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Laparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
Endometriosis is an enigmatic disorder, which affects women in their reproductive age. Failure of recent clinical trials on non-surgical management of endometriosis confirms the role of surgery as a viable treatment of choice. However, recurrence after surgery is common. Recurrence rate varies according to the surgeon’s skills, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and to the postoperative intervention outcome. In patients with severe endometriosis, lesions usually involve the posterior cul-de-sac, anterior rectum, one or both pelvic sidewalls, involving the ureters, the rectosigmoid, and less commonly the anterior bladder, the appendix, and the small bowel. Ureteral retroperitoneal dissection becomes mandatory in extensive endometriosis due to pelvic anatomical distortion. It also leaves the bowel intact without injuring it as the pseudo-peritoneum is lifted along with the inflamed bowel. Consequently, in the surgical practice of benign pathologies, a proper knowledge of the retroperitoneal anatomy ensures complete clearance in cases of advanced endometriosis and frozen pelvis. Here, we present a very interesting case of bladder endometriosis associated with hematuria during menstruation. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with bladder endometriosis in most cases. Provided surgeons are skilled and lesions require no ureteral reimplantation, operative laparoscopy is a valid alternative to laparotomy for partial cystectomy.
D Limbachiya
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2189 views
65 likes
0 comments
06:56
Laparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
Endometriosis is an enigmatic disorder, which affects women in their reproductive age. Failure of recent clinical trials on non-surgical management of endometriosis confirms the role of surgery as a viable treatment of choice. However, recurrence after surgery is common. Recurrence rate varies according to the surgeon’s skills, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and to the postoperative intervention outcome. In patients with severe endometriosis, lesions usually involve the posterior cul-de-sac, anterior rectum, one or both pelvic sidewalls, involving the ureters, the rectosigmoid, and less commonly the anterior bladder, the appendix, and the small bowel. Ureteral retroperitoneal dissection becomes mandatory in extensive endometriosis due to pelvic anatomical distortion. It also leaves the bowel intact without injuring it as the pseudo-peritoneum is lifted along with the inflamed bowel. Consequently, in the surgical practice of benign pathologies, a proper knowledge of the retroperitoneal anatomy ensures complete clearance in cases of advanced endometriosis and frozen pelvis. Here, we present a very interesting case of bladder endometriosis associated with hematuria during menstruation. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with bladder endometriosis in most cases. Provided surgeons are skilled and lesions require no ureteral reimplantation, operative laparoscopy is a valid alternative to laparotomy for partial cystectomy.
Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for big bladder endometriosis nodule
Bladder endometriosis is the most common presentation of urinary tract endometriosis and is frequently associated with specific symptoms such as dysuria, hematuria and recurrent urinary tract infections. Although it may be associated with ureteral endometriosis in severe cases, in most cases, it presents as an isolated disease.
The laparoscopic approach for bladder endometriosis nodule excision requires careful dissection of the paravesical spaces and identification of both ureters entering each ureteral tunnel. The shaving technique until healthy tissue is reached should be attempted, but if mucosal invasion is found, complete wall excision should be performed. In some occasions, when the nodule invades the bladder trigone, a double-J catheter may be inserted and left in place for 6 to 8 weeks.
In this video, we present the case of a 23-year-old woman complaining with significant dysuria associated with hematuria, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and chronic pelvic pain. Magnetic resonance imaging described a 5cm nodule located in the bladder dome, and cystoscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was referred to our Endometriosis Centre after diagnostic laparoscopy.
A Wattiez, J Albornoz, M Puga, E Faller
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1807 views
24 likes
0 comments
32:41
Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for big bladder endometriosis nodule
Bladder endometriosis is the most common presentation of urinary tract endometriosis and is frequently associated with specific symptoms such as dysuria, hematuria and recurrent urinary tract infections. Although it may be associated with ureteral endometriosis in severe cases, in most cases, it presents as an isolated disease.
The laparoscopic approach for bladder endometriosis nodule excision requires careful dissection of the paravesical spaces and identification of both ureters entering each ureteral tunnel. The shaving technique until healthy tissue is reached should be attempted, but if mucosal invasion is found, complete wall excision should be performed. In some occasions, when the nodule invades the bladder trigone, a double-J catheter may be inserted and left in place for 6 to 8 weeks.
In this video, we present the case of a 23-year-old woman complaining with significant dysuria associated with hematuria, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and chronic pelvic pain. Magnetic resonance imaging described a 5cm nodule located in the bladder dome, and cystoscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was referred to our Endometriosis Centre after diagnostic laparoscopy.
Laparoscopic excision of bladder endometriosis
This is the case of a 34-year-old woman, G1P0010, with a long standing history of chronic pelvic and bladder pain occurring on a monthly basis. The patient has had laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis in the past with no resection performed at that time. Given cyclic bladder pain, the patient also underwent cystoscopy, which revealed an implant of bladder endometriosis measuring approximately 2cm in diameter. She has failed medical therapy including oral contraceptives and Lupron from several months. Given her continued bladder pain and severe dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia for the last 5 years, the decision was made to proceed with a surgical intervention.
Operating room specificities:
The patient was positioned in the dorsal lithotomy position with arms tucked bilaterally.
A 12mm port was placed within the umbilicus for the laparoscope. A 5mm port was placed in the left lower quadrant about 2cm superior to the left anterior superior iliac spine. Another 5mm port was placed in the right upper quadrant about 8cm lateral and 2cm inferior to the umbilical port. A final 12mm port was placed in the right lower quadrant, about 2cm superior to the right anterior superior iliac spine. A 7cm clear view uterine manipulator was used.
The primary surgeon was positioned on the left side of the patient. The main surgical assistant, the resident, was positioned on the right side of the patient. The secondary surgical assistant, the fellow, was positioned between the patient’s legs.
M Milad, L Griffin, I Moy, S Bulun
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2022 views
23 likes
0 comments
03:59
Laparoscopic excision of bladder endometriosis
This is the case of a 34-year-old woman, G1P0010, with a long standing history of chronic pelvic and bladder pain occurring on a monthly basis. The patient has had laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis in the past with no resection performed at that time. Given cyclic bladder pain, the patient also underwent cystoscopy, which revealed an implant of bladder endometriosis measuring approximately 2cm in diameter. She has failed medical therapy including oral contraceptives and Lupron from several months. Given her continued bladder pain and severe dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia for the last 5 years, the decision was made to proceed with a surgical intervention.
Operating room specificities:
The patient was positioned in the dorsal lithotomy position with arms tucked bilaterally.
A 12mm port was placed within the umbilicus for the laparoscope. A 5mm port was placed in the left lower quadrant about 2cm superior to the left anterior superior iliac spine. Another 5mm port was placed in the right upper quadrant about 8cm lateral and 2cm inferior to the umbilical port. A final 12mm port was placed in the right lower quadrant, about 2cm superior to the right anterior superior iliac spine. A 7cm clear view uterine manipulator was used.
The primary surgeon was positioned on the left side of the patient. The main surgical assistant, the resident, was positioned on the right side of the patient. The secondary surgical assistant, the fellow, was positioned between the patient’s legs.
Laparoscopic total hysterectomy and unilateral adnexectomy with resection of urinary bladder nodule for endometriosis
This video demonstrates the technique of a total laparoscopic hysterectomy with unilateral adnexectomy and the excision of a vesical endometriotic nodule.
This patient is a 46-year-old lady with a previous surgical history of one laparotomy for a hemoperitoneum (endometriotic ovarian cyst rupture) and 6 laparoscopies because of endometriosis, the last one 3 years ago with a segmental sigmoid resection. After this last surgery, the patient starts to complain of dysmenorrhea, chronic pelvic pain and dysuria. She has never had any urinary infection.
Because of urinary stress incontinence, she had botulinic toxin injection and underwent a cystoscopy, which revealed a bladder nodule.
A Wattiez, S Barata, AM Furtado Lima, P Trompoukis, B Gabriel, J Nassif
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
586 views
31 likes
0 comments
10:14
Laparoscopic total hysterectomy and unilateral adnexectomy with resection of urinary bladder nodule for endometriosis
This video demonstrates the technique of a total laparoscopic hysterectomy with unilateral adnexectomy and the excision of a vesical endometriotic nodule.
This patient is a 46-year-old lady with a previous surgical history of one laparotomy for a hemoperitoneum (endometriotic ovarian cyst rupture) and 6 laparoscopies because of endometriosis, the last one 3 years ago with a segmental sigmoid resection. After this last surgery, the patient starts to complain of dysmenorrhea, chronic pelvic pain and dysuria. She has never had any urinary infection.
Because of urinary stress incontinence, she had botulinic toxin injection and underwent a cystoscopy, which revealed a bladder nodule.
Urinary complications during deep endometriosis surgery
During deep endometriosis surgery, bladder and ureter lesions are the most frequent complications.
Bladder lesions. The cystoscopy must be first carried out to assess the location of the endometriosis. If the nodule is close to the ureter, a stent is needed. To prevent lesion to the intramural part of the ureter, it is advisable to enter the bladder at its upper part. To minimize complications, an adequate surgical technique is necessary, a catheter must be placed for 1 to 3 weeks, a large catheter must be placed to drain clots, and control cystoscopy must be achieved before catheter removal. Intraoperative bladder lesions are never a major problem since the bladder wall heals well. Late complications are as follows: vesicovaginal fistula, rare but more frequent after hysterectomy, and the clinical sign is continuous leakage from the vagina, and the treatment is laparoscopy immediately or 50 days after surgery (with, in the last case, treatment with antibiotics until laparoscopic treatment begins). In addition, urinary retention is another late complication, more frequent, especially after resection of large nodules with lateral extension; it is due to parasympathetic nerve injury. Nerve-sparing prevention in endometriosis is not possible; the important thing is not to resect bilaterally. If injury is monolateral, it heals spontaneously in 3 months, rarely longer than 6-12 months.
Ureteral lesions. They occur mainly in cases of hydronephrosis or nodules bigger than 3 centimeters. In case of hydronephrosis, it is necessary to stent the patient before surgery; in all cases, especially when dealing with a nodule, the ureter should be isolated. After surgery a control cystoscopy must be carried out if the ureter works properly. It is important to monitor drain volume and CRP daily. CRP increases on the second day, and decreases on the third day. If CRP increases again, it means there is a complication (infection, ureteral lesion, leakage from rectum). Treatment is immediate laparoscopy with stitch and stent. Another complication is urinoma; symptoms are pain, diarrhea and high temperature. In these cases laparoscopy should be repeated. In case of ureterovaginal fistula, the leakage is intermittent. It usually becomes evident after 1 to 3 weeks. The diagnosis is made by intravenous pyelogram (IVP); treatment is carried out through laparoscopy. In case of unrecognized ureteral transection, there is a late ureteral leak (even after 25 days); ureteral re-anastomosis is the first-line treatment.
A Ussia
Lecture
7 years ago
925 views
17 likes
0 comments
17:28
Urinary complications during deep endometriosis surgery
During deep endometriosis surgery, bladder and ureter lesions are the most frequent complications.
Bladder lesions. The cystoscopy must be first carried out to assess the location of the endometriosis. If the nodule is close to the ureter, a stent is needed. To prevent lesion to the intramural part of the ureter, it is advisable to enter the bladder at its upper part. To minimize complications, an adequate surgical technique is necessary, a catheter must be placed for 1 to 3 weeks, a large catheter must be placed to drain clots, and control cystoscopy must be achieved before catheter removal. Intraoperative bladder lesions are never a major problem since the bladder wall heals well. Late complications are as follows: vesicovaginal fistula, rare but more frequent after hysterectomy, and the clinical sign is continuous leakage from the vagina, and the treatment is laparoscopy immediately or 50 days after surgery (with, in the last case, treatment with antibiotics until laparoscopic treatment begins). In addition, urinary retention is another late complication, more frequent, especially after resection of large nodules with lateral extension; it is due to parasympathetic nerve injury. Nerve-sparing prevention in endometriosis is not possible; the important thing is not to resect bilaterally. If injury is monolateral, it heals spontaneously in 3 months, rarely longer than 6-12 months.
Ureteral lesions. They occur mainly in cases of hydronephrosis or nodules bigger than 3 centimeters. In case of hydronephrosis, it is necessary to stent the patient before surgery; in all cases, especially when dealing with a nodule, the ureter should be isolated. After surgery a control cystoscopy must be carried out if the ureter works properly. It is important to monitor drain volume and CRP daily. CRP increases on the second day, and decreases on the third day. If CRP increases again, it means there is a complication (infection, ureteral lesion, leakage from rectum). Treatment is immediate laparoscopy with stitch and stent. Another complication is urinoma; symptoms are pain, diarrhea and high temperature. In these cases laparoscopy should be repeated. In case of ureterovaginal fistula, the leakage is intermittent. It usually becomes evident after 1 to 3 weeks. The diagnosis is made by intravenous pyelogram (IVP); treatment is carried out through laparoscopy. In case of unrecognized ureteral transection, there is a late ureteral leak (even after 25 days); ureteral re-anastomosis is the first-line treatment.
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
H Grover, R Syed, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
8953 views
74 likes
23 comments
07:04
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
Mucosal skinning for bowel endometriosis: standard technique
Bowel endometriosis is described in 3% to 37% of patients with endometriosis. In 90% of these cases, the rectum, the sigmoid colon or both are involved. It is the most severe form of the disease and its surgical management is complex. Surgery is very challenging and the degree of radical excision should always be counterbalanced with the risk of complications and functional disorders. Four types of surgery can be chosen: superficial excision or shaving, mucosal skinning, discoid excision, and segmental bowel resection. We believe that bowel resection can be avoided in some cases if mucosal skinning is first attempted. This video shows 2 endometriotic lesions of the rectosigmoid junction that were treated by mucosal skinning, hence avoiding an unnecessary segmental resection. The final result was satisfactory and postoperative outcome was uneventful. In 2008, the patient underwent a laparoscopic intervention, which revealed the presence of a deep infiltrating endometriosis and bilateral endometriotic cysts. Bilateral ovarian cystectomy was performed. Postoperative MRI for pelvic pains revealed a persistent lesion of the recto-vaginal septum. The patient then presented with persistent dysmenorrhea (8/10), chronic pelvic pain (8/10), dyschezia (6/10) without dyspareunia or bladder-related symptoms. Clinical examination showed a mobile anteverted uterus without clear evidence of a nodule lesion at the rectovaginal septum neither was it at the level of uterosacral ligaments, but most probably the presence of adhesions between the uterus and the rectosigmoid junction. Despite treatment with GnRH agonist, the patient was referred to the emergency department several times for bouts of intense pain.
A Wattiez, E Faller, J Albornoz, P Messori, T Boisramé
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1510 views
75 likes
0 comments
11:40
Mucosal skinning for bowel endometriosis: standard technique
Bowel endometriosis is described in 3% to 37% of patients with endometriosis. In 90% of these cases, the rectum, the sigmoid colon or both are involved. It is the most severe form of the disease and its surgical management is complex. Surgery is very challenging and the degree of radical excision should always be counterbalanced with the risk of complications and functional disorders. Four types of surgery can be chosen: superficial excision or shaving, mucosal skinning, discoid excision, and segmental bowel resection. We believe that bowel resection can be avoided in some cases if mucosal skinning is first attempted. This video shows 2 endometriotic lesions of the rectosigmoid junction that were treated by mucosal skinning, hence avoiding an unnecessary segmental resection. The final result was satisfactory and postoperative outcome was uneventful. In 2008, the patient underwent a laparoscopic intervention, which revealed the presence of a deep infiltrating endometriosis and bilateral endometriotic cysts. Bilateral ovarian cystectomy was performed. Postoperative MRI for pelvic pains revealed a persistent lesion of the recto-vaginal septum. The patient then presented with persistent dysmenorrhea (8/10), chronic pelvic pain (8/10), dyschezia (6/10) without dyspareunia or bladder-related symptoms. Clinical examination showed a mobile anteverted uterus without clear evidence of a nodule lesion at the rectovaginal septum neither was it at the level of uterosacral ligaments, but most probably the presence of adhesions between the uterus and the rectosigmoid junction. Despite treatment with GnRH agonist, the patient was referred to the emergency department several times for bouts of intense pain.
Ureteral endometriosis: general outcomes, our experience
This lecture presents ureteral endometriosis, which is a rare pathology (0.1% of cases). In 50% of cases, the condition is asymptomatic and can lead to loss of renal functions. In the literature, ureteral endometriosis increases with the presence of rectovaginal endometriosis, which does not appear in the study presented (221 cases of endometriosis, 19.5% of which are ureteral tract endometriosis). It seems to be significantly associated with uterosacral ligament (USL) endometriosis (p=0.01) but not with bladder endometriosis. Medical treatment is not indicated and conservative laparoscopic surgical management shows a long-term relief of symptoms and a low rate of anatomical recurrence (0-11%).
B Gabriel
Lecture
7 years ago
528 views
6 likes
0 comments
14:29
Ureteral endometriosis: general outcomes, our experience
This lecture presents ureteral endometriosis, which is a rare pathology (0.1% of cases). In 50% of cases, the condition is asymptomatic and can lead to loss of renal functions. In the literature, ureteral endometriosis increases with the presence of rectovaginal endometriosis, which does not appear in the study presented (221 cases of endometriosis, 19.5% of which are ureteral tract endometriosis). It seems to be significantly associated with uterosacral ligament (USL) endometriosis (p=0.01) but not with bladder endometriosis. Medical treatment is not indicated and conservative laparoscopic surgical management shows a long-term relief of symptoms and a low rate of anatomical recurrence (0-11%).
Radical excision or bowel resection for deep endometriosis
In this key lecture, the author focuses on bowel endometriosis. This disease is often multifocal and there are 8% of resection margins which are not free despite segmental resection. Although bowel resection is widely performed, indications are poorly documented regarding nodule size or localization. Segmental resection at the level of the rectum is associated with bowel, bladder, and sexual complications as found in other conditions (such as cancer). The author insists on the need to first perform a discoid resection except if the size of the lesion takes up more than 50% of the wall area and exceeds 2-3cm. For this procedure, it is recommended that the operation be carried out by pelvic surgeons with perfect expertise in endometriosis.
P Koninckx
Lecture
7 years ago
1355 views
8 likes
0 comments
21:48
Radical excision or bowel resection for deep endometriosis
In this key lecture, the author focuses on bowel endometriosis. This disease is often multifocal and there are 8% of resection margins which are not free despite segmental resection. Although bowel resection is widely performed, indications are poorly documented regarding nodule size or localization. Segmental resection at the level of the rectum is associated with bowel, bladder, and sexual complications as found in other conditions (such as cancer). The author insists on the need to first perform a discoid resection except if the size of the lesion takes up more than 50% of the wall area and exceeds 2-3cm. For this procedure, it is recommended that the operation be carried out by pelvic surgeons with perfect expertise in endometriosis.
Complications of endometriosis surgery
This lecture focuses on complications in laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis. First, the expert addresses how to define complications. Surgeons sometimes need to remove part of the adjacent structures such as bowel, vagina and ureter, which should be included in the surgery – to achieve a complete excision of the disease. Complications can always occur and the most important thing to be borne in mind is to know how to deal with them by laparoscopy.
Complications may include adhesions, bowel, ureter and vascular injuries. The rate of complications in rectal shaving ranges from 0.2 to 1.4%. In case of discoid bowel resection, the morbidity rate published in the literature is 13%. Regarding rectal segmental resection, the rate of complications in laparoscopy (4.25%) is similar to that of laparotomy (4.5%). The rate of rectovaginal fistula in case of rectal shaving is 8.3%, and in rectal segmental resection 3.1%, which is not associated with the distance between the anastomosis and the rectum. Voiding problems are frequent and the incidence of urinary retention ranges from 1 to 29% and depends on the interval of observation. Finally, in case of ureteral endometriosis, a double J catheter should be always placed in order to decrease the risk of ureteral fistula.
J Nassif
Lecture
7 years ago
1576 views
37 likes
0 comments
18:10
Complications of endometriosis surgery
This lecture focuses on complications in laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis. First, the expert addresses how to define complications. Surgeons sometimes need to remove part of the adjacent structures such as bowel, vagina and ureter, which should be included in the surgery – to achieve a complete excision of the disease. Complications can always occur and the most important thing to be borne in mind is to know how to deal with them by laparoscopy.
Complications may include adhesions, bowel, ureter and vascular injuries. The rate of complications in rectal shaving ranges from 0.2 to 1.4%. In case of discoid bowel resection, the morbidity rate published in the literature is 13%. Regarding rectal segmental resection, the rate of complications in laparoscopy (4.25%) is similar to that of laparotomy (4.5%). The rate of rectovaginal fistula in case of rectal shaving is 8.3%, and in rectal segmental resection 3.1%, which is not associated with the distance between the anastomosis and the rectum. Voiding problems are frequent and the incidence of urinary retention ranges from 1 to 29% and depends on the interval of observation. Finally, in case of ureteral endometriosis, a double J catheter should be always placed in order to decrease the risk of ureteral fistula.
Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for deep endometriosis
Patients with bladder endometriosis may present with variable painful symptoms, hematuria, repeated urinary infection and/or infertility. The main treatment is a complete resection of the lesion. We report the case of a 30-year-old patient with no previous pregnancies presenting with pelvic endometriosis recurrence located at the level of the bladder dome. Her medical history shows a cystoscopic coagulation of an endometriotic nodule of the bladder. Preoperative MRI showed a 3cm single nodule protruding of the bladder. The procedure started by the dissection of the vesicouterine space followed by partial cystectomy using a monopolar hook. A running suture in two layers was carried out to close the cystotomy, and its integrity and bilateral ureteral patency was confirmed. Six weeks later at postoperative follow-up the patient was pain-free and without any urinary symptoms.
This video was awarded first place at the AAGL 5th International Congress on Minimally Invasive Gynecology held in conjunction with the Turkish Society of Gynecological Endoscopy (TSGE) 4th Annual Scientific Meeting.
A Wattiez, S Haddad, A Marot-Richter, A Vázquez Rodriguez, P Trompoukis, S Maia
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
2160 views
14 likes
0 comments
07:37
Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for deep endometriosis
Patients with bladder endometriosis may present with variable painful symptoms, hematuria, repeated urinary infection and/or infertility. The main treatment is a complete resection of the lesion. We report the case of a 30-year-old patient with no previous pregnancies presenting with pelvic endometriosis recurrence located at the level of the bladder dome. Her medical history shows a cystoscopic coagulation of an endometriotic nodule of the bladder. Preoperative MRI showed a 3cm single nodule protruding of the bladder. The procedure started by the dissection of the vesicouterine space followed by partial cystectomy using a monopolar hook. A running suture in two layers was carried out to close the cystotomy, and its integrity and bilateral ureteral patency was confirmed. Six weeks later at postoperative follow-up the patient was pain-free and without any urinary symptoms.
This video was awarded first place at the AAGL 5th International Congress on Minimally Invasive Gynecology held in conjunction with the Turkish Society of Gynecological Endoscopy (TSGE) 4th Annual Scientific Meeting.
Surgical complications - it is possible to prevent them
Complications after laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis may occur even with a skilled surgeon and ideal circumstances. Success is linked to many factors, and not only to the surgeon’s experience. It is necessary to inform the patient in order to avoid medico-legal problems. An appropriate diagnosis must be performed, including clinical examination and all other necessary investigations. Proper instruments, anatomical knowledge, and exposure help to prevent severe complications. Make sure that you visualize the ureters at the beginning of the surgery as they always tend to go medially. In addition, ureterosacral resection should be avoided in order to prevent bladder dysfunction. Always prefer discoid excision of the bowel rather than bowel resection and make sure the suture does not exceed 3cm on the bowel, and avoid any vertical suturing when possible. If there is a history of surgery or a lesion near the ostia or a ureteral stenosis, ureteral stents should be placed. At the end of the procedure, it is recommended to carry out a blue dye or an air test, a cystoscopy or to place drains. A postoperative consultation is essential.
JM Wenger
Lecture
7 years ago
9252 views
445 likes
0 comments
24:53
Surgical complications - it is possible to prevent them
Complications after laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis may occur even with a skilled surgeon and ideal circumstances. Success is linked to many factors, and not only to the surgeon’s experience. It is necessary to inform the patient in order to avoid medico-legal problems. An appropriate diagnosis must be performed, including clinical examination and all other necessary investigations. Proper instruments, anatomical knowledge, and exposure help to prevent severe complications. Make sure that you visualize the ureters at the beginning of the surgery as they always tend to go medially. In addition, ureterosacral resection should be avoided in order to prevent bladder dysfunction. Always prefer discoid excision of the bowel rather than bowel resection and make sure the suture does not exceed 3cm on the bowel, and avoid any vertical suturing when possible. If there is a history of surgery or a lesion near the ostia or a ureteral stenosis, ureteral stents should be placed. At the end of the procedure, it is recommended to carry out a blue dye or an air test, a cystoscopy or to place drains. A postoperative consultation is essential.
Deep endometriosis excision with ureteral anastomosis followed by segmental rectosigmoid resection, transvaginal specimen extraction, and a transanal colorectal anastomosis
We present the case of a 29-year-old nulligest woman. Four years ago, she had a previous surgery with a rectovaginal nodule removed both by laparoscopy and vaginal approach. She has complained of dyspareunia (8/10), dysmenorrhea (8/10), dyschezia (8/10) and infertility over the last 2 years, but she also suffers from bladder dysfunction requiring urinary self-catheterization during her menstrual periods. The laparoscopic exploration revealed a big fibrotic nodule located in the right pelvic sidewall involving the right ureter and the rectum. Right ureter resection and anastomosis were performed. Segmental rectosigmoid resection was followed by transvaginal specimen extraction and a transanal colorectal anastomosis. The intracorporeal laparoscopic technique allows for a limited bowel devascularization and for an appropriate anastomosis with no need for extra abdominal incisions. No complications were noted and the patient had a good clinical evolution.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, E Faller, J Albornoz, P Messori
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2578 views
22 likes
0 comments
30:14
Deep endometriosis excision with ureteral anastomosis followed by segmental rectosigmoid resection, transvaginal specimen extraction, and a transanal colorectal anastomosis
We present the case of a 29-year-old nulligest woman. Four years ago, she had a previous surgery with a rectovaginal nodule removed both by laparoscopy and vaginal approach. She has complained of dyspareunia (8/10), dysmenorrhea (8/10), dyschezia (8/10) and infertility over the last 2 years, but she also suffers from bladder dysfunction requiring urinary self-catheterization during her menstrual periods. The laparoscopic exploration revealed a big fibrotic nodule located in the right pelvic sidewall involving the right ureter and the rectum. Right ureter resection and anastomosis were performed. Segmental rectosigmoid resection was followed by transvaginal specimen extraction and a transanal colorectal anastomosis. The intracorporeal laparoscopic technique allows for a limited bowel devascularization and for an appropriate anastomosis with no need for extra abdominal incisions. No complications were noted and the patient had a good clinical evolution.
Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses for cervical agenesis
Cervical agenesis occurs in one in 80,000 to 100,000 births. According to the American Fertility Society, cervical agenesis should be classified as a type 1b Müllerian anomaly. According to the ESHRE/ESGE classification, it is classified in class C4 category.
This is the case of a 16 year-old female patient with primary amenorrhea and episodes of cyclical lower abdominal pain for one year. After complete examination and investigations, diagnosis of isolated cervical agenesis with hematometra and left ovarian chocolate cyst was established. Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses were performed using an innovative technique and an appropriate management of endometriosis. A hysteroscopy was later performed and showed anastomotic patency. As a result, the patient has been experiencing spontaneous regular menstruation for nine months.
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2006 views
178 likes
1 comment
07:49
Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses for cervical agenesis
Cervical agenesis occurs in one in 80,000 to 100,000 births. According to the American Fertility Society, cervical agenesis should be classified as a type 1b Müllerian anomaly. According to the ESHRE/ESGE classification, it is classified in class C4 category.
This is the case of a 16 year-old female patient with primary amenorrhea and episodes of cyclical lower abdominal pain for one year. After complete examination and investigations, diagnosis of isolated cervical agenesis with hematometra and left ovarian chocolate cyst was established. Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses were performed using an innovative technique and an appropriate management of endometriosis. A hysteroscopy was later performed and showed anastomotic patency. As a result, the patient has been experiencing spontaneous regular menstruation for nine months.
Laparoscopic resection of deep endometriotic nodule for pelvic pain, left hydronephrosis and renal function impairment
Renal function impairment is a rare condition when associated with endometriosis. This video shows the laparoscopic resection of a deep endometriotic nodule for pelvic pain, left hydronephrosis and renal function impairment. The left kidney has an almost silent pattern on scintigraphy. The therapeutic strategy consists of freeing the obstacle caused by the endometriotic nodule, placement of a double J (JJ) catheter and monitoring for renal function in the postoperative follow-up. Further laparoscopic nephrectomy is to be discussed if the renal function is not improved.
A Wattiez, J Nassif, I Miranda-Mendoza, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
2233 views
42 likes
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07:56
Laparoscopic resection of deep endometriotic nodule for pelvic pain, left hydronephrosis and renal function impairment
Renal function impairment is a rare condition when associated with endometriosis. This video shows the laparoscopic resection of a deep endometriotic nodule for pelvic pain, left hydronephrosis and renal function impairment. The left kidney has an almost silent pattern on scintigraphy. The therapeutic strategy consists of freeing the obstacle caused by the endometriotic nodule, placement of a double J (JJ) catheter and monitoring for renal function in the postoperative follow-up. Further laparoscopic nephrectomy is to be discussed if the renal function is not improved.