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Intravesical mini-laparoscopic repair of vesicovaginal fistulas
Vesicovaginal fistulas (VVF) constitute the most common type of genitourinary fistulas. In developed countries, VVF are almost always iatrogenic and frequently a secondary complication of gynecologic surgery. Some minimally invasive techniques have been introduced to decrease morbidity related to standard open procedures for the treatment of VVF. One such procedure is the intravesical mini-laparoscopic approach. The aim of this was to present our initial clinical experience using this technique for transvesical VVF repair. In 2014, we carried out a mini-laparoscopic repair of VVF in two women who did not respond to conservative treatment with a Foley catheter. The procedure was performed transvesically with a 3mm instrument and a 5mm, 30-degree scope. The fistulous tract was dissected and partially excised. The bladder and vaginal wall defects were closed in two layers with two separate running barbed, absorbable 3/0 sutures. Median operative time was approximately 100 minutes, and blood loss was not significant. Patients were discharged from hospital 24 hours after surgery. A Foley catheter was left in place for 14 days. Imaging examinations performed 6 weeks postoperatively revealed no VVF. In patients with simple fistulas, this technique provides a minimally invasive easily reproducible approach with few associated complications.
The advantages of this technique as compared to the conventional laparoscopic approach are described as follows:
- the risk of bleeding is reduced because the size of the incision made is smaller and access to the fistula site is easier and direct without manipulating abdominal structures;
- the length of hospital stay required is significantly shorter with intravesical mini-laparoscopic than laparoscopic surgery conventional approach.
A Llueca, JL Herraiz, M Rodrigo, Y Maazouzi, D Piquer, M Guijarro, A Cañete, J Escrig
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3133 views
123 likes
0 comments
07:16
Intravesical mini-laparoscopic repair of vesicovaginal fistulas
Vesicovaginal fistulas (VVF) constitute the most common type of genitourinary fistulas. In developed countries, VVF are almost always iatrogenic and frequently a secondary complication of gynecologic surgery. Some minimally invasive techniques have been introduced to decrease morbidity related to standard open procedures for the treatment of VVF. One such procedure is the intravesical mini-laparoscopic approach. The aim of this was to present our initial clinical experience using this technique for transvesical VVF repair. In 2014, we carried out a mini-laparoscopic repair of VVF in two women who did not respond to conservative treatment with a Foley catheter. The procedure was performed transvesically with a 3mm instrument and a 5mm, 30-degree scope. The fistulous tract was dissected and partially excised. The bladder and vaginal wall defects were closed in two layers with two separate running barbed, absorbable 3/0 sutures. Median operative time was approximately 100 minutes, and blood loss was not significant. Patients were discharged from hospital 24 hours after surgery. A Foley catheter was left in place for 14 days. Imaging examinations performed 6 weeks postoperatively revealed no VVF. In patients with simple fistulas, this technique provides a minimally invasive easily reproducible approach with few associated complications.
The advantages of this technique as compared to the conventional laparoscopic approach are described as follows:
- the risk of bleeding is reduced because the size of the incision made is smaller and access to the fistula site is easier and direct without manipulating abdominal structures;
- the length of hospital stay required is significantly shorter with intravesical mini-laparoscopic than laparoscopic surgery conventional approach.
Laparoscopic retroperitoneal access to ovarian cysts fixed by severe pelvic adhesions: a case report
Left cystectomy or left adnexectomy can be difficult in cases of frozen pelvis, with an adnexa entirely covered with the sigmoid colon and stuck to the pelvic sidewall.
This video clearly demonstrates the advantages of the left retroperitoneal access to the adnexa, limiting the risks of injury of the ureter and the perforation of the sigmoid colon. The different steps of the operation are as follows: 1) Lysis of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the left pelvic sidewall to visualize the tube. 2) Division of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the uterus to visualize the left ovary. 3) Left retroperitoneal access to the ovary with a longitudinal incision of the peritoneum, laterally. 4) Division of the utero-ovarian pedicle. 5) Retroperitoneal dissection of the ureter to completely release the ovary from the ureter. 6) Lysis of the upper surface of the ovary from the sigmoid colon.
JB Dubuisson, J Dubuisson
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
5475 views
297 likes
0 comments
08:20
Laparoscopic retroperitoneal access to ovarian cysts fixed by severe pelvic adhesions: a case report
Left cystectomy or left adnexectomy can be difficult in cases of frozen pelvis, with an adnexa entirely covered with the sigmoid colon and stuck to the pelvic sidewall.
This video clearly demonstrates the advantages of the left retroperitoneal access to the adnexa, limiting the risks of injury of the ureter and the perforation of the sigmoid colon. The different steps of the operation are as follows: 1) Lysis of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the left pelvic sidewall to visualize the tube. 2) Division of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the uterus to visualize the left ovary. 3) Left retroperitoneal access to the ovary with a longitudinal incision of the peritoneum, laterally. 4) Division of the utero-ovarian pedicle. 5) Retroperitoneal dissection of the ureter to completely release the ovary from the ureter. 6) Lysis of the upper surface of the ovary from the sigmoid colon.
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, A Host
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3923 views
162 likes
0 comments
31:22
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
Laparoscopic management of extrauterine leiomyomas
Uterine leiomyomas affect 20 to 30% of women older than 35 years. Extrauterine leiomyomas are rarer, and they present a greater diagnostic challenge. These histologically benign leiomyomas occasionally occur with unusual growth patterns or in unusual locations which make their identification more challenging both clinically and radiologically. Unusual growth patterns may be seen, including benign metastasizing leiomyoma, disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis, intravenous leiomyomatosis, parasitic leiomyoma, and retroperitoneal growth. Diffuse peritoneal leiomyomatosis manifests as innumerable peritoneal nodules resembling those in peritoneal carcinomatosis. Parasitic leiomyoma and retroperitoneal leiomyomatosis usually manifest as single or multiple pelvic or retroperitoneal masses. Retroperitoneal growth is yet another unusual growth pattern of leiomyomas. Multiple leiomyomatous masses are usually seen in the pelvic retroperitoneum in women with a concurrent uterine leiomyoma or a history of uterine leiomyoma. Rarely, the extrauterine masses may extend to the upper retroperitoneum, as high as the level of the renal hilum. Occasionally, leiomyomas become adherent to surrounding structures (e.g., broad ligament, omentum, or retroperitoneal connective tissue), develop an auxiliary blood supply, and lose their original attachment to the uterus, hence becoming “parasitic.” We are presenting a case of extrauterine leiomyoma, which was operated for laparoscopic myomectomy for huge cervical leiomyoma 4 years back but was converted to an abdominal myomectomy.
D Limbachiya
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2862 views
174 likes
0 comments
09:11
Laparoscopic management of extrauterine leiomyomas
Uterine leiomyomas affect 20 to 30% of women older than 35 years. Extrauterine leiomyomas are rarer, and they present a greater diagnostic challenge. These histologically benign leiomyomas occasionally occur with unusual growth patterns or in unusual locations which make their identification more challenging both clinically and radiologically. Unusual growth patterns may be seen, including benign metastasizing leiomyoma, disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis, intravenous leiomyomatosis, parasitic leiomyoma, and retroperitoneal growth. Diffuse peritoneal leiomyomatosis manifests as innumerable peritoneal nodules resembling those in peritoneal carcinomatosis. Parasitic leiomyoma and retroperitoneal leiomyomatosis usually manifest as single or multiple pelvic or retroperitoneal masses. Retroperitoneal growth is yet another unusual growth pattern of leiomyomas. Multiple leiomyomatous masses are usually seen in the pelvic retroperitoneum in women with a concurrent uterine leiomyoma or a history of uterine leiomyoma. Rarely, the extrauterine masses may extend to the upper retroperitoneum, as high as the level of the renal hilum. Occasionally, leiomyomas become adherent to surrounding structures (e.g., broad ligament, omentum, or retroperitoneal connective tissue), develop an auxiliary blood supply, and lose their original attachment to the uterus, hence becoming “parasitic.” We are presenting a case of extrauterine leiomyoma, which was operated for laparoscopic myomectomy for huge cervical leiomyoma 4 years back but was converted to an abdominal myomectomy.
In bag morcellation of a uterine fibroid
For a long time, morcellation of an undiagnosed malignancy, an old and frightening topic, has been a matter of extensive discussions. Clinicians and pathologists still lack instruments to clearly diagnose specific pathologies such as leiomyosarcomas. Minimally invasive surgery brought numerous advantages for the patient. However, morcellation is a key issue for the extraction of a large uterus and myomas. In this video, we present an option for the extraction of myomas. By insufflating a large Endobag®, a virtual abdominal cavity is created, and the mass is morcellated under direct vision. The resistant bag works not only as a protection for the abdominal cavity in case of an undiagnosed malignancy, but also serves to deviate organs from the morcellator.
R Fernandes, A Silva e Silva, JP Carvalho
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3364 views
131 likes
0 comments
06:37
In bag morcellation of a uterine fibroid
For a long time, morcellation of an undiagnosed malignancy, an old and frightening topic, has been a matter of extensive discussions. Clinicians and pathologists still lack instruments to clearly diagnose specific pathologies such as leiomyosarcomas. Minimally invasive surgery brought numerous advantages for the patient. However, morcellation is a key issue for the extraction of a large uterus and myomas. In this video, we present an option for the extraction of myomas. By insufflating a large Endobag®, a virtual abdominal cavity is created, and the mass is morcellated under direct vision. The resistant bag works not only as a protection for the abdominal cavity in case of an undiagnosed malignancy, but also serves to deviate organs from the morcellator.
Laparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
Endometriosis is an enigmatic disorder, which affects women in their reproductive age. Failure of recent clinical trials on non-surgical management of endometriosis confirms the role of surgery as a viable treatment of choice. However, recurrence after surgery is common. Recurrence rate varies according to the surgeon’s skills, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and to the postoperative intervention outcome. In patients with severe endometriosis, lesions usually involve the posterior cul-de-sac, anterior rectum, one or both pelvic sidewalls, involving the ureters, the rectosigmoid, and less commonly the anterior bladder, the appendix, and the small bowel. Ureteral retroperitoneal dissection becomes mandatory in extensive endometriosis due to pelvic anatomical distortion. It also leaves the bowel intact without injuring it as the pseudo-peritoneum is lifted along with the inflamed bowel. Consequently, in the surgical practice of benign pathologies, a proper knowledge of the retroperitoneal anatomy ensures complete clearance in cases of advanced endometriosis and frozen pelvis. Here, we present a very interesting case of bladder endometriosis associated with hematuria during menstruation. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with bladder endometriosis in most cases. Provided surgeons are skilled and lesions require no ureteral reimplantation, operative laparoscopy is a valid alternative to laparotomy for partial cystectomy.
D Limbachiya
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2126 views
65 likes
0 comments
06:56
Laparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
Endometriosis is an enigmatic disorder, which affects women in their reproductive age. Failure of recent clinical trials on non-surgical management of endometriosis confirms the role of surgery as a viable treatment of choice. However, recurrence after surgery is common. Recurrence rate varies according to the surgeon’s skills, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and to the postoperative intervention outcome. In patients with severe endometriosis, lesions usually involve the posterior cul-de-sac, anterior rectum, one or both pelvic sidewalls, involving the ureters, the rectosigmoid, and less commonly the anterior bladder, the appendix, and the small bowel. Ureteral retroperitoneal dissection becomes mandatory in extensive endometriosis due to pelvic anatomical distortion. It also leaves the bowel intact without injuring it as the pseudo-peritoneum is lifted along with the inflamed bowel. Consequently, in the surgical practice of benign pathologies, a proper knowledge of the retroperitoneal anatomy ensures complete clearance in cases of advanced endometriosis and frozen pelvis. Here, we present a very interesting case of bladder endometriosis associated with hematuria during menstruation. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with bladder endometriosis in most cases. Provided surgeons are skilled and lesions require no ureteral reimplantation, operative laparoscopy is a valid alternative to laparotomy for partial cystectomy.