, the lesion was identified and elevated with hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven). It was dried with a hot snare in parts ("piecemeal" technique), thereby achieving complete resection. The defect was closed with metal clips. The specimen was recovered for histopathological study.
Results: During screening colonoscopy, a 56-year-old patient was found with a 30mm granular laterally spreading tumor of the rectum (LST-G or nodular mixed type), located 15cm from the anal verge. Complete endoscopic resection of the lesion with a curative intent was performed. On postoperative day 5, proctorrhagia presented without hemodynamic alteration. Emergency endoscopy was decided upon. Upon entering with the colonoscope, we identified a clot attached to the surgical site. Once the bleeding had been confirmed, a saline solution with 1/20,000 adrenaline was injected. And then, with a hot snare, electrocoagulation was performed in the same area, combining an injection method with a thermal one and achieving a satisfying hemostasis. The patient was discharged on the same day without any other complications. The pathology report showed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, including patches of high-grade dysplasia, and injury-free resection margins.
Conclusions: EMR of laterally spreading tumors is safe, although it is not devoid of complications such as bleeding, which is present in up to 9.8 of every 100,000 polypectomies in some series (Reumkens et al., AJG 2016). It is essential to suspect and know how to solve it efficiently with the tools available at that time of emergency.
J Isaguirre, A Insausti
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
555 views
1 like
0 comments
05:38
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading tumor in rectum and resolution of late bleeding
The objectives of this video are manifold, namely to present the totally endoscopic treatment of a laterally spreading tumor in the upper rectum with a piecemeal technique, and how to act against one of its most frequent complications, post-polypectomy bleeding.
Methods: The procedure was performed in an advanced flexible endoscopy unit, with the patient lying supine, with anesthesia (Propofol), and insufflation of carbon dioxide. A videocolonoscope was used, the lesion was identified and elevated with hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven). It was dried with a hot snare in parts ("piecemeal" technique), thereby achieving complete resection. The defect was closed with metal clips. The specimen was recovered for histopathological study.
Results: During screening colonoscopy, a 56-year-old patient was found with a 30mm granular laterally spreading tumor of the rectum (LST-G or nodular mixed type), located 15cm from the anal verge. Complete endoscopic resection of the lesion with a curative intent was performed. On postoperative day 5, proctorrhagia presented without hemodynamic alteration. Emergency endoscopy was decided upon. Upon entering with the colonoscope, we identified a clot attached to the surgical site. Once the bleeding had been confirmed, a saline solution with 1/20,000 adrenaline was injected. And then, with a hot snare, electrocoagulation was performed in the same area, combining an injection method with a thermal one and achieving a satisfying hemostasis. The patient was discharged on the same day without any other complications. The pathology report showed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, including patches of high-grade dysplasia, and injury-free resection margins.
Conclusions: EMR of laterally spreading tumors is safe, although it is not devoid of complications such as bleeding, which is present in up to 9.8 of every 100,000 polypectomies in some series (Reumkens et al., AJG 2016). It is essential to suspect and know how to solve it efficiently with the tools available at that time of emergency.