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Radical cystoprostatectomy with intracorporeal orthotopic ileal neobladder reconstruction: 3D HD video laparoscopy
The author presents the case of a 64-year-old male patient with a high-grade urothelial carcinoma infiltrating the bladders (pT2-G2), with a CT-scan of the abdomen and thorax negative for secondary localizations. The patient was subjected to a radical cystoprostatectomy with intracorporeal orthotopic ileal neobladder reconstruction, performed entirely in 3D HD videolaparoscopy. After the intervention, the patient is mobilized early. Parenteral feeding is given until restoration of bowel peristalsis. The nasogastric tube is removed with restoration of bowel peristalsis. Continuous antibiotic treatment is administered for 7 days after surgery. Neobladder lavage is performed daily to evacuate mucus. Stents are inspected daily to ensure patency and sterile saline is used if there is any suspicion of obstruction. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis is continued. The drain is removed when the draining liquid is less than 50cc per day and when there is no urine leak. A cystogram is performed on postoperative day 14. The stents are removed sequentially at 24 hours of interval. The catheter is extracted from the neobladder 20 days after surgery. The patient is discharged from hospital 21 days after surgery. Two years after the intervention, he presents a negative oncology follow-up. The patient is in a satisfactory general health condition. He has fully recovered and returned to a normal professional life. He urinates regularly and empties his neobladder every 3 to 4 hours, with minimal stress incontinence, particularly in the evening when he is physically tired; he gains erectile activity with the use of medical devices, benefiting from a more effective intracavernous injection therapy and vacuum device, and pharmacotherapy proves less effective.
D Geddo
Surgical intervention
1 day ago
39 views
1 like
0 comments
17:33
Radical cystoprostatectomy with intracorporeal orthotopic ileal neobladder reconstruction: 3D HD video laparoscopy
The author presents the case of a 64-year-old male patient with a high-grade urothelial carcinoma infiltrating the bladders (pT2-G2), with a CT-scan of the abdomen and thorax negative for secondary localizations. The patient was subjected to a radical cystoprostatectomy with intracorporeal orthotopic ileal neobladder reconstruction, performed entirely in 3D HD videolaparoscopy. After the intervention, the patient is mobilized early. Parenteral feeding is given until restoration of bowel peristalsis. The nasogastric tube is removed with restoration of bowel peristalsis. Continuous antibiotic treatment is administered for 7 days after surgery. Neobladder lavage is performed daily to evacuate mucus. Stents are inspected daily to ensure patency and sterile saline is used if there is any suspicion of obstruction. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis is continued. The drain is removed when the draining liquid is less than 50cc per day and when there is no urine leak. A cystogram is performed on postoperative day 14. The stents are removed sequentially at 24 hours of interval. The catheter is extracted from the neobladder 20 days after surgery. The patient is discharged from hospital 21 days after surgery. Two years after the intervention, he presents a negative oncology follow-up. The patient is in a satisfactory general health condition. He has fully recovered and returned to a normal professional life. He urinates regularly and empties his neobladder every 3 to 4 hours, with minimal stress incontinence, particularly in the evening when he is physically tired; he gains erectile activity with the use of medical devices, benefiting from a more effective intracavernous injection therapy and vacuum device, and pharmacotherapy proves less effective.
Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration using a disposable fiber-optic bonchoscope (Ambu® aScope™)
Background: Laparoscopic common bile duct (CBD) exploration can be performed following choledochotomy or via the trancystic approach. Laparoscopic CBD exploration is limited in some benign upper gastrointestinal units due to the cost of sterilization of the reusable choledochoscope.
We have recently published a case series confirming the safety and efficacy of the 5mm reusable bronchoscope for CBD exploration. This case series evaluates a single-use bronchochoscope (Ambu® aScope™) for laparoscopic CBD exploration.
Method: A retrospective study was conducted from January 2015 to December 2016. Data was collected from electronic records of the patients. All cases confirmed the presence of CBD stones using USS and MRCP. The disposable bronchoscope is introduced via an epigastric port. Choledochotomy is performed using a choledochotome, and a transcystic approach is used after cystic duct dilatation, if required. The Ambu® aScope™ 2 (Ambu UK Ltd, Cambridgeshire) is a sterile and single-use flexible bronchoscope, which is normally used by anesthesiologists for difficult tracheal intubation. A disposable bronchoscope is available in two sizes (3.8mm and 5mm). It is a one-piece unit with a single dimensional flexible tip manipulated with a handpiece (150-degree flex in the 5mm model and 130-degree flex in the 3.8mm model). There is a single instrument channel with a 2.2mm diameter, which allows for the passage of standard endoscopic baskets for CBD stone retrieval. The image is projected to a high-resolution 6.5” LCD screen with a resolution of 640x480 pixels. The bronchoscope handpiece includes a suction port, which is used as an irrigation source for CBD dilatation. It requires the use of a standard 3-way connector.
Results: Twenty nine patients had CBD exploration using the disposable bronchochoscope. There were 10 male and 19 female patients (median age: 42). Ten procedures were performed as emergencies and 19 were performed electively. All cases were managed laparoscopically except one, which was planned as an open procedure due to previous extensive open surgery.
Twenty eight patients had their CBD cleared using a disposable bronchoscope and two needed subsequent ERCP. Choledochotomy was performed in 15 patients and a transcystic approach was used in 6 patients. No T-tube was used in the laparoscopic cases. Two cases were performed as day case surgery. Median postoperative hospital stay was 2.5 days.
Conclusion: The disposable bronchoscope is a safe and effective instrument for CBD exploration, with results comparable to our previously published case series. It has guaranteed sterility and is cost-effective compared to the reusable bronchoscope, especially when initial capital outlay, sterile processing and maintenance costs are considered.
Y Aawsaj, I Ibrahim, A Mitchell, A Gilliam
Surgical intervention
3 days ago
37 views
1 like
0 comments
10:08
Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration using a disposable fiber-optic bonchoscope (Ambu® aScope™)
Background: Laparoscopic common bile duct (CBD) exploration can be performed following choledochotomy or via the trancystic approach. Laparoscopic CBD exploration is limited in some benign upper gastrointestinal units due to the cost of sterilization of the reusable choledochoscope.
We have recently published a case series confirming the safety and efficacy of the 5mm reusable bronchoscope for CBD exploration. This case series evaluates a single-use bronchochoscope (Ambu® aScope™) for laparoscopic CBD exploration.
Method: A retrospective study was conducted from January 2015 to December 2016. Data was collected from electronic records of the patients. All cases confirmed the presence of CBD stones using USS and MRCP. The disposable bronchoscope is introduced via an epigastric port. Choledochotomy is performed using a choledochotome, and a transcystic approach is used after cystic duct dilatation, if required. The Ambu® aScope™ 2 (Ambu UK Ltd, Cambridgeshire) is a sterile and single-use flexible bronchoscope, which is normally used by anesthesiologists for difficult tracheal intubation. A disposable bronchoscope is available in two sizes (3.8mm and 5mm). It is a one-piece unit with a single dimensional flexible tip manipulated with a handpiece (150-degree flex in the 5mm model and 130-degree flex in the 3.8mm model). There is a single instrument channel with a 2.2mm diameter, which allows for the passage of standard endoscopic baskets for CBD stone retrieval. The image is projected to a high-resolution 6.5” LCD screen with a resolution of 640x480 pixels. The bronchoscope handpiece includes a suction port, which is used as an irrigation source for CBD dilatation. It requires the use of a standard 3-way connector.
Results: Twenty nine patients had CBD exploration using the disposable bronchochoscope. There were 10 male and 19 female patients (median age: 42). Ten procedures were performed as emergencies and 19 were performed electively. All cases were managed laparoscopically except one, which was planned as an open procedure due to previous extensive open surgery.
Twenty eight patients had their CBD cleared using a disposable bronchoscope and two needed subsequent ERCP. Choledochotomy was performed in 15 patients and a transcystic approach was used in 6 patients. No T-tube was used in the laparoscopic cases. Two cases were performed as day case surgery. Median postoperative hospital stay was 2.5 days.
Conclusion: The disposable bronchoscope is a safe and effective instrument for CBD exploration, with results comparable to our previously published case series. It has guaranteed sterility and is cost-effective compared to the reusable bronchoscope, especially when initial capital outlay, sterile processing and maintenance costs are considered.
Heller's cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Achalasia stems from Greek and means “a” (not) and “khálasis” (relaxation).
Idiopathic megaesophagus (achalasia) is an esophageal primary motor irregularity. It is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis, together with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter after swallowing.
Differential diagnosis must be made between Chagas disease and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate ranges from 0.5 to 1 per 100,000 persons-years of study. Although there are several theories, the etiology remains unknown.
The first clinical description was made by Sir Thomas Wills (1672). He used to treat the disease via dilation with a sponge attached to a whalebone. Arthur Hertz was the first to name the disease “achalasia”. Ernest Heller performed the first successful esophagectomy in 1913. Zaaijer was the first to describe the anterior myotomy in 1923.
Other therapeutic procedures include botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter. It has transient effects and patients can develop tolerance to the injections. Another option is endoscopic hydropneumatic dilation, which should be fluoroscopically-guided. When it fails, the efficacy of other therapeutic options decreases. The most serious complication is esophageal perforation.
The diagnostic criteria are based on endoscopic findings. Endoscopy reveals there are food remains as well as esophageal dilation, and decreased motility. X-ray exams show esophageal dilation and narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric findings show decreased esophageal motility, increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
The patient was operated on. Since there was no hiatal hernia, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication was chosen, based on its efficacy in preventing reflux, as well as in keeping the myotomy free of a wrap.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres, NS Gómez Peña-Alfaro
Surgical intervention
1 day ago
80 views
0 likes
1 comment
12:40
Heller's cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Achalasia stems from Greek and means “a” (not) and “khálasis” (relaxation).
Idiopathic megaesophagus (achalasia) is an esophageal primary motor irregularity. It is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis, together with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter after swallowing.
Differential diagnosis must be made between Chagas disease and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate ranges from 0.5 to 1 per 100,000 persons-years of study. Although there are several theories, the etiology remains unknown.
The first clinical description was made by Sir Thomas Wills (1672). He used to treat the disease via dilation with a sponge attached to a whalebone. Arthur Hertz was the first to name the disease “achalasia”. Ernest Heller performed the first successful esophagectomy in 1913. Zaaijer was the first to describe the anterior myotomy in 1923.
Other therapeutic procedures include botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter. It has transient effects and patients can develop tolerance to the injections. Another option is endoscopic hydropneumatic dilation, which should be fluoroscopically-guided. When it fails, the efficacy of other therapeutic options decreases. The most serious complication is esophageal perforation.
The diagnostic criteria are based on endoscopic findings. Endoscopy reveals there are food remains as well as esophageal dilation, and decreased motility. X-ray exams show esophageal dilation and narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric findings show decreased esophageal motility, increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
The patient was operated on. Since there was no hiatal hernia, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication was chosen, based on its efficacy in preventing reflux, as well as in keeping the myotomy free of a wrap.
Laparoscopic central hepatectomy for hepatoma using a Glissonian approach
Introduction: Although laparoscopic liver resection has been widely adopted, performing a total laparoscopic central hepatectomy remains a challenging and technically demanding procedure because it requires two transection planes. This video illustrates a useful technique for laparoscopic central hepatectomy, which was successfully performed in a cirrhotic patient with hepatoma. Method: We demonstrated a total laparoscopic central hepatectomy which was performed in a 65-year-old woman who had a centrally located hepatoma, and this tumor was in contact with the middle hepatic vein. The operative procedure was performed by using five ports with the patient placed in a low lithotomy position. Results: The technique was successfully performed without any complications. The operative time was 380 min. Intraoperative blood loss was 60mL. The length of hospital stay was 5 days. The pathological report was well-differentiated HCC and free surgical margins. Conclusions: Laparoscopic central hepatectomy for hepatoma by using a Glissonian approach is feasible and safe.
R Chanwat
Surgical intervention
1 day ago
43 views
2 likes
0 comments
10:01
Laparoscopic central hepatectomy for hepatoma using a Glissonian approach
Introduction: Although laparoscopic liver resection has been widely adopted, performing a total laparoscopic central hepatectomy remains a challenging and technically demanding procedure because it requires two transection planes. This video illustrates a useful technique for laparoscopic central hepatectomy, which was successfully performed in a cirrhotic patient with hepatoma. Method: We demonstrated a total laparoscopic central hepatectomy which was performed in a 65-year-old woman who had a centrally located hepatoma, and this tumor was in contact with the middle hepatic vein. The operative procedure was performed by using five ports with the patient placed in a low lithotomy position. Results: The technique was successfully performed without any complications. The operative time was 380 min. Intraoperative blood loss was 60mL. The length of hospital stay was 5 days. The pathological report was well-differentiated HCC and free surgical margins. Conclusions: Laparoscopic central hepatectomy for hepatoma by using a Glissonian approach is feasible and safe.
Pylorus-preserving laparoscopic gastrectomy with pyloric balloon dilatation
Gastric cancer screening programs implemented by Japan and South Korea have shown impressive results in terms of the increasing proportion of early gastric cancer diagnosis. Because of this, more interest has been focused on preserving the organ function in order to improve postoperative quality of life aiming to reduce complications or sequelae and avoiding large resections. Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) was first introduced by Maki et al. and it is probably the most representative technique of function-preserving gastrectomy. It has been reported that, due to an impaired pyloric function, patients may occasionally experience a sensation of gastric fullness after food intake as well as long-term food retention in the remnant stomach. This delayed gastric emptying caused by pyloric spasms has been shown to decrease the patient’s quality of life. There is no standardized management strategy at present, and consequently gastric surgeons have often found themselves hesitant to perform this minimally invasive, function-preserving surgery. Here, we present a PPG case followed by a pyloric spasm, which was successfully treated with balloon dilatation.
F Signorini, HK Yang
Surgical intervention
1 day ago
22 views
1 like
0 comments
10:02
Pylorus-preserving laparoscopic gastrectomy with pyloric balloon dilatation
Gastric cancer screening programs implemented by Japan and South Korea have shown impressive results in terms of the increasing proportion of early gastric cancer diagnosis. Because of this, more interest has been focused on preserving the organ function in order to improve postoperative quality of life aiming to reduce complications or sequelae and avoiding large resections. Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) was first introduced by Maki et al. and it is probably the most representative technique of function-preserving gastrectomy. It has been reported that, due to an impaired pyloric function, patients may occasionally experience a sensation of gastric fullness after food intake as well as long-term food retention in the remnant stomach. This delayed gastric emptying caused by pyloric spasms has been shown to decrease the patient’s quality of life. There is no standardized management strategy at present, and consequently gastric surgeons have often found themselves hesitant to perform this minimally invasive, function-preserving surgery. Here, we present a PPG case followed by a pyloric spasm, which was successfully treated with balloon dilatation.
A young lady with dysphagia and GIST after a complicated sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity
A 34 year-old woman was referred to us for persistent dysphagia and retrosternal chest pain, aggravated by eating. Two years earlier, she underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.
Her operation was complicated by septic shock due to an esophagogastric fistula with subphrenic abscesses, and on postoperative day 20, she underwent a laparotomy, abscess debridement and drainage, splenectomy and application of cyanoacrylate-based glue, followed by endoscopic positioning of a self-expandable partially coated prosthesis.
Three weeks afterwards, her prosthesis was replaced with a self-expandable fully coated prosthesis due to persistent leak. This prosthesis was finally removed after 7 weeks.
One year after her operation, at gastroscopy, a 25mm submucosal nodule covered with an ulcerated mucosa was found in the proximal antrum. Biopsy was negative, and endoscopic ultrasonography was suggestive of GIST.
She underwent an esophageal manometry, which was indicative of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Her barium swallow test showed a delayed esophageal emptying due to the narrowing and twisting of the proximal part of the stomach. Her abdominal MRI was normal.
An exploratory laparoscopy was indicated for adhesiolysis and removal of the antral lesion.
Total duration of the operation was 3 hours. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Her postoperative swallow study showed the easy passage of the contrast agent with no leaks. The patient completely recovered from her symptoms, and remained asymptomatic after 30 months. Final histology of her lesion evidenced a foreign body granuloma.
S Greco, M Giulii Capponi, M Lotti, M Khotcholava
Surgical intervention
1 day ago
24 views
1 like
0 comments
14:14
A young lady with dysphagia and GIST after a complicated sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity
A 34 year-old woman was referred to us for persistent dysphagia and retrosternal chest pain, aggravated by eating. Two years earlier, she underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.
Her operation was complicated by septic shock due to an esophagogastric fistula with subphrenic abscesses, and on postoperative day 20, she underwent a laparotomy, abscess debridement and drainage, splenectomy and application of cyanoacrylate-based glue, followed by endoscopic positioning of a self-expandable partially coated prosthesis.
Three weeks afterwards, her prosthesis was replaced with a self-expandable fully coated prosthesis due to persistent leak. This prosthesis was finally removed after 7 weeks.
One year after her operation, at gastroscopy, a 25mm submucosal nodule covered with an ulcerated mucosa was found in the proximal antrum. Biopsy was negative, and endoscopic ultrasonography was suggestive of GIST.
She underwent an esophageal manometry, which was indicative of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Her barium swallow test showed a delayed esophageal emptying due to the narrowing and twisting of the proximal part of the stomach. Her abdominal MRI was normal.
An exploratory laparoscopy was indicated for adhesiolysis and removal of the antral lesion.
Total duration of the operation was 3 hours. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Her postoperative swallow study showed the easy passage of the contrast agent with no leaks. The patient completely recovered from her symptoms, and remained asymptomatic after 30 months. Final histology of her lesion evidenced a foreign body granuloma.
Laparoscopic Biliopancreatic Diversion with Duodenal Switch (BPD/DS)
Morbid obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) is the most effective bariatric surgery procedure for weight loss. This procedure was first described by Scopinaro in 1979. It consisted of a horizontal gastrectomy, a transection of the bowel halfway from the ligament of Treitz and the ileocecal junction, and a Roux-en-Y reconstruction with a 50cm common channel. This was later modified: the duodenal switch was added and the gastrectomy was performed in a vertical sleeve fashion, thereby preserving the pylorus and increasing the common channel to 100cm. This modification greatly reduced the incidence of marginal ulceration, dumping, and nutritional deficiencies. However, this operation is still uncommon due to the perceived technical difficulty and risk of nutritional morbidity. This video demonstrates a standardized technique for this complex procedure.
RC Pullatt
Surgical intervention
1 day ago
41 views
0 likes
0 comments
13:00
Laparoscopic Biliopancreatic Diversion with Duodenal Switch (BPD/DS)
Morbid obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) is the most effective bariatric surgery procedure for weight loss. This procedure was first described by Scopinaro in 1979. It consisted of a horizontal gastrectomy, a transection of the bowel halfway from the ligament of Treitz and the ileocecal junction, and a Roux-en-Y reconstruction with a 50cm common channel. This was later modified: the duodenal switch was added and the gastrectomy was performed in a vertical sleeve fashion, thereby preserving the pylorus and increasing the common channel to 100cm. This modification greatly reduced the incidence of marginal ulceration, dumping, and nutritional deficiencies. However, this operation is still uncommon due to the perceived technical difficulty and risk of nutritional morbidity. This video demonstrates a standardized technique for this complex procedure.
Redo laparoscopic anterior resection
The reported incidence rates of regional recurrence for colorectal cancer after oncologic resection ranged between 5% and 19%. Locoregional recurrence occurs in the anastomotic site, the remnant colon, the peritoneal surface (nodal or soft tissue), or the retroperitoneum. As reported in the literature, in colorectal cancers, mucinous differentiation, lymphovascular invasion and anastomotic leakage are independent risk factors for anastomotic recurrence.
We present the case of an 86 year-old female patient. In 2014, the patient underwent a laparoscopic left colectomy for a Haggitt level 4 sigmoid polyp. The definitive histologic features showed a T2N0M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma. During the postoperative follow-up, 46 months after the left colectomy, an anastomotic recurrence was found. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colorectal resection for anastomotic recurrence. The operative time was 220 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. No complications occurred intraoperatively and postoperatively.
References:
1. Gopalan S, Bose JC, Periasamy S (2015) Anastomotic Recurrence of Colon Cancer-is it a Local Recurrence, a Second Primary, or a Metastatic Disease (Local Manifestation of Systemic Disease)? Indian J Surg 77:232-236.
2. Ramphal W, Boeding JRE, Gobardhan PD, Rutten HJT, de Winter L, Crolla R, Schreinemakers JMJ (2018) Oncologic outcome and recurrence rate following anastomotic leakage after curative resection for colorectal cancer. Surg Oncol 27:730-736.
3. Jung WB, Yu CS, Lim SB, Park IJ, Yoon YS, Kim JC (2017) Anastomotic Recurrence After Curative Resection for Colorectal Cancer. World J Surg 41:285-294.
F Corcione, M D'Ambra, U Bracale, S Dilillo, G Luglio
Surgical intervention
1 day ago
38 views
0 likes
0 comments
23:20
Redo laparoscopic anterior resection
The reported incidence rates of regional recurrence for colorectal cancer after oncologic resection ranged between 5% and 19%. Locoregional recurrence occurs in the anastomotic site, the remnant colon, the peritoneal surface (nodal or soft tissue), or the retroperitoneum. As reported in the literature, in colorectal cancers, mucinous differentiation, lymphovascular invasion and anastomotic leakage are independent risk factors for anastomotic recurrence.
We present the case of an 86 year-old female patient. In 2014, the patient underwent a laparoscopic left colectomy for a Haggitt level 4 sigmoid polyp. The definitive histologic features showed a T2N0M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma. During the postoperative follow-up, 46 months after the left colectomy, an anastomotic recurrence was found. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colorectal resection for anastomotic recurrence. The operative time was 220 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. No complications occurred intraoperatively and postoperatively.
References:
1. Gopalan S, Bose JC, Periasamy S (2015) Anastomotic Recurrence of Colon Cancer-is it a Local Recurrence, a Second Primary, or a Metastatic Disease (Local Manifestation of Systemic Disease)? Indian J Surg 77:232-236.
2. Ramphal W, Boeding JRE, Gobardhan PD, Rutten HJT, de Winter L, Crolla R, Schreinemakers JMJ (2018) Oncologic outcome and recurrence rate following anastomotic leakage after curative resection for colorectal cancer. Surg Oncol 27:730-736.
3. Jung WB, Yu CS, Lim SB, Park IJ, Yoon YS, Kim JC (2017) Anastomotic Recurrence After Curative Resection for Colorectal Cancer. World J Surg 41:285-294.
Laparoscopic Beger procedure with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy
This is the case of a 49-year-old male patient presenting with recurrent intractable abdominal pain. The patient had a history of obstructive jaundice and underwent biliary decompression provided by a percutaneous cholecystostomy. CT-scan showed signs of chronic pancreatitis, multiple stones in the pancreatic parenchyma, a compressed portal vein and biliary obstruction. The patient underwent a laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) – a technique known as the Beger procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain, combined with portal and biliary compression caused by severe chronic pancreatitis. The surgical procedure preserves the stomach, the duodenum, and the biliary tree unlike standard duodenopancreatectomy (Whipple procedure), which is the other option for these patients. As Beger himself stated: “Preservation of the duodenum and the biliary system has major advantages for patients regarding short- and long-term outcome as compared to the Kausch-Whipple resection and pylorus-preserving resection”.
In this case, after completing the pancreatic head resection and fashioning the distal and proximal pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, a hepaticojejunostomy was performed. It was necessary due to the stenosis of the intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that the laparoscopic Beger procedure is safe and feasible, and provides all the well-known advantages of the minimally invasive approach, particularly lower postoperative pain, earlier functional recovery, and shorter hospital stay.
P Agami, A Andrianov, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
1 day ago
40 views
2 likes
0 comments
17:23
Laparoscopic Beger procedure with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy
This is the case of a 49-year-old male patient presenting with recurrent intractable abdominal pain. The patient had a history of obstructive jaundice and underwent biliary decompression provided by a percutaneous cholecystostomy. CT-scan showed signs of chronic pancreatitis, multiple stones in the pancreatic parenchyma, a compressed portal vein and biliary obstruction. The patient underwent a laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) – a technique known as the Beger procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain, combined with portal and biliary compression caused by severe chronic pancreatitis. The surgical procedure preserves the stomach, the duodenum, and the biliary tree unlike standard duodenopancreatectomy (Whipple procedure), which is the other option for these patients. As Beger himself stated: “Preservation of the duodenum and the biliary system has major advantages for patients regarding short- and long-term outcome as compared to the Kausch-Whipple resection and pylorus-preserving resection”.
In this case, after completing the pancreatic head resection and fashioning the distal and proximal pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, a hepaticojejunostomy was performed. It was necessary due to the stenosis of the intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that the laparoscopic Beger procedure is safe and feasible, and provides all the well-known advantages of the minimally invasive approach, particularly lower postoperative pain, earlier functional recovery, and shorter hospital stay.
Minimally invasive surgery for esophagectomy and tubularized gastric pull-up
The accidental ingestion of caustic agents is a common problem in pediatric emergency units. These agents can cause a series of damage to the upper gastrointestinal tract and can lead to an esophageal stricture. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl who was referred to our hospital for vomiting and hematemesis after ingesting a caustic solution. Physical examination revealed tongue edema and denuded buccal mucosa. Friable mucosa and esophageal ulceration were observed in the endoscopy. The patient was administered omeprazole and a nasogastric tube was placed for a week. Two esophageal strictures were observed after 3 weeks of the ingestion. The patient underwent esophageal dilatation once or twice a month during 21 months depending on the symptoms. Due to the refractory stricture, we decided to perform an esophagectomy and tubularized gastric pull-up by combining thoracoscopy, laparoscopy, and cervicotomy. In addition, we performed a jejunostomy to provide sufficient nutritional support. The patient started feeding on postoperative day 7 and she is currently asymptomatic.
I Cano Novillo, A García Vázquez, F de la Cruz Vigo, B Aneiros Castro
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
301 views
3 likes
1 comment
12:40
Minimally invasive surgery for esophagectomy and tubularized gastric pull-up
The accidental ingestion of caustic agents is a common problem in pediatric emergency units. These agents can cause a series of damage to the upper gastrointestinal tract and can lead to an esophageal stricture. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl who was referred to our hospital for vomiting and hematemesis after ingesting a caustic solution. Physical examination revealed tongue edema and denuded buccal mucosa. Friable mucosa and esophageal ulceration were observed in the endoscopy. The patient was administered omeprazole and a nasogastric tube was placed for a week. Two esophageal strictures were observed after 3 weeks of the ingestion. The patient underwent esophageal dilatation once or twice a month during 21 months depending on the symptoms. Due to the refractory stricture, we decided to perform an esophagectomy and tubularized gastric pull-up by combining thoracoscopy, laparoscopy, and cervicotomy. In addition, we performed a jejunostomy to provide sufficient nutritional support. The patient started feeding on postoperative day 7 and she is currently asymptomatic.
Surgical technique of tubal reanastomosis
Many women who undergo tubal ligation surgery later decide to have children again. One option available to these women is tubal ligation reversal, or tubal reanastomosis. In this microsurgery, the two separated parts of a uterine tube are surgically reunited. It is ideally performed in younger women under 39 years of age with good ovarian reserve. Depending on the previously used tubal ligation method, it may be necessary to first perform a diagnostic laparoscopy to check the condition of the uterus, the uterine tubes, and the ovaries and to make sure that the tubal length is sufficient for reversal. Following the proper principles of microsurgery, this procedure can yield very good results and offer a more economical option to women desirous of childbearing if the tubal pathology related to tubal sterilization is the only cause of infertility.
H Grover, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1092 views
10 likes
0 comments
08:48
Surgical technique of tubal reanastomosis
Many women who undergo tubal ligation surgery later decide to have children again. One option available to these women is tubal ligation reversal, or tubal reanastomosis. In this microsurgery, the two separated parts of a uterine tube are surgically reunited. It is ideally performed in younger women under 39 years of age with good ovarian reserve. Depending on the previously used tubal ligation method, it may be necessary to first perform a diagnostic laparoscopy to check the condition of the uterus, the uterine tubes, and the ovaries and to make sure that the tubal length is sufficient for reversal. Following the proper principles of microsurgery, this procedure can yield very good results and offer a more economical option to women desirous of childbearing if the tubal pathology related to tubal sterilization is the only cause of infertility.
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
H Grover, R Syed, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
6098 views
43 likes
13 comments
07:04
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
Low rectal resection with transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) performed with standard laparoscopic instrumentation
This is the case of a 62-year-old woman with rectal bleeding. She underwent a colonoscopy which showed a low rectal adenocarcinoma, 6cm from the anal margin. A CT-scan revealed the absence of metastasis and pelvic MRI showed a cT3N1 tumor.
The patient was treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. She received 50 Gray and capecitabine after which a new MRI showed a partial tumor response. The patient underwent surgery 10 weeks after finishing neoadjuvant therapy.
We started the operation with a laparoscopic abdominal approach. Four ports were placed. Two 10mm ports were introduced in the umbilicus and the right iliac fossa. Two 5mm ports were inserted in the left and right lower quadrant. Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) was performed with a 5mm, 30-degree scope, monopolar hook, and bipolar forceps. The rectum was dissected 1cm distally from the neoplasia. The specimen was extracted transanally. Anastomosis was carried out transanally using a 33mm EEA™ circular stapler, after examination of the frozen section margin. A protective ileostomy was performed through the 10mm port site in the right iliac fossa and a drainage was put in place in the pelvis through the 5mm port entry site into the left flank.
The patient resumed food intake on postoperative day 2 and she was discharged on postoperative day 7. A complete mesorectal excision was confirmed on pathological examination. Fifteen negative nodes were removed. Distal and circumferential margins were negative.
The coloanal anastomosis was controlled with colonoscopy one month later. No sign of leakage was detected, and the ileostomy was subsequently closed.
The patient reports an adequate continence to gas and feces with one or two bowel movements per day. After 15 months of follow-up, the patient is still disease-free.
Our video shows that TaTME is a technique which can be performed by surgeons who have experience in laparoscopic and colorectal surgery.
In our operation, we did not use any energy devices, 3D or 4K technology. This procedure can be performed without expensive equipment.
L Taglietti, G Baronio, L Lussardi, R Cazzaniga, S Dester, A Zanoletti
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1550 views
2 likes
1 comment
09:56
Low rectal resection with transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) performed with standard laparoscopic instrumentation
This is the case of a 62-year-old woman with rectal bleeding. She underwent a colonoscopy which showed a low rectal adenocarcinoma, 6cm from the anal margin. A CT-scan revealed the absence of metastasis and pelvic MRI showed a cT3N1 tumor.
The patient was treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. She received 50 Gray and capecitabine after which a new MRI showed a partial tumor response. The patient underwent surgery 10 weeks after finishing neoadjuvant therapy.
We started the operation with a laparoscopic abdominal approach. Four ports were placed. Two 10mm ports were introduced in the umbilicus and the right iliac fossa. Two 5mm ports were inserted in the left and right lower quadrant. Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) was performed with a 5mm, 30-degree scope, monopolar hook, and bipolar forceps. The rectum was dissected 1cm distally from the neoplasia. The specimen was extracted transanally. Anastomosis was carried out transanally using a 33mm EEA™ circular stapler, after examination of the frozen section margin. A protective ileostomy was performed through the 10mm port site in the right iliac fossa and a drainage was put in place in the pelvis through the 5mm port entry site into the left flank.
The patient resumed food intake on postoperative day 2 and she was discharged on postoperative day 7. A complete mesorectal excision was confirmed on pathological examination. Fifteen negative nodes were removed. Distal and circumferential margins were negative.
The coloanal anastomosis was controlled with colonoscopy one month later. No sign of leakage was detected, and the ileostomy was subsequently closed.
The patient reports an adequate continence to gas and feces with one or two bowel movements per day. After 15 months of follow-up, the patient is still disease-free.
Our video shows that TaTME is a technique which can be performed by surgeons who have experience in laparoscopic and colorectal surgery.
In our operation, we did not use any energy devices, 3D or 4K technology. This procedure can be performed without expensive equipment.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
S Macina, L Baldari, E Cassinotti, M Ballabio, A Spota, M de Francesco, L Boni
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2643 views
17 likes
0 comments
07:10
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
E Soricelli, E Facchiano, L Leuratti, G Quartararo, N Console, P Tonelli, M Lucchese
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2056 views
6 likes
0 comments
09:10
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
P Agami, A Andrianov, V Shchadrova, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
4652 views
17 likes
3 comments
12:28
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
G Baiocchi, R Nascimbeni, N Vettoretto, N de Manzini, M Morino
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1542 views
3 likes
0 comments
09:24
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
A Tojal, AR Loureiro, B Prata, R Patrão, N Carrilho, C Casimiro
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
945 views
3 likes
0 comments
10:34
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
Laparoscopic treatment of primary omental infarction
A 53-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department for right hypochondrium pain, fever, and weight loss, with clinical evidence of an abdominal mass in his right lumbar region.
His white blood cell (WBC) count was 11.9x109/L and his C-reactive protein value was 11.7mg/dL.
His abdominal CT-scan and MRI showed a 12.5cm omental mass, suggestive of omental infarction with a hemorrhagic component. His gastroscopy and colonoscopy were negative, and the needle biopsy of the mass was not suggestive of malignancy. Exploratory laparoscopy with biopsy or resection of the omental lesion was indicated. The total duration of the operation was 1 hour, and the omental mass was resected. The patient completely recovered from his symptoms, and was discharged after two days. Final histology of his lesion demonstrated an omental infarction with thrombosis, hemorrhage, and fat cell necrosis.
M Lotti, M Marini, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1768 views
5 likes
0 comments
14:43
Laparoscopic treatment of primary omental infarction
A 53-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department for right hypochondrium pain, fever, and weight loss, with clinical evidence of an abdominal mass in his right lumbar region.
His white blood cell (WBC) count was 11.9x109/L and his C-reactive protein value was 11.7mg/dL.
His abdominal CT-scan and MRI showed a 12.5cm omental mass, suggestive of omental infarction with a hemorrhagic component. His gastroscopy and colonoscopy were negative, and the needle biopsy of the mass was not suggestive of malignancy. Exploratory laparoscopy with biopsy or resection of the omental lesion was indicated. The total duration of the operation was 1 hour, and the omental mass was resected. The patient completely recovered from his symptoms, and was discharged after two days. Final histology of his lesion demonstrated an omental infarction with thrombosis, hemorrhage, and fat cell necrosis.
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
F Freire Lisboa Junior, R de Lima França, A de Araujo Lima Liguori, AC de Medeiros Junior, M HSMP Tavares, F Medeiros de Azevedo, D Myller Barros Lima
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1104 views
5 likes
0 comments
14:36
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
Laparoscopic ligation of middle sacral artery and dissection of sacrococcygeal teratoma to decrease intraoperative hemorrhagic risk
Sacrococcygeal teratomas are the most common teratomas presenting at birth. Life-threatening bleeding is a major complication during tumor excision in children. In this video, we demonstrate our technique for the laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery during dissection of sacrococcygeal teratomas in two pediatric patients.
Two female infants diagnosed with type IV and type III sacrococcygeal teratomas underwent preoperative evaluation in the postnatal period. The first patient was an 18-month-old female patient who presented with a metastatic type IV teratoma resected after neoadjuvant therapy. The second patient was a 6-day-old female infant with a prenatal diagnosis of cystic type III teratoma. Using laparoscopy in both patients, the presacral space was reached by opening the peritoneal reflection with blunt dissection and the middle sacral artery was identified. It was then carefully isolated and divided with a 5mm LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device. The pelvic components of the tumors were partially dissected using laparoscopy. The first patient’s tumor resection was completed using a posterior sagittal approach and the second patient required a standard Chevron incision.
Both patients underwent a successful laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery and resection of the sacrococcygeal teratomas without complications. As a result, laparoscopic middle sacral artery division before sacrococcygeal teratoma excision offers a safe approach which can reduce the risk of hemorrhage during surgery.
T Huy, H Osei, AS Munoz Abraham, R Damle, GA Villalona
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
577 views
4 likes
0 comments
05:33
Laparoscopic ligation of middle sacral artery and dissection of sacrococcygeal teratoma to decrease intraoperative hemorrhagic risk
Sacrococcygeal teratomas are the most common teratomas presenting at birth. Life-threatening bleeding is a major complication during tumor excision in children. In this video, we demonstrate our technique for the laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery during dissection of sacrococcygeal teratomas in two pediatric patients.
Two female infants diagnosed with type IV and type III sacrococcygeal teratomas underwent preoperative evaluation in the postnatal period. The first patient was an 18-month-old female patient who presented with a metastatic type IV teratoma resected after neoadjuvant therapy. The second patient was a 6-day-old female infant with a prenatal diagnosis of cystic type III teratoma. Using laparoscopy in both patients, the presacral space was reached by opening the peritoneal reflection with blunt dissection and the middle sacral artery was identified. It was then carefully isolated and divided with a 5mm LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device. The pelvic components of the tumors were partially dissected using laparoscopy. The first patient’s tumor resection was completed using a posterior sagittal approach and the second patient required a standard Chevron incision.
Both patients underwent a successful laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery and resection of the sacrococcygeal teratomas without complications. As a result, laparoscopic middle sacral artery division before sacrococcygeal teratoma excision offers a safe approach which can reduce the risk of hemorrhage during surgery.
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
R Adjerid, F Sebaa, N Otsmane, A Khelifaoui
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1552 views
8 likes
0 comments
05:13
Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children
Introduction:
Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. Laparoscopic treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver remains controversial and few series have been published. The aim of this work is to present a case of liver hydatid cyst in an 8-year-old girl treated laparoscopically.
Case presentation:
An 8-year-old child was admitted to our department for the management of a voluminous liver hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a thoraco-abdominal CT-scan, which concluded to a left lobe liver hydatid cyst. The laparoscopic open access is achieved at the umbilicus using a 10mm port. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum pressure is maintained at 10mmHg. Two other 5mm ports are introduced in the right and left hypochondrium. A 0-degree laparoscope is then used. The cyst is protected by means of pads filled with a 10% hypertonic saline solution. After we proceed to a puncture aspiration of the cyst, sterilization is achieved via injection of a hypertonic saline solution during 15 minutes, then reaspiration is performed with a Veress needle. The cyst is opened with a coagulating hook and the proligerous membrane is removed and put in a bag. The last step is the resection of the dome and the search for biliary fistula. We drained the residual cavity. The pads are removed. The Redon drain was removed on day 2 and the patient was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 3. Postoperatively, the patient was put on albendazole (10mg/kg) for one month.
Conclusion:
Laparoscopy stands for an excellent approach to the treatment of a hydatid cyst of the liver in children by respecting appropriate indications.
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading tumor in rectum and resolution of late bleeding
The objectives of this video are manifold, namely to present the totally endoscopic treatment of a laterally spreading tumor in the upper rectum with a piecemeal technique, and how to act against one of its most frequent complications, post-polypectomy bleeding.
Methods: The procedure was performed in an advanced flexible endoscopy unit, with the patient lying supine, with anesthesia (Propofol), and insufflation of carbon dioxide. A videocolonoscope was used, the lesion was identified and elevated with hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven). It was dried with a hot snare in parts ("piecemeal" technique), thereby achieving complete resection. The defect was closed with metal clips. The specimen was recovered for histopathological study.
Results: During screening colonoscopy, a 56-year-old patient was found with a 30mm granular laterally spreading tumor of the rectum (LST-G or nodular mixed type), located 15cm from the anal verge. Complete endoscopic resection of the lesion with a curative intent was performed. On postoperative day 5, proctorrhagia presented without hemodynamic alteration. Emergency endoscopy was decided upon. Upon entering with the colonoscope, we identified a clot attached to the surgical site. Once the bleeding had been confirmed, a saline solution with 1/20,000 adrenaline was injected. And then, with a hot snare, electrocoagulation was performed in the same area, combining an injection method with a thermal one and achieving a satisfying hemostasis. The patient was discharged on the same day without any other complications. The pathology report showed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, including patches of high-grade dysplasia, and injury-free resection margins.
Conclusions: EMR of laterally spreading tumors is safe, although it is not devoid of complications such as bleeding, which is present in up to 9.8 of every 100,000 polypectomies in some series (Reumkens et al., AJG 2016). It is essential to suspect and know how to solve it efficiently with the tools available at that time of emergency.
J Isaguirre, A Insausti
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
419 views
0 likes
0 comments
05:38
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading tumor in rectum and resolution of late bleeding
The objectives of this video are manifold, namely to present the totally endoscopic treatment of a laterally spreading tumor in the upper rectum with a piecemeal technique, and how to act against one of its most frequent complications, post-polypectomy bleeding.
Methods: The procedure was performed in an advanced flexible endoscopy unit, with the patient lying supine, with anesthesia (Propofol), and insufflation of carbon dioxide. A videocolonoscope was used, the lesion was identified and elevated with hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven). It was dried with a hot snare in parts ("piecemeal" technique), thereby achieving complete resection. The defect was closed with metal clips. The specimen was recovered for histopathological study.
Results: During screening colonoscopy, a 56-year-old patient was found with a 30mm granular laterally spreading tumor of the rectum (LST-G or nodular mixed type), located 15cm from the anal verge. Complete endoscopic resection of the lesion with a curative intent was performed. On postoperative day 5, proctorrhagia presented without hemodynamic alteration. Emergency endoscopy was decided upon. Upon entering with the colonoscope, we identified a clot attached to the surgical site. Once the bleeding had been confirmed, a saline solution with 1/20,000 adrenaline was injected. And then, with a hot snare, electrocoagulation was performed in the same area, combining an injection method with a thermal one and achieving a satisfying hemostasis. The patient was discharged on the same day without any other complications. The pathology report showed a villous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, including patches of high-grade dysplasia, and injury-free resection margins.
Conclusions: EMR of laterally spreading tumors is safe, although it is not devoid of complications such as bleeding, which is present in up to 9.8 of every 100,000 polypectomies in some series (Reumkens et al., AJG 2016). It is essential to suspect and know how to solve it efficiently with the tools available at that time of emergency.
Laparoscopic distal splenopancreatectomy for pancreatic cystadenoma: clockwise technique assisted with T’Lift device
Serous cystic neoplasm is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, which is increasingly detected at an asymptomatic stage. Serous cystadenomas are benign cystic tumors which occur more often in women than in men, and particularly in the seventh decade of life. Despite this, in the literature, three patients were reported to have malignant serous cystadenomas, with sizes greater than 7cm. The serous cystic neoplasm was confirmed by an imaging characteristic appearance, with multiple small or different-sized cysts, but when the diagnosis is doubtful, which often leads to surgery.
The clinical case is the one of a 79-year-old woman with a cystadenoma of the pancreas. She had a history of partial cystectomy for bladder neoplasia and recently (in 2017), she was submitted to laparoscopic focal cryotherapy for the treatment of a left unilateral renal tumor. At that time, she underwent a CT-can, which found a cystic neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas. A heterogeneous 5cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, near the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies highly suggestive of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
In October 2018, in a follow-up CT-scan, there was an increase in size of the lesion (6.6cm) and a surgical resection was planned. A distal splenopancreatectomy using a clockwise technique was performed using the Signia™ stapling system with no complications. Histological examination confirmed a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
M Rui Martins, J Correia, D Jordão, S Martins, H Ferrão
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1070 views
4 likes
0 comments
20:59
Laparoscopic distal splenopancreatectomy for pancreatic cystadenoma: clockwise technique assisted with T’Lift device
Serous cystic neoplasm is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, which is increasingly detected at an asymptomatic stage. Serous cystadenomas are benign cystic tumors which occur more often in women than in men, and particularly in the seventh decade of life. Despite this, in the literature, three patients were reported to have malignant serous cystadenomas, with sizes greater than 7cm. The serous cystic neoplasm was confirmed by an imaging characteristic appearance, with multiple small or different-sized cysts, but when the diagnosis is doubtful, which often leads to surgery.
The clinical case is the one of a 79-year-old woman with a cystadenoma of the pancreas. She had a history of partial cystectomy for bladder neoplasia and recently (in 2017), she was submitted to laparoscopic focal cryotherapy for the treatment of a left unilateral renal tumor. At that time, she underwent a CT-can, which found a cystic neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas. A heterogeneous 5cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, near the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies highly suggestive of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
In October 2018, in a follow-up CT-scan, there was an increase in size of the lesion (6.6cm) and a surgical resection was planned. A distal splenopancreatectomy using a clockwise technique was performed using the Signia™ stapling system with no complications. Histological examination confirmed a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
J Magalhães, C Osorio, L Frutuoso, AM Pereira, A Trovão, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
3604 views
15 likes
0 comments
09:44
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1228 views
6 likes
0 comments
13:16
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
Robotic Nissen fundoplication with the da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system
For a long time, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has been used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The main challenges of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication involve the 2-dimensional visualization, exposure of complex gastroesophageal anatomy, and suturing of the wrap fundoplication. In 1999, robotic Nissen fundoplication, a completely new technique, was introduced, demonstrating advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery due to improved manual dexterity, ergonomics, and 3-dimensional visualization. However, time spent on robotic platform docking and arm clashing during the procedure are factors that surgeons often find cumbersome and time-consuming. The newest surgical platform, the da Vinci Xi surgical robotic system, can help to overcome such problems. This video shows a stepwise approach of the da Vinci Xi docking process and surgical technique demonstrating fundoplication according to the Nissen technique.
L Marano, A Spaziani, G Castagnoli
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
1384 views
2 likes
0 comments
07:00
Robotic Nissen fundoplication with the da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system
For a long time, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has been used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The main challenges of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication involve the 2-dimensional visualization, exposure of complex gastroesophageal anatomy, and suturing of the wrap fundoplication. In 1999, robotic Nissen fundoplication, a completely new technique, was introduced, demonstrating advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery due to improved manual dexterity, ergonomics, and 3-dimensional visualization. However, time spent on robotic platform docking and arm clashing during the procedure are factors that surgeons often find cumbersome and time-consuming. The newest surgical platform, the da Vinci Xi surgical robotic system, can help to overcome such problems. This video shows a stepwise approach of the da Vinci Xi docking process and surgical technique demonstrating fundoplication according to the Nissen technique.
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
J Magalhães, AM Pereira, T Fonseca, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
1502 views
3 likes
0 comments
09:34
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, L Arru, F Gheza, M Diana
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
3519 views
10 likes
0 comments
12:41
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
J Magalhães, L Matos, J Costa, J Costa Pereira, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2473 views
13 likes
2 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2511 views
8 likes
0 comments
10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.