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Laparoscopic TAPP repair of strangulated Spigelian hernia
Among all abdominal wall hernias, Spigelian hernia (SH) or lateral ventral hernia represents a rare surgical condition accounting for about 0.1%. It occurs through slit-like defects in the transversus abdominis muscle aponeurosis in the so-called “semilunar or Spigelian fascia”, between the semilunar line and the rectus muscle, usually at the level where the lateral margin of the rectus muscle intersects the arcuate line of Douglas. It is clinically asymptomatic in almost 90% cases and has nonspecific clinical findings. However, it can sometimes be complicated by bowel content strangulation, requiring immediate surgical management. The laparoscopic repair has been well-described. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we show the laparoscopic repair of a strangulated Spigelian hernia presented as intestinal obstruction using a transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) technique.
A Lapergola, A D'Attilio
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
9 views
0 likes
0 comments
07:12
Laparoscopic TAPP repair of strangulated Spigelian hernia
Among all abdominal wall hernias, Spigelian hernia (SH) or lateral ventral hernia represents a rare surgical condition accounting for about 0.1%. It occurs through slit-like defects in the transversus abdominis muscle aponeurosis in the so-called “semilunar or Spigelian fascia”, between the semilunar line and the rectus muscle, usually at the level where the lateral margin of the rectus muscle intersects the arcuate line of Douglas. It is clinically asymptomatic in almost 90% cases and has nonspecific clinical findings. However, it can sometimes be complicated by bowel content strangulation, requiring immediate surgical management. The laparoscopic repair has been well-described. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we show the laparoscopic repair of a strangulated Spigelian hernia presented as intestinal obstruction using a transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) technique.
Laparoscopic Sugarbaker parastomal hernia repair
In this video, authors demonstrate a laparoscopic Sugarbaker technique for parastomal hernia repair using a Gore-Tex mesh in an 18-year-old man with a history of anal cancer status post-abdominoperineal resection with an end colostomy and known chronic parastomal hernia. His history also includes hypoplastic left heart syndrome status post-orthotopic cardiac transplant, DiGeorge syndrome, Hodgkin’s disease type post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and immune deficiency. He presented with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting secondary to small bowel obstruction at the site of his previous parastomal hernia. CT-scan showed a mesenteric swirl with a transition point. Upon laparoscopy, the parastomal hernia was identified. The bowel was reduced and hernia edges cauterized. Primary repair of the hernia defect was performed using a percutaneous technique. A Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain was left inside the hernia area and exited through a separate part of the abdomen. Following the Sugarbaker technique, a 16 by 20cm Gore-Tex dual mesh plus was used to reinforce the defect. Percutaneous sutures in the four corners secured the mesh. Once the mesh was in the desired location, absorbable tackers were used to attach the mesh to the anterior abdominal wall. Additional percutaneous sutures were added to the medial mesh. The patient recovered well. His nasogastric tube was removed on postoperative day (POD) 4. He was advanced to a regular diet and discharged on POD 7. Surveillance CT showed an intact repair with no recurrence a year after surgery. This case demonstrates a Sugarbaker technique for the closure of parastomal hernias using a Gore-Tex graft for parastomal hernias. The laparoscopic Sugarbaker technique is a safe procedure for the repair of parastomal hernias.
T Huy, A Bajinting, J Greenspon, GA Villalona
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
2497 views
28 likes
1 comment
05:01
Laparoscopic Sugarbaker parastomal hernia repair
In this video, authors demonstrate a laparoscopic Sugarbaker technique for parastomal hernia repair using a Gore-Tex mesh in an 18-year-old man with a history of anal cancer status post-abdominoperineal resection with an end colostomy and known chronic parastomal hernia. His history also includes hypoplastic left heart syndrome status post-orthotopic cardiac transplant, DiGeorge syndrome, Hodgkin’s disease type post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and immune deficiency. He presented with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting secondary to small bowel obstruction at the site of his previous parastomal hernia. CT-scan showed a mesenteric swirl with a transition point. Upon laparoscopy, the parastomal hernia was identified. The bowel was reduced and hernia edges cauterized. Primary repair of the hernia defect was performed using a percutaneous technique. A Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain was left inside the hernia area and exited through a separate part of the abdomen. Following the Sugarbaker technique, a 16 by 20cm Gore-Tex dual mesh plus was used to reinforce the defect. Percutaneous sutures in the four corners secured the mesh. Once the mesh was in the desired location, absorbable tackers were used to attach the mesh to the anterior abdominal wall. Additional percutaneous sutures were added to the medial mesh. The patient recovered well. His nasogastric tube was removed on postoperative day (POD) 4. He was advanced to a regular diet and discharged on POD 7. Surveillance CT showed an intact repair with no recurrence a year after surgery. This case demonstrates a Sugarbaker technique for the closure of parastomal hernias using a Gore-Tex graft for parastomal hernias. The laparoscopic Sugarbaker technique is a safe procedure for the repair of parastomal hernias.
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3850 views
16 likes
2 comments
08:23
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
Complex cases in laparoscopic recurrent and incisional hernia repair: multi-recurrence, infections, fistulas, difficult abdomen
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
12701 views
4 likes
0 comments
03:00
Complex cases in laparoscopic recurrent and incisional hernia repair: multi-recurrence, infections, fistulas, difficult abdomen
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
Recurrent and incisional hernia repair: complex cases
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
State of the art
1 year ago
3282 views
21 likes
1 comment
00:00
Recurrent and incisional hernia repair: complex cases
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
A Tojal, AR Loureiro, B Prata, R Patrão, N Carrilho, C Casimiro
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1353 views
5 likes
0 comments
10:34
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair for unilateral inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient
In this video, we present the case of a left-sided unilateral indirect inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient. Treatment was performed using the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair technique. The hernia sac was promptly identified and dissected without any concern to cord structures since the patient was a female. The herniotomy was performed with an Endoloop®. The only constraints of surgery were limited operating space and ergonomic handling of instruments. The patient was discharged in the evening of surgery and wounds healed within a week. Postoperative follow-up after 6 months revealed excellent cosmesis and a complete absence of hernia on the operated site. Mini laparoscopic instruments can also be used to improve surgical cosmesis and ensure same day discharge without any postoperative sequelae.
KB Kaundinya
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1555 views
6 likes
0 comments
03:35
Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair for unilateral inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient
In this video, we present the case of a left-sided unilateral indirect inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient. Treatment was performed using the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair technique. The hernia sac was promptly identified and dissected without any concern to cord structures since the patient was a female. The herniotomy was performed with an Endoloop®. The only constraints of surgery were limited operating space and ergonomic handling of instruments. The patient was discharged in the evening of surgery and wounds healed within a week. Postoperative follow-up after 6 months revealed excellent cosmesis and a complete absence of hernia on the operated site. Mini laparoscopic instruments can also be used to improve surgical cosmesis and ensure same day discharge without any postoperative sequelae.
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
S Morales-Conde, T Urade, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6004 views
22 likes
2 comments
42:53
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.