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Endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection for malignant polyp excision
This is the case of an 83-year-old woman who presented with per rectal bleeding. She had flexible sigmoidoscopy, which showed a 1.5 to 2cm flat polyp with central depression and non-lifting sign. CT-scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was performed and showed no metastasis. The case was discussed with the multidisciplinary team and decision was made to perform an endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection. The case was performed using the colonic FTRD® set (OVESCO™). The procedure was completed successfully and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. During the postoperative follow-up, the resection margin was clear. This is the first case performed in the North-East of England to our knowledge. Since this case, we have performed another case.
Y Aawsaj, K Khan, M Hayat
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
563 views
2 likes
1 comment
05:30
Endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection for malignant polyp excision
This is the case of an 83-year-old woman who presented with per rectal bleeding. She had flexible sigmoidoscopy, which showed a 1.5 to 2cm flat polyp with central depression and non-lifting sign. CT-scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was performed and showed no metastasis. The case was discussed with the multidisciplinary team and decision was made to perform an endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection. The case was performed using the colonic FTRD® set (OVESCO™). The procedure was completed successfully and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. During the postoperative follow-up, the resection margin was clear. This is the first case performed in the North-East of England to our knowledge. Since this case, we have performed another case.
Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
H Inoue, RA Ciurezu, M Pizzicannella, F Habersetzer
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
259 views
2 likes
0 comments
25:51
Peroral endoscopic myotomy of a suspected type III achalasia with a double scope control
A 59-year-old woman was referred to our unit for progressive dysphagia and chest pain associated with heartburn and chest fullness. A nutcracker esophagus was suspected at the HD manometry and the patient was scheduled for a peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The procedure started with an esophagogastroduodenal series (EGDS), which showed abnormal contractions of the distal esophagus and increased resistance at the level of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) with a high suspicion of type III achalasia. The tunnel was started 12cm above the EGJ in a 5 o’clock position. After submucosal injection, a mucosal incision was made with a new triangle-tip (TT) knife equipped with water jet facility. The access to the submucosa was gained and a submucosal longitudinal tunnel was created until the EGJ, dissecting the submucosal fibers with the TT knife. The myotomy was performed by completely dissecting the circular muscular layer muscle fibers using swift coagulation. To assess the extension of the myotomy just at the level of the EGJ, a “double scope control” was performed by inserting a pediatric scope, which confirmed the presence of the mother scope light in the esophagus. The submucosal tunnel and the myotomy were then extended together for 1 to 2cm. A second check with the pediatric scope showed the presence of the mother scope light in the correct position above the EGJ. The mucosal incision site was finally closed using multiple endoclips.
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: live procedure
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system mounted on a dual-channel Olympus® scope allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to reduce the volume and the size of the stomach. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. Once the Overtube™ was placed, the scope equipped with the OverStitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery®, Austin, Tex) suturing device was inserted through the stomach, and the suturing was initiated at the level of the incisura. The tissue-retracting helix device was used to grab the stomach wall, allowing for full-thickness bites. Each suture consisted of multiple sequential U-shaped bites along the anterior wall, the greater curvature, the posterior wall, and then in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device. Three sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization, and to spare the fundus.
S Perretta, M Pizzicannella, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
480 views
1 like
0 comments
18:32
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: live procedure
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system mounted on a dual-channel Olympus® scope allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to reduce the volume and the size of the stomach. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. Once the Overtube™ was placed, the scope equipped with the OverStitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery®, Austin, Tex) suturing device was inserted through the stomach, and the suturing was initiated at the level of the incisura. The tissue-retracting helix device was used to grab the stomach wall, allowing for full-thickness bites. Each suture consisted of multiple sequential U-shaped bites along the anterior wall, the greater curvature, the posterior wall, and then in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device. Three sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization, and to spare the fundus.
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of multiple hyperplastic polyps of the stomach
A 69 year-old man with a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and renal insufficiency underwent a gastroscopy for chronic anemia. During this procedure, a 3cm hyperplastic gastric polyp was discovered. The patient was scheduled for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The procedure started with a gastroscopy, which showed a normal duodenum and many gastric hyperplastic polyps. The largest one was a pedunculated polyp of about 3cm in size at the level of the greater curvature. The operator opted for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the multiple polyps. After submucosal injection, polyps were resected using a snare (ENDO CUT® Q mode). All resected polyps were retrieved with a Roth Net® for histological evaluation.
A Lemmers, M Pizzicannella, F Habersetzer
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
175 views
0 likes
0 comments
08:46
Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of multiple hyperplastic polyps of the stomach
A 69 year-old man with a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and renal insufficiency underwent a gastroscopy for chronic anemia. During this procedure, a 3cm hyperplastic gastric polyp was discovered. The patient was scheduled for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The procedure started with a gastroscopy, which showed a normal duodenum and many gastric hyperplastic polyps. The largest one was a pedunculated polyp of about 3cm in size at the level of the greater curvature. The operator opted for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the multiple polyps. After submucosal injection, polyps were resected using a snare (ENDO CUT® Q mode). All resected polyps were retrieved with a Roth Net® for histological evaluation.
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal cancer: live procedure
This video of a live surgery performed by Professor Chen (Associate Professor, China Medical University Taichung, Taiwan) during an IRCAD Taiwan course very clearly demonstrates the stepwise execution of a laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) with all its tips and tricks.
This is the case of a 65-year-old woman, with a low rectal tumor (4cm) is operated on after a short chemoradiation course (2 weeks before) for a stage IIA cancer (cT3N0M0).
Professor Chen’s surgical skills and experience and the beauty of the procedure, associated with a dynamic Q&A and expert comments coming from the auditorium, make of this video a must see.
WTL Chen, J Verde
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1465 views
4 likes
0 comments
47:24
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal cancer: live procedure
This video of a live surgery performed by Professor Chen (Associate Professor, China Medical University Taichung, Taiwan) during an IRCAD Taiwan course very clearly demonstrates the stepwise execution of a laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) with all its tips and tricks.
This is the case of a 65-year-old woman, with a low rectal tumor (4cm) is operated on after a short chemoradiation course (2 weeks before) for a stage IIA cancer (cT3N0M0).
Professor Chen’s surgical skills and experience and the beauty of the procedure, associated with a dynamic Q&A and expert comments coming from the auditorium, make of this video a must see.
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
S Morales-Conde, T Urade, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
4392 views
17 likes
2 comments
42:53
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
D Mutter, T Urade, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
7147 views
47 likes
0 comments
46:18
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
B Dallemagne, T Urade, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1731 views
18 likes
1 comment
39:46
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Gf Donatelli, S Perretta, M Ignat, M Pizzicannella, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
675 views
2 likes
0 comments
14:45
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Fully robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is becoming increasingly popular. The use of the surgical robot is developing rapidly, and this is especially true for digestive surgery. The aim of this video is to show that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be performed using a totally robotic approach. When using the robot, one follows the same steps as for a conventional intervention. The 3D vision and the degrees of freedom of the instruments facilitate the dissection, especially around the cardia, and for suturing procedures. The surgeon takes advantage of the console's user friendly set-up which does not put his/her shoulders or back in a vulnerable position, as they sometimes are when using a laparoscopic approach.
M Vix, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
1379 views
4 likes
0 comments
12:00
Fully robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is becoming increasingly popular. The use of the surgical robot is developing rapidly, and this is especially true for digestive surgery. The aim of this video is to show that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be performed using a totally robotic approach. When using the robot, one follows the same steps as for a conventional intervention. The 3D vision and the degrees of freedom of the instruments facilitate the dissection, especially around the cardia, and for suturing procedures. The surgeon takes advantage of the console's user friendly set-up which does not put his/her shoulders or back in a vulnerable position, as they sometimes are when using a laparoscopic approach.
LIVE UNCUT SURGERY: laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy.
The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected.
After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe.
Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia.
This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
D Mutter, G Philouze, B Seeliger, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
13126 views
74 likes
7 comments
30:23
LIVE UNCUT SURGERY: laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy.
The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected.
After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe.
Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia.
This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic total gastrectomy highlighting esojejunal anastomosis
This video presents the case of a 71-year-old man with a BMI of 29. He was admitted to the emergency room for fatigue, severe anemia, and abdominal pain. His past medical history was significant for cardiac disease, aortic valve stenosis, and small adrenal adenoma. His past surgical history included a cholecystectomy and a prostatectomy. Work-up started with an endoscopy which showed an ulcer at the antrum, which was biopsied and showed signet cell adenocarcinoma. CT-scan confirmed the presence of a large bulky lesion and ruled out the presence of a metastatic disease. The patient was admitted again for bleeding and hematemesis and he was scheduled for a total gastrectomy. He had an exploratory laparoscopy which showed no signs of carcinomatosis. He also had preoperative chemotherapy.
This live interactive video demonstrates a robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including a stepwise lymphadenectomy and precise thorough description of esojejunal anastomosis.
WJ Hyung, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
1787 views
10 likes
0 comments
04:27
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic total gastrectomy highlighting esojejunal anastomosis
This video presents the case of a 71-year-old man with a BMI of 29. He was admitted to the emergency room for fatigue, severe anemia, and abdominal pain. His past medical history was significant for cardiac disease, aortic valve stenosis, and small adrenal adenoma. His past surgical history included a cholecystectomy and a prostatectomy. Work-up started with an endoscopy which showed an ulcer at the antrum, which was biopsied and showed signet cell adenocarcinoma. CT-scan confirmed the presence of a large bulky lesion and ruled out the presence of a metastatic disease. The patient was admitted again for bleeding and hematemesis and he was scheduled for a total gastrectomy. He had an exploratory laparoscopy which showed no signs of carcinomatosis. He also had preoperative chemotherapy.
This live interactive video demonstrates a robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including a stepwise lymphadenectomy and precise thorough description of esojejunal anastomosis.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
D Mutter, G Philouze, B Seeliger, J Marescaux
How to
7 months ago
13089 views
71 likes
0 comments
00:30:23
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
E Parra-Davila, M Ignat, L Soler, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
1530 views
2 likes
0 comments
32:48
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
S Morales-Conde, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
5033 views
8 likes
0 comments
43:25
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.