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LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
S Morales-Conde, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5759 views
12 likes
0 comments
43:25
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
Low rectal resection with transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) performed with standard laparoscopic instrumentation
This is the case of a 62-year-old woman with rectal bleeding. She underwent a colonoscopy which showed a low rectal adenocarcinoma, 6cm from the anal margin. A CT-scan revealed the absence of metastasis and pelvic MRI showed a cT3N1 tumor.
The patient was treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. She received 50 Gray and capecitabine after which a new MRI showed a partial tumor response. The patient underwent surgery 10 weeks after finishing neoadjuvant therapy.
We started the operation with a laparoscopic abdominal approach. Four ports were placed. Two 10mm ports were introduced in the umbilicus and the right iliac fossa. Two 5mm ports were inserted in the left and right lower quadrant. Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) was performed with a 5mm, 30-degree scope, monopolar hook, and bipolar forceps. The rectum was dissected 1cm distally from the neoplasia. The specimen was extracted transanally. Anastomosis was carried out transanally using a 33mm EEA™ circular stapler, after examination of the frozen section margin. A protective ileostomy was performed through the 10mm port site in the right iliac fossa and a drainage was put in place in the pelvis through the 5mm port entry site into the left flank.
The patient resumed food intake on postoperative day 2 and she was discharged on postoperative day 7. A complete mesorectal excision was confirmed on pathological examination. Fifteen negative nodes were removed. Distal and circumferential margins were negative.
The coloanal anastomosis was controlled with colonoscopy one month later. No sign of leakage was detected, and the ileostomy was subsequently closed.
The patient reports an adequate continence to gas and feces with one or two bowel movements per day. After 15 months of follow-up, the patient is still disease-free.
Our video shows that TaTME is a technique which can be performed by surgeons who have experience in laparoscopic and colorectal surgery.
In our operation, we did not use any energy devices, 3D or 4K technology. This procedure can be performed without expensive equipment.
L Taglietti, G Baronio, L Lussardi, R Cazzaniga, S Dester, A Zanoletti
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
2469 views
7 likes
1 comment
09:56
Low rectal resection with transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) performed with standard laparoscopic instrumentation
This is the case of a 62-year-old woman with rectal bleeding. She underwent a colonoscopy which showed a low rectal adenocarcinoma, 6cm from the anal margin. A CT-scan revealed the absence of metastasis and pelvic MRI showed a cT3N1 tumor.
The patient was treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. She received 50 Gray and capecitabine after which a new MRI showed a partial tumor response. The patient underwent surgery 10 weeks after finishing neoadjuvant therapy.
We started the operation with a laparoscopic abdominal approach. Four ports were placed. Two 10mm ports were introduced in the umbilicus and the right iliac fossa. Two 5mm ports were inserted in the left and right lower quadrant. Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) was performed with a 5mm, 30-degree scope, monopolar hook, and bipolar forceps. The rectum was dissected 1cm distally from the neoplasia. The specimen was extracted transanally. Anastomosis was carried out transanally using a 33mm EEA™ circular stapler, after examination of the frozen section margin. A protective ileostomy was performed through the 10mm port site in the right iliac fossa and a drainage was put in place in the pelvis through the 5mm port entry site into the left flank.
The patient resumed food intake on postoperative day 2 and she was discharged on postoperative day 7. A complete mesorectal excision was confirmed on pathological examination. Fifteen negative nodes were removed. Distal and circumferential margins were negative.
The coloanal anastomosis was controlled with colonoscopy one month later. No sign of leakage was detected, and the ileostomy was subsequently closed.
The patient reports an adequate continence to gas and feces with one or two bowel movements per day. After 15 months of follow-up, the patient is still disease-free.
Our video shows that TaTME is a technique which can be performed by surgeons who have experience in laparoscopic and colorectal surgery.
In our operation, we did not use any energy devices, 3D or 4K technology. This procedure can be performed without expensive equipment.
Laparoscopic en bloc splenopancreatectomy with left adrenalectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The objective of this video is to present a surgical approach to a left adrenal mass caused by the invasion of a pancreatic lesion. A pulmonary lesion was also found. However, a preoperative biopsy of that lesion was impossible to perform. In order to distinguish the primary origin of this lung lesion, a laparoscopic ‘en bloc’ splenopancreatectomy combined with a left adrenalectomy and a para-aortic lymphadenectomy were planned.
Retrograde distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy is the standard procedure for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. In the literature, fewer studies describe the feasibility and the oncological safety of the laparoscopic approach.
This video aims to show the different operative steps of the procedure beginning with laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by distal pancreatectomy and para-aortic lympadenectomy.
R Romito, L Portigliotti, G Bondonno, M Zacchero, A Volpe
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1497 views
11 likes
0 comments
13:28
Laparoscopic en bloc splenopancreatectomy with left adrenalectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The objective of this video is to present a surgical approach to a left adrenal mass caused by the invasion of a pancreatic lesion. A pulmonary lesion was also found. However, a preoperative biopsy of that lesion was impossible to perform. In order to distinguish the primary origin of this lung lesion, a laparoscopic ‘en bloc’ splenopancreatectomy combined with a left adrenalectomy and a para-aortic lymphadenectomy were planned.
Retrograde distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy is the standard procedure for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. In the literature, fewer studies describe the feasibility and the oncological safety of the laparoscopic approach.
This video aims to show the different operative steps of the procedure beginning with laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by distal pancreatectomy and para-aortic lympadenectomy.
Robot-assisted left upper lobectomy for T1N0M0 adenocarcinoma
This is the case of a robotic left upper lobectomy with lymphadenectomy in a woman aged 52 who has had 9 children and who was a regular smoker (50 packs per year). She is presenting with an isolated cT1N0M0 adenocarcinoma in the left upper pulmonary lobe. PET-scan was positive for the lesion without any other pathological finding in the mediastinum or far metastasis. Histology was obtained by CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy.
This minimally invasive technique, assisted by the da Vinci® robotic surgical system, is sure, comfortable, and efficient to perform a pulmonary lobectomy with lymphadenectomy in the early stages of lung cancer.
3D vision and the accuracy of dissection appear to be better than in conventional VATS.
As in VATS lobectomy, hospital stay is reduced to 3-4 days and postoperative pain appears to be more acceptable.
N Santelmo, F Antonacci, G Massard
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
557 views
6 likes
0 comments
11:59
Robot-assisted left upper lobectomy for T1N0M0 adenocarcinoma
This is the case of a robotic left upper lobectomy with lymphadenectomy in a woman aged 52 who has had 9 children and who was a regular smoker (50 packs per year). She is presenting with an isolated cT1N0M0 adenocarcinoma in the left upper pulmonary lobe. PET-scan was positive for the lesion without any other pathological finding in the mediastinum or far metastasis. Histology was obtained by CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy.
This minimally invasive technique, assisted by the da Vinci® robotic surgical system, is sure, comfortable, and efficient to perform a pulmonary lobectomy with lymphadenectomy in the early stages of lung cancer.
3D vision and the accuracy of dissection appear to be better than in conventional VATS.
As in VATS lobectomy, hospital stay is reduced to 3-4 days and postoperative pain appears to be more acceptable.
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, L Arru, F Gheza, M Diana
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
4298 views
11 likes
0 comments
12:41
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for adenocarcinoma
Total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy is recommended for T1-T2 gastric cancer.
The laparoscopic approach for this procedure has been validated by extensive clinical randomized trials in Asia, leading to fewer postoperative complications and morbidity and identical oncological outcome.
This video presents a laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy in a 54-year-old woman presenting with a T1-T2 poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach. Due to the location of the tumor, lymphadenectomy of stations 10 and 11d are not performed. An original technique of circular eso-jejunal anastomosis is described.
A Talvane Torres de Oliveira, C Lacerda, PA Bertulucci
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
5309 views
81 likes
0 comments
25:53
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for adenocarcinoma
Total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy is recommended for T1-T2 gastric cancer.
The laparoscopic approach for this procedure has been validated by extensive clinical randomized trials in Asia, leading to fewer postoperative complications and morbidity and identical oncological outcome.
This video presents a laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy in a 54-year-old woman presenting with a T1-T2 poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach. Due to the location of the tumor, lymphadenectomy of stations 10 and 11d are not performed. An original technique of circular eso-jejunal anastomosis is described.
Completely intracorporeal handsewn laparoscopic anastomoses during Whipple procedure
Background: Since 1935, the Whipple procedure was described, using conventional open surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it was reported to be feasible also using the latest technology. In this video, the authors demonstrate a full laparoscopic Whipple procedure, performing the three anastomoses using an intracorporeal handsewn method.

Video: A 70-year-old man presenting with an adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, infiltrating the pancreatic parenchyma, underwent a laparoscop ic Whipple procedure. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N1M0 tumor.

Results: Total operative time was 8 hours 20minutes; time for the dissection was 6 hours 20 minutes; time for specimen extraction was 20 minutes, and time for the three laparoscopic intracorporeal handsewn anastomoses was 1 hour 40 minutes. Operative bleeding was 350cc. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 9. Pathological findings confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, with perinervous infiltration and lymphovascular emboli, free margins, 2 metastatic lymph nodes on 23 isolated; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4N1.

Conclusions: The laparoscopic Whipple procedure remains an advanced procedure to be performed laparoscopically and/or using open surgery. All the advantages of MIS such as reduced abdominal trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, improved patient’s comfort, and enhanced cosmesis are offered using laparoscopy.
G Dapri, NA Bascombe, L Gerard, C Samaniego Ballar, C Jiménez Viñas
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2980 views
234 likes
1 comment
10:22
Completely intracorporeal handsewn laparoscopic anastomoses during Whipple procedure
Background: Since 1935, the Whipple procedure was described, using conventional open surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it was reported to be feasible also using the latest technology. In this video, the authors demonstrate a full laparoscopic Whipple procedure, performing the three anastomoses using an intracorporeal handsewn method.

Video: A 70-year-old man presenting with an adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, infiltrating the pancreatic parenchyma, underwent a laparoscop ic Whipple procedure. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N1M0 tumor.

Results: Total operative time was 8 hours 20minutes; time for the dissection was 6 hours 20 minutes; time for specimen extraction was 20 minutes, and time for the three laparoscopic intracorporeal handsewn anastomoses was 1 hour 40 minutes. Operative bleeding was 350cc. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 9. Pathological findings confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, with perinervous infiltration and lymphovascular emboli, free margins, 2 metastatic lymph nodes on 23 isolated; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4N1.

Conclusions: The laparoscopic Whipple procedure remains an advanced procedure to be performed laparoscopically and/or using open surgery. All the advantages of MIS such as reduced abdominal trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, improved patient’s comfort, and enhanced cosmesis are offered using laparoscopy.
Three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with intracorporeal manual esophagojejunostomy
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven to be oncologically feasible and safe. Over the last decade, a new philosophy of MIS reducing abdominal trauma and improving cosmetic results has been made popular. The authors report a three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy combined with a D2 lymphadenectomy for smaller curvature gastric adenocarcinoma.
Video: A 52-year-old woman presenting with a non-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma at the incisura angularis was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N+M0 tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, laparoscopy was scheduled. Three ports (5mm, 12mm, 5mm) were placed in the abdomen. Exposure of the operative field was improved with percutaneous sutures. En-bloc total gastrectomy and omentectomy were performed with a D2 lymphadenectomy, including the nodes of stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a, 8p, 9, 10, 11p, 11d, and 12a. A completely manual end-to-side esophagojejunostomy, and a linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, with closure of both mesenteric and mesocolic defects. The specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic access.
Results: Operative time was 4 hours and 45 minutes (anastomosis: 30) and perioperative bleeding amounted to 100cc. The pathological report confirmed the presence of a non-differentiated adenocarcinoma, mucinous, G3, interesting the gastric wall completely, with 63 (4 positive) nodes removed; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4aN2aM0; keratine AE1/AE3 negative, HER2/neu and HER2/CEP17 non-amplified. During the postoperative follow-up, no recurrence was demonstrated at 12 months.
Conclusions: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery provides the same quality of oncologic surgery as conventional multiport laparoscopy. However, a superior cosmesis and a reduced abdominal trauma are offered.
G Dapri, HK Yang
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3140 views
97 likes
0 comments
11:03
Three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with intracorporeal manual esophagojejunostomy
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven to be oncologically feasible and safe. Over the last decade, a new philosophy of MIS reducing abdominal trauma and improving cosmetic results has been made popular. The authors report a three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy combined with a D2 lymphadenectomy for smaller curvature gastric adenocarcinoma.
Video: A 52-year-old woman presenting with a non-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma at the incisura angularis was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N+M0 tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, laparoscopy was scheduled. Three ports (5mm, 12mm, 5mm) were placed in the abdomen. Exposure of the operative field was improved with percutaneous sutures. En-bloc total gastrectomy and omentectomy were performed with a D2 lymphadenectomy, including the nodes of stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a, 8p, 9, 10, 11p, 11d, and 12a. A completely manual end-to-side esophagojejunostomy, and a linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, with closure of both mesenteric and mesocolic defects. The specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic access.
Results: Operative time was 4 hours and 45 minutes (anastomosis: 30) and perioperative bleeding amounted to 100cc. The pathological report confirmed the presence of a non-differentiated adenocarcinoma, mucinous, G3, interesting the gastric wall completely, with 63 (4 positive) nodes removed; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4aN2aM0; keratine AE1/AE3 negative, HER2/neu and HER2/CEP17 non-amplified. During the postoperative follow-up, no recurrence was demonstrated at 12 months.
Conclusions: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery provides the same quality of oncologic surgery as conventional multiport laparoscopy. However, a superior cosmesis and a reduced abdominal trauma are offered.
Pure NOTES total transanal caudal-to-cranial low rectal resection
A 37-year-old female patient underwent a pure NOTES transanal rectal resection without transabdominal laparoscopic assistance for a rectal lesion located 5cm away from the anal verge (cT2N0M0 adenocarcinoma). All oncologic principles were fulfilled.
A GelPOINT Path Transanal® access platform was used. The procedure was achieved with no-flexible cameras and straight laparoscopic instruments. An Ultracision® device was used for dissection. A circular stapler with a long anvil was selected because it helped to achieve the anastomosis.
No complications were observed and the patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day.
P Leão, A Goulart, N Marcos, C Veiga, H Cristino
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1359 views
29 likes
0 comments
15:43
Pure NOTES total transanal caudal-to-cranial low rectal resection
A 37-year-old female patient underwent a pure NOTES transanal rectal resection without transabdominal laparoscopic assistance for a rectal lesion located 5cm away from the anal verge (cT2N0M0 adenocarcinoma). All oncologic principles were fulfilled.
A GelPOINT Path Transanal® access platform was used. The procedure was achieved with no-flexible cameras and straight laparoscopic instruments. An Ultracision® device was used for dissection. A circular stapler with a long anvil was selected because it helped to achieve the anastomosis.
No complications were observed and the patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day.
Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy for adenocarcinoma of the lower esophagus
Conventional esophagectomy requires either a laparotomy with a transhiatal dissection or a laparotomy combined with thoracotomy and it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the attempt to decrease morbidity, some surgeons have reported the application of minimally invasive technique of resection of the esophagus. De Paula was the first to report a large series of 48 patients undergoing a total laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy (LTH). LTH may be used to treat patients with either benign or malignant esophageal disease because the reconstructive result cervical esophagogastric anastomosis yields good functional outcomes. Here we show the case of a LTH for adenocarcinoma of the lower esophagus.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
5702 views
162 likes
0 comments
21:14
Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy for adenocarcinoma of the lower esophagus
Conventional esophagectomy requires either a laparotomy with a transhiatal dissection or a laparotomy combined with thoracotomy and it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the attempt to decrease morbidity, some surgeons have reported the application of minimally invasive technique of resection of the esophagus. De Paula was the first to report a large series of 48 patients undergoing a total laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy (LTH). LTH may be used to treat patients with either benign or malignant esophageal disease because the reconstructive result cervical esophagogastric anastomosis yields good functional outcomes. Here we show the case of a LTH for adenocarcinoma of the lower esophagus.
Thoracoscopic left superior segmentectomy for primary lung adenocarcinoma
This 59-old male patient, smoker, has a previous history of thymoma that was operated upon 15 years ago by sternotomy. He presented with a large nodule in the superior segment of the left lower lobe. Bronchoscopy was normal. A biopsy was performed under CT-scan control and revealed a primary adenocarcinoma TTF1+. 18-FDG scintigraphy showed a significant and isolated fixation. Because of the impaired respiratory function, a limited resection was decided upon, i.e, a resection of the superior segment of the left lower lobe with radical lymph node dissection.

This technique is presented in the book :
D. Gossot Atlas of endoscopic major pulmonary resections
(2010) Springer-Verlag France
www.springer.com/978-2-287-99776-1
D Gossot
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
2281 views
14 likes
0 comments
07:01
Thoracoscopic left superior segmentectomy for primary lung adenocarcinoma
This 59-old male patient, smoker, has a previous history of thymoma that was operated upon 15 years ago by sternotomy. He presented with a large nodule in the superior segment of the left lower lobe. Bronchoscopy was normal. A biopsy was performed under CT-scan control and revealed a primary adenocarcinoma TTF1+. 18-FDG scintigraphy showed a significant and isolated fixation. Because of the impaired respiratory function, a limited resection was decided upon, i.e, a resection of the superior segment of the left lower lobe with radical lymph node dissection.

This technique is presented in the book :
D. Gossot Atlas of endoscopic major pulmonary resections
(2010) Springer-Verlag France
www.springer.com/978-2-287-99776-1
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy for pT2 N0 M0 adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach
Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer remains limited because of technical problems, expecially for lymphadenectomy. We present the case of a 75-year-old patient with no specific history in which an adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach was found. An endoscopic ultrasound had shown a UST3 N0 lesion. The CT-scan confirmed the absence of secondary lesion and a neoadjuvant chemotherapy was carried out. Following chemotherapy, a re-evaluation was performed and confirmed the 2 by 2cm lesion of the lesser curvature of the stomach without secondary lesion. The decision to perform a laparoscopic total gastrectomy was made.
B Dallemagne, F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
7627 views
24 likes
0 comments
15:53
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy for pT2 N0 M0 adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach
Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer remains limited because of technical problems, expecially for lymphadenectomy. We present the case of a 75-year-old patient with no specific history in which an adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach was found. An endoscopic ultrasound had shown a UST3 N0 lesion. The CT-scan confirmed the absence of secondary lesion and a neoadjuvant chemotherapy was carried out. Following chemotherapy, a re-evaluation was performed and confirmed the 2 by 2cm lesion of the lesser curvature of the stomach without secondary lesion. The decision to perform a laparoscopic total gastrectomy was made.
Laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer after liver transplantation
It has already been demonstrated that laparoscopic gastrectomy is a safe approach for early gastric cancer. It can provide the same oncological outcomes as open gastrectomy with the benefit of fewer complications and early recovery.
Liver transplantation has a high incidence rate in the Korean population, just like gastric cancer. Additionally, South Korea has the highest incidence of this type of cancer worldwide. Patients who had received a liver transplant might benefit from a better recovery thanks to laparoscopic gastrectomy, and this approach can be performed by experienced surgeons.
Please add in the text narrative how you performed the anastomosis.
F Signorini, DJ Park, HK Yang
Surgical intervention
7 days ago
278 views
2 likes
0 comments
09:23
Laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer after liver transplantation
It has already been demonstrated that laparoscopic gastrectomy is a safe approach for early gastric cancer. It can provide the same oncological outcomes as open gastrectomy with the benefit of fewer complications and early recovery.
Liver transplantation has a high incidence rate in the Korean population, just like gastric cancer. Additionally, South Korea has the highest incidence of this type of cancer worldwide. Patients who had received a liver transplant might benefit from a better recovery thanks to laparoscopic gastrectomy, and this approach can be performed by experienced surgeons.
Please add in the text narrative how you performed the anastomosis.
Proximal gastrectomy with stapled circular esophagogastrostomy: manual purse-string technique
Early tumors of the esophagogastric junction can be managed with a minimally invasive proximal gastrectomy. This operation has recently been reevaluated for early-stage tumors since it offers a good postoperative quality of life with oncological outcomes equivalent to more extended procedures. In this video, we present the case of a 72-year-old man presenting with a 2cm adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. The clinical stage of the lesion was T1N0. A laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy with stapled circular esophagogastrostomy was decided upon. Five ports were placed. The left trocar incision was enlarged to introduce the circular stapler for the anastomoses and for specimen extraction. The procedure began with a complete abdominal exploration to rule out peritoneal metastases. The gastrocolic and gastrosplenic ligaments were divided with an ultrasonic scalpel. Short splenic vessels were clipped and divided and the greater curvature completely isolated with careful preservation of the gastroepiploic arcade and of the right gastroepiploic artery and vein. Left gastric vessels were divided at their origin with a vascular stapler and the distal esophagus was isolated through the diaphragmatic hiatus. A gastric tube was created with multiple applications of a linear stapler. The anvil of the circular stapler was secured to the esophageal stump with a hand-sewn purse-string suture in order to avoid the overlap of two suture lines. The esophagogastric anastomosis was then achieved with a circular stapler.
C Battiston, D Citterio, L Conti, M Virdis, V Mazzaferro
Surgical intervention
7 days ago
142 views
5 likes
1 comment
11:43
Proximal gastrectomy with stapled circular esophagogastrostomy: manual purse-string technique
Early tumors of the esophagogastric junction can be managed with a minimally invasive proximal gastrectomy. This operation has recently been reevaluated for early-stage tumors since it offers a good postoperative quality of life with oncological outcomes equivalent to more extended procedures. In this video, we present the case of a 72-year-old man presenting with a 2cm adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. The clinical stage of the lesion was T1N0. A laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy with stapled circular esophagogastrostomy was decided upon. Five ports were placed. The left trocar incision was enlarged to introduce the circular stapler for the anastomoses and for specimen extraction. The procedure began with a complete abdominal exploration to rule out peritoneal metastases. The gastrocolic and gastrosplenic ligaments were divided with an ultrasonic scalpel. Short splenic vessels were clipped and divided and the greater curvature completely isolated with careful preservation of the gastroepiploic arcade and of the right gastroepiploic artery and vein. Left gastric vessels were divided at their origin with a vascular stapler and the distal esophagus was isolated through the diaphragmatic hiatus. A gastric tube was created with multiple applications of a linear stapler. The anvil of the circular stapler was secured to the esophageal stump with a hand-sewn purse-string suture in order to avoid the overlap of two suture lines. The esophagogastric anastomosis was then achieved with a circular stapler.
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
E Soricelli, E Facchiano, L Leuratti, G Quartararo, N Console, P Tonelli, M Lucchese
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
3296 views
11 likes
0 comments
09:10
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
G Baiocchi, R Nascimbeni, N Vettoretto, N de Manzini, M Morino
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1825 views
5 likes
0 comments
09:24
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with venous reconstruction
Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy is an alternative to open surgery, which offers equivalent oncological results with a faster recovery associated with the minimally invasive approach. In cases of venous invasion, laparoscopic reconstruction with graft interposition is technically demanding. Nevertheless, good results can be achieved. This is the case of a 79-year-old man who was evaluated for jaundice. CT-scan found a tumor in the head of the pancreas with a 180-degree infiltration of the portal vein. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy with volumetric shrinking, but persistence of venous infiltration, a laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with venous reconstruction was decided upon.
E Giordano, A Alcaraz, S Reimondez, M Marani, W Salinas, R Pereyra, F Signorini, M Maraschio, L Obeide
Surgical intervention
25 days ago
1054 views
12 likes
1 comment
08:05
Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with venous reconstruction
Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy is an alternative to open surgery, which offers equivalent oncological results with a faster recovery associated with the minimally invasive approach. In cases of venous invasion, laparoscopic reconstruction with graft interposition is technically demanding. Nevertheless, good results can be achieved. This is the case of a 79-year-old man who was evaluated for jaundice. CT-scan found a tumor in the head of the pancreas with a 180-degree infiltration of the portal vein. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy with volumetric shrinking, but persistence of venous infiltration, a laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with venous reconstruction was decided upon.
Spleen-preserving total laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy
A 68-year-old woman was referred to us for multiple pancreatic cysts incidentally discovered on a routine ultrasound. An MRI was performed showing multiple cystic tumors throughout the pancreas, the largest of which was 15mm. This led to a suspicion of multifocal, side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), with minimal dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. An echo-endoscopy was subsequently performed indicating the presence of a multifocal IPMN. A fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was performed during this procedure, with aspiration of cystic content which was sent for CEA analysis and cytology. Cytology was compatible with a mucinous neoplasm with mild atypia and CEA at 98 IU/mL.
A spleen-preserving total laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy was proposed. The procedure was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. Pathology revealed a 19mm IPMN, with severe dysplasia and 3 foci of micro-invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of 1mm - pT1N0R0.
H Cristino, M Almeida, V Gomes, J Costa Maia
Surgical intervention
25 days ago
364 views
3 likes
1 comment
07:41
Spleen-preserving total laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy
A 68-year-old woman was referred to us for multiple pancreatic cysts incidentally discovered on a routine ultrasound. An MRI was performed showing multiple cystic tumors throughout the pancreas, the largest of which was 15mm. This led to a suspicion of multifocal, side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), with minimal dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. An echo-endoscopy was subsequently performed indicating the presence of a multifocal IPMN. A fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was performed during this procedure, with aspiration of cystic content which was sent for CEA analysis and cytology. Cytology was compatible with a mucinous neoplasm with mild atypia and CEA at 98 IU/mL.
A spleen-preserving total laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy was proposed. The procedure was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. Pathology revealed a 19mm IPMN, with severe dysplasia and 3 foci of micro-invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of 1mm - pT1N0R0.
Pylorus-preserving laparoscopic gastrectomy with pyloric balloon dilatation
Gastric cancer screening programs implemented by Japan and South Korea have shown impressive results in terms of the increasing proportion of early gastric cancer diagnosis. Because of this, more interest has been focused on preserving the organ function in order to improve postoperative quality of life aiming to reduce complications or sequelae and avoiding large resections. Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) was first introduced by Maki et al. and it is probably the most representative technique of function-preserving gastrectomy. It has been reported that, due to an impaired pyloric function, patients may occasionally experience a sensation of gastric fullness after food intake as well as long-term food retention in the remnant stomach. This delayed gastric emptying caused by pyloric spasms has been shown to decrease the patient’s quality of life. There is no standardized management strategy at present, and consequently gastric surgeons have often found themselves hesitant to perform this minimally invasive, function-preserving surgery. Here, we present a PPG case followed by a pyloric spasm, which was successfully treated with balloon dilatation.
F Signorini, HK Yang
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2088 views
5 likes
1 comment
10:02
Pylorus-preserving laparoscopic gastrectomy with pyloric balloon dilatation
Gastric cancer screening programs implemented by Japan and South Korea have shown impressive results in terms of the increasing proportion of early gastric cancer diagnosis. Because of this, more interest has been focused on preserving the organ function in order to improve postoperative quality of life aiming to reduce complications or sequelae and avoiding large resections. Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) was first introduced by Maki et al. and it is probably the most representative technique of function-preserving gastrectomy. It has been reported that, due to an impaired pyloric function, patients may occasionally experience a sensation of gastric fullness after food intake as well as long-term food retention in the remnant stomach. This delayed gastric emptying caused by pyloric spasms has been shown to decrease the patient’s quality of life. There is no standardized management strategy at present, and consequently gastric surgeons have often found themselves hesitant to perform this minimally invasive, function-preserving surgery. Here, we present a PPG case followed by a pyloric spasm, which was successfully treated with balloon dilatation.
Redo laparoscopic anterior resection
The reported incidence rates of regional recurrence for colorectal cancer after oncologic resection ranged between 5% and 19%. Locoregional recurrence occurs in the anastomotic site, the remnant colon, the peritoneal surface (nodal or soft tissue), or the retroperitoneum. As reported in the literature, in colorectal cancers, mucinous differentiation, lymphovascular invasion and anastomotic leakage are independent risk factors for anastomotic recurrence.
We present the case of an 86 year-old female patient. In 2014, the patient underwent a laparoscopic left colectomy for a Haggitt level 4 sigmoid polyp. The definitive histologic features showed a T2N0M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma. During the postoperative follow-up, 46 months after the left colectomy, an anastomotic recurrence was found. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colorectal resection for anastomotic recurrence. The operative time was 220 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. No complications occurred intraoperatively and postoperatively.
References:
1. Gopalan S, Bose JC, Periasamy S (2015) Anastomotic Recurrence of Colon Cancer-is it a Local Recurrence, a Second Primary, or a Metastatic Disease (Local Manifestation of Systemic Disease)? Indian J Surg 77:232-236.
2. Ramphal W, Boeding JRE, Gobardhan PD, Rutten HJT, de Winter L, Crolla R, Schreinemakers JMJ (2018) Oncologic outcome and recurrence rate following anastomotic leakage after curative resection for colorectal cancer. Surg Oncol 27:730-736.
3. Jung WB, Yu CS, Lim SB, Park IJ, Yoon YS, Kim JC (2017) Anastomotic Recurrence After Curative Resection for Colorectal Cancer. World J Surg 41:285-294.
F Corcione, M D'Ambra, U Bracale, S Dilillo, G Luglio
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2698 views
3 likes
1 comment
23:20
Redo laparoscopic anterior resection
The reported incidence rates of regional recurrence for colorectal cancer after oncologic resection ranged between 5% and 19%. Locoregional recurrence occurs in the anastomotic site, the remnant colon, the peritoneal surface (nodal or soft tissue), or the retroperitoneum. As reported in the literature, in colorectal cancers, mucinous differentiation, lymphovascular invasion and anastomotic leakage are independent risk factors for anastomotic recurrence.
We present the case of an 86 year-old female patient. In 2014, the patient underwent a laparoscopic left colectomy for a Haggitt level 4 sigmoid polyp. The definitive histologic features showed a T2N0M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma. During the postoperative follow-up, 46 months after the left colectomy, an anastomotic recurrence was found. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colorectal resection for anastomotic recurrence. The operative time was 220 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. No complications occurred intraoperatively and postoperatively.
References:
1. Gopalan S, Bose JC, Periasamy S (2015) Anastomotic Recurrence of Colon Cancer-is it a Local Recurrence, a Second Primary, or a Metastatic Disease (Local Manifestation of Systemic Disease)? Indian J Surg 77:232-236.
2. Ramphal W, Boeding JRE, Gobardhan PD, Rutten HJT, de Winter L, Crolla R, Schreinemakers JMJ (2018) Oncologic outcome and recurrence rate following anastomotic leakage after curative resection for colorectal cancer. Surg Oncol 27:730-736.
3. Jung WB, Yu CS, Lim SB, Park IJ, Yoon YS, Kim JC (2017) Anastomotic Recurrence After Curative Resection for Colorectal Cancer. World J Surg 41:285-294.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
S Macina, L Baldari, E Cassinotti, M Ballabio, A Spota, M de Francesco, L Boni
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
4069 views
20 likes
1 comment
07:10
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
Endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection for malignant polyp excision
This is the case of an 83-year-old woman who presented with per rectal bleeding. She had flexible sigmoidoscopy, which showed a 1.5 to 2cm flat polyp with central depression and non-lifting sign. CT-scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was performed and showed no metastasis. The case was discussed with the multidisciplinary team and decision was made to perform an endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection. The case was performed using the colonic FTRD® set (OVESCO™). The procedure was completed successfully and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. During the postoperative follow-up, the resection margin was clear. This is the first case performed in the North-East of England to our knowledge. Since this case, we have performed another case.
Y Aawsaj, K Khan, M Hayat
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
755 views
2 likes
1 comment
05:30
Endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection for malignant polyp excision
This is the case of an 83-year-old woman who presented with per rectal bleeding. She had flexible sigmoidoscopy, which showed a 1.5 to 2cm flat polyp with central depression and non-lifting sign. CT-scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was performed and showed no metastasis. The case was discussed with the multidisciplinary team and decision was made to perform an endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection. The case was performed using the colonic FTRD® set (OVESCO™). The procedure was completed successfully and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. During the postoperative follow-up, the resection margin was clear. This is the first case performed in the North-East of England to our knowledge. Since this case, we have performed another case.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
J Magalhães, C Osorio, L Frutuoso, AM Pereira, A Trovão, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
5021 views
20 likes
1 comment
09:44
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
Robotic abdominoperineal resection (APR) with intraperitoneal puborectalis incision
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This advantage is mainly in the deep pelvis where the limited working space and visibility makes distal rectal dissection extremely challenging. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.

An abdominoperineal resection (APR) involves the excision of the rectum with a total mesorectal excision (TME), and excision of the anus with an adequate circumferential resection margin (CRM). In a conventional open or laparoscopic approach, the rectal dissection is performed down to the level of the pelvic floor, after which the perineal approach is used to excise the anus and to cut the pelvic floor muscles circumferentially to allow for ‘en bloc’ tumor removal. However, as the pelvic floor is frequently very deep from the skin surface, dissection is technically challenging due to poor visualization, often leading to blind dissection. As a result, many APR specimens suffer from the problem of “waisting” and a positive CRM at the level of the levator ani muscle. In order to solve this problem, some units practice extralevator APR – however, in those cases, the patient ends up with a large perineal defect which frequently needs to be closed with either mesh or flap reconstruction.
With the da Vinci™ robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. The robotic system can be used to access deep into the pelvic cavity and make an incision in the puborectalis sling down to the ischiorectal fat. This incision, once completed, allows for easy access from the perineal approach to enter the pelvic cavity and complete the dissection, preventing any blind dissection and facilitating a CRM-clear specimen to be excised.
This video features a totally robotic approach to an abdominoperineal resection for a poorly differentiated anorectal adenocarcinoma, with intraperitoneal incision of the puborectalis sling to facilitate subsequent perineal dissection and specimen extraction.

Clinical case
A 79-year-old female patient presented with a perianal lump and discomfort. Colonoscopy revealed a 2cm mobile adenomatous polypoid lesion at the anorectal junction. Excision biopsy showed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma.

CT-scan of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis did not show any distant metastases, and MRI of the rectum did not show any significant locoregional disease. A robotic abdominoperineal resection was performed.

Patient set-up
The da Vinci™ Si™ robotic system was used, and a dual docking approach was chosen.
The patient was placed in a Lloyd-Davies position. Robotic ports (8mm) were placed in the epigastrium, left flank, suprapubic region, and in the right iliac fossa respectively. A 12mm trocar is inserted into the right flank for assistance and stapling.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
691 views
3 likes
0 comments
11:27
Robotic abdominoperineal resection (APR) with intraperitoneal puborectalis incision
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This advantage is mainly in the deep pelvis where the limited working space and visibility makes distal rectal dissection extremely challenging. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.

An abdominoperineal resection (APR) involves the excision of the rectum with a total mesorectal excision (TME), and excision of the anus with an adequate circumferential resection margin (CRM). In a conventional open or laparoscopic approach, the rectal dissection is performed down to the level of the pelvic floor, after which the perineal approach is used to excise the anus and to cut the pelvic floor muscles circumferentially to allow for ‘en bloc’ tumor removal. However, as the pelvic floor is frequently very deep from the skin surface, dissection is technically challenging due to poor visualization, often leading to blind dissection. As a result, many APR specimens suffer from the problem of “waisting” and a positive CRM at the level of the levator ani muscle. In order to solve this problem, some units practice extralevator APR – however, in those cases, the patient ends up with a large perineal defect which frequently needs to be closed with either mesh or flap reconstruction.
With the da Vinci™ robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. The robotic system can be used to access deep into the pelvic cavity and make an incision in the puborectalis sling down to the ischiorectal fat. This incision, once completed, allows for easy access from the perineal approach to enter the pelvic cavity and complete the dissection, preventing any blind dissection and facilitating a CRM-clear specimen to be excised.
This video features a totally robotic approach to an abdominoperineal resection for a poorly differentiated anorectal adenocarcinoma, with intraperitoneal incision of the puborectalis sling to facilitate subsequent perineal dissection and specimen extraction.

Clinical case
A 79-year-old female patient presented with a perianal lump and discomfort. Colonoscopy revealed a 2cm mobile adenomatous polypoid lesion at the anorectal junction. Excision biopsy showed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma.

CT-scan of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis did not show any distant metastases, and MRI of the rectum did not show any significant locoregional disease. A robotic abdominoperineal resection was performed.

Patient set-up
The da Vinci™ Si™ robotic system was used, and a dual docking approach was chosen.
The patient was placed in a Lloyd-Davies position. Robotic ports (8mm) were placed in the epigastrium, left flank, suprapubic region, and in the right iliac fossa respectively. A 12mm trocar is inserted into the right flank for assistance and stapling.
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
J Magalhães, L Matos, J Costa, J Costa Pereira, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3033 views
13 likes
3 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.