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Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
S Macina, L Baldari, E Cassinotti, M Ballabio, A Spota, M de Francesco, L Boni
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2984 views
17 likes
0 comments
07:10
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
E Soricelli, E Facchiano, L Leuratti, G Quartararo, N Console, P Tonelli, M Lucchese
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2367 views
7 likes
0 comments
09:10
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal cancer: live procedure
This video of a live surgery performed by Professor Chen (Associate Professor, China Medical University Taichung, Taiwan) during an IRCAD Taiwan course very clearly demonstrates the stepwise execution of a laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) with all its tips and tricks.
This is the case of a 65-year-old woman, with a low rectal tumor (4cm) is operated on after a short chemoradiation course (2 weeks before) for a stage IIA cancer (cT3N0M0).
Professor Chen’s surgical skills and experience and the beauty of the procedure, associated with a dynamic Q&A and expert comments coming from the auditorium, make of this video a must see.
WTL Chen, J Verde
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1808 views
8 likes
0 comments
47:24
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal cancer: live procedure
This video of a live surgery performed by Professor Chen (Associate Professor, China Medical University Taichung, Taiwan) during an IRCAD Taiwan course very clearly demonstrates the stepwise execution of a laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) with all its tips and tricks.
This is the case of a 65-year-old woman, with a low rectal tumor (4cm) is operated on after a short chemoradiation course (2 weeks before) for a stage IIA cancer (cT3N0M0).
Professor Chen’s surgical skills and experience and the beauty of the procedure, associated with a dynamic Q&A and expert comments coming from the auditorium, make of this video a must see.
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
G Baiocchi, R Nascimbeni, N Vettoretto, N de Manzini, M Morino
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1604 views
3 likes
0 comments
09:24
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
A D'Urso, Gf Donatelli, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
116 views
2 likes
0 comments
12:02
ERCP in a patient with previous subtotal gastrectomy for cancer: hybrid approach with transjejunal access
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with prior gastric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, partial or subtotal gastrectomy) is a challenging procedure. Despite technological advances in endoscopy, reaching the duodenum and entering the bile duct remains difficult. Laparoscopic assisted ERCP (LAERCP) allows the duodenum to be accessed through the excluded stomach in case of previous RYGB or through the proximal jejunum in case of gastric resection. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the hybrid approach in a patient with a previous subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
2552 views
5 likes
0 comments
13:26
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
J Magalhães, C Osorio, L Frutuoso, AM Pereira, A Trovão, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
3902 views
15 likes
0 comments
09:44
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2548 views
8 likes
0 comments
10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
E Parra-Davila, M Ignat, L Soler, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1574 views
2 likes
0 comments
32:48
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
Laparoscopic total D2 gastrectomy for cancer
Laparoscopic gastrectomy is accepted as a treatment of choice for gastric cancer due to low postoperative pain, faster recovery, shorter hospital stay, and a better cosmetic outcome as compared to open gastrectomy. Radical gastrectomy, with lymph node dissection, is essential to cure this type of cancer. This technique can be reproduced also in third world countries.
This is the case of a 74-year-old woman who was evaluated for dyspepsia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy found a tumor near the cardia on the lesser curvature. The biopsy study confirmed the presence of an adenocarcinoma. CT-scan showed no metastasis or lymph nodes affected. Surgical treatment was decided upon along with a laparoscopic total D2 gastrectomy.
F Signorini, S Reimondez, M España, L Obeide, F Moser
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
9856 views
426 likes
0 comments
06:41
Laparoscopic total D2 gastrectomy for cancer
Laparoscopic gastrectomy is accepted as a treatment of choice for gastric cancer due to low postoperative pain, faster recovery, shorter hospital stay, and a better cosmetic outcome as compared to open gastrectomy. Radical gastrectomy, with lymph node dissection, is essential to cure this type of cancer. This technique can be reproduced also in third world countries.
This is the case of a 74-year-old woman who was evaluated for dyspepsia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy found a tumor near the cardia on the lesser curvature. The biopsy study confirmed the presence of an adenocarcinoma. CT-scan showed no metastasis or lymph nodes affected. Surgical treatment was decided upon along with a laparoscopic total D2 gastrectomy.
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
J Magalhães, L Matos, J Costa, J Costa Pereira, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
2589 views
13 likes
3 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Interactive discussion around splenic flexure during laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer
In this educational video, Professor Luc Soler gives a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling. Dr. Corcione introduces the main principles of trocar and port placement. He briefly demonstrates the technical aspects, main principles and key steps of laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer in a 61-year-old male patient in a live interactive surgery. He highlights the technical aspects and main principles of lesser sac opening, vascular identification and division, splenic flexure mobilization, lateral mobilization, transection, suprapubic incision for specimen removal, and EEA anastomosis.
F Corcione, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
6755 views
322 likes
0 comments
58:02
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: Interactive discussion around splenic flexure during laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer
In this educational video, Professor Luc Soler gives a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling. Dr. Corcione introduces the main principles of trocar and port placement. He briefly demonstrates the technical aspects, main principles and key steps of laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer in a 61-year-old male patient in a live interactive surgery. He highlights the technical aspects and main principles of lesser sac opening, vascular identification and division, splenic flexure mobilization, lateral mobilization, transection, suprapubic incision for specimen removal, and EEA anastomosis.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
12828 views
1083 likes
0 comments
13:33
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision for advanced ascending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vascular ligation (CVL) is a potentially superior oncological technique in colon cancer surgery. The tenets of high vascular ligation at the origin and mesocolic dissection facilitate a greater lymph node yield. We present the case of a 70-year-old lady with chronic right iliac fossa discomfort. Computer tomographic scans showed a bulky ascending colon cancer with a 2.6cm right mesocolic lymph node. She underwent laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with CVL. Three operative trocars were used (a 12mm trocar in the left iliac fossa, 5mm ports in the left flank and right iliac fossa). Dissection begins in an inferior to superior approach, starting with mobilization of the ileocolic mesentery off the right common iliac vessels, then progressing to separate the mesentery off the duodenum and Gerota's fascia, exposing the head of the pancreas and the duodenal loop. CVL begins with the identification of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV). The vascular structures are isolated individually and ligated high at the level of the SMV, removing the metastatic right mesocolic node ‘en bloc’. Following proximal and distal transections, an intracorporeal ileo-transverse anastomosis is performed. Histology findings demonstrate the presence of a pT4a N2a M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma with 5 out of 17 lymph nodes (including the large mesocolic lymph node) positive for metastasis.
JL Ng, SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
14275 views
1175 likes
0 comments
05:37
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision for advanced ascending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vascular ligation (CVL) is a potentially superior oncological technique in colon cancer surgery. The tenets of high vascular ligation at the origin and mesocolic dissection facilitate a greater lymph node yield. We present the case of a 70-year-old lady with chronic right iliac fossa discomfort. Computer tomographic scans showed a bulky ascending colon cancer with a 2.6cm right mesocolic lymph node. She underwent laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with CVL. Three operative trocars were used (a 12mm trocar in the left iliac fossa, 5mm ports in the left flank and right iliac fossa). Dissection begins in an inferior to superior approach, starting with mobilization of the ileocolic mesentery off the right common iliac vessels, then progressing to separate the mesentery off the duodenum and Gerota's fascia, exposing the head of the pancreas and the duodenal loop. CVL begins with the identification of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV). The vascular structures are isolated individually and ligated high at the level of the SMV, removing the metastatic right mesocolic node ‘en bloc’. Following proximal and distal transections, an intracorporeal ileo-transverse anastomosis is performed. Histology findings demonstrate the presence of a pT4a N2a M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma with 5 out of 17 lymph nodes (including the large mesocolic lymph node) positive for metastasis.
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
S Qian, P Tejedor, M Leon, M Ortega, C Pastor
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
3972 views
5 likes
0 comments
06:45
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
Endometrial cancer surgical indications
The surgical management of endometrial cancer has been markedly changed by minimally invasive techniques. After three decades of laparoscopy, robotic surgery has built upon and expanded the population of patients able to benefit from minimally invasive techniques. Updates in the field of laparoscopy continue, including single site surgery. The emergence and rapid uptake of robotics continues to produce favorable outcomes while simultaneously expanding minimal access surgery to the obese and elderly populations. Sentinel lymph node detection and single port surgery are expanding areas which will continue to push the role of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in endometrial cancer. In this key lecture, Dr. Querleu will discuss the role of MIS in the management of endometrial cancer.
D Querleu
Lecture
2 years ago
1414 views
102 likes
0 comments
29:34
Endometrial cancer surgical indications
The surgical management of endometrial cancer has been markedly changed by minimally invasive techniques. After three decades of laparoscopy, robotic surgery has built upon and expanded the population of patients able to benefit from minimally invasive techniques. Updates in the field of laparoscopy continue, including single site surgery. The emergence and rapid uptake of robotics continues to produce favorable outcomes while simultaneously expanding minimal access surgery to the obese and elderly populations. Sentinel lymph node detection and single port surgery are expanding areas which will continue to push the role of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in endometrial cancer. In this key lecture, Dr. Querleu will discuss the role of MIS in the management of endometrial cancer.
Laparoscopic left complete mesocolic excision for stented descending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vessel ligation (CVL) was first introduced with the aim to preserve an intact layer of mesocolon, containing all blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, and surrounding soft tissue during colorectal cancer resection. The supplying vessels are also transected at their origin for optimal oncological outcomes. This method has been extensively studied in right colonic cancers with improvement in local recurrence and survival rates when compared to the conventional approach. Its excellent results are attributed to the superior lymph node harvest and removal of disseminated cancer cells in the surrounding soft tissue. Similarly, such advantages can be translated to left hemicolectomy with the use of CME with a CVL approach. Additionally, in left hemicolectomy, the vessels ligated (left branch of middle colic and left colic) are branches of vessels from the aorta rather than from the aorta directly, often limiting lymph node harvest. CME with CVL can help to overcome this limitation in left hemicolectomy. We present a video of a laparoscopic CME and CVL in a 48-year-old Chinese male with large bowel obstruction secondary to a descending colonic tumor which was successfully stented one week before.
SAE Yeo, MH Chang
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3189 views
316 likes
0 comments
08:47
Laparoscopic left complete mesocolic excision for stented descending colon cancer
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vessel ligation (CVL) was first introduced with the aim to preserve an intact layer of mesocolon, containing all blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, and surrounding soft tissue during colorectal cancer resection. The supplying vessels are also transected at their origin for optimal oncological outcomes. This method has been extensively studied in right colonic cancers with improvement in local recurrence and survival rates when compared to the conventional approach. Its excellent results are attributed to the superior lymph node harvest and removal of disseminated cancer cells in the surrounding soft tissue. Similarly, such advantages can be translated to left hemicolectomy with the use of CME with a CVL approach. Additionally, in left hemicolectomy, the vessels ligated (left branch of middle colic and left colic) are branches of vessels from the aorta rather than from the aorta directly, often limiting lymph node harvest. CME with CVL can help to overcome this limitation in left hemicolectomy. We present a video of a laparoscopic CME and CVL in a 48-year-old Chinese male with large bowel obstruction secondary to a descending colonic tumor which was successfully stented one week before.
Role of para-aortic staging lymphadenectomy in advanced cervical cancer (update of September 2014 lecture)
Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation is a major component of the surgical staging procedure for several gynecologic malignancies. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, but assessment of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes is performed with lymphadenectomy and/or imaging. The surgical and oncologic goals of lymph node dissection are to define the extent of disease, and thereby, to guide further treatment. Lymphadenectomy may also have a therapeutic goal in conditions in which removing nodes harboring metastatic disease improves survival. The role of para-aortic lymph node dissection for women diagnosed with LACC had been described in these slides.
F Kridelka
Lecture
2 years ago
1438 views
123 likes
0 comments
27:54
Role of para-aortic staging lymphadenectomy in advanced cervical cancer (update of September 2014 lecture)
Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation is a major component of the surgical staging procedure for several gynecologic malignancies. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, but assessment of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes is performed with lymphadenectomy and/or imaging. The surgical and oncologic goals of lymph node dissection are to define the extent of disease, and thereby, to guide further treatment. Lymphadenectomy may also have a therapeutic goal in conditions in which removing nodes harboring metastatic disease improves survival. The role of para-aortic lymph node dissection for women diagnosed with LACC had been described in these slides.
Common bile duct stricture due to an inoperable pancreatic head cancer: metal stent placement
There are several major indications for the endoscopic drainage of malignant common bile duct obstruction. There are several types of drainage: a preoperative biliary drainage, which is performed in selected cases (delayed surgery, high bilirubin levels, itching, cholangitis), a biliary drainage before neo-adjuvant therapies, and a biliary drainage for palliation. According to the ESGE guidelines, palliative biliary drainage should be performed according to life expectancy. If less than 4 months, plastic stent placement is recommended; if longer than 4 months, a self-expandable metal stent should be placed. In any case, every single patient should be evaluated for the best treatment. In particular, since uncovered self-expandable metal stents are impossible to remove, malignancy must be evidenced before placement of these stents.
I Boškoski, M Morar, I Crisan, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
859 views
83 likes
0 comments
18:14
Common bile duct stricture due to an inoperable pancreatic head cancer: metal stent placement
There are several major indications for the endoscopic drainage of malignant common bile duct obstruction. There are several types of drainage: a preoperative biliary drainage, which is performed in selected cases (delayed surgery, high bilirubin levels, itching, cholangitis), a biliary drainage before neo-adjuvant therapies, and a biliary drainage for palliation. According to the ESGE guidelines, palliative biliary drainage should be performed according to life expectancy. If less than 4 months, plastic stent placement is recommended; if longer than 4 months, a self-expandable metal stent should be placed. In any case, every single patient should be evaluated for the best treatment. In particular, since uncovered self-expandable metal stents are impossible to remove, malignancy must be evidenced before placement of these stents.