We use cookies to offer you an optimal experience on our website. By browsing our website, you accept the use of cookies.
Filter by
Specialty
View more
Technologies
View more
Clear filter Media type
View more
Clear filter Category
View more
Publication date
Sort by:
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
Morbid obesity surgery, which induces a rapid weight loss, is a predisposing factor for the onset of gallstones. There are treatments which help to reduce this risk. However, the observance is poor and lithogenicity brings about risks of complications such as cholecystitis, stone migration, and acute pancreatitis.
This video demonstrates the case of a patient who underwent a sleeve gastrectomy with a substantial weight loss. Stone migration was found along with a less serious pancreatic response. During a blood test analysis, thrombocytopenia was found and investigated by hematologists. Besides a low platelet count, a qualitative anomaly was observed increasing the risk of bleeding. Despite of this, cholecystectomy was necessary to prevent any new stone migration.
The operator was skilled and used a conventional laparoscopic approach. The patient’s liver is the site of a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), making the procedure even more complex. Four ports were placed to allow for an adequate gallbladder retraction and for a minute dissection. Calot’s triangle was classically approached first as soon as the adhesions between the omentum and the gallbladder were taken down. Due to a thickened and inflammatory cystic duct, the entire gallbladder was dissected before ligating the cystic duct with two ligatures, one of them being reinforced by means of a surgical loop.
M Vix, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
830 views
2 likes
0 comments
13:25
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
Morbid obesity surgery, which induces a rapid weight loss, is a predisposing factor for the onset of gallstones. There are treatments which help to reduce this risk. However, the observance is poor and lithogenicity brings about risks of complications such as cholecystitis, stone migration, and acute pancreatitis.
This video demonstrates the case of a patient who underwent a sleeve gastrectomy with a substantial weight loss. Stone migration was found along with a less serious pancreatic response. During a blood test analysis, thrombocytopenia was found and investigated by hematologists. Besides a low platelet count, a qualitative anomaly was observed increasing the risk of bleeding. Despite of this, cholecystectomy was necessary to prevent any new stone migration.
The operator was skilled and used a conventional laparoscopic approach. The patient’s liver is the site of a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), making the procedure even more complex. Four ports were placed to allow for an adequate gallbladder retraction and for a minute dissection. Calot’s triangle was classically approached first as soon as the adhesions between the omentum and the gallbladder were taken down. Due to a thickened and inflammatory cystic duct, the entire gallbladder was dissected before ligating the cystic duct with two ligatures, one of them being reinforced by means of a surgical loop.
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
J Magalhães, AM Pereira, T Fonseca, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1595 views
3 likes
0 comments
09:34
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: cystic duct stone management
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 69-year-old woman who had multiple episodes of biliary colic. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the presence of multiple gallbladder stones. MRI also showed a folded gallbladder infundibulum over the cystic duct, which is enlarged and contains a stone. The common bile duct is otherwise perfectly thin and free of stones. In this video, one can observe a stepwise cholecystectomy technique, with exposure, dissection of the serosa and of Calot’s triangle. Cystic artery division is first performed in order to allow complete cystic duct dissection obtaining the critical view of safety. The dissection of the dilated cystic duct is thoroughly demonstrated. A small stone is pushed back into the gallbladder; the cystic duct is opened and checked for residual stones, and the cystic duct convergence with the common bile duct is evidenced prior to clip positioning and duct division.
M Ignat, M Wehr, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2986 views
11 likes
0 comments
10:44
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: cystic duct stone management
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 69-year-old woman who had multiple episodes of biliary colic. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the presence of multiple gallbladder stones. MRI also showed a folded gallbladder infundibulum over the cystic duct, which is enlarged and contains a stone. The common bile duct is otherwise perfectly thin and free of stones. In this video, one can observe a stepwise cholecystectomy technique, with exposure, dissection of the serosa and of Calot’s triangle. Cystic artery division is first performed in order to allow complete cystic duct dissection obtaining the critical view of safety. The dissection of the dilated cystic duct is thoroughly demonstrated. A small stone is pushed back into the gallbladder; the cystic duct is opened and checked for residual stones, and the cystic duct convergence with the common bile duct is evidenced prior to clip positioning and duct division.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
D Mutter, G Philouze, B Seeliger, J Marescaux
How to
8 months ago
13128 views
74 likes
0 comments
00:30:23
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, L Arru, F Gheza, M Diana
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
3709 views
10 likes
0 comments
12:41
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
J Magalhães, L Matos, J Costa, J Costa Pereira, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
2596 views
13 likes
3 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
E Parra-Davila, M Ignat, L Soler, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
1575 views
2 likes
0 comments
32:48
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
2548 views
8 likes
0 comments
10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
Laparoscopic rectal resection with ICG-guided nodal navigation
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 66-year-old woman with a sigmoid-rectal junction early stage cancer submitted to laparoscopic resection. Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to mark the distal margin of the neoplasia, and 2mL of ICG were injected into the mucosa of the rectum, 2cm distal to the inferior border of the tumor.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588 camera system), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
It was possible to verify the good perfusion of the proximal stump of the anastomosis before the Knight-Griffen anastomosis was performed, thanks to an intravenous injection of ICG.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection, a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures, and could be related with a lower risk of anastomotic fistula, controlling the adequate perfusion of the stump.
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, A Titi, G Gaverini
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
2967 views
6 likes
0 comments
11:48
Laparoscopic rectal resection with ICG-guided nodal navigation
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 66-year-old woman with a sigmoid-rectal junction early stage cancer submitted to laparoscopic resection. Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to mark the distal margin of the neoplasia, and 2mL of ICG were injected into the mucosa of the rectum, 2cm distal to the inferior border of the tumor.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588 camera system), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
It was possible to verify the good perfusion of the proximal stump of the anastomosis before the Knight-Griffen anastomosis was performed, thanks to an intravenous injection of ICG.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection, a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures, and could be related with a lower risk of anastomotic fistula, controlling the adequate perfusion of the stump.
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
S Qian, P Tejedor, M Leon, M Ortega, C Pastor
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
3973 views
5 likes
0 comments
06:45
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
S Morales-Conde, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
5225 views
10 likes
0 comments
43:25
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
Laparoscopic splenic flexure mobilization during low anterior resection (LAR), extra central connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems
This is the case of two adult patients who presented with a low rectal carcinoma. A low anterior resection was performed laparoscopically. In both cases, the procedure was begun with a mobilization of the splenic flexure to ensure sufficient length on the proximal colonic segment to facilitate a tension-free low colorectal anastomosis. In the first case, a small aberrant artery, and during the second case, an aberrant artery of greater caliber can be appreciated. Anatomical studies report an extra central arterial connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems in addition to the marginal artery of Drummond in 10 to 30% of cases. In such cases, there is an extra connection from the ascending branch of the left colic artery to the middle colic artery or the marginal artery of Drummond. Different names have been given to these connections, such as for example the meandering mesenteric artery, the artery of Moskovitch and Riolan’s arch.
A Wijsmuller, RJ Franken, JB Tuynman, J Bonjer
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
6827 views
30 likes
0 comments
19:46
Laparoscopic splenic flexure mobilization during low anterior resection (LAR), extra central connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems
This is the case of two adult patients who presented with a low rectal carcinoma. A low anterior resection was performed laparoscopically. In both cases, the procedure was begun with a mobilization of the splenic flexure to ensure sufficient length on the proximal colonic segment to facilitate a tension-free low colorectal anastomosis. In the first case, a small aberrant artery, and during the second case, an aberrant artery of greater caliber can be appreciated. Anatomical studies report an extra central arterial connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems in addition to the marginal artery of Drummond in 10 to 30% of cases. In such cases, there is an extra connection from the ascending branch of the left colic artery to the middle colic artery or the marginal artery of Drummond. Different names have been given to these connections, such as for example the meandering mesenteric artery, the artery of Moskovitch and Riolan’s arch.
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
C Viana, M Lozano, D Poletto, T Moreno, C Varela, A Toscano
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
3402 views
9 likes
1 comment
15:27
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.