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Robot-assisted left video thoracoscopic partial thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma
This film presents the case of an 85-year-old man who suffered from primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed on a pathological cervical fracture and elevated laboratory values for parathyroid hormone and calcium. Preoperative localizing studies showed no anomalies on the parathyroid gland. However, a left anterior mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma was found on 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenomas can be resected in a minimally invasive fashion via a conventional transcervical approach, or using a video-assisted thoracoscopic resection, allowing for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) also allows for a better visualization and less instrument crowding, with no difference in clinical results.
Considering the good efficacy and the better chances not to leave tumor tissue missed out during surgery, and the impossibility to install the patient with cervical hyperextension, we decided to perform a robot-assisted thoracoscopy through a left-sided approach, instead of the conventional transcervical approach.
During the intraoperative period, the adenoma was identified, and we did not feel the need to perform PTH assay. There were no complications in the postoperative period. PTH levels reached a normal range after adenoma removal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He remains asymptomatic at 3 months after the intervention.
The robotic resection of an intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional transcervical approach.
JM Baste, M Dazza, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1063 views
29 likes
0 comments
06:54
Robot-assisted left video thoracoscopic partial thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma
This film presents the case of an 85-year-old man who suffered from primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed on a pathological cervical fracture and elevated laboratory values for parathyroid hormone and calcium. Preoperative localizing studies showed no anomalies on the parathyroid gland. However, a left anterior mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma was found on 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenomas can be resected in a minimally invasive fashion via a conventional transcervical approach, or using a video-assisted thoracoscopic resection, allowing for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) also allows for a better visualization and less instrument crowding, with no difference in clinical results.
Considering the good efficacy and the better chances not to leave tumor tissue missed out during surgery, and the impossibility to install the patient with cervical hyperextension, we decided to perform a robot-assisted thoracoscopy through a left-sided approach, instead of the conventional transcervical approach.
During the intraoperative period, the adenoma was identified, and we did not feel the need to perform PTH assay. There were no complications in the postoperative period. PTH levels reached a normal range after adenoma removal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He remains asymptomatic at 3 months after the intervention.
The robotic resection of an intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional transcervical approach.
Video-assisted parathyroidectomy using augmented reality
The effectiveness of preoperative imaging to detect parathyroid adenomas allows for a targeted minimally invasive video-assisted approach. In our department, at the IRCAD, special software is used to virtually reconstruct the neck and its structures from mere CT-scan images of the cervicomediastinal region. This virtual reconstruction helps to precisely define the location of the parathyroid adenoma in relation to the superior part of the sternum, to the inferior thyroid artery and to the thyroid gland, hence guiding the surgeon in the proper identification of anatomical landmarks.
The reconstruction also helps to control the absence of "non-recurrent" recurrent nerves showing the presence of a right brachiocephalic arterial trunk.
M Vix, HA Mercoli, L Soler, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1329 views
17 likes
0 comments
06:14
Video-assisted parathyroidectomy using augmented reality
The effectiveness of preoperative imaging to detect parathyroid adenomas allows for a targeted minimally invasive video-assisted approach. In our department, at the IRCAD, special software is used to virtually reconstruct the neck and its structures from mere CT-scan images of the cervicomediastinal region. This virtual reconstruction helps to precisely define the location of the parathyroid adenoma in relation to the superior part of the sternum, to the inferior thyroid artery and to the thyroid gland, hence guiding the surgeon in the proper identification of anatomical landmarks.
The reconstruction also helps to control the absence of "non-recurrent" recurrent nerves showing the presence of a right brachiocephalic arterial trunk.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic total gastrectomy highlighting esophagojejunal anastomosis
This video presents the case of a 71-year-old man with a BMI of 29. He was admitted to the emergency room for fatigue, severe anemia, and abdominal pain. His past medical history was significant for cardiac disease, aortic valve stenosis, and small adrenal adenoma. His past surgical history included a cholecystectomy and a prostatectomy. Work-up started with an endoscopy which showed an ulcer at the antrum, which was biopsied and showed signet cell adenocarcinoma. CT-scan confirmed the presence of a large bulky lesion and ruled out the presence of a metastatic disease. The patient was admitted again for bleeding and hematemesis and he was scheduled for a total gastrectomy. He had an exploratory laparoscopy which showed no signs of carcinomatosis. He also had preoperative chemotherapy.
This live interactive video demonstrates a robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including a stepwise lymphadenectomy and precise thorough description of esophagojejunal anastomosis.
WJ Hyung, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2843 views
16 likes
0 comments
04:27
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic total gastrectomy highlighting esophagojejunal anastomosis
This video presents the case of a 71-year-old man with a BMI of 29. He was admitted to the emergency room for fatigue, severe anemia, and abdominal pain. His past medical history was significant for cardiac disease, aortic valve stenosis, and small adrenal adenoma. His past surgical history included a cholecystectomy and a prostatectomy. Work-up started with an endoscopy which showed an ulcer at the antrum, which was biopsied and showed signet cell adenocarcinoma. CT-scan confirmed the presence of a large bulky lesion and ruled out the presence of a metastatic disease. The patient was admitted again for bleeding and hematemesis and he was scheduled for a total gastrectomy. He had an exploratory laparoscopy which showed no signs of carcinomatosis. He also had preoperative chemotherapy.
This live interactive video demonstrates a robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including a stepwise lymphadenectomy and precise thorough description of esophagojejunal anastomosis.
Primary hyperparathyroidism cure using 3D CT-scan reconstruction
Parathyroid surgery has largely benefited from advances in preoperative imaging modalities allowing to determine potential adenomas. Conventionally, ultrasonography and scintigraphy with 99mTc-sestamibi (MIBI) provide sufficient information to guide the surgical procedure. Specific software has been developed at the IRCAD to allow for the 3D reconstruction of the entire cervical structures. The handling of such reconstruction helps to perform a precise preoperative assessment. Arterial reconstruction allows to predict the existence of an arteria lusoria and of a non-recurrent recurrent nerve. In this case, the position of a potential adenoma in relation to the inferior thyroid artery allows to anticipate that it is not an adenoma but a thyroid nodule. A second potential target is visualized inferiorly. These two potential locations will be explored during the video-assisted surgical intervention.
M Vix, J D'Agostino, L Soler, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
4875 views
6 likes
1 comment
05:46
Primary hyperparathyroidism cure using 3D CT-scan reconstruction
Parathyroid surgery has largely benefited from advances in preoperative imaging modalities allowing to determine potential adenomas. Conventionally, ultrasonography and scintigraphy with 99mTc-sestamibi (MIBI) provide sufficient information to guide the surgical procedure. Specific software has been developed at the IRCAD to allow for the 3D reconstruction of the entire cervical structures. The handling of such reconstruction helps to perform a precise preoperative assessment. Arterial reconstruction allows to predict the existence of an arteria lusoria and of a non-recurrent recurrent nerve. In this case, the position of a potential adenoma in relation to the inferior thyroid artery allows to anticipate that it is not an adenoma but a thyroid nodule. A second potential target is visualized inferiorly. These two potential locations will be explored during the video-assisted surgical intervention.
Totally endoscopic left hemithyroidectomy: axillary approach for papillary carcinoma, including a critical analysis by M Vix, MD, and point by point answer by Dr. Shah
Introduction:
Endoscopic thyroidectomy is a novel approach used to avoid cervical scar, which represents sequelae of conventional thyroidectomies. This technique is feasible providing equal results under expert hands.
Case presentation:
This is the case of a 20 year-old woman with cervical swelling, a 3 by 3cm solitary nodule in the left thyroid lobe, which was evaluated clinically, radiologically, and withfine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). She was diagnosed with a low-risk papillary carcinoma.
Discussion:
The patient underwent an endoscopic transaxillary left hemithyroidectomy under general anesthesia. The recurrent laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid gland were preserved. The patient was discharged with a normal tone on postoperative day 1.
Conclusion:
Endoscopic transaxillary thyroidectomy is a feasible good technique with equal results, which can be considered for patients with small thyroid lesions. Conventional laparoscopic instruments are used without the need for extra instrumentation.

This video is commented upon by Dr. M Vix, MD (University Hospital, Strasbourg, France), providing a comprehensive outline of Dr. Shah's original technique.


Point by point answer by Dr. Shah:

1. Carbon dioxide causing surgical emphysema, especially of an incapacitating nature, has not been experienced since intracavitary pressures are generally maintained at a low level by the almost continuous low-grade suction used throughout the surgery.

2. In our experience, adequate visualization of the thyroid pedicles in close proximity to the gland precludes the need for a deeper and more lateral dissection to identify the jugulocarotid vessels. This potentially decreases the risk of a major vascular mishap.

3. As is the norm with open thyroidectomy, division of the superior thyroid pedicle close to the gland usually does not require the identification of the superior laryngeal nerve.

4. In this approach, the recurrent laryngeal nerve is identified very early on in the dissection. Subsequent dissection is performed in a plane anterior to the visualized nerve, hence preventing any injuries. The recurrent laryngeal nerve is visualized in its entire extent up to Berry's ligament.



AR Shah
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1248 views
117 likes
0 comments
11:09
Totally endoscopic left hemithyroidectomy: axillary approach for papillary carcinoma, including a critical analysis by M Vix, MD, and point by point answer by Dr. Shah
Introduction:
Endoscopic thyroidectomy is a novel approach used to avoid cervical scar, which represents sequelae of conventional thyroidectomies. This technique is feasible providing equal results under expert hands.
Case presentation:
This is the case of a 20 year-old woman with cervical swelling, a 3 by 3cm solitary nodule in the left thyroid lobe, which was evaluated clinically, radiologically, and withfine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). She was diagnosed with a low-risk papillary carcinoma.
Discussion:
The patient underwent an endoscopic transaxillary left hemithyroidectomy under general anesthesia. The recurrent laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid gland were preserved. The patient was discharged with a normal tone on postoperative day 1.
Conclusion:
Endoscopic transaxillary thyroidectomy is a feasible good technique with equal results, which can be considered for patients with small thyroid lesions. Conventional laparoscopic instruments are used without the need for extra instrumentation.

This video is commented upon by Dr. M Vix, MD (University Hospital, Strasbourg, France), providing a comprehensive outline of Dr. Shah's original technique.


Point by point answer by Dr. Shah:

1. Carbon dioxide causing surgical emphysema, especially of an incapacitating nature, has not been experienced since intracavitary pressures are generally maintained at a low level by the almost continuous low-grade suction used throughout the surgery.

2. In our experience, adequate visualization of the thyroid pedicles in close proximity to the gland precludes the need for a deeper and more lateral dissection to identify the jugulocarotid vessels. This potentially decreases the risk of a major vascular mishap.

3. As is the norm with open thyroidectomy, division of the superior thyroid pedicle close to the gland usually does not require the identification of the superior laryngeal nerve.

4. In this approach, the recurrent laryngeal nerve is identified very early on in the dissection. Subsequent dissection is performed in a plane anterior to the visualized nerve, hence preventing any injuries. The recurrent laryngeal nerve is visualized in its entire extent up to Berry's ligament.