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Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1655 views
10 likes
0 comments
13:16
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3705 views
391 likes
0 comments
06:01
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: laparoscopic right hepatectomy in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome
In this live interactive video, Professor Luc Soler provided a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling for precise tumor localization and future liver remnant before and after chemoembolization and right portal vein embolization. Dr. Soubrane briefly described the main principles, key steps, and preoperative planning in a 62-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome. He demonstrated the main technical aspects of port placement, hepatic pedicle dissection, exploration and dissection of vessels, and transection of liver parenchyma.
O Soubrane, P Pessaux, R Memeo, L Soler, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
4980 views
571 likes
0 comments
51:19
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: laparoscopic right hepatectomy in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome
In this live interactive video, Professor Luc Soler provided a brief introduction of 3D reconstruction and modeling for precise tumor localization and future liver remnant before and after chemoembolization and right portal vein embolization. Dr. Soubrane briefly described the main principles, key steps, and preoperative planning in a 62-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metabolic syndrome. He demonstrated the main technical aspects of port placement, hepatic pedicle dissection, exploration and dissection of vessels, and transection of liver parenchyma.
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
M Lotti, E Poiasina, G Panyor, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2970 views
442 likes
0 comments
11:18
Mobilization of the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome in a 38-year-old patient
This video demonstrates our laparoscopic approach to the right colon for Chilaiditi syndrome with recurrent episodes of bowel obstruction.
A 38-year-old man with Down syndrome was admitted to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and vomiting. The objective signs and radiographic findings were indicative of bowel obstruction. In his last few years, he was admitted multiple times to the emergency department for mechanical bowel obstruction. Both CT-scan and MRI showed medial dislocation of the liver and transposition of the right colon and small bowel loops in between the diaphragm and the liver. We propose a specific port-site layout and a counterclockwise approach, to allow for the correct triangulation of surgical instruments especially during the mobilization of the hepatic flexure, which is often the most critical phase of the operation. Starting from the mobilization of the transverse colon and proceeding towards the caecum we take advantage of gravity in handling the right colon. The operative time was 90 minutes. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 6. His symptoms disappeared completely.
Arcuate ligament syndrome: laparoscopic approach
Median arcuate ligament syndrome is caused by the extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk by the median arcuate ligament, prominent fibrous bands, and peri-aortic nodal tissue. In many cases, it is asymptomatic, even though postprandial abdominal pain or, during exercise, nauseas, vomiting, and weight loss could be found. Doppler ultrasound and angiotomography are used for diagnosis while arteriography is the gold standard. Only symptomatic patients might require surgical treatment, and the laparoscopic approach has been proposed as a safe and effective technique. We present a case of laparoscopic approach for the treatment of arcuate ligament syndrome.
F Moser, P Maldonado, F Signorini, V Gorodner, E Romero, A Vigilante, E Miranda, H Eynard, L Obeide
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2157 views
94 likes
1 comment
07:28
Arcuate ligament syndrome: laparoscopic approach
Median arcuate ligament syndrome is caused by the extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk by the median arcuate ligament, prominent fibrous bands, and peri-aortic nodal tissue. In many cases, it is asymptomatic, even though postprandial abdominal pain or, during exercise, nauseas, vomiting, and weight loss could be found. Doppler ultrasound and angiotomography are used for diagnosis while arteriography is the gold standard. Only symptomatic patients might require surgical treatment, and the laparoscopic approach has been proposed as a safe and effective technique. We present a case of laparoscopic approach for the treatment of arcuate ligament syndrome.
Laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy for superior mesenteric artery syndrome
Purpose:
The superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is a rare disease in which the third portion of the duodenum is compressed by the narrow space of the SMA and the aorta. Surgical treatment such as duodenojejunostomy (DJS) could resolve this problem. Here we report our experience of laparoscopic DJS with a video demonstration.

Materials and Methods:
This 18-year-old woman suffered from vomiting, abdominal distention and progressive weight loss during 6 months before admission. The abdominal discomfort usually occurred after meals and it could be alleviated by a decubitus position. Endoscopic exams revealed gastritis and reflux esophagitis. Computed tomography (CT) with contrast identified the distended stomach and the proximal duodenum obstructed by the SMA. Surgical treatment was advised after a complete preoperative survey, including a series of image survey, psychological evaluation and nutrition status. A three-port laparoscopic approach was used. After opening a small window through the mesocolon, a side-to-side DJS was created with a linear stapler and the common channel was closed with a hand-sewn suture.

Results:
There were no intraoperative complications. The laparoscopic DJS tooks 52 mins and blood loss was minimal. The nasogastric tube was removed on postoperative day 3 and she was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 7. The postoperative upper GI series showed a smooth contrast passage from the DJS to the intestine and the patient gained 6 kg within 4 months after surgery.

Conclusion:
Laparoscopic DJS is a surgical option for SMA syndrome after conservative treatment failure. It is safe, feasible and provides the benefits of a minimally invasive approach.
CH Hsu, KH Liu, CY Tsai, TS Yeh
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1997 views
66 likes
0 comments
08:42
Laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy for superior mesenteric artery syndrome
Purpose:
The superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is a rare disease in which the third portion of the duodenum is compressed by the narrow space of the SMA and the aorta. Surgical treatment such as duodenojejunostomy (DJS) could resolve this problem. Here we report our experience of laparoscopic DJS with a video demonstration.

Materials and Methods:
This 18-year-old woman suffered from vomiting, abdominal distention and progressive weight loss during 6 months before admission. The abdominal discomfort usually occurred after meals and it could be alleviated by a decubitus position. Endoscopic exams revealed gastritis and reflux esophagitis. Computed tomography (CT) with contrast identified the distended stomach and the proximal duodenum obstructed by the SMA. Surgical treatment was advised after a complete preoperative survey, including a series of image survey, psychological evaluation and nutrition status. A three-port laparoscopic approach was used. After opening a small window through the mesocolon, a side-to-side DJS was created with a linear stapler and the common channel was closed with a hand-sewn suture.

Results:
There were no intraoperative complications. The laparoscopic DJS tooks 52 mins and blood loss was minimal. The nasogastric tube was removed on postoperative day 3 and she was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 7. The postoperative upper GI series showed a smooth contrast passage from the DJS to the intestine and the patient gained 6 kg within 4 months after surgery.

Conclusion:
Laparoscopic DJS is a surgical option for SMA syndrome after conservative treatment failure. It is safe, feasible and provides the benefits of a minimally invasive approach.
Robotic left adrenalectomy for Conn's syndrome
Introduction: Since the first robotic adrenalectomy by Piazza et al. in 1999, using both the ZEUS and AESOP systems, numerous series and case reports have been published describing both left and right adrenalectomies using both transperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. These studies demonstrate that the robotic approach is feasible and safe.
Methods: This is the case of a 43-year-old female patient who presented with weakness, muscular cramps and systemic arterial hypertension. Her blood tests revealed a high Na++, low K+, very low renin (inhibited) and high aldosterone dose levels. A CT-scan showed a unique adenoma within 2.6cm at the left adrenal gland. She was diagnosed with Conn’s syndrome.
Results: In this video showing a robotic left adrenalectomy, the patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus, jack-knife position. Four robotic arms were used. Dissection was performed by means of scissors and of a bipolar fenestrated forceps. Operative time took 95 minutes. No measurable bleeding was observed. No UCI stay was necessary and the patient was discharged 24 hours after the intervention.
Conclusion: In this case, adrenal surgery was performed using a robotic approach, which demonstrated that the procedure was feasible, safe, with a low morbidity and a short hospital stay.
Fe Madureira, Fa Madureira, E Parra-Davila, D Madureira
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1802 views
64 likes
0 comments
08:20
Robotic left adrenalectomy for Conn's syndrome
Introduction: Since the first robotic adrenalectomy by Piazza et al. in 1999, using both the ZEUS and AESOP systems, numerous series and case reports have been published describing both left and right adrenalectomies using both transperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. These studies demonstrate that the robotic approach is feasible and safe.
Methods: This is the case of a 43-year-old female patient who presented with weakness, muscular cramps and systemic arterial hypertension. Her blood tests revealed a high Na++, low K+, very low renin (inhibited) and high aldosterone dose levels. A CT-scan showed a unique adenoma within 2.6cm at the left adrenal gland. She was diagnosed with Conn’s syndrome.
Results: In this video showing a robotic left adrenalectomy, the patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus, jack-knife position. Four robotic arms were used. Dissection was performed by means of scissors and of a bipolar fenestrated forceps. Operative time took 95 minutes. No measurable bleeding was observed. No UCI stay was necessary and the patient was discharged 24 hours after the intervention.
Conclusion: In this case, adrenal surgery was performed using a robotic approach, which demonstrated that the procedure was feasible, safe, with a low morbidity and a short hospital stay.
Endoscopic extraction of a giant cystic duct stone to treat type I Mirizzi syndrome
Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is characterized by common hepatic duct obstruction due to mechanical compression and surrounding inflammation by a gallstone impacted in the cystic duct (type I) or at the gallbladder neck (type II). Preoperative diagnosis of the syndrome is mandatory and associated with a decrease of complication rate of surgical management. Endoscopic therapies like ERCP with lithotripsy or endoscopic extraction of cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been described. Here we report successful endoscopic stone-clearance using double-cannulation and large balloon dilatation of the papilla for giant biliary stone impacted in the cystic duct inserted low in the common hepatic duct causing type I MS.
Bibliographic reference:
Double-cannulation and large papillary balloon dilation: key to successful endoscopic treatment of mirizzi syndrome in low insertion of cystic duct. Donatelli G, Dhumane P, Dallemagne B, Marx L, Delvaux M, Gay G, Marescaux J. Dig Endosc 2012;24:466-9.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, S Perretta, BM Vergeau, JL Dumont, T Tuszynski, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
896 views
13 likes
0 comments
04:09
Endoscopic extraction of a giant cystic duct stone to treat type I Mirizzi syndrome
Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is characterized by common hepatic duct obstruction due to mechanical compression and surrounding inflammation by a gallstone impacted in the cystic duct (type I) or at the gallbladder neck (type II). Preoperative diagnosis of the syndrome is mandatory and associated with a decrease of complication rate of surgical management. Endoscopic therapies like ERCP with lithotripsy or endoscopic extraction of cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been described. Here we report successful endoscopic stone-clearance using double-cannulation and large balloon dilatation of the papilla for giant biliary stone impacted in the cystic duct inserted low in the common hepatic duct causing type I MS.
Bibliographic reference:
Double-cannulation and large papillary balloon dilation: key to successful endoscopic treatment of mirizzi syndrome in low insertion of cystic duct. Donatelli G, Dhumane P, Dallemagne B, Marx L, Delvaux M, Gay G, Marescaux J. Dig Endosc 2012;24:466-9.
Laparoscopic management of a type III Mirizzi syndrome: cholecystectomy with flag technique and ideal suture of a cholecystobiliary fistula
In this video, authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a Mirizzi syndrome. Due to a cholecystocholedochal fistula and to a difficult dissection of Calot’s triangle, authors decided to modify the dissection technique by performing a primary freeing of the gallblader as described by Jean Mouiel. In order to prevent any further biliary damage, a subtotal cholecystectomy is also achieved by means of an EndoGia™ linear stapler. Cholecystobiliary fistula is repaired using an absorbable running suture protected by an internal choledochal drain placed thanks to preoperative endoscopic catheterization.
HA Mercoli, L Marx, J Leroy, P Pessaux, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
6024 views
176 likes
0 comments
07:11
Laparoscopic management of a type III Mirizzi syndrome: cholecystectomy with flag technique and ideal suture of a cholecystobiliary fistula
In this video, authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a Mirizzi syndrome. Due to a cholecystocholedochal fistula and to a difficult dissection of Calot’s triangle, authors decided to modify the dissection technique by performing a primary freeing of the gallblader as described by Jean Mouiel. In order to prevent any further biliary damage, a subtotal cholecystectomy is also achieved by means of an EndoGia™ linear stapler. Cholecystobiliary fistula is repaired using an absorbable running suture protected by an internal choledochal drain placed thanks to preoperative endoscopic catheterization.
Subtotal laparoscopic cholecystectomy for Mirizzi syndrome type IA
This video shows a case of Mirizzi syndrome type IA (according to the classification of Csendes and Nagakava). This 36-year-old female patient was admitted for an elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to a chronic calculous cholecystitis. Preoperative examination did not reveal any peculiarities. Patient set-up and trocar placement were conventional and unremarkable. During the operation, anatomical abnormalities of Calot’s triangle were observed -- namely common bile duct and other elements of the neck of gallbladder were not differentiated. The common bile duct was firstly adopted as the cystic duct, giving the impression that it falls into the gallbladder. In addition, it was impossible to visualize the proximal part of the common bile duct. After several long attempts at dissection, the cystic duct failed to show. We then opened the lumen of the gallbladder accidentally, which revealed the inner opening of the cystic duct. We used it as a landmark to dissect the stump of the cystic duct. Three Endoclips were applied onto the stump of the duct. The free wall of the gallbladder was excised. The remaining mucosa of the gallbladder was carefully coagulated.
In relation to such changes, the diagnosis of chronic calculous cholecystitis, Mirizzi syndrome type IA was established.
A Sazhin, S Mosin
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
4825 views
128 likes
0 comments
14:44
Subtotal laparoscopic cholecystectomy for Mirizzi syndrome type IA
This video shows a case of Mirizzi syndrome type IA (according to the classification of Csendes and Nagakava). This 36-year-old female patient was admitted for an elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to a chronic calculous cholecystitis. Preoperative examination did not reveal any peculiarities. Patient set-up and trocar placement were conventional and unremarkable. During the operation, anatomical abnormalities of Calot’s triangle were observed -- namely common bile duct and other elements of the neck of gallbladder were not differentiated. The common bile duct was firstly adopted as the cystic duct, giving the impression that it falls into the gallbladder. In addition, it was impossible to visualize the proximal part of the common bile duct. After several long attempts at dissection, the cystic duct failed to show. We then opened the lumen of the gallbladder accidentally, which revealed the inner opening of the cystic duct. We used it as a landmark to dissect the stump of the cystic duct. Three Endoclips were applied onto the stump of the duct. The free wall of the gallbladder was excised. The remaining mucosa of the gallbladder was carefully coagulated.
In relation to such changes, the diagnosis of chronic calculous cholecystitis, Mirizzi syndrome type IA was established.
Laparoscopic and endoscopic treatment of a complicated candy cane syndrome after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
A “Candy Cane” Roux syndrome represents an excessive length of non-functional Roux limb proximal to the gastrojejunostomy, which can cause abnormal upper gastrointestinal symptoms of postprandial epigastric discomfort that is relieved by vomiting. Symptoms of reflux, loss of satiety, and nausea are also common. The length of the blind loop is the essential factor to explain these symptoms, but the orientation of the gastrojejunal anastomosis is equally important to facilitate the emptying of the gastric pouch.
Scarce data can be found in the literature --a case report (1) and a case series (2) with a number of limitations. It is not possible to determine a critical excess length of Roux limb at which symptoms would become evident, nor were we able to determine whether all patients, or just a small minority, would develop symptoms, even with a seemingly excessive Roux limb.
Patients who underwent a gastric bypass technique with a gastrojejunal anastomosis using a circular stapler seem to be more likely to develop this anomaly. All 3 patients described by Cottam et al. (2) have their primary procedure performed by means of a circular stapler.
A long, non-functional Roux limb tip may cause persistent nausea, postprandial epigastric pain, and even a lack of satiety. Surgeons should attempt to minimize redundancy in the Roux limb during the primary procedure. Limiting the length and orientating the Roux limb to aid in gravity and drainage during the initial operation may prevent this syndrome.
References:
1. Dallal RM, Cottam D. "Candy cane" Roux syndrome--a possible complication after gastric bypass surgery. Surg Obes Relat Dis 2007;3:408-10.
2. Romero-Mejía C, Camacho-Aguilera JF, Paipilla-Monroy O. "Candy cane" Roux syndrome in laparoscopic gastric by-pass. Cir Cir 2010;78:347-51.
L Marx, M Nedelcu, M Vix, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1523 views
10 likes
0 comments
05:57
Laparoscopic and endoscopic treatment of a complicated candy cane syndrome after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
A “Candy Cane” Roux syndrome represents an excessive length of non-functional Roux limb proximal to the gastrojejunostomy, which can cause abnormal upper gastrointestinal symptoms of postprandial epigastric discomfort that is relieved by vomiting. Symptoms of reflux, loss of satiety, and nausea are also common. The length of the blind loop is the essential factor to explain these symptoms, but the orientation of the gastrojejunal anastomosis is equally important to facilitate the emptying of the gastric pouch.
Scarce data can be found in the literature --a case report (1) and a case series (2) with a number of limitations. It is not possible to determine a critical excess length of Roux limb at which symptoms would become evident, nor were we able to determine whether all patients, or just a small minority, would develop symptoms, even with a seemingly excessive Roux limb.
Patients who underwent a gastric bypass technique with a gastrojejunal anastomosis using a circular stapler seem to be more likely to develop this anomaly. All 3 patients described by Cottam et al. (2) have their primary procedure performed by means of a circular stapler.
A long, non-functional Roux limb tip may cause persistent nausea, postprandial epigastric pain, and even a lack of satiety. Surgeons should attempt to minimize redundancy in the Roux limb during the primary procedure. Limiting the length and orientating the Roux limb to aid in gravity and drainage during the initial operation may prevent this syndrome.
References:
1. Dallal RM, Cottam D. "Candy cane" Roux syndrome--a possible complication after gastric bypass surgery. Surg Obes Relat Dis 2007;3:408-10.
2. Romero-Mejía C, Camacho-Aguilera JF, Paipilla-Monroy O. "Candy cane" Roux syndrome in laparoscopic gastric by-pass. Cir Cir 2010;78:347-51.
Metabolic/bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes
In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Buchwald focuses on metabolic and bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes.
Through a valuable account of the historical evolution of the concept of metabolic surgery, Dr. Henry Buchwald, Professor of surgery and biomedical engineering as well as Owen and Sarah Davidson Wangensteen Chair in Experimental Surgery Emeritus at the University of Minnesota shows us the important role that different surgical procedures, both bariatric and non-bariatric, have played in the treatment of diverse metabolic pathologies, especially in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, emphasizing the rich and intense research activity which has generated this progress and the future of surgery in the treatment of chronic metabolic diseases.
H Buchwald
Lecture
3 months ago
180 views
0 likes
0 comments
23:01
Metabolic/bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes
In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Buchwald focuses on metabolic and bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes.
Through a valuable account of the historical evolution of the concept of metabolic surgery, Dr. Henry Buchwald, Professor of surgery and biomedical engineering as well as Owen and Sarah Davidson Wangensteen Chair in Experimental Surgery Emeritus at the University of Minnesota shows us the important role that different surgical procedures, both bariatric and non-bariatric, have played in the treatment of diverse metabolic pathologies, especially in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, emphasizing the rich and intense research activity which has generated this progress and the future of surgery in the treatment of chronic metabolic diseases.
Repair of distal esophageal perforation (Boerhaave’s syndrome) by left thoracoscopy with the patient in prone position
Background: Boerhaave’s syndrome is an emergency disease related to a high risk of mortality and morbidity. Surgical treatment is usually performed by thoracotomy or thoracoscopy with the patient in lateral position. The authors report a patient with a distal esophageal perforation treated by left thoracoscopy in prone position.

Clinical case: A 44-year-old man was admitted to our emergency room following a 14-hour episode of vomiting and hematemesis. Preoperative work-up evidenced a perforation of the distal esophagus on the left side, associated with a pneumomediastinum. The patient underwent a left thoracoscopy in a prone position, after induction of general anesthesia using a Carlens-type double lumen tube. Three trocars of 5mm, 10mm, and 5mm, were placed in the 5th, 7th, and 10th intercostal spaces respectively. Exploration of the chest cavity revealed the presence of free liquid and fibrin, with no evidence of esophageal perforation. However, the esophageal perforation was demonstrated after dissection of the mediastinal pleura, and appeared to be 2cm in length. A nasogastric tube was advanced into the stomach under visual control, and an additional trocarless grasper was placed in the 10th intercostal space to improve exposure. The esophagus perforation was closed using 2/0 silk interrupted sutures, with a reinforcement patch using the inferior pulmonary ligament. The cavity was cleansed and the 5mm trocar was replaced with a chest tube in the 10th intercostal space, with its tip close to the suture.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and no significant operative bleeding was noted. The patient was admitted to hospital in the Intensive Care Unit and extubated after 24 hours. A chest tube was placed in the right chest after 10 days for a pleural effusion, and a pericardial drain was placed after 16 days for pericardial tamponade. A gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 10 revealed a residual sinus at the site of the perforation. Another gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 20 was negative for leakage. The patient was discharged after 32 days.

Conclusions: Esophageal perforation can be treated by thoracoscopy with the patient placed in a prone position as access is facilitated by the effect of gravity on the cardiopulmonary organs. The success of the primary suture depends on the timing between the incident and the treatment; however, morbidity remains high.
G Dapri, S Carandina, L Gerard, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
3055 views
60 likes
0 comments
07:11
Repair of distal esophageal perforation (Boerhaave’s syndrome) by left thoracoscopy with the patient in prone position
Background: Boerhaave’s syndrome is an emergency disease related to a high risk of mortality and morbidity. Surgical treatment is usually performed by thoracotomy or thoracoscopy with the patient in lateral position. The authors report a patient with a distal esophageal perforation treated by left thoracoscopy in prone position.

Clinical case: A 44-year-old man was admitted to our emergency room following a 14-hour episode of vomiting and hematemesis. Preoperative work-up evidenced a perforation of the distal esophagus on the left side, associated with a pneumomediastinum. The patient underwent a left thoracoscopy in a prone position, after induction of general anesthesia using a Carlens-type double lumen tube. Three trocars of 5mm, 10mm, and 5mm, were placed in the 5th, 7th, and 10th intercostal spaces respectively. Exploration of the chest cavity revealed the presence of free liquid and fibrin, with no evidence of esophageal perforation. However, the esophageal perforation was demonstrated after dissection of the mediastinal pleura, and appeared to be 2cm in length. A nasogastric tube was advanced into the stomach under visual control, and an additional trocarless grasper was placed in the 10th intercostal space to improve exposure. The esophagus perforation was closed using 2/0 silk interrupted sutures, with a reinforcement patch using the inferior pulmonary ligament. The cavity was cleansed and the 5mm trocar was replaced with a chest tube in the 10th intercostal space, with its tip close to the suture.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and no significant operative bleeding was noted. The patient was admitted to hospital in the Intensive Care Unit and extubated after 24 hours. A chest tube was placed in the right chest after 10 days for a pleural effusion, and a pericardial drain was placed after 16 days for pericardial tamponade. A gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 10 revealed a residual sinus at the site of the perforation. Another gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 20 was negative for leakage. The patient was discharged after 32 days.

Conclusions: Esophageal perforation can be treated by thoracoscopy with the patient placed in a prone position as access is facilitated by the effect of gravity on the cardiopulmonary organs. The success of the primary suture depends on the timing between the incident and the treatment; however, morbidity remains high.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
3521 views
7 likes
0 comments
13:26
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
D Kadoche, M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
804 views
5 likes
0 comments
08:22
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Laparoscopic total colectomy for T4N0M0 right colonic cancer and Lynch syndrome
The authors demonstrate their technique of laparoscopic total colectomy indicated for T3 tumors of the right transverse colon in a 40-year-old man with a family history of Lynch syndrome. Colonoscopy performed 3 years earlier ruled out the presence of polyps. Due to the tumor's invasiveness and the necessity to perform repeated endoscopic monitoring, it was decided to perform a total colectomy. The intervention is begun to the right and is completed to the left making sure to avoid any tumor manipulation. The different steps of the procedure are clearly outlined with images of outstanding quality. The vascular approach, especially to the right along the superior mesenteric axis, is beautifully exposed.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
6106 views
115 likes
0 comments
28:29
Laparoscopic total colectomy for T4N0M0 right colonic cancer and Lynch syndrome
The authors demonstrate their technique of laparoscopic total colectomy indicated for T3 tumors of the right transverse colon in a 40-year-old man with a family history of Lynch syndrome. Colonoscopy performed 3 years earlier ruled out the presence of polyps. Due to the tumor's invasiveness and the necessity to perform repeated endoscopic monitoring, it was decided to perform a total colectomy. The intervention is begun to the right and is completed to the left making sure to avoid any tumor manipulation. The different steps of the procedure are clearly outlined with images of outstanding quality. The vascular approach, especially to the right along the superior mesenteric axis, is beautifully exposed.
Laparoscopic management of Mirizzi syndrome
The surgical management of acute cholecystitis continues to be a matter of personal choice. At our institution, we perform early laparoscopic cholecystectomy electively after treatment with intravenous fluids and antibiotics.
We present the case of a 35-year-old man who was admitted with a history of pain in the right upper abdomen for one day. He was managed with analgesics, intravenous fluids, and antibiotics. Despite relief from pain with aggressive medical therapy, he developed jaundice. An ultrasound examination confirmed a small stone impacted in the neck of the gallbladder and non-dilated biliary radicles. In view of increased serum bilirubin, the patient was scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed a gangrenous gallbladder with dilated cystic and common bile ducts. Intraoperative cholangiogram showed a suspicious filling defect at the lower end of the common bile duct. The ureteric catheter was therefore left indwelling and removed after one month.
Aa Rai, R Singh, S Rai, Sa Rai
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
6301 views
102 likes
0 comments
16:58
Laparoscopic management of Mirizzi syndrome
The surgical management of acute cholecystitis continues to be a matter of personal choice. At our institution, we perform early laparoscopic cholecystectomy electively after treatment with intravenous fluids and antibiotics.
We present the case of a 35-year-old man who was admitted with a history of pain in the right upper abdomen for one day. He was managed with analgesics, intravenous fluids, and antibiotics. Despite relief from pain with aggressive medical therapy, he developed jaundice. An ultrasound examination confirmed a small stone impacted in the neck of the gallbladder and non-dilated biliary radicles. In view of increased serum bilirubin, the patient was scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed a gangrenous gallbladder with dilated cystic and common bile ducts. Intraoperative cholangiogram showed a suspicious filling defect at the lower end of the common bile duct. The ureteric catheter was therefore left indwelling and removed after one month.
Laparoscopic appendectomy for recurrent appendicitis after medical treatment
Appendectomy is the only curative treatment of appendicitis. However, the management of patients with an appendiceal mass or abscess can be temporarily managed medically with intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or percutaneous drainage. And yet, there are many controversies over the non-operative management of acute appendicitis. In 2015, Fair et al. used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project to evaluate 30-day morbidity and mortality of intervention (laparoscopic and open appendectomy) at different time periods. A delay of operative intervention longer than 48 hours was associated with a doubling of complication rates. Elective appendectomy can be performed after 6 to 8 weeks later, which proves successful in the vast majority of patients.
This is the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with an acute appendicitis treated medically in another hospital. The patient had a past medical history of arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathy, previous cerebral ischemia, and rectal polyp. A delayed appendectomy was planned. However, before the procedure, a total colonoscopy was performed because of the history of polyps. This elderly patient was hospitalized for colonoscopy. At admission, he presented with fever, right iliac fossa tenderness, and a biological inflammatory syndrome. A CT-scan was performed. It showed a recurrent acute appendicitis without mass, with a 2cm abscess on the tip of the appendix. An appendectomy was performed in this case.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5383 views
343 likes
0 comments
05:00
Laparoscopic appendectomy for recurrent appendicitis after medical treatment
Appendectomy is the only curative treatment of appendicitis. However, the management of patients with an appendiceal mass or abscess can be temporarily managed medically with intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or percutaneous drainage. And yet, there are many controversies over the non-operative management of acute appendicitis. In 2015, Fair et al. used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project to evaluate 30-day morbidity and mortality of intervention (laparoscopic and open appendectomy) at different time periods. A delay of operative intervention longer than 48 hours was associated with a doubling of complication rates. Elective appendectomy can be performed after 6 to 8 weeks later, which proves successful in the vast majority of patients.
This is the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with an acute appendicitis treated medically in another hospital. The patient had a past medical history of arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathy, previous cerebral ischemia, and rectal polyp. A delayed appendectomy was planned. However, before the procedure, a total colonoscopy was performed because of the history of polyps. This elderly patient was hospitalized for colonoscopy. At admission, he presented with fever, right iliac fossa tenderness, and a biological inflammatory syndrome. A CT-scan was performed. It showed a recurrent acute appendicitis without mass, with a 2cm abscess on the tip of the appendix. An appendectomy was performed in this case.
Laparoscopic duodenal derotation due to superior mesenteric artery syndrome
Introduction: Wilkie’s Syndrome, also called the Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome (SMA) is a clinical entity characterized by compression of the 3rd portion of the duodenum between the aorta and the emergence of the SMA. It is a rare cause of duodenal obstruction with around 400 cases reported in the literature.
Methods: this video illustrates the case of a 50 year-old patient with a history of ankylosing spondylitis and cholecystectomy by laparotomy. She was admitted at the Emergency Room with a story suggestive of high intestinal obstruction. During hospitalization, a CT-scan was performed suggesting the existence of a mesenteric clamp. This etiology was confirmed after evaluation of the abdomen with Magnetic Resonance Imaging the next day.
Results: the patient was subjected to a laparoscopic duodenal derotation, with resolution of clinical symptoms.
Conclusions: duodenal derotation can be sufficient to treat this pathology. The laparoscopic approach, when performed by an experienced laparoscopic surgeon and using the same principles of laparotomy, should be preferred. It allows a better visualization of anatomical structures and a better patient recovery.
M Nora, G Gonçalves, T Ferreira
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
3807 views
62 likes
0 comments
06:57
Laparoscopic duodenal derotation due to superior mesenteric artery syndrome
Introduction: Wilkie’s Syndrome, also called the Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome (SMA) is a clinical entity characterized by compression of the 3rd portion of the duodenum between the aorta and the emergence of the SMA. It is a rare cause of duodenal obstruction with around 400 cases reported in the literature.
Methods: this video illustrates the case of a 50 year-old patient with a history of ankylosing spondylitis and cholecystectomy by laparotomy. She was admitted at the Emergency Room with a story suggestive of high intestinal obstruction. During hospitalization, a CT-scan was performed suggesting the existence of a mesenteric clamp. This etiology was confirmed after evaluation of the abdomen with Magnetic Resonance Imaging the next day.
Results: the patient was subjected to a laparoscopic duodenal derotation, with resolution of clinical symptoms.
Conclusions: duodenal derotation can be sufficient to treat this pathology. The laparoscopic approach, when performed by an experienced laparoscopic surgeon and using the same principles of laparotomy, should be preferred. It allows a better visualization of anatomical structures and a better patient recovery.
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
JB Dubuisson
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5395 views
588 likes
0 comments
08:01
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
Large intradiverticulum endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy
Periampullary duodenal diverticula are observed in 10-20% of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and could well increase ampulla cannulation failure risk, as well as potential complications related to endoscopic sphincterotomy.
Here we report two successful cases of large intradiverticular endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy in the treatment of two different kinds of benign biliary pathologies. The first case was that of a woman with multiple large stones in the common bile duct (CBD). The second case was one of a male patient with cholestasis due to a compression of the distal common bile duct caused by a diverticulum – this condition being known as Lemmel’s syndrome.
Gf Donatelli, L Marx, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1372 views
77 likes
0 comments
05:09
Large intradiverticulum endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy
Periampullary duodenal diverticula are observed in 10-20% of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and could well increase ampulla cannulation failure risk, as well as potential complications related to endoscopic sphincterotomy.
Here we report two successful cases of large intradiverticular endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy in the treatment of two different kinds of benign biliary pathologies. The first case was that of a woman with multiple large stones in the common bile duct (CBD). The second case was one of a male patient with cholestasis due to a compression of the distal common bile duct caused by a diverticulum – this condition being known as Lemmel’s syndrome.
Ulnar impaction syndrome
Ulno-carpal impaction syndrome is often secondary to the sequels of a fracture of the distal radius.
The inversion of the distal radio-ulnar index with a positive ulnar variance by shortening relative to the radius eventually leads to an abutment between the head of the ulna and the proximal articular face of the lunate. This contact leads to the alteration of the cartilaginous carpal surfaces. There are numerous treatments for the distal radio-ulnar component of malunion of distal radius fracture and the choice of therapy is based on specific evaluation of this joint through a clinical and radiological analysis.
Arthroscopy remains the best diagnostic element in evaluating the seriousness of the ulno-carpal abutment with a direct visualization of the cartilaginous lesions and allowing a precise assessment of the associated lesions, in particular on TFCC or LT ligament. When the inversion of the distal radio-ulnar index is less than or equal to 5mm, the surgical treatment can also be carried out by arthroscopy.
JR Haugstvedt
Lecture
9 years ago
391 views
6 likes
0 comments
10:08
Ulnar impaction syndrome
Ulno-carpal impaction syndrome is often secondary to the sequels of a fracture of the distal radius.
The inversion of the distal radio-ulnar index with a positive ulnar variance by shortening relative to the radius eventually leads to an abutment between the head of the ulna and the proximal articular face of the lunate. This contact leads to the alteration of the cartilaginous carpal surfaces. There are numerous treatments for the distal radio-ulnar component of malunion of distal radius fracture and the choice of therapy is based on specific evaluation of this joint through a clinical and radiological analysis.
Arthroscopy remains the best diagnostic element in evaluating the seriousness of the ulno-carpal abutment with a direct visualization of the cartilaginous lesions and allowing a precise assessment of the associated lesions, in particular on TFCC or LT ligament. When the inversion of the distal radio-ulnar index is less than or equal to 5mm, the surgical treatment can also be carried out by arthroscopy.
The vascular hitch: a simpler procedure for vascular pyeloureteral junction obstruction (PUJO)
Ureteropelvic junction obstruction may occur in about 10% of cases, the origin of which is not an intrinsic organic obstruction in this transitional area between the renal pelvis and the ureter, but it is rather secondary to an extrinsic obstruction, related to the presence of aberrant lower pole vessels.
It is an intermittent ureteropelvic junction obstruction syndrome, which is usually diagnosed late and in which renal function is most often preserved. The operating technique was already described more than 60 years ago. It is a simple technique.
The greatest difficulty is not technical but lies in the indication which must be relevant. The main difficulty is to preoperatively and intraoperatively evaluate either the totally extrinsic nature or conversely the mixed nature of the obstruction, which in that case requires a pyeloplasty according to Anderson-Hynes with division of the ureterovesical junction posteriorly to the vessels and reconstruction of the ureteropelvic junction once enlarged, anteriorly to the lower pole vessels.
I Mushtaq
Lecture
3 years ago
567 views
32 likes
0 comments
13:17
The vascular hitch: a simpler procedure for vascular pyeloureteral junction obstruction (PUJO)
Ureteropelvic junction obstruction may occur in about 10% of cases, the origin of which is not an intrinsic organic obstruction in this transitional area between the renal pelvis and the ureter, but it is rather secondary to an extrinsic obstruction, related to the presence of aberrant lower pole vessels.
It is an intermittent ureteropelvic junction obstruction syndrome, which is usually diagnosed late and in which renal function is most often preserved. The operating technique was already described more than 60 years ago. It is a simple technique.
The greatest difficulty is not technical but lies in the indication which must be relevant. The main difficulty is to preoperatively and intraoperatively evaluate either the totally extrinsic nature or conversely the mixed nature of the obstruction, which in that case requires a pyeloplasty according to Anderson-Hynes with division of the ureterovesical junction posteriorly to the vessels and reconstruction of the ureteropelvic junction once enlarged, anteriorly to the lower pole vessels.
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, A Host
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
4155 views
162 likes
0 comments
31:22
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
C Peillon, G Philouze, JM Baste
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
622 views
15 likes
1 comment
09:09
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for phlegmonous acute cholecystitis
This video demonstrates the early surgical management of a 3-day history of acute cholecystitis in an 83-year-old patient. This patient was admitted to the emergency department for epigastric and right hypochondrium pain, without any other symptoms. Clinically, the patient presented with a localized abdominal guarding; Murphy’s sign was positive. Blood chemistries demonstrated the presence of an inflammatory syndrome and liver function tests were normal. The ultrasound exam confirmed the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. A laparoscopic cholecystectomy was decided upon. The postoperative outcome was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the gold standard for the early treatment of acute cholecystitis with an onset of symptoms less than 72 hours (Tokyo Guidelines 2013, recommendation 1, grade A).
O Perotto, H Jeddou, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
7084 views
273 likes
0 comments
10:57
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for phlegmonous acute cholecystitis
This video demonstrates the early surgical management of a 3-day history of acute cholecystitis in an 83-year-old patient. This patient was admitted to the emergency department for epigastric and right hypochondrium pain, without any other symptoms. Clinically, the patient presented with a localized abdominal guarding; Murphy’s sign was positive. Blood chemistries demonstrated the presence of an inflammatory syndrome and liver function tests were normal. The ultrasound exam confirmed the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. A laparoscopic cholecystectomy was decided upon. The postoperative outcome was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the gold standard for the early treatment of acute cholecystitis with an onset of symptoms less than 72 hours (Tokyo Guidelines 2013, recommendation 1, grade A).
Diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic common bile duct stones following cholecystectomy by means of EUS and ERCP
A post-cholecystectomy syndrome is a well-known condition, which includes dyspepsia and biliary-like abdominal pain coupled with deterioration of liver enzymes. Biliary factors responsible for a post-cholecystectomy syndrome could be the following: biliary iatrogenic duct strictures, retained stones in the common bile duct (CBD), cystic stump, or even a gallbladder remnant.
The diagnosis of stones is difficult to establish considering that even trans-abdominal ultrasonography has a diagnostic sensitivity of only 27%. Conversely, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a very useful tool to diagnose stones in such situations, allowing to perform subsequent ERCP and stone extraction during the same anesthetic session. Here, we report the case of a 69-year-old man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and who was referred to us after 24 hours of abdominal colic pain and cholestasis. He underwent EUS, which diagnosed residual common bile duct stones. As a result, treatment was performed by means of ERCP during the same session.
Gf Donatelli, F Cereatti, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1543 views
62 likes
0 comments
03:26
Diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic common bile duct stones following cholecystectomy by means of EUS and ERCP
A post-cholecystectomy syndrome is a well-known condition, which includes dyspepsia and biliary-like abdominal pain coupled with deterioration of liver enzymes. Biliary factors responsible for a post-cholecystectomy syndrome could be the following: biliary iatrogenic duct strictures, retained stones in the common bile duct (CBD), cystic stump, or even a gallbladder remnant.
The diagnosis of stones is difficult to establish considering that even trans-abdominal ultrasonography has a diagnostic sensitivity of only 27%. Conversely, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a very useful tool to diagnose stones in such situations, allowing to perform subsequent ERCP and stone extraction during the same anesthetic session. Here, we report the case of a 69-year-old man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and who was referred to us after 24 hours of abdominal colic pain and cholestasis. He underwent EUS, which diagnosed residual common bile duct stones. As a result, treatment was performed by means of ERCP during the same session.
Laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release
The video demonstrates the case of a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release for a patient presenting with median arcuate ligament syndrome. This is a 37-year-old woman who was admitted to our clinic with complaints of intermittent abdominal pain, especially with meals, for 3 years’ duration. Her physical examination was unremarkable, except for an epigastric bruit detected on auscultation. Investigations included a duplex ultrasound, which showed increased hemodynamic velocities in the celiac trunk. In addition, CT-angiogram of the abdomen revealed an 80% luminal narrowing and extrinsic compression of the celiac artery at its origin. Her symptoms could be a result of foregut ischemia caused by the vessel’s narrowing. A potential anatomical factor contributing to extrinsic compression is the median arcuate ligament. This video explains our operative approach and technique used to dissect the esophagus at the hiatus, creating a subsequent pathway to identify the median arcuate ligament inferiorly and transect it down to the level of the celiac trunk’s origin. This will allow for relief of the external vascular compression and increased blood flow to the foregut and relief of her abdominal pain. Postoperatively, the patient had complete resolution of her abdominal symptoms.
N De La Cruz-Munoz, K Mohammad
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1532 views
37 likes
0 comments
13:19
Laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release
The video demonstrates the case of a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release for a patient presenting with median arcuate ligament syndrome. This is a 37-year-old woman who was admitted to our clinic with complaints of intermittent abdominal pain, especially with meals, for 3 years’ duration. Her physical examination was unremarkable, except for an epigastric bruit detected on auscultation. Investigations included a duplex ultrasound, which showed increased hemodynamic velocities in the celiac trunk. In addition, CT-angiogram of the abdomen revealed an 80% luminal narrowing and extrinsic compression of the celiac artery at its origin. Her symptoms could be a result of foregut ischemia caused by the vessel’s narrowing. A potential anatomical factor contributing to extrinsic compression is the median arcuate ligament. This video explains our operative approach and technique used to dissect the esophagus at the hiatus, creating a subsequent pathway to identify the median arcuate ligament inferiorly and transect it down to the level of the celiac trunk’s origin. This will allow for relief of the external vascular compression and increased blood flow to the foregut and relief of her abdominal pain. Postoperatively, the patient had complete resolution of her abdominal symptoms.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass redo after sleeve gastrectomy associated with intrathoracic sleeve migration
Sleeve gastrectomy is a standard procedure in bariatric surgery nowadays. However, common contraindications involve the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese female patient with a past surgical history of a Nissen fundoplication reversed in 2012 because of dysphagia. A sleeve gastrectomy had been performed 2 years ago complicated by an intrathoracic migration and gastric twist as discovered in the preoperative control followed by dysphagia, reflux, and vomiting. A conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has been decided upon.
L Marx, S Tzedakis, HA Mercoli, S Perretta, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1689 views
47 likes
1 comment
09:21
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass redo after sleeve gastrectomy associated with intrathoracic sleeve migration
Sleeve gastrectomy is a standard procedure in bariatric surgery nowadays. However, common contraindications involve the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese female patient with a past surgical history of a Nissen fundoplication reversed in 2012 because of dysphagia. A sleeve gastrectomy had been performed 2 years ago complicated by an intrathoracic migration and gastric twist as discovered in the preoperative control followed by dysphagia, reflux, and vomiting. A conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has been decided upon.