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Transumbilical single access laparoscopic right adrenalectomy with 1.8mm epigastric trocarless grasping forceps
Background: Single access laparoscopic adrenalectomy has been reported in supine and prone patient positioning. The authors report the technique with the patient in supine position, with the umbilicus as access site, and with all adopted material as reusable.

Video: A 43-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital for symptomatic primary hyperaldosteronism. A right-side adrenal adenoma was diagnosed, and surgery was proposed. The patient was placed in a supine position with a mild semi-lateral left-sided decubitus. The technique was performed using an 11mm reusable trocar to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree rigid and regular length scope, in addition to curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany). The right liver lobe was retracted using the 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope), inserted percutaneously under the 12th right rib. The procedure started with the adhesiolysis between the hepatic surface and right Gerota’s fascia. Then, after having identified the adrenal gland, it was dissected and the inferior adrenal arteries and veins were clipped between 5mm Hem-o-lok® clips (Teleflex Medical, Research Triangle Park, NC, US). The middle adrenal vein was clipped as well using the 5mm Hem-o-lok® ligation systems. Once the specimen was completely mobilized, a plastic bag (used for suction drain) was custom-made and introduced into the abdomen through the 11mm trocar. The specimen was removed transumbilically, and the procedure finished with the closure of the access site by absorbable figure of 8 sutures.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 98 minutes, estimated blood loss was 20cc, and the final scar length was 16mm. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 2 days.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single access laparoscopic right adrenalectomy is feasible and safe. With this technique, the cost of the procedure is not increased, the final scar length is minimal, and the working triangulation is established intrabdominally as well as externally.
G Dapri, L Gerard, M Bortes, V Zulian, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1859 views
25 likes
0 comments
06:24
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic right adrenalectomy with 1.8mm epigastric trocarless grasping forceps
Background: Single access laparoscopic adrenalectomy has been reported in supine and prone patient positioning. The authors report the technique with the patient in supine position, with the umbilicus as access site, and with all adopted material as reusable.

Video: A 43-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital for symptomatic primary hyperaldosteronism. A right-side adrenal adenoma was diagnosed, and surgery was proposed. The patient was placed in a supine position with a mild semi-lateral left-sided decubitus. The technique was performed using an 11mm reusable trocar to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree rigid and regular length scope, in addition to curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany). The right liver lobe was retracted using the 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope), inserted percutaneously under the 12th right rib. The procedure started with the adhesiolysis between the hepatic surface and right Gerota’s fascia. Then, after having identified the adrenal gland, it was dissected and the inferior adrenal arteries and veins were clipped between 5mm Hem-o-lok® clips (Teleflex Medical, Research Triangle Park, NC, US). The middle adrenal vein was clipped as well using the 5mm Hem-o-lok® ligation systems. Once the specimen was completely mobilized, a plastic bag (used for suction drain) was custom-made and introduced into the abdomen through the 11mm trocar. The specimen was removed transumbilically, and the procedure finished with the closure of the access site by absorbable figure of 8 sutures.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 98 minutes, estimated blood loss was 20cc, and the final scar length was 16mm. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 2 days.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single access laparoscopic right adrenalectomy is feasible and safe. With this technique, the cost of the procedure is not increased, the final scar length is minimal, and the working triangulation is established intrabdominally as well as externally.
Laparoscopic resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours
We demonstrate two minimally invasive approaches for the management of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST). GISTs are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastroinstestinal tract. About 50% of GISTs are located in the stomach which makes it the most frequent location. GISTs can be totally intraluminal or extraluminal. In this film, we demonstrate two approaches for the removal of gastric GIST, depending upon the site of tumour. The majority of patients are diagnosed incidentally or present with vague symptoms. GISTs can also present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding as in our first case. We demonstrate that laparoscopic GIST resection is safe and effective.
SA Naqi, S Rajendran, M Arumugasamy
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
3534 views
93 likes
0 comments
13:47
Laparoscopic resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours
We demonstrate two minimally invasive approaches for the management of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST). GISTs are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastroinstestinal tract. About 50% of GISTs are located in the stomach which makes it the most frequent location. GISTs can be totally intraluminal or extraluminal. In this film, we demonstrate two approaches for the removal of gastric GIST, depending upon the site of tumour. The majority of patients are diagnosed incidentally or present with vague symptoms. GISTs can also present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding as in our first case. We demonstrate that laparoscopic GIST resection is safe and effective.
Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
H Inoue, RA Ciurezu, M Pizzicannella, F Habersetzer
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
286 views
2 likes
0 comments
25:51
Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
F Freire Lisboa Junior, R de Lima França, A de Araujo Lima Liguori, AC de Medeiros Junior, M HSMP Tavares, F Medeiros de Azevedo, D Myller Barros Lima
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
1120 views
5 likes
0 comments
14:36
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
Advanced bariatric surgery: reduced port simplified gastric bypass, a reproducible 3-port technique
Minimally invasive surgery is a field of continuous evolution and the advantages of this approach is no longer a matter of debate. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has shown to be the cornerstone in the treatment of morbid obesity and so far all the efforts in this technique have been conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Nowadays, reduced port surgery is regaining momentum as the evolution of minimally invasive surgery.
The purpose is to describe our technique of LRYGB, which mimics all the fundamental aspects of the “simplified gastric bypass” described by A. Cardoso Ramos et al. in a conventional laparoscopic surgical approach (5 ports) while incorporating some innovative technical features to reduce the quantity of ports. Despite the use of only three trocars, there is no problem with exposure or ergonomics, which represent major drawbacks when performing reduced port surgery.

Our technique can be a useful and feasible tool in selected patients in order to minimize parietal trauma and its possible complications, to improve cosmetic results, and to indirectly avoid the need for a second assistant, thereby improving the logistics, team dynamics, and economic aspects of the procedure.

In our experience, this technique is indicated as primary surgery in patients without previous surgery and with a BMI ranging from 35 to 50. Major contraindications are liver steatosis, superobese patients, and potentially revisional surgery. Although based on the experience of the team, we had also to perform revisional surgery mostly from ring vertical gastroplasty.

From January 2015 to June 2017, we analyzed 72 consecutive cases in our institution with a mean initial BMI of 43.12 (range: 30.1-58.7) using this approach, and the mean operative time was 64.77 minutes (range: 30-155, n=72) and excluding revisional cases or cases associated with cholecystectomy (58.72 min, range: 30-104, n=62).

This approach should be performed by highly skilled surgeons experienced with conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and with one of the patients feeling particularly comfortable. We strongly suggest using additional trocars if patient safety is jeopardized.
D Lipski, D Garcilazo Arismendi, S Targa
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3342 views
426 likes
0 comments
07:37
Advanced bariatric surgery: reduced port simplified gastric bypass, a reproducible 3-port technique
Minimally invasive surgery is a field of continuous evolution and the advantages of this approach is no longer a matter of debate. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has shown to be the cornerstone in the treatment of morbid obesity and so far all the efforts in this technique have been conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Nowadays, reduced port surgery is regaining momentum as the evolution of minimally invasive surgery.
The purpose is to describe our technique of LRYGB, which mimics all the fundamental aspects of the “simplified gastric bypass” described by A. Cardoso Ramos et al. in a conventional laparoscopic surgical approach (5 ports) while incorporating some innovative technical features to reduce the quantity of ports. Despite the use of only three trocars, there is no problem with exposure or ergonomics, which represent major drawbacks when performing reduced port surgery.

Our technique can be a useful and feasible tool in selected patients in order to minimize parietal trauma and its possible complications, to improve cosmetic results, and to indirectly avoid the need for a second assistant, thereby improving the logistics, team dynamics, and economic aspects of the procedure.

In our experience, this technique is indicated as primary surgery in patients without previous surgery and with a BMI ranging from 35 to 50. Major contraindications are liver steatosis, superobese patients, and potentially revisional surgery. Although based on the experience of the team, we had also to perform revisional surgery mostly from ring vertical gastroplasty.

From January 2015 to June 2017, we analyzed 72 consecutive cases in our institution with a mean initial BMI of 43.12 (range: 30.1-58.7) using this approach, and the mean operative time was 64.77 minutes (range: 30-155, n=72) and excluding revisional cases or cases associated with cholecystectomy (58.72 min, range: 30-104, n=62).

This approach should be performed by highly skilled surgeons experienced with conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and with one of the patients feeling particularly comfortable. We strongly suggest using additional trocars if patient safety is jeopardized.
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
S Qian, P Tejedor, M Leon, M Ortega, C Pastor
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
3971 views
5 likes
0 comments
06:45
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
A stepwise personal technique of RYGB with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy
With more than 25 years of experience, we have created a unique laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass technique with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy and several additional steps which offer our patients a safe and reliable procedure.
We routinely use 5 bladeless 12mm trocars. The procedure begins with the creation of a 15-20mL gastric pouch with a tilted orientation for the first stapling (not horizontal), and staple lines are oversewn for both gastric pouch and gastric remnant. A blue dye test is always performed at this stage. The second stage of the procedure includes the creation of a 75cm biliopancreatic limb with division of the mesentery and creation of a mechanical jejunojejunostomy with a 100cm alimentary limb, and hand-sewn closure of the enterotomy. Anti-torsion stitches are mandatory at this point. Closure of mesenteric defects (intermesenteric space and Petersen's space) is accomplished with non-absorbable sutures performed in a routine manner. The third and final stage of the procedure involves the creation of the hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy with an interposed limb and 4 layers of absorbable sutures over a 28-30 French bougie.
Closure of all trocar defects is performed in every patient.
L Zorrilla-Nunez, P Zorrilla
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1443 views
219 likes
0 comments
10:05
A stepwise personal technique of RYGB with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy
With more than 25 years of experience, we have created a unique laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass technique with hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy and several additional steps which offer our patients a safe and reliable procedure.
We routinely use 5 bladeless 12mm trocars. The procedure begins with the creation of a 15-20mL gastric pouch with a tilted orientation for the first stapling (not horizontal), and staple lines are oversewn for both gastric pouch and gastric remnant. A blue dye test is always performed at this stage. The second stage of the procedure includes the creation of a 75cm biliopancreatic limb with division of the mesentery and creation of a mechanical jejunojejunostomy with a 100cm alimentary limb, and hand-sewn closure of the enterotomy. Anti-torsion stitches are mandatory at this point. Closure of mesenteric defects (intermesenteric space and Petersen's space) is accomplished with non-absorbable sutures performed in a routine manner. The third and final stage of the procedure involves the creation of the hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy with an interposed limb and 4 layers of absorbable sutures over a 28-30 French bougie.
Closure of all trocar defects is performed in every patient.
PerOral Endoscopic Thyroidectomy (POET), a novel pioneering technique
Thyroid surgery has evolved towards minimally invasive approaches to reduce or prevent cervical scars, which are potential seats for keloidal scarring. Several approaches have been put forward: video-assisted surgery via a reduced cervical scar, transaxillary access with or without robotic assistance, transoral retromandibular approach, retroauricular approach in keeping with a lifting procedure.
In this video, we present the case of an original transoral vestibular approach. This access is exclusively subcutaneous. No cervical scar is necessary. This technique allows for a unilateral or bilateral approach in excellent visualization conditions. Dissection is performed from cranially to caudally with the rapid identification of the inferior laryngeal nerve.
A Anuwong, M Vix, HS Wu
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
4613 views
316 likes
1 comment
25:34
PerOral Endoscopic Thyroidectomy (POET), a novel pioneering technique
Thyroid surgery has evolved towards minimally invasive approaches to reduce or prevent cervical scars, which are potential seats for keloidal scarring. Several approaches have been put forward: video-assisted surgery via a reduced cervical scar, transaxillary access with or without robotic assistance, transoral retromandibular approach, retroauricular approach in keeping with a lifting procedure.
In this video, we present the case of an original transoral vestibular approach. This access is exclusively subcutaneous. No cervical scar is necessary. This technique allows for a unilateral or bilateral approach in excellent visualization conditions. Dissection is performed from cranially to caudally with the rapid identification of the inferior laryngeal nerve.
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, I Argay
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5273 views
312 likes
1 comment
42:42
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
Reduced port laparoscopic pyloroduodenectomy with handsewn Roux-en-Y reconstruction
Background: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) is an evolution of conventional laparoscopic surgery, allowing for enhanced cosmetic outcomes, in addition to a reduced abdominal wall trauma. Tips and tricks are required to complete a procedure using a RPLS.

Video: This video shows a 55-year-old lady who underwent a laparoscopic pyloro-duodenectomy for a duodenal bulb lesion increased in size at endoscopic follow-up. Three trocars were used (a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, a 5mm one in the left flank). The exposure of the operative field was enhanced thanks to a temporary percutaneous suture placed into the hepatic round ligament. Perioperative gastroscopy allowed for an adequate resection without too much distance from the margins, and preservation of the entire gastric antrum. The reconstruction was performed through a handsewn end-to-end gastrojejunostomy, with a 50cm alimentary limb, and a semi-mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy. Finally, a gastroscopy was used to test the gastrojejunostomy.

Results: Total operative time was 190 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7. Pathological findings demonstrated a Brunner’s gland hamartoma, with safe distance from the margins.

Conclusions: RPLS is a step forward of conventional laparoscopy. Perioperative gastroscopy is essential to perform safe upper GI resections. br>
G Dapri, NA Bascombe, S Targa
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
802 views
25 likes
0 comments
09:01
Reduced port laparoscopic pyloroduodenectomy with handsewn Roux-en-Y reconstruction
Background: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) is an evolution of conventional laparoscopic surgery, allowing for enhanced cosmetic outcomes, in addition to a reduced abdominal wall trauma. Tips and tricks are required to complete a procedure using a RPLS.

Video: This video shows a 55-year-old lady who underwent a laparoscopic pyloro-duodenectomy for a duodenal bulb lesion increased in size at endoscopic follow-up. Three trocars were used (a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, a 5mm one in the left flank). The exposure of the operative field was enhanced thanks to a temporary percutaneous suture placed into the hepatic round ligament. Perioperative gastroscopy allowed for an adequate resection without too much distance from the margins, and preservation of the entire gastric antrum. The reconstruction was performed through a handsewn end-to-end gastrojejunostomy, with a 50cm alimentary limb, and a semi-mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy. Finally, a gastroscopy was used to test the gastrojejunostomy.

Results: Total operative time was 190 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7. Pathological findings demonstrated a Brunner’s gland hamartoma, with safe distance from the margins.

Conclusions: RPLS is a step forward of conventional laparoscopy. Perioperative gastroscopy is essential to perform safe upper GI resections. br>
Laparoscopic bile duct exploration with bile duct endoscopy and biliary bypass for recurrent biliary pancreatitis after cholecystectomy
This video shows the peculiar case of a 50-year-old male patient who underwent an open cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis 12 years ago and he has been consulting for pancreatitis symptoms during the last seven years.
The patient reported that he had undergone ERCP twice after cholecystectomy because of bile duct stones and reportedly, complete bile duct clearance was achieved both times.
He presented to our facility with a new episode of mild pancreatitis.
No abnormalities were demonstrated in liver function tests. Amylase, GGT, and alkaline phosphatase values were normal.
Hepatobiliary ultrasound demonstrated a dilated common bile duct. MRCP (cholangio-MRI) showed several filling defects, particularly in the common bile duct and the left hepatic duct. CT-scan of the pancreas did not reveal abnormalities within the pancreatic parenchyma.
We decided to perform a bile duct exploration with endoscopic evaluation of the entire biliary tree and to perform a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy because of recurrent biliary pancreatitis after cholecystectomy.
JM Cabada-Lee
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1927 views
106 likes
0 comments
10:55
Laparoscopic bile duct exploration with bile duct endoscopy and biliary bypass for recurrent biliary pancreatitis after cholecystectomy
This video shows the peculiar case of a 50-year-old male patient who underwent an open cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis 12 years ago and he has been consulting for pancreatitis symptoms during the last seven years.
The patient reported that he had undergone ERCP twice after cholecystectomy because of bile duct stones and reportedly, complete bile duct clearance was achieved both times.
He presented to our facility with a new episode of mild pancreatitis.
No abnormalities were demonstrated in liver function tests. Amylase, GGT, and alkaline phosphatase values were normal.
Hepatobiliary ultrasound demonstrated a dilated common bile duct. MRCP (cholangio-MRI) showed several filling defects, particularly in the common bile duct and the left hepatic duct. CT-scan of the pancreas did not reveal abnormalities within the pancreatic parenchyma.
We decided to perform a bile duct exploration with endoscopic evaluation of the entire biliary tree and to perform a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy because of recurrent biliary pancreatitis after cholecystectomy.
Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a hazardous operation when the anatomy of Calot’s triangle is distorted by acute inflammation or any other factor (in our case, adhesions due to the recent surgery, and especially due to radiotherapy). In these difficult situations, the intraoperative decision to use a protective surgical technique as subtotal cholecystectomy is made with the purpose to prevent any injury to the biliary tree.
This video demonstrates the case of a 69-year-old woman with morbid obesity (BMI of 55) and diagnosed with acute cholecystitis. Her past medical history is relevant for right nephrectomy for renal carcinoma using a right subcostal laparotomy followed by radiochemotherapy completed 3 months earlier.
Subtotal cholecystectomy is a procedure which aims to remove portions of the gallbladder when structures of Calot’s triangle cannot be safely identified in "difficult gallbladders". The conversion rate to open surgery was higher among this category of patients. We describe our experience with a technical change, namely, a tactical laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy which almost always prevents conversion at the end of the procedures, and prevents both the risk of injury to the common bile duct and the risk of hemorrhage. In such cases, there is a need for rigor and prudence in order to return to the traditional technique in real time, if necessary.
Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy can be considered a safe and feasible alternative to conversion to open surgery. Subtotal cholecystectomy is an essential technique to be used in difficult gallbladders. It achieves morbidity rates comparable to those reported for total cholecystectomy in simple cases.
A Cotirlet, M Nedelcu
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
4828 views
286 likes
0 comments
20:31
Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a hazardous operation when the anatomy of Calot’s triangle is distorted by acute inflammation or any other factor (in our case, adhesions due to the recent surgery, and especially due to radiotherapy). In these difficult situations, the intraoperative decision to use a protective surgical technique as subtotal cholecystectomy is made with the purpose to prevent any injury to the biliary tree.
This video demonstrates the case of a 69-year-old woman with morbid obesity (BMI of 55) and diagnosed with acute cholecystitis. Her past medical history is relevant for right nephrectomy for renal carcinoma using a right subcostal laparotomy followed by radiochemotherapy completed 3 months earlier.
Subtotal cholecystectomy is a procedure which aims to remove portions of the gallbladder when structures of Calot’s triangle cannot be safely identified in "difficult gallbladders". The conversion rate to open surgery was higher among this category of patients. We describe our experience with a technical change, namely, a tactical laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy which almost always prevents conversion at the end of the procedures, and prevents both the risk of injury to the common bile duct and the risk of hemorrhage. In such cases, there is a need for rigor and prudence in order to return to the traditional technique in real time, if necessary.
Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy can be considered a safe and feasible alternative to conversion to open surgery. Subtotal cholecystectomy is an essential technique to be used in difficult gallbladders. It achieves morbidity rates comparable to those reported for total cholecystectomy in simple cases.
Three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with intracorporeal manual esophagojejunostomy
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven to be oncologically feasible and safe. Over the last decade, a new philosophy of MIS reducing abdominal trauma and improving cosmetic results has been made popular. The authors report a three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy combined with a D2 lymphadenectomy for smaller curvature gastric adenocarcinoma.
Video: A 52-year-old woman presenting with a non-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma at the incisura angularis was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N+M0 tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, laparoscopy was scheduled. Three ports (5mm, 12mm, 5mm) were placed in the abdomen. Exposure of the operative field was improved with percutaneous sutures. En-bloc total gastrectomy and omentectomy were performed with a D2 lymphadenectomy, including the nodes of stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a, 8p, 9, 10, 11p, 11d, and 12a. A completely manual end-to-side esophagojejunostomy, and a linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, with closure of both mesenteric and mesocolic defects. The specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic access.
Results: Operative time was 4 hours and 45 minutes (anastomosis: 30) and perioperative bleeding amounted to 100cc. The pathological report confirmed the presence of a non-differentiated adenocarcinoma, mucinous, G3, interesting the gastric wall completely, with 63 (4 positive) nodes removed; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4aN2aM0; keratine AE1/AE3 negative, HER2/neu and HER2/CEP17 non-amplified. During the postoperative follow-up, no recurrence was demonstrated at 12 months.
Conclusions: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery provides the same quality of oncologic surgery as conventional multiport laparoscopy. However, a superior cosmesis and a reduced abdominal trauma are offered.
G Dapri, HK Yang
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3070 views
96 likes
0 comments
11:03
Three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with intracorporeal manual esophagojejunostomy
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven to be oncologically feasible and safe. Over the last decade, a new philosophy of MIS reducing abdominal trauma and improving cosmetic results has been made popular. The authors report a three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy combined with a D2 lymphadenectomy for smaller curvature gastric adenocarcinoma.
Video: A 52-year-old woman presenting with a non-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma at the incisura angularis was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N+M0 tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, laparoscopy was scheduled. Three ports (5mm, 12mm, 5mm) were placed in the abdomen. Exposure of the operative field was improved with percutaneous sutures. En-bloc total gastrectomy and omentectomy were performed with a D2 lymphadenectomy, including the nodes of stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a, 8p, 9, 10, 11p, 11d, and 12a. A completely manual end-to-side esophagojejunostomy, and a linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, with closure of both mesenteric and mesocolic defects. The specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic access.
Results: Operative time was 4 hours and 45 minutes (anastomosis: 30) and perioperative bleeding amounted to 100cc. The pathological report confirmed the presence of a non-differentiated adenocarcinoma, mucinous, G3, interesting the gastric wall completely, with 63 (4 positive) nodes removed; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4aN2aM0; keratine AE1/AE3 negative, HER2/neu and HER2/CEP17 non-amplified. During the postoperative follow-up, no recurrence was demonstrated at 12 months.
Conclusions: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery provides the same quality of oncologic surgery as conventional multiport laparoscopy. However, a superior cosmesis and a reduced abdominal trauma are offered.
Laparoscopic gastric bypass after open vertical banded gastroplasty
This video shows a laparoscopic reintervention after an open vertical banded gastroplasty in a 51-year-old woman presenting with untreatable gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD originated from gastric remnant outlet obstruction. For that reason, we decided to perform a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. First, very intense adhesions of the greater omentum and the stomach to the parietal peritoneum and the left lobe of the liver are dissected. The gastric remnant is dissected in order to transect it proximally to the stenotic, banded segment. A Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with a 50cm alimentary limb using the OrVil™ orogastric tube and the DST Series™ EEA™ 25mm circular stapling device is performed.
P Vorwald, M Posada, G Salcedo, C Lévano Linares, ML Sánchez de Molina, R Restrepo, JR Torres
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1651 views
36 likes
0 comments
12:54
Laparoscopic gastric bypass after open vertical banded gastroplasty
This video shows a laparoscopic reintervention after an open vertical banded gastroplasty in a 51-year-old woman presenting with untreatable gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD originated from gastric remnant outlet obstruction. For that reason, we decided to perform a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. First, very intense adhesions of the greater omentum and the stomach to the parietal peritoneum and the left lobe of the liver are dissected. The gastric remnant is dissected in order to transect it proximally to the stenotic, banded segment. A Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with a 50cm alimentary limb using the OrVil™ orogastric tube and the DST Series™ EEA™ 25mm circular stapling device is performed.
Posterior retroperitoneoscopic revision of the right suprarenal space for recurrence of pheochromocytoma
A 36-year-old woman came to the attention of the endocrinologist for a recent onset of headache and tachycardia and an US finding of a 1.8cm nodule in the right suprarenal space.
At age 25, she was submitted to an anterior laparoscopic transperitoneal right adrenalectomy for a 5cm pheochromocytoma. At age 33, she underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
The diagnostic work-up revealed raised urinary metanephrine and normetanephrine and an MRI finding of a 1.5cm nodule in the right suprarenal space, with smaller satellite nodules in the retrocaval space.
A surgical revision of the right suprarenal space was indicated and the posterior retroperitoneal approach was chosen, to warrant better reach of the nodules and allow direct exposure of the retrocaval and retrohepatic spaces.
The operative time was 210 minutes. The patient recovered with no major complications and was discharged on her 4th postoperative day. Her symptoms recovered and she was found with lowered metanephrines at follow-up. An 18-FDG PET-CT scan performed 6 months after the operation showed no abnormal metabolic activity within her body.
M Lotti, B Carrara, L Moroni, S Cassibba, D Gianola, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
849 views
40 likes
0 comments
16:24
Posterior retroperitoneoscopic revision of the right suprarenal space for recurrence of pheochromocytoma
A 36-year-old woman came to the attention of the endocrinologist for a recent onset of headache and tachycardia and an US finding of a 1.8cm nodule in the right suprarenal space.
At age 25, she was submitted to an anterior laparoscopic transperitoneal right adrenalectomy for a 5cm pheochromocytoma. At age 33, she underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
The diagnostic work-up revealed raised urinary metanephrine and normetanephrine and an MRI finding of a 1.5cm nodule in the right suprarenal space, with smaller satellite nodules in the retrocaval space.
A surgical revision of the right suprarenal space was indicated and the posterior retroperitoneal approach was chosen, to warrant better reach of the nodules and allow direct exposure of the retrocaval and retrohepatic spaces.
The operative time was 210 minutes. The patient recovered with no major complications and was discharged on her 4th postoperative day. Her symptoms recovered and she was found with lowered metanephrines at follow-up. An 18-FDG PET-CT scan performed 6 months after the operation showed no abnormal metabolic activity within her body.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: live demonstration and technical details
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has become a common procedure for the management of morbid obesity. However, learning to perform such a procedure may be difficult as it is made up of very technical operative steps in complex cases of overweight patients with a great amount of adipose tissue. In order to prevent complications, an operative strategy should be adopted, allowing for an easy and rapid acquisition of the technique. Each step is perfectly mastered and outlined.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass performed live, showing all the preoperative and operative patient settings. The surgical technique is thoroughly explained.
M Vix, M Nedelcu, HA Mercoli, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
7323 views
197 likes
1 comment
28:09
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: live demonstration and technical details
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has become a common procedure for the management of morbid obesity. However, learning to perform such a procedure may be difficult as it is made up of very technical operative steps in complex cases of overweight patients with a great amount of adipose tissue. In order to prevent complications, an operative strategy should be adopted, allowing for an easy and rapid acquisition of the technique. Each step is perfectly mastered and outlined.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass performed live, showing all the preoperative and operative patient settings. The surgical technique is thoroughly explained.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass after gastric band removal
This video demonstrates the case of a 50-year-old woman with morbid obesity (BMI of 39). She had a gastric banding placed 7 years before, which became ineffective 3 years after the primary surgery, resulting in band removal 2 years ago.
A secondary bariatric surgery was scheduled, with the decision to perform a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. This video shows the surgical technique, with special emphasis on dissection of the cardia and lesser curvature, where the anatomy is altered as a result of the previous band. An interesting technical point occurs during the creation of the jejunojejunostomy, where a perforation of the biliary loop is accidentally made during the EndoGIATM linear stapler introduction.
M Vix, C Lebares, M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2183 views
59 likes
0 comments
32:11
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass after gastric band removal
This video demonstrates the case of a 50-year-old woman with morbid obesity (BMI of 39). She had a gastric banding placed 7 years before, which became ineffective 3 years after the primary surgery, resulting in band removal 2 years ago.
A secondary bariatric surgery was scheduled, with the decision to perform a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. This video shows the surgical technique, with special emphasis on dissection of the cardia and lesser curvature, where the anatomy is altered as a result of the previous band. An interesting technical point occurs during the creation of the jejunojejunostomy, where a perforation of the biliary loop is accidentally made during the EndoGIATM linear stapler introduction.
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy in case of large uterus
This video demonstrates the case of a 46-year-old patient presented with menorrhagia and anemia.
Clinical examination revealed a large mass almost reaching the level of the umbilicus.
The uterus appeared much bigger than usual on MRI, with a large myoma coming out of the pelvis.
It was decided to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy combined with bilateral salpingectomy.
This video demonstrates the appropriate strategy to safely perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy in case of large uterus, showing the appropriate surgical steps and providing safety tips. The specimen weighed more than 1kg.
A Wattiez, F Asencio, J Faria, I Argay, L Schwartz
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
9027 views
309 likes
0 comments
25:01
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy in case of large uterus
This video demonstrates the case of a 46-year-old patient presented with menorrhagia and anemia.
Clinical examination revealed a large mass almost reaching the level of the umbilicus.
The uterus appeared much bigger than usual on MRI, with a large myoma coming out of the pelvis.
It was decided to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy combined with bilateral salpingectomy.
This video demonstrates the appropriate strategy to safely perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy in case of large uterus, showing the appropriate surgical steps and providing safety tips. The specimen weighed more than 1kg.
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic segmental small bowel resection including 3 different intracorporeal anastomoses
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) can be offered to young ladies presenting with malignant digestive tumors since they can undergo surgery through a suprapubic access, with a final non-visible result because it is under the bikini line.
Video: A 40-year-old woman presenting with an unknown anemia was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up evidenced an adenocarcinoma of the small bowel at 120cm from the pylorus. A suprapubic SIL segmental small bowel resection was proposed to the patient. The procedure was performed with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs, using three reusable ports placed above the pubic bone. Curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) allowed surgeons to work in good ergonomic conditions, maintaining a low cost for SIL. For the insertion of the linear stapler, a temporary 5mm scope was used and the intestinal continuity was established by a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-end anastomosis. Another option is to perform a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-side anastomosis (especially in case of obstructive tumor) or a linear mechanical side-to-side anastomosis. The mesenteric window was closed. The specimen was extracted suprapubically with a wound protection once the three windows of the ports have been joined together.
Results: Laparoscopy took 160 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No postoperative complications were noted and the use of minimal pain killers allowed for patient discharge after four days. Pathological findings demonstrated a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the jejunum, with 17 negative nodes (pT3N0Mx). The postoperative follow-up, including blood tests and PET-scan, did not show any recurrence at 12 months.
Conclusions: In addition to the known advantages of conventional multiport laparoscopy, the SIL technique allows to offer satisfying oncological results in addition to a non-visible surgical scar, because it is localized under the bikini line. Additionally, abdominal trauma and the final scar length can be reduced, since they are related to the tumor’s size.
G Dapri, K Grozdev, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
899 views
23 likes
0 comments
11:21
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic segmental small bowel resection including 3 different intracorporeal anastomoses
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) can be offered to young ladies presenting with malignant digestive tumors since they can undergo surgery through a suprapubic access, with a final non-visible result because it is under the bikini line.
Video: A 40-year-old woman presenting with an unknown anemia was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up evidenced an adenocarcinoma of the small bowel at 120cm from the pylorus. A suprapubic SIL segmental small bowel resection was proposed to the patient. The procedure was performed with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs, using three reusable ports placed above the pubic bone. Curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) allowed surgeons to work in good ergonomic conditions, maintaining a low cost for SIL. For the insertion of the linear stapler, a temporary 5mm scope was used and the intestinal continuity was established by a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-end anastomosis. Another option is to perform a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-side anastomosis (especially in case of obstructive tumor) or a linear mechanical side-to-side anastomosis. The mesenteric window was closed. The specimen was extracted suprapubically with a wound protection once the three windows of the ports have been joined together.
Results: Laparoscopy took 160 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No postoperative complications were noted and the use of minimal pain killers allowed for patient discharge after four days. Pathological findings demonstrated a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the jejunum, with 17 negative nodes (pT3N0Mx). The postoperative follow-up, including blood tests and PET-scan, did not show any recurrence at 12 months.
Conclusions: In addition to the known advantages of conventional multiport laparoscopy, the SIL technique allows to offer satisfying oncological results in addition to a non-visible surgical scar, because it is localized under the bikini line. Additionally, abdominal trauma and the final scar length can be reduced, since they are related to the tumor’s size.
Pure NOTES total transanal caudal-to-cranial low rectal resection
A 37-year-old female patient underwent a pure NOTES transanal rectal resection without transabdominal laparoscopic assistance for a rectal lesion located 5cm away from the anal verge (cT2N0M0 adenocarcinoma). All oncologic principles were fulfilled.
A GelPOINT Path Transanal® access platform was used. The procedure was achieved with no-flexible cameras and straight laparoscopic instruments. An Ultracision® device was used for dissection. A circular stapler with a long anvil was selected because it helped to achieve the anastomosis.
No complications were observed and the patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day.
P Leão, A Goulart, N Marcos, C Veiga, H Cristino
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1351 views
29 likes
0 comments
15:43
Pure NOTES total transanal caudal-to-cranial low rectal resection
A 37-year-old female patient underwent a pure NOTES transanal rectal resection without transabdominal laparoscopic assistance for a rectal lesion located 5cm away from the anal verge (cT2N0M0 adenocarcinoma). All oncologic principles were fulfilled.
A GelPOINT Path Transanal® access platform was used. The procedure was achieved with no-flexible cameras and straight laparoscopic instruments. An Ultracision® device was used for dissection. A circular stapler with a long anvil was selected because it helped to achieve the anastomosis.
No complications were observed and the patient was discharged home on the third postoperative day.
Single incision laparoscopic non-traumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia repair
Background: A diaphragmatic hernia is a quite uncommon disease, being congenital or post-traumatic. Its diagnosis is frequently incidental. The surgical treatment can be performed through the abdomen as well as through the chest. Laparoscopy and thoracoscopy offer a surgical benefit, because of reduced abdominal wall trauma and added advantages provided by minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy (TSIL), in addition to improved cosmetic results, can offer other advantages to MIS such as reduced postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and improved patient comfort.
Video: The authors report the case of a 45-year-old man who consulted for a non-traumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia, which was discovered incidentally, and which was treated using TSIL suture and mesh reinforcement.
Results: Laparoscopic time was 104 minutes and perioperative bleeding was insignificant. The final umbilical scar was 15mm. During the postoperative course, only 4 grams of paracetamol were used. The patient was discharged on the 1st postoperative day, after chest X-ray control. At consultation, the patient did not report the use of painkillers and, at 1, 6, and 12 months, the chest X-ray control was negative for recurrence.
Conclusions: Uncommon conditions, such as a lateral diaphragmatic hernia, can be approached using TSIL, because this technique adds an improved cosmetic result, a reduced postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and an improved patient comfort.
G Dapri, K Jottard, K Grozdev, D Guta, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1021 views
32 likes
0 comments
07:14
Single incision laparoscopic non-traumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia repair
Background: A diaphragmatic hernia is a quite uncommon disease, being congenital or post-traumatic. Its diagnosis is frequently incidental. The surgical treatment can be performed through the abdomen as well as through the chest. Laparoscopy and thoracoscopy offer a surgical benefit, because of reduced abdominal wall trauma and added advantages provided by minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy (TSIL), in addition to improved cosmetic results, can offer other advantages to MIS such as reduced postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and improved patient comfort.
Video: The authors report the case of a 45-year-old man who consulted for a non-traumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia, which was discovered incidentally, and which was treated using TSIL suture and mesh reinforcement.
Results: Laparoscopic time was 104 minutes and perioperative bleeding was insignificant. The final umbilical scar was 15mm. During the postoperative course, only 4 grams of paracetamol were used. The patient was discharged on the 1st postoperative day, after chest X-ray control. At consultation, the patient did not report the use of painkillers and, at 1, 6, and 12 months, the chest X-ray control was negative for recurrence.
Conclusions: Uncommon conditions, such as a lateral diaphragmatic hernia, can be approached using TSIL, because this technique adds an improved cosmetic result, a reduced postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and an improved patient comfort.
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) through single right iliac fossa (RIF) incision
Background: Single incision laparoscopy is worth of interest during up-to-down rectal resection because it allows to use the single site as the site of temporary ileostomy placement at the end of the procedure.
Video: This video shows an up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection in a 49-year-old woman presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma located 12cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor. The procedure was entirely performed with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), inserted in the right flank. The uterus and the peritoneal sheet covering the vagina were retrieved using percutaneous sutures. A circular mechanical colorectal anastomosis was performed and a final temporary ileostomy was placed at the site of the single access.
Results: The procedure duration was 297 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (20 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection allows to place the temporary ileostomy at the single incision site, offering oncological results comparable to conventional laparoscopy.
G Dapri, N Bachir, L Antolino, K Grozdev, D Guta, K Jottard, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2275 views
108 likes
0 comments
09:22
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) through single right iliac fossa (RIF) incision
Background: Single incision laparoscopy is worth of interest during up-to-down rectal resection because it allows to use the single site as the site of temporary ileostomy placement at the end of the procedure.
Video: This video shows an up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection in a 49-year-old woman presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma located 12cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor. The procedure was entirely performed with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), inserted in the right flank. The uterus and the peritoneal sheet covering the vagina were retrieved using percutaneous sutures. A circular mechanical colorectal anastomosis was performed and a final temporary ileostomy was placed at the site of the single access.
Results: The procedure duration was 297 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (20 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection allows to place the temporary ileostomy at the single incision site, offering oncological results comparable to conventional laparoscopy.
Four different intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. Suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of extended scar due to a large tumor. Intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory through a suprapubic access, because it prevents traction on the mesentery and on the transverse mesocolon.
Video: This video shows four different types of intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses.
1) Linear mechanical side-to-side
2) Completely manual side-to-side
3) Completely manual end-to-side
4) Completely manual end-to-end
At the end of each type of anastomosis, mesenteric defect closure is mandatory, to prevent intestinal obstruction caused by internal hernia.
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform linear mechanical anastomosis is 25 minutes and manual anastomosis takes 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different ileocolic anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire right hemicolectomy, please click here.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3847 views
178 likes
0 comments
07:58
Four different intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. Suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of extended scar due to a large tumor. Intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory through a suprapubic access, because it prevents traction on the mesentery and on the transverse mesocolon.
Video: This video shows four different types of intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses.
1) Linear mechanical side-to-side
2) Completely manual side-to-side
3) Completely manual end-to-side
4) Completely manual end-to-end
At the end of each type of anastomosis, mesenteric defect closure is mandatory, to prevent intestinal obstruction caused by internal hernia.
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform linear mechanical anastomosis is 25 minutes and manual anastomosis takes 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different ileocolic anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire right hemicolectomy, please click here.
Laparoscopic gastrostomy in a patient with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma
Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and self-expanding endoscopic prosthesis are considered to be the "gold standard" for patients with neurological or oncologic diseases, which do not allow feeding per os. When they fail, surgical gastrostomy is considered. Recent data suggest that the laparoscopic approach may be better regarding early complications as compared to PEG.
We present the case of an 81-year-old male patient diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The patient presented with total dysphagia. The attempt of placing a self-expanding endoscopic prosthesis was unsuccessful. The patient was then proposed for the placement of a feeding laparoscopic gastrostomy. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day two.
Surgical gastrostomy is associated with frequent complications, such as erythema, chronic suppuration, migration and complications associated with surgical access. Laparoscopic access and technical details of the procedure allowed to reduce such complications and to perform the main steps under direct visual control, making it very safe and easily reproducible.
A Gomes, D Luis, T Carneiro, C Veiga
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1959 views
58 likes
0 comments
06:40
Laparoscopic gastrostomy in a patient with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma
Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and self-expanding endoscopic prosthesis are considered to be the "gold standard" for patients with neurological or oncologic diseases, which do not allow feeding per os. When they fail, surgical gastrostomy is considered. Recent data suggest that the laparoscopic approach may be better regarding early complications as compared to PEG.
We present the case of an 81-year-old male patient diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The patient presented with total dysphagia. The attempt of placing a self-expanding endoscopic prosthesis was unsuccessful. The patient was then proposed for the placement of a feeding laparoscopic gastrostomy. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day two.
Surgical gastrostomy is associated with frequent complications, such as erythema, chronic suppuration, migration and complications associated with surgical access. Laparoscopic access and technical details of the procedure allowed to reduce such complications and to perform the main steps under direct visual control, making it very safe and easily reproducible.
Stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia treatment using laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair
Introduction: Prolapse stands for one of the most common complications of colostomy (>10%). Parastomal incisional hernia also represents 10 to 50% of complications. When both are present, the Sugarbaker technique represents a good indication due to mesh repair and pseudo-subperitonization, which can manage both prolapse and hernia. The laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker technique can be performed laparoscopically even in case of multiple previous laparotomies.
Clinical case: We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient presenting with parastomal incisional hernia and stomal prolapse after multiple abdominal procedures for ulcerative colitis, including rectosigmoidectomy, Hartmann procedure for anastomotic leak, left extended colectomy and stomal transposition for ischemic necrosis. An intra-abdominal proctectomy was attempted to manage the recurrence of colitis on the rectal stump. However, this attempt proved unsuccessful, and a local abdominoperineal resection was performed. Due to symptomatic hernia and prolapse, the laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified surgical technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair is performed to manage prolapse by pseudo-subperitonization and to manage hernia using an IPOM repair. As shown in this video, this technique is safe, reproducible, and effective.
J Leroy, HA Mercoli, S Tzedakis, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2333 views
99 likes
0 comments
10:54
Stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia treatment using laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair
Introduction: Prolapse stands for one of the most common complications of colostomy (>10%). Parastomal incisional hernia also represents 10 to 50% of complications. When both are present, the Sugarbaker technique represents a good indication due to mesh repair and pseudo-subperitonization, which can manage both prolapse and hernia. The laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker technique can be performed laparoscopically even in case of multiple previous laparotomies.
Clinical case: We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient presenting with parastomal incisional hernia and stomal prolapse after multiple abdominal procedures for ulcerative colitis, including rectosigmoidectomy, Hartmann procedure for anastomotic leak, left extended colectomy and stomal transposition for ischemic necrosis. An intra-abdominal proctectomy was attempted to manage the recurrence of colitis on the rectal stump. However, this attempt proved unsuccessful, and a local abdominoperineal resection was performed. Due to symptomatic hernia and prolapse, the laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified surgical technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair is performed to manage prolapse by pseudo-subperitonization and to manage hernia using an IPOM repair. As shown in this video, this technique is safe, reproducible, and effective.
Type III hiatal hernia: stepwise laparoscopic treatment
The surgical treatment of type III hiatal hernia has been thoroughly standardized in the following order: extrasaccular approach, reduction of the entire sac, and esophageal mobilization in order to restore the esophagogastric anatomy. Although it is recommended to combine this with a fundoplication as most authors do, there is still controversy concerning the closure technique of the diaphragmatic defect. Some experts recommend the reinforcement of this closure by means of a synthetic mesh. It is, however, a method which does not prevent recurrence and which can also bring about complications, which can at times be disastrous. As a result, we privilege reinforcement using an absorbable mesh.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, S Tzedakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
8264 views
285 likes
0 comments
16:21
Type III hiatal hernia: stepwise laparoscopic treatment
The surgical treatment of type III hiatal hernia has been thoroughly standardized in the following order: extrasaccular approach, reduction of the entire sac, and esophageal mobilization in order to restore the esophagogastric anatomy. Although it is recommended to combine this with a fundoplication as most authors do, there is still controversy concerning the closure technique of the diaphragmatic defect. Some experts recommend the reinforcement of this closure by means of a synthetic mesh. It is, however, a method which does not prevent recurrence and which can also bring about complications, which can at times be disastrous. As a result, we privilege reinforcement using an absorbable mesh.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass redo after sleeve gastrectomy associated with intrathoracic sleeve migration
Sleeve gastrectomy is a standard procedure in bariatric surgery nowadays. However, common contraindications involve the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese female patient with a past surgical history of a Nissen fundoplication reversed in 2012 because of dysphagia. A sleeve gastrectomy had been performed 2 years ago complicated by an intrathoracic migration and gastric twist as discovered in the preoperative control followed by dysphagia, reflux, and vomiting. A conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has been decided upon.
L Marx, S Tzedakis, HA Mercoli, S Perretta, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1585 views
47 likes
1 comment
09:21
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass redo after sleeve gastrectomy associated with intrathoracic sleeve migration
Sleeve gastrectomy is a standard procedure in bariatric surgery nowadays. However, common contraindications involve the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese female patient with a past surgical history of a Nissen fundoplication reversed in 2012 because of dysphagia. A sleeve gastrectomy had been performed 2 years ago complicated by an intrathoracic migration and gastric twist as discovered in the preoperative control followed by dysphagia, reflux, and vomiting. A conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has been decided upon.