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LIVE UNCUT SURGERY: laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy.
The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected.
After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe.
Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia.
This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
D Mutter, G Philouze, B Seeliger, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
25181 views
208 likes
20 comments
30:23
LIVE UNCUT SURGERY: laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy.
The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected.
After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe.
Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia.
This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
D Mutter, G Philouze, B Seeliger, J Marescaux
How to
1 year ago
25162 views
208 likes
0 comments
00:30:23
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
Diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic common bile duct stones following cholecystectomy by means of EUS and ERCP
A post-cholecystectomy syndrome is a well-known condition, which includes dyspepsia and biliary-like abdominal pain coupled with deterioration of liver enzymes. Biliary factors responsible for a post-cholecystectomy syndrome could be the following: biliary iatrogenic duct strictures, retained stones in the common bile duct (CBD), cystic stump, or even a gallbladder remnant.
The diagnosis of stones is difficult to establish considering that even trans-abdominal ultrasonography has a diagnostic sensitivity of only 27%. Conversely, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a very useful tool to diagnose stones in such situations, allowing to perform subsequent ERCP and stone extraction during the same anesthetic session. Here, we report the case of a 69-year-old man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and who was referred to us after 24 hours of abdominal colic pain and cholestasis. He underwent EUS, which diagnosed residual common bile duct stones. As a result, treatment was performed by means of ERCP during the same session.
Gf Donatelli, F Cereatti, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1618 views
62 likes
0 comments
03:26
Diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic common bile duct stones following cholecystectomy by means of EUS and ERCP
A post-cholecystectomy syndrome is a well-known condition, which includes dyspepsia and biliary-like abdominal pain coupled with deterioration of liver enzymes. Biliary factors responsible for a post-cholecystectomy syndrome could be the following: biliary iatrogenic duct strictures, retained stones in the common bile duct (CBD), cystic stump, or even a gallbladder remnant.
The diagnosis of stones is difficult to establish considering that even trans-abdominal ultrasonography has a diagnostic sensitivity of only 27%. Conversely, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a very useful tool to diagnose stones in such situations, allowing to perform subsequent ERCP and stone extraction during the same anesthetic session. Here, we report the case of a 69-year-old man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and who was referred to us after 24 hours of abdominal colic pain and cholestasis. He underwent EUS, which diagnosed residual common bile duct stones. As a result, treatment was performed by means of ERCP during the same session.